Learning Technology Development Council (LTDC)

2010-2011 Grant Awards and Reports

View 2010-2011 Grant Information | Back to Latest Grant Information

Curricular Redesign Grant

Total funding: $80,000

Intermediate Algebra Video Project

Amount Awarded:
$5,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Theresa Adsit, UW-Green Bay
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Green Bay
Abstract:
The purpose of the Intermediate Algebra Video Project is to enhance student learning in Intermediate Algebra by moving the bulk of instructional lecture material to videos which the student will be assigned to view outside of class and thus free up valuable class time to engage in active learning techniques emphasizing real life examples and a deeper understanding of algebra.
Grant documents
View Algebra Video proposal | View Algebra Video final proposal

Getting It Straight: Improving Language Comprehension with Syntax Untangler

Amount Awarded:
$15,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Alan Ng, UW-Madison
Involved Campus(es):
Larry Kuiper, UW-Milwaukee,
Sage Goellner, UW-Madison
Abstract:

The skill of recognizing and decoding second-language (L2) syntax is conventionally taught in the classroom at a board, involving frequent sessions of live conversation, marking up sentences on the board, and drawing sentence diagrams. Learners otherwise tend to read and hear L2 texts while applying syntactical expectations from their native language (L1), leading to very common comprehension errors, such as reversing subject/object relationships (e.g. "Man bites dog.") We propose to build an online, interactive activity that trains students in best practices for approaching and comprehending entire sentences. The activity will sequence and encourage the practices of scanning for phrase boundaries, reading syntactical clues, and mentally reordering phrases. It will make these practices visually obvious and cement the experience by engaging the physical sensation of dragging L2 phrases into a more familiar L1 syntax sequence. Distance language programs that lack live, interactive video will gain the most dramatic benefits, but classroom and other instructional formats also need this tool. We will immediately develop, evaluate, and implement this activity for at least five different languages and programs taught both face-to-face and via distance at UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, and UW-Extension Independent Learning, including Spanish, French, German, Thai, and Hindi languages. We would like to share the activity as freely as the Wisconsin Idea demands, including creating and offering an "authoring tool" for any language instructor anywhere, without technical skills, to create and insert their own content for this activity. The potential impact is global and universal, including English as a Second Language instruction, K-12 language instruction, and remedial English instruction.

Grant documents
View Language Comprehension proposal | View Language Comprehensions final report | Access Syntax Untangler

Preparing Wisconsin Teachers: Fusing First Nations Studies into Education Curriculum

Amount Awarded:
$15,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Lisa Poupart, UW-Green Bay
Involved Campus(es):
Ryan Comfort, UW-Madison,
Tim Kaufman, UW-Green Bay,
Art Lacey, UW-Green Bay
Abstract:

In 1983 the federal courts up upheld the Anishinabeg reserved right to hunt, fish, and gather within the territory they ceded in the Treaties of1837 and 1842. The people of Wisconsin had little understanding of tribal sovereignty or of treaties and the government-to-government relationships that they established. Tribal leaders, educators, and advocates sought and secured an educational solution to this problem. In 1989, the state government passed a law requiring all persons seeking a license to teach in Wisconsin to have received instruction in the history, culture, contemporary status, and sovereignty of the federally-recognized tribes and bands in the state (s.118.19(8) Wis. Stats.). The individual teacher education programs are responsible for incorporating this information into their courses of study to ensure that all of their graduates will have received this instruction. This curricular redesign project is collaboration between the First Nations Studies and Education programs at UW Green Bay and the American Indian Curriculum Services Coordinator at UW Madison. The plan addresses teacher education in several important ways. It uses an integrative approach to ingrate First Nations Studies course work into Education department requirements using technology while simultaneously seeking to hold true to the oral traditional, holistic, tribal world view. The project allows education students to build their understanding of salient issues and incorporate these understandings into their lessons as required under s.121.D2(1)(L)4 Wis. Stats. It provides an approach that may be replicated at any university around diversity issues and is aligned with the UW System plan for Inclusive Excellence. The design features an efficient and institutionalized way of imparting information through the strategy of connecting First Nations Studies (FNS) course work to undergraduate education requirements through the use of digital storytelling and Web quest. Electronic culture based assess rubrics will be developed to assess students' electronic portfolios.

Grant documents
View First Nation Studies grant proposal

Arts Marketing Online Course Development Project

Amount Awarded:
$9,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Megan Matthews, UW-Whitewater,
Ellen Rosewell, UW-Green Bay
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Whitewater, UW-Green Bay
Abstract:

Arts management is a relatively new academic field which has undergraduate programs on four UW-System campuses: UW-Green Bay (program begun in 2000), UW-Parkside (program begun in 1998), UW-Whitewater (program begun in 1992) and UW-Stevens Point (program begun in 1988). Because of the rapid change and growth of the field, consistent teaching materials for undergraduate students do not exist. The nature of available resources and our need to collaborate to provide the best opportunities for our students lends itself to the development of online resources. In 2005, we were given a grant from the Curricular Redesign Program to develop an introductory undergraduate Arts Management course, which was successfully completed and is now being used on all of our campuses.

