Text-only

Faculty College
Sponsored by the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council (now OPID)
University of Wisconsin Center-Marinette County
May 24-May 27, 1999


Introduction

Sponsored by the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council, Faculty College provides an annual opportunity for UW System faculty and academic staff to unite in concentrated study and discussion aimed at improving undergraduate teaching and learning. Some 100 participants attend three days of intensive, interdisciplinary seminars on topics related to teaching and learning. Each participant registers for two of the four seminars offered.

The experience of the College enhances collegial interchange on teaching, contributing to a systemwide network of faculty and academic staff committed to educational excellence.

Application information is available from the Vice Chancellor's office at each UW institution.

TOP OF PAGE

1999 PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE

Monday, May 24

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows Meeting 2:00 - 4:30
Registration 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Keynote Address and Discussion 7:30 - 9:00


TOP OF PAGE
Tuesday, May 25

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 11:45
Lunch 12:00 - 1:15
Afternoon Seminars 1:30 - 4:00
Free Time 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00


TOP OF PAGE
Wednesday, May 26

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 11:45
Lunch 12:00 - 1:15
Afternoon Seminars 1:30 - 4:00
Free Time 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Evening Program 7:30 - 9:00


TOP OF PAGE
Thursday, May 27

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 10:45
Afternoon Seminars 11:00 - 12:30
Lunch and Closing Session 12:30 - 1:30

TOP OF PAGE

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Stu Robertshaw, Dr. Humor

How to Prevent Humor Impairment in Higher Education

In addition to the four seminars, the 1999 Faculty College program includes a keynote address by Stu Robertshaw, a.k.a. "Dr. Humor."

Dr. Stuart Robertshaw is Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Education at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, as well as a practicing attorney. He is the founder, Chairman of the Board of Directors, and Chief Executive Officer of The National Association for the Humor Impaired. He is known throughout the nation as "Dr. Humor," and has been featured in over 144 newspapers and magazines from around the country, among them The New York Times, the L.A. Times, and Family Circle. He began his research into humor in 1987, and has authored two books devoted to the subject, Dear Dr. Humor and Each New Day Above Ground is a Great Day. In his battle to combat what he considers one of modern society’s greatest afflictions, terminal seriousness, he has spoken to a wide variety of groups on humor, including the FBI, the CIA, and over 600 educational, medical, business and religious organizations in 28 states.

TOP OF PAGE



Teaching and Learning in the Diverse Classroom
Mathew L. Ouellett

This highly interactive workshop focuses on how to more effectively address issues related to teaching and learning in the diverse classroom. Through a series of brief writing assignments, experiential learning exercises, case studies and small group discussions, participants will work across four key arenas of diversity in the college classroom: teacher self-awareness, student diversity, pedagogy, and course content. The incorporation of individual teaching development project exercises will also encourage faculty to apply these concepts in practical ways to enhance the inclusive nature of the teaching and learning environment in their own classroom. Participants should bring a syllabus for a course for which they are considering the integration of diversity-related teaching improvement goals and strategies.

Mathew L. Oullett is Associate Director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he works with faculty and teaching assistants on developing skills for teaching and learning in the diverse classroom. He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the Smith College School of Social Work, teaching classes on the implications of racism for clinical social work practice in the United States. He presents faculty development workshops related to diversity issues both regionally and nationally. His research interests and publications focus on issues of multicultural organizational development in education settings and social justice and equity issues related to teaching and teacher training. Most recently, he is co-author (with Mary Deane Sorcinelli) of the chapter, "T.A. Training: Strategies for Responding to Diversity in the Classroom," in The Professional Development of Graduate Teaching Assistants.

TOP OF PAGE

Teaching in Three Dimensions: Cases Across the Curriculum 

John Boehrer

Case teaching grounds academic instruction in the concrete reality of practical experience, engaging students in highly interactive class discussion of specific events and challenging instructors to manage a dynamic, and often exhilarating, process. It is adaptable to varied settings and effective at making theory accessible and developing higher order thinking and communication skills.
This workshop will introduce participants to cases through class discussion, small group planning, and practical exercises in discussion leading. By discussing cases about teaching situations, we will get a chance to explore the teaching issues embedded in the cases, and an opportunity to experience and reflect on learning from and leading case discussion. Participants should bring syllabi for courses in which they might use cases, and expect to carry away a grasp of the case method's essence, an appreciation of its possibilities and demands, and a sense of how to begin integrating it into their teaching.

