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Faculty College 2006; May 30-June 2, 2006; UW-Richland, Richland Center, Wisconsin

2006 Program / Workshops / Schedule

Faculty College 2006 brochure (113 kb pdf)

   


Program

 

 

Keynote Address:
For Teachers to Live, Must
Professors Die?

by Lendol Calder, chair of the department of history at Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois and 1999 Carnegie Scholar.

Seminars:
Get to What Matters Most:
Teach Inclusively

by Mathew L. Ouellett, Director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Massachusetts Amherst;

Staying Sane in Insane Places:
Managing Diverse Faculty Responsibilities with Clarity, Balance and Ease

by Susan Robison, a psychologist, author, and consultant;

From Liability to Asset:
Teaching Strategies that Capitalize
on Student Diversity

by Elizabeth F. Barkley, a nationally-known scholar, educator and consultant; and

Enhancing Student Learning through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
by Kathleen McKinney, from Illinois State University.

 

   


Lendol
Calder

 

 

Keynote Address:
For Teachers to Live, Must
Professors Die?

Lendol Calder is chair of the department of history
at Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois. A Carnegie Scholar in 1999, he has been working with others in the emergent field of the scholarship of teaching and learning to invent and share new models for teaching and learning at the post-secondary level. Calder's research examines the problem of coverage in introductory courses and is part of a larger effort to forge a "signature pedagogy" for the discipline of history. A popular presenter and workshop leader, he consults for important national initiatives such as the Teaching American History Grant Program, the Quality in Undergraduate Education Project, and the National Council on History Education. Calder's 1999 book, Financing the American Dream: A Cultural History of Con-sumer Credit, was hailed by the Wall Street Journal as "deliciously seditious" for the ways it inverted common assumptions about the meaning of credit in American life. Calder is currently at work on "The Thrift and American Culture Project," a multidisciplinary scholarly initiative examining the history and significance of a thrift ethos in American life. He is probably the only person attending Faculty College who has ever wrestled a bear.

 

   


Mathew L.
Ouellett

 

 

Seminar:
Get to What Matters Most:
Teach Inclusively

Research has identified two essential determinants of undergraduate student success, regardless of the institutional type or size, specific discipline, or the particulars of a student's profile: the student's ability to develop meaningful relationships with both an instructor and with peers. Participants in this work-shop will work individually and collaboratively to identify and apply both general and course-specific strategies related to creating and sustaining teaching and learning environments that are inclusive and, consequently, successfully develop and sustain such meaningful relationships for all students.

After a brief presentation of models of multicultural course development, planning and assessment, participants will use a current syllabus of their own to explore and apply what matters most in creating inclusive classrooms: clear, discipline-based diversity outcome goals specifically tailored to your course objectives; the use of a range of assessment tools for providing students feedback on their progress; and identifying and implementing concrete practices that encourage critical thinking and risk-taking by and between students.

By engaging in such course-based planning, participants will assess the current strengths of their courses and plan for innovations that will increase the achievement and success of all students.

For example, participants will:

  1. Identify appropriate course-based, diversity-related learning outcome goals;
  2. Build transparent assessment and grading; and
  3. Design and implement content modules and other learning experiences that advance the overarching outcome goals of the course.

Mathew L. Ouellett is Director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Focusing on multiculturally inclusive teaching, Dr. Ouellett has worked with graduate students, faculty members, and departments in the Teaching and Learning in the Diverse Classroom Program (TLDC) for the past ten years. He also teaches courses in the Smith College School of Social Work and serves as an adjunct instructor in the Social Justice Education Program. Dr. Ouellett has been invited to present on a range of faculty development issues both nationally and internationally. His research interests and publications focus on issues of multicultural organizational development and social justice and equity in higher education.

 

   


Susan
Robison

 

 

Seminar:
Staying Sane in Insane Places:
Managing Diverse Faculty Responsibilities with Clarity, Balance and Ease

College faculty wear many hats in their complex job descriptions: teachers, scholar, advisor, and administrator, to name just a few. Unlike most faculty development workshops which emphasize improving your skills in those areas, this lively, interactive workshop asks you to take a broader look at how your job relates to your sense of meaning and purpose. Reenter the classroom this fall with a renewed sense of why you are there, and how maintaining better work-life balance will increase your job satisfaction and your effectiveness in all your roles.

Participants will:

  • Explore strategies for staying sane in insane places by examining diverse faculty responsibilities and applying well-being research to personal priorities.
  • Develop a personal well-being plan that supports a satisfying personal life and a productive work life.
  • Assess strengths and learn strategies for working from strengths instead of playing to weaknesses.
  • Discover how to fit work life to personality instead of the other way around.
  • Practice streamlined writing methods for classroom application, stress management and professional development.
  • Develop time management skills that lead to more time for scholarly or recreational pursuits.
  • Practice social intelligence skills of clarifying expectations, negotiating differences, finding common ground with colleagues, employers, and family.

