Faculty College 2001, UW-Richland, Richland Center, WI, June 4-7, 2001 (trees reflected in water)

UW-Richland
Richland Center, WI
June 3-6, 2002

Sponsored by the Office of Professional & Instructional Development, Faculty College provides an annual opportunity for UW System faculty and academic staff to unite in concentrated study and discussion aimed at improving undergraduate teaching and learning. Some 100 participants attend three days of intensive, interdisciplinary seminars on topics related to teaching and learning. Each participant registers for two of the four seminars offered. The experience of the College enhances collegial interchange on teaching, contributing to a systemwide network of faculty and academic staff committed to educational excellence.

Application information is available from the Vice Chancellor's office at each UW institution.

2002 PROGRAM

Preliminary Schedule

Teaching as Intellectual Work
Dan Bernstein

Teaching for Deeper Understanding
William Cerbin

Writing to Enhance Learning and Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines
Sharon J. Hamilton

Teaching and Learning in the Diverse Classroom
Mathew L. Ouellett

TEACHING AS INTELLECTUAL WORK
Dan Bernstein

As higher education reconsiders the balance among various missions served by colleges and universities, there is more discussion about how teaching can be a form of scholarship. While some teaching is largely routine coverage of the basic ideas and materials in a specialized field of study, other teachers engage in serious intellectual work that aims at helping students achieve a rich understanding of the area.

This seminar explores how faculty members can treat any regular teaching assignment as an invitation to engage in serious inquiry into the development of student understanding. The components of the intellectual work in teaching are broken down using the general framework presented in Scholarship Assesed (by Glassick, Huber, & Maeroff). Participants will focus on a course of their own choosing, examining it as an inquiry into student understanding. Teachers will frame the goals, practices, and results of their teaching, and then examine how well the results reflect the intellectual goals stated for the course. As a final step, teachers will identify implications of this analysis for future teaching practices. Participants in this seminar should have with them some examples of assignments that are used in a particular course, including several graded pieces of student work (if available) that represent a range of understanding. The final product would include a plan to modify the analyzed course so that it provides richer opportunities for students to demonstrate understanding and achievement of the course goals by a broader range of students.

Dan Bernstein is Professor of Psychology at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln, where he has taught for 29 years and is a member of the UNL Academy of Distinguished Teachers. He was a Carnegie Scholar in the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, a program that provides extra time to develop a line of inquiry into the teaching of a particular course (the analysis can be seen at http://www.unl.edu/peerrev/bernstein/). He is also coordinator of a program in Peer Review of Teaching that began at UNL in 1995 with support from the U.S. Department of Education (FIPSE). Additional funding from the Hewlett Foundation gave opportunities to explore assessment of general liberal education using peer reviewed course portfolios, and current funding from the Pew Charitable Trusts supports the exchange of peer reviewed course portfolios among five universities. A good introduction to the project can be gained by visiting the preoject web site (http://www.unl.edu/peerrev) and following links to conference or introductory materials. Dan has given many workshops and presentations on representing the intellectual work in teaching through collaboration with colleagues.

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TEACHING FOR DEEPER UNDERSTANDING
William Cerbin

A bedrock goal of higher education is to foster students' understanding of knowledge and ideas. We want our students to develop more than a superficial grasp of important disciplinary knowledge. A college education should prepare students to use knowledge to understand and solve complex problems, make sound judgments and develop new ideas. Yet, contemporary research indicates that deep understanding is not an automatic consequence of teaching. Too often, students' understanding is fragmented, underdeveloped and even riddled with misconceptions and misunderstanding.

This seminar explores how and why students understand or do not understand what we teach, and what we can do to foster deeper understanding of our subjects. It focuses on the problem of student understanding as a design problem. As teachers we need to better understand how our students understand the subjects we teach, and then design instruction and learning experiences most likely to support the development of students' understanding. Participants will use principles from the seminar to analyze cases, problems, and redesign their own course materials.

Bill Cerbin is Professor of Psychology and Assistant to the Provost at UW-La Crosse where he has taught a wide range of psychology courses for 20 years. At UW-La Crosse he has served as university assessment coordinator, and as director of university-wide projects on teaching and learning, including the "Student Learning Project" and the "Writing-in-the-Major Project" (http://www.uwlax.edu/wimp). He is a former co-director of the UW System Wisconsin Teaching Fellows Program. In 1998 he was named to the Pew National Fellowship Program for Carnegie Scholars. As a Carnegie Scholar he studied the development of student understanding in a problem-based learning course he teaches. See http://kml2.carnegiefoundation.org/kml/login/ for more information about this work. Bill has given numerous workshops and presentations on problem-based learning, teaching for understanding, and using course portfolios to document the scholarship of teaching and learning.

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WRITING TO ENHANCE LEARNING AND CRITICAL THINKING ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES
Sharon J. Hamilton

Would you like your students to write more effectively?
Would you like to see better evidence of critical thinking in written assignments?
Would you like to spend less time grading student papers?
Then this might be the workshop for you!

This interactive workshop will engage participants in designing discipline-specific writing assignments that will enhance student learning and critical thinking. Participants will try out several writing-to-learn strategies as they develop rubrics tied to learning outcomes and desired critical thinking skills. The workshop will conclude with strategies for reducing the time spent actually grading papers while at the same time increasing student writing proficiencies.

Sharon J. Hamilton, Chancellor's Professor, is the Director of Campus Writing at IUPUI (Indiana Univerisity-Purdue University Indianapolis) and the Director of the Indiana University Faculty Colloquium for Excellence in Teaching. Sharon has led faculty workshops on writing and collaborative learning in the US, Canada, and the United Kingdom. She has published widely on writing across the curriculum, collaborative learning, electronic portfolios, and the literacy narrative.

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TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE DIVERSE CLASSROOM
Mathew L. Ouellett

This highly interactive workshop focuses on how to more effectively address issues related to teaching and learning in the diverse classroom. Through a series of brief writing assignments, experiential learning exercises, case studies and small group discussions, participants will work across four key
arenas of diversity in the college classroom: teacher self-awareness, student diversity, pedagogy, and course content. The incorporation of individual teaching development projects will also encourage faculty to apply these concepts in practical ways to enhance the inclusive nature of the teaching and learning environment in their own classroom. Participants should bring a syllabus for a course for which they are considering the integration of diversity-related teaching improvement goals and strategies.

Mathew L. Ouellett is Associate Director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he works with faculty and teaching assistants on developing skills for teaching and learning in the diverse classroom. He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the Smith College School of Social Work, teaching classes on the implications of racism for clinical social work practice in the United States. He presents faculty development workshops related to diversity issues both regionally and nationally. His research interests and publications focus on issues of multicultural organizational development in education settings and social justice and equity issues related to teaching and teacher training. Most recently, he is author of the chapter, "Teaching for Inclusion," in Teaching Large Classes (2002).

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2002 PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE
Monday, June 3
1:00 - 4:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Wisconsin Teaching Scholars Luncheon and Orientation Meeting

4:00 - 5:00

Registration

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:30 - 8:00

Welcome Address


Tuesday, June 4
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:30-9:00

Film Viewing and Discussion


Wednesday, June 5

7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:30 - 9:00

Evening Program


Thursday, June 6
 
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 10:45

Morning Seminars

11:00 - 12:30

Afternoon Seminars


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The Office of Professional & Instructional Development, formerly the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council, is a part of the Office of Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin System. This page was created on 2/14/01. It can be reached at http://www.uwsa.edu/opid/conf/fc01.htm.
Last updated: June 19, 2002 .

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