John Boehrer is Director of Teaching Development at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. From 1989-1995, he was Director of the Pew Faculty Fellowship in International Affairs, a program established to strengthen American education in international affairs through the introduction of the case method. He has worked with faculty and graduate students on developing their classroom presentation and discussion leading skills since 1979, and was formerly Associate Director of the Harvard-Danforth (now Bok) Center for Teaching and Learning. His publications include "Teaching with Cases: Learning to Question," in The Changing Face of College Teaching; and "Crossing the Rubicon: Twenty-four Faculty Transform Their Teaching," in Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning.  He recently co-edited The New International Studies Classroom:Active Teaching, Active Learning, forthcoming from Lynne Rienner Publishers.

TOP OF PAGE

Computers as Environments for Writing Across the Curriculum Efforts: Problems and Potential

Cynthia L. Selfe

Increasingly, collegiate faculty are being asked to encourage the use of computers and networks as environments for student writing within a variety of disciplines. Few faculty, however, have had the opportunity to explore the complex issues that surround such technology use, especially in relation to the teaching of important literacy skills like writing and reading. This workshop locates discussions of—and decisions about—technology within existing and changing systems of educational goals, teaching practices, social formations, cultural values, and political issues.

Questions to be addressed include: To what extent do computers alter our conception, practice, and teaching of literacy? How are existing cultural/educational/political values built into computers and to what extent do they shape our uses of these machines? What are some of the promising trends of computer use currently being identified and practiced by classroom teachers? This workshop focuses on literacy practices, the teaching of literacy, and the practice of literacy; technology comes in a distant, but interesting, second place. Participants need have no previous experience with computers.

Cynthia Selfe is Professor of Composition and Communication and Chair of the Humanities Department at Michigan Technological University. Selfe is the current Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication. In addition, she has chaired several committees of the National Council of Teachers of English. She has also been a member of the Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies for the Modern Language Association (MLA). Selfe was the first woman and the first English teacher ever to receive the EDUCOM Medal Award for innovative computer use in higher education. She has authored and co-authored numerous books, book chapters, essays, and articles on literacy, writing, and computers.

TOP OF PAGE

Fostering Critical Thinking and Mature Valuing Across the Curriculum

Craig Nelson

Critical thinking is prerequisite to many goals of liberal education. This seminar will briefly examine three major approaches to teaching critical thinking: mental schemata, reacculturation, and intellectual development. Using the schemes in Perry’s Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development and in Women’s Ways of Knowing by Belenky et al, participants will focus on intellectual development and examine various modes of thinking and the transitions between them. The seminar will seek ways to support the transitions toward more powerful modes of thinking. Participants will consider how these ideas might apply in their own classrooms.

Among the questions to be considered are: How can you tell whether students have mastered critical thinking by the end of your course? What aspects of what you teach make critical thinking necessary? How do experts in your field select better "products" (ideas, applications, poems, etc.) from the vast array of inferior ones? What counts as evidence? How do values enter into the choices made in your field? How does this field reflect your own values (and what are some of your conflicts)? How can you help your students assume more sophisticated voices than those they bring spontaneously to class? How can you reveal your own intellectual history and values?

Craig Nelson is Professor of Biology and Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in evolution and ecology, as well as interdisciplinary courses. He is a consulting editor for College Teaching and the Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, and the recipient of five university-wide awards for distinguished teaching from IU and of similar awards from Vanderbilt and Northwestern. He has conducted numerous workshops on teaching critical thinking at universities and national conferences.

Top of Page /Return to OPID Home

The Office of Professional & Instructional Development (formerly the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council) is part of the Office of Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin System.

This page can be reached at: http://www.uwsa.edu/opid/conf/fc99.htm.

Last updated: June 19, 2002 .

Introduction

1999 Preliminary Schedule
Monday, May 24
Tuesday, May 25
Wednesday, May 26
Thursday, May 27

Keynote Speaker:
Stu Robertshaw, Dr. Humor

Seminars:

Teaching and Learning in the Diverse Classroom
Mathew L. Ouellett

Computers as Environments for Writing Across the Curriculum Efforts: Problems and Potential
Cynthia L. Selfe

Fostering Critical Thinking and Mature Valuing Across the Curriculum
Craig Nelson