Methods include: mini-lectures, pencil/paper personal exercises, partner and small group application exercises, and class discussion/conversation.

Susan Robison, Ph.D., is a psychologist, author, and consultant. A former academic department chair, Susan is a professor of Psychology at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland where she teaches leadership courses in the graduate school. In addition to her faculty development seminars on work-life balance, she is also the owner of BossWoman, a leadership development company that provides training and coaching for professional women, business owners and executives. Susan is the author of a national leadership program for women and a national training trainers program as well as numerous articles on leadership and work-life balance. She maintains a clinical practice at the Center for Extraordinary Marriages where she is co-director with her husband of 36 years. Her speaking topics include stress management, leadership, marriage, work-life issues, and communication skills.

 

   


Elizabeth F. Barkley

 

 

Seminar:
From Liability to Asset:
Teaching Strategies that Capitalize
on Student Diversity

Many faculty struggle with diversity, searching for ways to accommodate the multiple and varied needs of a wide range of students. Collaborative learning converts student diversity from a peda-gogical liability to a pedagogical asset. It engages students of all backgrounds, calling upon and honoring individual knowledge and perspectives. This workshop synthesizes the relevant research and good practice literature to guide teachers through all aspects of collaborative learning. It provides solid information on what to do and how to do it, equipping faculty with powerful strategies to solve the pedagogical challenges of today's diverse classroom.

In this workshop, you will:

  1. Hear a brief synthesis of the theory, research,
  2. and practice regarding group learning;
  3. Acquire practical information on topics such as how to form groups, assign roles, assess student learning, and ensure individual accountability; and
  4. Learn group work techniques in five categories: discussion, problem solving, reciprocal peer teaching, graphic information organizing, and writing.

You will leave this workshop with solid information for how to make 'group work' work, to help you convert student diversity from a pedagogical liability to a pedagogical asset.

Elizabeth Barkley is a nationally-known scholar, educator and consultant. With over 25 years experience as an innovative and reflective teacher, her areas of interest include engaging students through active and collaborative learning; transforming F2F and online curriculum to meet the needs of diverse learners (especially those from new and emerging generations); and connecting learning goals with outcomes and assessment. Her books include Collaborative Learning Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty (with K. Patricia Cross and Claire Howell Major, Jossey-Bass, 2004) and Crossroads: The Multicultural Roots of America's Popular Music (Prentice-Hall, 2nd edition, 2006). Dr. Barkley was named California's 1998 Higher Education Professor of the Year and selected as a Carnegie Scholar in the discipline of music by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She has also received honors recognizing her achievements in the areas of learning outcomes assessment, online education, and educational innovation and excellence.

 

   


Kathleen McKinney

 

 

Seminar:
Enhancing Student Learning through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

This hands-on, interactive workshop or seminar will offer participants an overview of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) in higher education. Participants will be provided with materials and information related to the following topics:

  • Understanding the meanings of SoTL and its importance for improving teaching and learning;
  • Conceptualizing a teaching-learning problem to be studied;
  • Integrating SoTL into existing teaching practices and other professional work;
  • Choosing appropriate methodologies;
  • Considering ethical issues;
  • Finding presentation and publication outlets,
  • Documenting SoTL work; and
  • Applying what is learned to improve teaching
    and learning.

Opportunities during the seminar will include time to discuss and work on participant ideas for SoTL projects. The workshop is intended for faculty and staff new to SoTL as well as those with some SoTL knowledge or experience.

Dr. Kathleen McKinney is Cross Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and Professor of Sociology at Illinois State University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1982. From 1996 to 2002, she held the administrative position of Director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching at Illinois State University. McKinney has numerous scholarly publications including several co-authored and edited books, and dozens of refereed articles in the areas of relationships, sexuality, sexual harassment, faculty development, and college teaching. She served three years as editor of Teaching Sociology. McKinney is a 2003-2004 Carnegie Scholar working on a multi-method study of how sociology majors learn sociology. She has also received numerous teaching awards including Illinois State University's Outstanding University Teacher, and the American Sociological Association's Hans O. Mauksch Award and Distinguished Contributions to Teaching Award.

 

   


2006
Preliminary
Schedule

 

 

Tuesday, May 30
1:00 - 4:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Wisconsin Teaching Scholars Luncheon and Orientation Meeting

4:00 - 5:00

Registration

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 8:30

Welcome and
Keynote Address by Lendol Calder

 

Wednesday, May 31
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

12:00 - 1:15

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Luncheon Meeting

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 8:30

Evening Program TBA

 

Thursday, June 1

7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 9:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Meeting

 

Friday, June 2

7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 10:45

Morning Seminars

11:00 - 12:30

Afternoon Seminars

12:30 - 1:30

Closing Lunch
 

   
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Last update: February 8, 2007