Faculty College 2005, UW-Richland, Richland Center, WI, May 31 - June 3, 2005 (heading)

Sponsored by the Office of Professional & Instructional Development (OPID), Faculty College provides an annual opportunity for UW System faculty and academic staff to unite in concentrated study and discussion aimed at improving undergraduate teaching and learning. Some 100 participants attend three days of intensive, interdisciplinary seminars on topics related to teaching and learning. Each participant registers for two of the four seminars offered. The experience of the College enhances collegial interchange on teaching, contributing to a systemwide network of faculty and academic staff committed to educational excellence.

Application information is available from the Provost's office at each UW institution.

Faculty College 2005 brochure in pdf format (97kb)

 

2005 PROGRAM

Keynote Address:
The Teacher in the Movies

James Rhem, Ph.D., Executive Editor of The National Teaching and Learning Forum.

Schedule

 

Improving Teaching and Student Learning Through Lesson Study
Bill Cerbin and Bryan Kopp

Engaging Students in Active Learning Through Collaboration: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice
Elizabeth F. Barkley

Achievement, Equity and Retention: Three Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom
Craig E. Nelson

Want Your Students to Learn More? Some New Ideas for Designing Significant Learning into Your Courses
L. Dee Fink

 

 

Improving Teaching and Student Learning Through Lesson Study
Bill Cerbin and Bryan Kopp

Lesson Study—a teaching improvement activity in which a group of instructors collectively plans, implements, evaluates and revises a single lesson—is accessible, economical and practical. In approximately 25 hours over the course of two semesters, teachers build knowledge about how students learn in their discipline, produce a lesson that can be used by others, and create manuscripts for possible publication, presentation, and inclusion in teaching portfolios.

With Lesson Study, you can

  • focus on specific concepts and learning issues that are most important to you
  • improve teaching without undertaking extensive revisions in your course or teaching practice
  • study teaching and learning without special expertise in educational research
  • produce scholarly products suitable for publication and presentation
  • collaborate with teaching colleagues in meaningful ways
  • document your teaching improvement activities

In this seminar you will learn how to do Lesson Study. We will focus on 1) key elements of lesson design, 2) how to gather evidence of student learning, and 3) how to create scholarly products from this work. We will explore important phases of the lesson study process by analyzing video examples of college instructors engaged in Lesson Study. When you complete this seminar you will be able to start a Lesson Study group with colleagues on your campus.

Bill Cerbin is Professor of Psychology and Assistant to the Provost at UW-La Crosse. His scholarship of teaching focuses on how students develop deep understanding of important subject matter, and on how faculty can learn to do scholarly inquiry in the classroom. In 1998-99 and in 2003-04 he was named a Carnegie Scholar with the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Bryan Kopp, Assistant Professor in the Department of English at UW-La Crosse, teaches courses in writing, rhetorical theory and history, and English Education. His scholarship of teaching and learning explores how students interact with texts in reading and writing across the disciplines. He has participated in three separate lesson study projects and has worked with Bill Cerbin to produce online and print materials, resources, and tools to support Lesson Study.

Currently, they direct the Lesson Study Project (http://www.uwlax.edu/sotl/lsp) which supports college instructors in all phases of the Lesson Study process.

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Engaging Students in Active Learning Through Collaboration: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice
Elizabeth F. Barkley

Engaging students in active learning is a predominant theme in today's college classrooms. To promote active learning, teachers across the disciplines and in all kinds of colleges are incorporating collaborative learning into their teaching.

In this seminar, you will

  • Hear a brief synthesis of the theory, research, and practice regarding group learning,
  • Acquire practical information on topics such as how to form groups, assign roles, assess student learning, and ensure individual accountability,
  • Learn group work techniques in five categories: discussion, problem solving, reciprocal peer teaching, graphic information organizing, and writing, and
  • Design your own course-specific collaborative learning activities.
You will leave this seminar well equipped with information and strategies for how to make “group work” work.

