Sponsored by the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council
University of Wisconsin - Richland
June 1-4, 2000


Introduction

Sponsored by the Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council, Faculty College provides an annual opportunity for UW System faculty and academic staff to unite in concentrated study and discussion aimed at improving undergraduate teaching and learning. Some 100 participants attend three days of intensive, interdisciplinary seminars on topics related to teaching and learning. Each participant registers for two of the four seminars offered.

The experience of the College enhances collegial interchange on teaching, contributing to a systemwide network of faculty and academic staff committed to educational excellence.

Application information is available from the Vice Chancellor's office at each UW institution.


2000 PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE

Thursday, June 1

Wisconsin Teaching Fellows Orientation Meeting 2:00 - 4:30
Registration 4:00 - 5:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Welcome Address 7:30 - 8:00
Evening Activity 8:00 - ?

Friday, June 2

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 11:45
Lunch 12:00 - 1:15
Afternoon Seminars 1:30 - 4:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Keynote Address 7:30 - 9:00


Saturday, June 3

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 11:45
Lunch 12:00 - 1:15
Afternoon Seminars 1:30 - 4:00
Reception and Dinner 5:00 - 7:00
Diversity Discussion with Edith Fraser 7:30 - 9:00

Sunday, June 4

Chinese Exercises 7:30 - 8:15
Breakfast 7:30 - 9:00
Morning Seminars 9:15 - 10:45
Afternoon Seminars 11:00 - 12:30

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Randy Bass

Hyper Activity and Under Construction: Learning Culture in a Wired World

Randy Bass is Executive Director of the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarhsip (CNDLS, or "CANDLES") at Georgetown University, a campus-wide center supporting faculty work in new learning and research environments. Bass is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Georgetown University, the author of Border Texts: Cultural Readings for Contemporary Writers (Houghton Mifflin, 1998), and co-editor of Intentional Media: the Crossroads Conversations on Learning and Technology in the American Culture and History Classroom (Works & Days, Fall 1999).

Dr. Bass is also the Director of the American Studies Crossroads Project, an international project on technology and education sponsored by the American Studies Association, with major funding by the FIPSE and the Annenberg/CPB Project. In conjunction with the Crossroads Project, Bass is the supervising editor of Engines of Inquiry: A Practical Guide for Using Technology to Teach American Studies, and executive producer of the companion video. He is a co-leader of the NEH-funded "New Media Classroom Project: Building a National Conversation on Narrative Inquiry and Technology," in conjunction with the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning (at the CUNY Graduate Center). He is also the Electronic Resources Editor for the Heath Anthology of American Literature (third edition, Paul Lauter, ed.), and the founder of T-AMLIT, the "Teaching the American Literatures discussion list." For 1998-99, he served as a Pew Scholar and Carnegie Fellow with the Carnegie Teaching Academy, for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. In 1999, he was awarded the EDUCAUSE Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Information Technology and Undergraduate Education.

EVENING SPEAKER

Edith Fraser

Reflections on Developing an Inclusive Classroom

Throughout life we have been confronted with people who might be described as different, dissimilar, distinct, unique, extraordinary, atypical, unconventional or rare. What happens when they are in our class? What happens if their worldview is antithetical to our own? In our highly polarized society, with its emphasis on political correctness, how do we accommodate the variety of worldviews we encounter? In a session that is interactive, introspective and informal, participants will explore both individually and in small groups: the meaning of difference; how we confront difference; our previous exposure to difference; and how these cumulative experiences and meanings affect our teaching style.
Edith Fraser is Professor and Chair of the Social Work Department at Oakwood College, a Historically Black College, where she is very active in faculty development. She is also Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the Smith College School for Social Work, where she teaches classes on the implication of racism for clinical social work practice in the United States. In addition to her teaching experience she has been a recipient of several international research grants, including a Fulbright to Egypt and a Drew International Research Grant to Ghana. Edith has been the recipient of numerous awards, such as the Zaparra Excellence in Teaching Award and the NASW Social Worker-of-the-Year. She has conducted numerous seminars on a variety of family issues, teaching and diversity.


Teaching and Learning in the Diverse Classroom

Mathew L. Ouellet and Edith Fraser

This highly interactive workshop focuses on preparing faculty to more effectively address issues related to teaching and learning in the diverse classroom. Building upon the presenters' six years of experience as an interracial team in the Smith College School of Social Work, this workshop will address common obstacles and offer multiple strategies for building inclusive teaching and learning environments. Through a series of brief writing assignments, experiential learning exercises, case studies and small group discussions, participants will work across four key arenas of diversity in the college classroom: teacher self-awareness, student diversity, pedagogy, and course content. The incorporation of individual teaching development project exercises will invite faculty to consider practical ways to enhance their teaching practice. Participants are encouraged to bring a syllabus for a course for which they are considering the integration of diversity-related teaching improvement goals. The presenters will be available for individual consultation.

Mathew L. Oullett is Associate Director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he works with faculty and teaching assistants on developing skills for teaching and learning in the diverse classroom. He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the Smith College School of Social Work, teaching classes on the implications of racism for clinical social work practice in the United States. He presents faculty development workshops related to diversity issues both regionally and nationally. His research interests and publications focus on issues of multicultural organizational development, social justice, and equity issues in education settings. Most recently, he is co-author (with Mary Deane Sorcinelli) of the chapter, "T.A. Training: Strategies for Responding to Diversity in the Classroom," in The Professional Development of Graduate Teaching Assistants.

