Faculty College
Sponsored by the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council
University of Wisconsin Center-Marinette County
May 28-31, 1998


Introduction

Sponsored by the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council, Faculty College provides an annual opportunity for UW System faculty and academic staff to unite in concentrated study and discussion aimed at improving undergraduate teaching and learning. Some 100 participants attend three days of intensive, interdisciplinary seminars on topics related to teaching and learning. Each participant registers for two of the four seminars offered.

The experience of the College enhances collegial interchange on teaching, contributing to a systemwide network of faculty and academic staff committed to educational excellence.

Application information is available from the Vice Chancellor's office at each UW institution.

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1998 PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE

Thursday, May 28

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows Meeting 2:00 - 4:30
Registration 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Keynote Address and Discussion 7:30 - 9:00


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Friday, May 29

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 11:45
Lunch 12:00 - 1:15
Afternoon Seminars 1:30 - 4:00
Free Time 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00


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Saturday, May 30

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 11:45
Lunch 12:00 - 1:15
Afternoon Seminars 1:30 - 4:00
Free Time 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Evening Program 7:30 - 9:00


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Sunday, May 31

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 10:45
Afternoon Seminars 11:00 - 12:30
Lunch and Closing Session 12:30 - 1:30

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Elaine Maimon

Classrooms as Contact Zones: Exploring Borderlands in Higher Education

In addition to the four seminars, the 1998 Faculty College program includes a keynote address by Elaine P. Maimon and Janice H. Peritz.

Professor, administrator, and author, Dr. Elaine P. Maimon became the fourth person and the first woman to serve as provost of Arizona State University West in August 1996. She received all her advanced degrees-B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in English-from the University of Pennsylvania. She has served in a number of teaching and administrative roles at Haverford College, Beaver College, Brown University, and Queens College, CUNY. Nationally recognized as a founder of the Writing Across the Curriculum Movement, Dr. Maimon has co-authored three books and has directed national institutes sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities to improve the teaching of writing.

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Active Learning Strategies: How to Devise, Implement, and Think about Them

Diane Gillespie and Jerry Cederblom

This highly interactive workshop explores how to design strategies that make particular cognitive demands on students. It will be organized so that participants can focus, at least part of the time, on the type of active learning most suited for their disciplines. Diane Gillespie will work with those who want to use more open-ended, constructionist strategies, such as forum theater or reader-response groups. Jerry Cederblom will work with those interested in strategies that uncover patterns found, for example, in the study of science. Since participants will use their knowledge of strategies and context to design an active learning strategy (or strategies) for their own classroom, they should bring with them a syllabus or lecture that they would like to create or revise.

Diane Gillespie
is a professor in the Goodrich Scholarship program at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she teaches multicultural courses in the social sciences. She also teaches qualitative research at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Her research includes articles on reflective teaching practices and a book entitled The Mind's We: Contextualism in Cognitive Psychology. She has won seven awards for her teaching, including the 1992 Nebraska Case Professor of the Year, and conducted workshops nationwide on active learning and reflective teaching practices.
Jerry Cederblom is a professor in the Goodrich Scholarship Program and in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He is co-author (with David Paulsen) of Critical Reasoning: Understanding and Criticizing Arguments and Theories. He has conducted workshops nationwide on active learning and is a regular contributor to conferences on critical thinking. Currently, he is Chair of UNO's Committee for the Advancement of Teaching, and has received UNO's Excellence in Teaching Award.

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Teaching in Three Dimensions: Cases Across the Curriculum

John Boehrer

Case teaching grounds academic instruction in the concrete reality of practical experience, engaging students in highly interactive class discussion of specific events and challenging instructors to manage a dynamic, and often exhilarating, process. It is adaptable to varied settings and effective at making theory accessible and developing higher order thinking and communication skills.
This workshop will introduce participants to cases through class discussion, small group planning, and practical exercises in discussion leading. By discussing cases about teaching situations, we will get a chance to explore the teaching issues embedded in the cases, and an opportunity to experience and reflect on learning from and leading case discussion. Participants should bring syllabi for courses in which they might use cases, and expect to carry away a grasp of the case method's essence, an appreciation of its possibilities and demands, and a sense of how to begin integrating it into their teaching.

John Boehrer is Director of Teaching Development at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. From 1989-1995, he was Director of the Pew Faculty Fellowship in International Affairs, a program established to strengthen American education in international affairs through the introduction of the case method. He has worked with faculty and graduate students on developing their classroom presentation and discussion leading skills since 1979, and was formerly Associate Director of the Harvard-Danforth (now Bok) Center for Teaching and Learning. His publications include "Teaching with Cases: Learning to Question," in The Changing Face of College Teaching; and "Crossing the Rubicon: Twenty-four Faculty Transform Their Teaching," in Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning.


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Designing Computer-Enhanced Presentations: From the Classroom to the Web

Les Howles

This seminar focuses on design principles and pedagogical issues in creating computer-enhanced presentations. Through examples, discussion and interactive exercises, you'll learn how to use classroom and web-based presentation technology to improve student learning. Topics include: selecting appropriate software tools, using multimedia effectively, instructional design strategies, teaching and learning styles, screen design, and communicating through pictures and graphics. An optional hands-on evening session will be available for interested participants.

Les Howles
is a senior consultant for the Department of Learning Technology and Distance Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He came to UW-Madison in the fall of 1993, with over twelve years of experience in instructional design and educational technology. Les has worked in both corporate and educational environments, developing training programs and instructional multimedia materials. During the last several years, he has specialized in assisting faculty to incorporate computer-enhanced multimedia technology into their classroom teaching.

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Effective Teaching in a Large Class (Without Perishing Under the Paperload)

Barbara E. Walvoord


This workshop will present strategies that will help to motivate students in large classes and to help them learn. Part of the workshop will be a 30-minute documentary film that shows how five faculty from very different disciplines at a large university are trying to make their large classes more interactive. Strategies include high-tech and low-tech, with TA’s and without TA’s. The workshop will be extremely practical and will attend to issues of faculty time and workload. Barbara E. Walvoord is Director of the Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning, and Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. She is the author and co-author of numerous books and articles, including Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment; In the Long Run: A Study of Faculty in Three Writing-Across-The-Curriculum Programs; Thinking and Writing in College: A Naturalistic Study of Students in Four Disciplines; and Academic Departments: How They Work, How They Change. She is also the creator of an award-winning video, Making Large Classes Interactive, and in 1987 she was the Maryland English Teacher of the Year for Higher Education. Barbara has directed four faculty development programs, each of which received national awards and/or recognition. Over the past 20 years, she has consulted and led workshops nationwide, on getting students involved in learning, using writing in the disciplines, using the grading process for departmental and institutional assessment, evaluating teaching, and creating a teaching/learning culture at the department level.

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The Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council is part of the Office of Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin System.

This page can be reached at: http://www.uwsa.edu/opid/conf/fc98.htm.

Last updated: January 11, 2007 .

Introduction

1998 Preliminary Schedule
Thursday, May 28
Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Sunday, May 31

Keynote Speaker:
Elaine Maimon

Seminars:

Active Learning Strategies: How to Devise, Implement, and Think about Them
Diane Gillespie and Jerry Cederblom

Teaching in Three Dimensions: Cases Across the Curriculum
John Boehrer

Designing Computer-Enhanced Presentations: From the Classroom to the Web
Les Howles

Effective Teaching in a Large Class (Without Perishing Under the Paperload)
Barbara E. Walvoord