Elizabeth Barkley is a classical pianist who holds a BA and MA from the University of California at Riverside and a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. She has worked at Foothill College since 1977, including nine years as Dean of Fine Arts and Communications. As a faculty member at Foothill she has taught piano, music history and literature, and music theory and composition. Her books include Collaborative Learning Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty, co-authored with K. Patricia Cross and Claire Howell Major (Jossey-Bass, 2004). Dr. Barkley was named California's Higher Education Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and has also received honors recognizing her achievements in the areas of learning outcomes assessment, innovation, educational excellence, diversity, and out-of-the-box thinking. Additionally, her course Music of Multicultural America was selected as the Best Online Course by the California Virtual Campus. She currently chairs a taskforce for the executive board of the College Music Society and continues to work as a consultant and presenter nationally in the areas of collaborative learning, curriculum transformation, online education, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Most recently, she was selected by the American Association of Higher Education to serve as one of 10 American scholars to conduct collaborative work internationally on the scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education.

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Achievement, Equity and Retention: Three Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom
Craig E. Nelson

When diversity issues are cast in content-centered ways, many faculty may view them as irrelevant to their own teaching. However, examination of pedagogical practices reveals a need for major changes in nearly all courses. We will examine at least three types of pedagogical changes that can make a real difference in achievement and retention in almost any college or university classroom.

Specific topics will include:

  • How can I radically reduce or eliminate low grades in lecture courses without lowering standards?
  • How can I make my students brighter and harder working using only 1 hour of class time (in ways that level the playing field for all groups)?
  • Does my assessment system unfairly and unnecessarily favor particular groups? Throughout we will ask what else we can do to increase achievement and fairness.

Processes:
Brief lectures alternating with writing and discussions of applications to your own teaching.

Craig E. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University (IU) in Bloomington, where he has been since 1966. His biological research has been on evolution and ecology. His articles on teaching address critical thinking and mature valuing, diversity, active learning, teaching evolution, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has presented invited workshops on these and related topics at numerous national meetings and at many individual institutions. He taught several courses in biology as well as intensive freshman seminars, great books and other honors courses, several collaboratively-taught interdisciplinary courses, and regularly taught a graduate course on "Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology." He was instrumental in the development of IU's award-winning Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) program (http://www.indiana.edu/~sotl/) and was founding Director of Environmental Programs in IU's School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He has received several awards for distinguished teaching from IU, including the President's Medal for Excellence, "the highest honor bestowed by Indiana University," in 2001, as well as nationally competitive awards from Vanderbilt and Northwestern. He has been a Carnegie Scholar since 2000, and was named the Outstanding Research and Doctoral University Professor of the Year 2000 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). He retired from teaching in 2004.

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Want Your Students to Learn More? Some New Ideas for Designing Significant Learning into Your Courses
L. Dee Fink

Most college teachers would like their courses to be an experience in which their students achieve some kind of significant learning that lasts. But we feel frustrated and uncertain about how to get that to happen, for more students, more of the time.

In this workshop, we will:

  • Examine the place of instructional design in the “big picture” of teaching,
  • Take a close look at what each of us really wants our students to learn, and
  • Systematically work through a new model of instructional design that will enable us to “design high-quality learning into our courses.”

The reaction of most teachers to this new model, Integrated Course Design, is quite enthusiastic, for two reasons. It shows them why much of what they are currently doing is good, but it also identifies what they could add to their teaching that would make it even more powerful.

Dr. L. Dee Fink has served as the founding director of the Instructional Development Program at the University of Oklahoma since 1979. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1976, and then accepted an academic appointment in the departments of Geography and Education at Oklahoma. He is a nationally recognized expert on various aspects of college teaching, and has recently published two books on college teaching. He is the author of Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses (Jossey-Bass, 2003) and co-editor of Team-Based Learning: A Transformative Use of Small Groups in College Teaching (Stylus, 2004). He is currently President of the Professional and Organizational Development (POD) Network in Higher Education, the largest professional organization for faculty development in the United States. His website is: http://www.ou.edu/idp/dfink.htm

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2005 SCHEDULE
Tuesday, May 31
1:00 - 4:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Wisconsin Teaching Scholars Luncheon and Orientation Meeting

4:00 - 5:00

Registration

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 8:30

Welcome and
Keynote Address by James Rhem


Wednesday, June 1
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

12:00 - 1:15

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Luncheon Meeting

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 8:00

Evening Program


Thursday, June 2

7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:00 - 9:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Meeting


Friday, June 3
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 10:45

Morning Seminars

11:00 - 12:30

AfternoonSeminars

12:30 - 1:30

Closing Lunch


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The Office of Professional & Instructional Development, formerly the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council, is a part of the Office of Academic and Student Services, University of Wisconsin System. This page was created on 3/17/05. It can be reached at http://www.uwsa.edu/opid/conf/fc05.htm.
Last updated: January 17, 2006 .

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