Faculty College 2001, UW-Richland, Richland Center, WI, June 4-7, 2001 (trees reflected in water)

Sponsored by the Office of Professional & Instructional Development, Faculty College provides an annual opportunity for UW System faculty and academic staff to unite in concentrated study and discussion aimed at improving undergraduate teaching and learning. Some 100 participants attend three days of intensive, interdisciplinary seminars on topics related to teaching and learning. Each participant registers for two of the four seminars offered. The experience of the College enhances collegial interchange on teaching, contributing to a systemwide network of faculty and academic staff committed to educational excellence.

Application information is available from the Vice Chancellor's office at each UW institution.

2001 PROGRAM

Preliminary Schedule

Teaching Well Using Technology
Barbara Walvoord & Kevin Barry

Teaching for Understanding By Design
William Cerbin

Teaching With Style
Tony Grasha

Case Method Teaching
William Welty

Keynote Address: Learning from CHANGE
Deborah DeZure

TEACHING WELL USING TECHNOLOGY
Barbara Walvoord and Kevin Barry

This interactive workshop follows a seven-step course-planning process that will help faculty plan and design courses that use appropriate technology for student learning. This is not a hands-on workshop to learn how to use powerpoint or listserv or chat. Rather, it's the workshop you should take BEFORE you decide WHETHER to put your notes on powerpoint or get your students on listserv or chat. We will discuss what makes good pedagogy in general, what technologies are available along with their strengths and weaknesses, and how you can put it all together, using the available times, spaces, and technologies for the maximum learning. The workshop will be relevant to those who have not yet used any technology beyond perhaps the overhead projector or the VCR, as well as for those on the cutting edge of new technology. We define educational technology as any human-made instrument intended to aid the learning process, including chalk as well as the newest computer-based simulations. The teacher's task is to select the best technologies for his or her student, learning goals, time, preferences, and available resources. This workshop helps teachers plan courses in highly practical ways.

Barbara E. Walvoord, Ph.D., is Director of the John A. Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning, as well as concurrent Professor of English and Fellow of the Institute for Educational Initiatives at the University of Notre Dame. Barbara leads hundreds of faculty workshops at institutions across the U.S., and publishes widely on teaching, learning, and student writing across the disciplines. She was the 1987 Maryland English Teacher of the Year.

Kevin Barry, with a B.S. in Marine Biology, M.S. and Ed.S. in Science Education, is an Assistant Director at the John A. Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning at Notre Dame. He consults with faculty members to help them choose and implement methods and tools that enhance student learning. Kevin also develops technology-based curriculum resources and consults on the design of learning spaces. He is a concurrent instructor in, and educational technology consultant to, the Alliance for Catholic Education Master of Education Program.

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TEACHING FOR UNDERSTANDING BY DESIGN
William Cerbin

A bedrock goal of higher education is to foster students' understanding of knowledge and ideas. We want our students to develop more than a superficial grasp of important disciplinary knowledge. Yet contemporary research indicates that deep understanding is not an automatic consequence of teaching. Too often, students' understanding is fragmented, underdeveloped and even riddled with misconceptions and misunderstanding. This workshop explores how and why students understand or do not understand what we teach, and what we can do to foster deep understanding of our subjects. It focuses on the problem of developing student understanding not as a matter of using specific teaching techniques, but as a design problem.

As teachers we need to contemplate how students come to understand the subjects we teach, to clarify what we really want our students to understand, and then to design instruction and learning experiences that most likely support the development of students' understanding. Participants are asked to bring to the workshop: 1) a syllabus for a course in which you would like to improve students' understanding and 2) an assignment, exercise, or "lesson" from that course.

Bill Cerbin is Professor of Psychology and Assistant to the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at UW-La Crosse, where he was the founding director of the Center for Effective Teaching and Learning and the University Assessment Coordinator. He is former co-director of the UW System Wisconsin Teaching Fellows Program. He earned a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Chicago and a masters degree in developmental psychology from Columbia University, and has taught for 20 years. In 1998 he was named to the Pew National Fellowship Program for Carnegie Scholars. As a Carnegie Scholar he studied the development of student understanding in a problem-based learning course he teaches. Bill has given numerous workshops and presentations on campuses and national conferences. He is generally credited with having "invented" the first course portfolio in which he examined how and why students learned and did not learn what they were taught in an undergraduate course. The course portfolio is now being used by faculty across the country as one means of documenting their scholarship of teaching.

For more information on Dr. Cerbin's work, visit http://kml2.carnegiefoundation.org/kml/login/.

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TEACHING WITH STYLE
Track I: Enhancing Learning by Understanding Teaching and Learning Styles
Track II: Enhancing Learning By Understanding Teaching and Learning Styles in Technology-Driven Courses

Tony Grasha

The workshop in Track I of Teaching with Style will provide an overview of contemporary work on teaching and learning styles and then explore the practical applications of using this information as a means of encouraging active learning. The workshop will introduce participants to Dr. Grasha's integrated model of teaching and learning styles as a conceptual base from which to develop their own models for integration into their classroom teaching.