For this cycle, two of the original collaborators are requesting funding for the development of up to two additional online arts management courses, Marketing the Arts and Arts in the Community. These two courses will add to our original offerings by providing specific content needed by both students and practitioners, and will help make the original course even more useful within the context of undergraduate programs, Adult Degree and for nontraditional students. An exciting component of this new project is the opportunity to use advancing technology, including social media, online research tools and simulation technology, which are an important component of marketing and arts management in the 21st Century. We propose to work collaboratively in summer and fall of 2010. We will be able to test the resulting courses on students in spring of 2011 and be prepared to submit a full evaluation of the project in June of 2011.

Grant documents
View Arts Marketing grant proposal | View Arts Marketing final report | Access Arts Management course files

Beyond Text: Facilitating Student-Centered Learning through ePortfolios and Digital Storytelling

Amount Awarded:
$12,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Amy Mangrich, UW-Milwaukee,
Matthew Russell, UW-Milwaukee,
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Milwaukee
Abstract:

The purposes of this curricular redesign project are to encourage retention, consistent with the UW Growth Agenda, to facilitate student engagement through the development of reflective and critical thinking skills in student-produced media within coursework, and to increase awareness of cultural diversity at UWM by showcasing student work both within and outside the university. In our efforts to support faculty to redesign courses in our Cultures and Communities program, we will collect examples of student work that are tied tightly to the Essential Learning Outcomes (ELOs) that UWM has embraced. We will also employ VoiceThread and YouTube to make far easier the process by which students may contribute their own content to these courses to enlarge their role as active learners.

We will generate and disseminate examples of student projects, sample ePortfolio and digital storytelling assignments, and course modules that instructors from a variety of disciplines can employ in their own courses. The use of the D2L ePortfolio tool makes project outcomes readily generalizable to other UWS campuses. We will distribute our findings and modules throughout the UW system through presentations – both online showcases and conference presentations. We will also produce an accompanying Web site as a resource for others to use in their curricular redesign initiatives. Finally, our assessment process will support other campuses that are also seeking to address the UW-System Growth Agenda.

Grant documents
View ePortfolio grant proposal

A learning Community through Algebra Labs

Amount Awarded:
$10,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Kirthi Pemadasa , UW Colleges
Involved Campus(es):
UW Colleges (Marathon County), UW-Whitewater
Abstract:

Most Mathematics instructors would agree that College Algebra is one of the most problematic courses taught at the undergraduate level. In the UW Colleges, less than 40% of students who enroll in college algebra pass with a grade of C or better. Two common problems with College Algebra are:

  • Students fail to see the actual usage of Algebra. They often ask "What is it used for?"
  • Students seem to find it difficult to bridge the gap between what is taught in the math classroom and its significant use in other classes they take.

As a remedy, we propose a sequence of "Algebra labs" designed in conjunction with professors representing different disciplines to create a learning community where students work with real data and a variety of models. Students will use MS Excel to display the data and arrive at algebraic expressions to model the data and make predictions. Students will collaborate via D2L discussion forums, and present their lab reports as electronic documents. Professors in Chemistry, Biology, Psychology and Economics will join Mathematics to create these laboratory exercises. The project will run concurrently at UW-Marathon County and UW-Whitewater. The following are the anticipated outcomes.

  • Students will learn how to use spread sheet software (MS Excel) to fit algebraic formulas that model real data from cooperating disciplines.
  • A learning community will be created on campus and Math courses will be more aligned with other courses offered on campus providing the students with an integrad learning experience
  • Students will learn to collaborate in D2L forums and make professional electronic presentations.
Grant documents
View Algebra Labs grant proposal | View Algebra Labs final report | Access worksheets and tasksheets developed for this grant

Second Life Faculty Learning Community and Research Exploration

Amount Awarded:
$14,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Karen Skibba, UW-Whitewater
Involved Campus(es):
Multiple, UW-Whitewater
Abstract:

UW-Whitewater has faculty interested in working collaboratively across disciplines to learn about and use Second Life to increase student engagement, build more engaging learning communities, and increase experiential and collaborative learning. The excitement for using Second Life has ignited many great ideas and shared interests to use Second Life as either the main environment for online learning or for group or individual student and faculty exploration for other courses.

The ideas proposed by the faculty, with collaboration from UW-Whitewater Learning Technology Center instructional designers and technologists, will result in creating objects, environments, and learning activities and assessments that can be shared and used by all UW institutions in conjunction with the UW System Second Life Island. What makes this proposal unique is that this project will follow a learning community model where faculty would meet regularly in person, in Second Life, and collaborate with each other and others during Second Life events and workshops to explore and learn together how this environment can enhance teaching and learning and the pedagogical and technological considerations.

Faculty and student surveys will be combined with a longitudinal qualitative research study to understand the faculty experiences with the help of instructional designers and technologists as they learn about and make the transition into teaching using Second Life. The goal is that the findings of this learning community will be shared in workshops and conferences throughout the UW System and nationally. In addition, the faculty participating in the learning community would become mentors for other faculty considering using Second Life in their curriculum.

View Faculty Learning grant proposal | View Faculty Learning final report

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