TTT Teaching with Technology Today
homeBrowse the TTT Articles and Abstracts Collectioni

Browse Articles
Teaching Sholars Forum
Mission Statement
Submit Article
About TTT Staff
e-mail TTT

 
 

BOOK REVIEWS

The Experience Designer: Learning, Networks and the Cybersphere
by Brian Alger
Tucson: Fenestra Books, 2002.


Reviewed by M. Kayt Sunwood, UW-Superior

Sunwood offers a mixed review of Alger's 2002 book. Its message, she writes, is an essential one for leaders in education, government, and the private sector. But Alger's views frequently get lost--thanks to "abysmal to nonexistent copy-editing." (April 2003)

Web Portals and Higher Education: Technologies to Make IT Personal,
Edited by Richard N. Katz, et al.
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002.

Review by Ann-Marie Johnson, UW Oshkosh

Failure To Connect: How Computers Affect Our Children’s Minds – for Better and Worse
by Jane M. Healy, Ph.D.
New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998

Review by Patricia Ploetz, UW-Stevens Point

Ploetz describes Healy's Failure to Connect as an insightful, highly readable critique of the "technology craze" mindset held by some educators. Healy cites convincing evidence that too much computer exposure for very young children may actually be harmful to their development. Healy promotes a measured, "do it right when the time is right" attitude towards the integration of technology into children's education. (Jan. 2001)

Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace: Effective Strategies for the Online Classroom
by Rena M. Palloff and Keith Pratt
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1999

Review by M. Kayt Sunwood, UW-Superior, and Jane Henderson, UW-Stout

This review marks the first in TTT's proposed series of reviews of recent publications in educational technology. Included is a link to a helpful Web companion to the book created by Henderson and others. (May 2000)

The Teaching with Technology Today project consists of a web-based NEWSLETTER and WISLRNTEC, a companion listserv where members discuss technology, pedagogy, and student learning. TTT was instigated by the UW Learning Technology Development Council; it receives significant support from UW-Extension's Division of Continuing Education.