The workshop in Track II, Teaching with Style and Technology Too, will provide an overview of contemporary work on teaching and learning styles in courses where technology is emphasized, and then explore the practical applications of using this information as a means of encouraging active learning. The workshop will introduce participants to Dr. Grasha's integrated model of teaching and learning styles in technology-driven courses. With this conceptual base, participants will have the opportunity to develop their own models for integration into their classroom teaching. In both tracks, a variety of self-assessment tools, case studies, video examples, small group discussion, and personal planning strategies will be employed to illustrate workshop concepts.

Tony Grasha, Ph.D. is a Social Pscyhologist and Professor of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati. He is the Past President of the Cincinnati Psychological Association and serves as the Executive Editor of the interdisciplinary journal College Teaching. He has won many local and national awards for his teaching, including, in 1991, the University of Cincinnati's first title of Distinguished Teaching Professor for his career accomplishments. He has been a consultant on educational issues and workshop leader for over two decades and his sessions have been attended by faculty and administrators representing more than 1200 institutions of higher education. His publications on educational issues include more than forty articles, six book chapters, and four books related to enhancing the teaching-learning process.

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CASE METHOD TEACHING
William M. Welty

Long used in schools of business and law, case studies are now being considered by faculty in a wide variety of disciplines--education, social work, nursing, medical education, political science, economics, sociology, the sciences, philosophy, and engineering. This workshop will introduce participants to case studies and consider the pedagogical issues surrounding case method teaching. Participants will discuss a case study about college teaching followed by a series of exercises designed to help them understand and practice the pedagogical strategies used in case method teaching.

William M. Welty is Professor of Management and Co-Director of the Center for Case Studies in Education at Pace University in New York. He was the founder and former director of the Pforzheimer Center for Faculty Development at Pace. With his colleague, Rita Silverman, he has for the past ten years been working on a series of projects, supported in part by three FIPSE grants, to develop and disseminate case studies in teacher education and to foster an understanding of case method pedagogy throughout higher education. He has presented workshops at many national and international conferences and at colleges and universities across the country. With Rita Silverman and Sally Lyon, he has written seven case books for teacher education published by McGraw-Hill. These teacher education cases have now been made available as well in McGraw-Hill's new electronic database publishing system, Primis. In addition, he and Silverman have developed a series of twenty case studies for faculty development, available from the Center for Case Studies at Pace University.

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Keynote: Learning from CHANGE
Deborah DeZure

Deborah DeZure will trace the evolution of teaching and learning in higher education during the last 30 years. She will identify major developments, trends and unfinished agendas that pose both challenges and opportunities for faculty today as they shape the future of teaching and learning in the 21st century.

Dr. DeZure is Coordinator of Faculty Programs at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan. Previously, she was Director of the Faculty Center for Instructional Excellence at Eastern Michigan University. Deborah received her B.A., MA., and Ph.D. from New York University in interdisciplinary humanities and education with a specialization in measurement and evaluation. She is widely published on issues of teaching and learning in higher education. She has edited two books: Learning from Change: Landmarks in Teaching and Learning from Change Magazine (1969-1999) (Stylus and AAHE, 2000), and To Improve the Academy (Professional and Organizational Network in Higher Education, 1997), and has had numerous articles in journals such as Academe, Change, AAHE Bulletin, Thought and Action, and publications of the NCTE. Deborah was recently appointed to the Advisory Board for the AAHE Initiative on The Engaged Campus. Her areas of expertise include assessment, active learning, case studies, writing across the curriculum, interdisciplinarity and peer review of teaching.

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2001 PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE
Monday, June 4
1:00 - 4:00

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Wisconsin Teaching Scholars Luncheon and Orientation Meeting

4:00 - 5:00

Registration

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:30 - 8:00

Welcome Address

8:00 - 10:00

Film Viewing and Discussion


Tuesday, June 5
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:30 - 9:00

Keynote Address
by Deborah DeZure


Wednesday, June 6

7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 11:45

Morning Seminars

12:00 - 1:15

Lunch

1:30 - 4:00

Afternoon Seminars

5:00 - 7:00

Cash Bar and Dinner

7:30 - 9:00

Evening Program


Thursday, June 7
 
7:30 - 8:00

Chinese Exercises

7:30 - 9:00

Breakfast

9:15 - 10:45

Morning Seminars

11:00 - 12:30

Afternoon Seminars


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The Office of Professional & Instructional Development, formerly the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council, is a part of the Office of Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin System. This page was created on 2/14/01. It can be reached at http://www.uwsa.edu/opid/conf/fc01.htm.
Last updated: June 19, 2002 .

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