Edith Fraser is Professor and Chair of the Social Work Department at Oakwood College, a Historically Black College, where she is very active in faculty development. She is also Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the Smith College School for Social Work, where she teaches classes on the implication of racism for clinical social work practice in the United States. In addition to her teaching experience she has been a recipient of several international research grants, including a Fulbright to Egypt and a Drew International Research Grant to Ghana. Edith has been the recipient of numerous awards, such as the Zaparra Excellence in Teaching Award and the NASW Social Worker-of-the-Year. She has conducted numerous seminars on a variety of family issues, teaching and diversity.

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Making Explicit the Values Behind Our Teaching

Greg Valde

Teaching improvement activities frequently focus on "how to" implement specific teaching strategies, leaving unexamined the assumptions and values implicit in those practices. This workshop seeks to make explicit the essential value decisions teachers must make, which logically ought to occur prior to decisions about specific teaching practice. We will begin with an exploration of some of the "big questions" in higher education and will explore five or six major belief systems about education and teaching. Participants will have opportunity to discuss the varieties of ideas presented, to clarify their own priorities for their students, and to plan for appropriate teaching changes as they see fit.

Greg Valde is an Associate Professor of Educational Foundations at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the psychological foundations of education and directs the UW-W Teaching Scholars Program. Greg is the recipient of several teaching awards, although we all know that this process is as political as it is meritorious. Greg toured nationally with his family in the summer of '63, when his father got a new Oldsmobile station wagon. He has published several things, but suggests you read all the great books before looking at anything of his.

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Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom

Chuck Bonwell

Educators agree that active learning is more effective than passive learning, but why does so little active learning actually occur in a typical classroom? This workshop will explore both the promise and the potential problems of using active learning techniques while modeling ways that faculty can transform students from passive listeners to active learners. Specific topics will include: what does active learning mean?; why is active learning important?; what obstacles or barriers prevent faculty from using active learning strategies?; and, how can these barriers be overcome? Particular emphasis will be placed on how active learning methods can be successfully incorporated into a large-class lecture format.

Charles C. Bonwell directed Centers for Teaching and Learning at the Saint Louis College of Pharmacy (1993-1998) and Southeast Missouri State University (1990-1993). A former Professor of History, he received a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Stanford University and his Ph.D. from Kansas State University in the history of science and technology. As an instructional consultant, he has facilitated over 200 workshops nationally and internationally for faculty and teaching assistants on active learning and critical thinking, and has given the keynote address at numerous regional, national, and international conferences. In 1986 Bonwell was one of 50 faculty honored nationwide by the American Association of Higher Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching for his "outstanding educational leadership." He is co-author, with James Eison, of the best-selling ASHE-ERIC monograph Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom (1991). With Tracey Sutherland, he co-authored Using Active Learning in College Classrooms: A Range of Options for Faculty (Jossey-Bass, 1996).

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Grading and Assessing Student Work in the Classroom and in the Department or Institution

Barbara Walvoord

This interactive workshop addresses the following issues: 1) Constructing Better Tests and Assignments; 2) Establishing Clear Criteria for Tests and Assignments; 3) Saving Time in the Grading/Responding Process; 4) Integrating Grading with Teaching and Learning; 5) How to Use the Classroom Grading Process for Departmental or Institutional Assessment. The workshop will be useful for faculty in all disciplines who are teaching complex, higher-order thinking skills in their classroom. It will also be useful for those who are serving on assessment committees and who want to use classroom grading processes (not the grades themselves) to yield rich information for departmental and institutional assessment.

Barbara E. Walvoord is Director of the Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning, concurrent Professor of English and Fellow of the Institute for Educational Initiatives at the University of Notre Dame. She is the author and co-author of numerous books and articles, including: Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment; In the Long Run: A Study of Faculty in Three Writing-Across-The-Curriculum Programs; and Academic Departments: How They Work, How They Change. She is also the creator of an award-winning video, "Making Large Classes Interactive," and in 1987 she was the Maryland English Teacher of the Year for Higher Education. Dr. Walvoord has directed four, nationally recognized faculty development programs, and has written, received, and directed sixteen grants. Since the late 1970s, she has provided consulting and workshops to 10-20 institutions per year, on such topics as course planning, grading and responding to student work, using writing in the disciplines, using the grading process for departmental and institutional assessment, and creating a teaching/learning culture at the department level.

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The Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Council is part of the Office of Academic Affairs, University of Wisconsin System.

This page can be reached at: http://www.uwsa.edu/opid/conf/fc00.htm.

Last updated: January 11, 2007 .

2000 Preliminary Schedule

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Hyper Activity and Under Constructruction: Learning Culture in a Wired World
Professor Randy Bass

EVENING SPEAKER:

Reflections on Developing an Inclusive Classroom
Edith Fraser

SEMINARS:

Teaching and Learning in the Diverse Classroom
Mathew L. Ouellett and Edith Fraser

Making Explicit the Values Behind our Teaching
Greg Valde

Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom
Chuck Bonwell

Grading and Assessing Student Work in the Classroom and in the Department or Institution
Barbara Walvoord