Learning Technology Development Council (LTDC)

2009-2010 Grant Awards and Reports

2009-2010 Grant Information | Back to Latest Grant Information

Emerging Technology Grant

A Blended Workshop on Teaching with GPS and GIS for Faculty in non-GIS Disciplines

Amount Awarded:
$2,988
Primary Investigator(s):
William Bajjali, UW-Superior
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Superior
Abstract:

This project will advance the innovative use of the emerging technology of GPS in teaching disciplines and will explore the effective use of videoconferencing technologies for teaching Global Positioning System (GPS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) in a blended format. The researcher proposes to teach a workshop at UW-Superior and UW-Fox Valley campuses aimed at improving the abilities of UW faculty and academic staff in fields outside of GIS to teach and provide students with relevant instructional activities using GIS and GPS technology. The technical and pedagogical training on GPS and GIS technologies will be provided through a blended workshop, part faculty-to-faculty and part online using either Desire2Learn/Elluminate or Adobe Connect Pro through UW-System. The one-day face-to-face session will provide instructors with best practices in using GPS with students and field experience in using GPS Associated with GIS ArcPad. The GPS gives field-based personnel the ability to capture, edit, analyze, and display geographic information easily and efficiently to generate and record data. The online sessions will make full use of recent enhancements in videoconferencing technologies to teach the use of GIS and GPS for data representation and spatial analysis. The sessions will provide additional knowledge, skills, and best practices to instructors so that they can create and implement GIS and GPS learning activities in their own class environments.

Grant documents
View GPS & GIS grant proposal | View GPS & GIS grant final report

Emerging Virtual Modeling Technology to Enhance Student Learning, Engagement and Critical Thinking

Amount Awarded:
$3,423
Primary Investigator(s):
Xuedong (David) Ding,, UW-Stout
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Stout
Abstract:

This research project drives from a new technology, process virtual modeling. Due to the lack of industrial experiences, students have difficulties understanding the industrial operation processes. This often results misunderstanding while teaching operation management, lean, supply chain management and quality assurance courses. As an instructor who teaches these courses, I strongly believe that more creative approaches are needed to enhance students' awareness of the operation systems which will improve their learning outcome, encourage their use of critical thinking and strengthen their ability to identify and solve the problems. Virtual Modeling, which use simulation packages virtually illustrates the operation systems, will give students an opportunity to actually see the dynamic industrial operations.

During this pilot study, several virtual models of industrial process will be created and then used in class to help students understand the processes. The outcome will be evaluated at the end of the study.

Virtual models can be recorded through screen recording software such as Camtasia. These recordings can then be shared throughout the UW System so the students in the same disciplines of other campus can use them.

Grant documents
View Virtual Modeling grant proposal

Second Life - L TDC Island sandbox for training, exploration and experimentation

Amount Awarded:
$7,540
Primary Investigator(s):
Pat Fellows, UW Colleges,
Scott Reeser, UW Colleges
Involved Campus(es):
Statewide
Abstract:

Second Life (SL, http://secondlife.com) is an open virtual 3D environment that continues to gain popularity as a potential learning and community platform. This project has the ultimate goal of laying the foundation for future development and projects, by providing a central resource for UW campuses interested in exploring Second Life but who, for various reasons, do not have the resources to support the exploration independently. Potential areas of exploration will include (but are not limited to): social or communal learning design; content development and/or inclusion (e.g. objects, scripting, interactions, external web content); and conduting SL-based class activities.

This proposal suggests the transfer of ownership of a previously built Second Life presence created by UW Extension's Division of Continuing Education, Outreach, and eLearning (CEOEL). The current space already provides the potential for group ollaboration activities, as well as the environment for UW faculty and staff to experiment with immersive content development, while at the same time avoiding initial startup costs required by Linden Labs (creators of Second Life).

Grant documents
View SL Island grant proposal | View SL Island final report

Developing elementary pre-service teachers' TPACK in division of fractions by integrating SmartBoard, Mathematical Habits of Mind, and content knowledge in the design of instruction.

Amount Awarded:
$3,950
Primary Investigator(s):
Hsing-Wen Hu, UW-River Falls
Involved Campus(es):
UW-River Falls
Abstract:

In this age of digilal technology, developing an overarching construct for mathematical teaching has become a critical issue in mathematics education. Mathematics Teacher TPACK Standards, created by AMTE's Technology Committee, orfers guidelines for thinking about this construct. TPACK has been proposed as the interconnection or technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge for mathematics educators to develop an instructional model. This proposal plans to assist pre-service teachers in developing strategies that will teach the concept, ' division of fractions ' using the TPACK framework. This involves teaching the interaction of Mathematical Habits of the Mind (pedagogical knowledge) using interactive whiteboard (technology knowledge) to actively learn about the division of fractions (content knowledge). After participating in this module, participants' knowledge in division of fractions will be assessed by using an achievement lest. In addition, a five-stage developmental process (recognizing, accepting, adapting. exploring, and advancing) will be used to evaluate pre-service teachers' progress in learning to integrate a particular technology in teaching mathematics. The project is not only useful for pre-service teachers to assess their mathematics TJ>ACK, but is also helpful in guiding teacher educators to evaluate and plan the technology preparation of their pre-service teachers.

Grant documents
View TPACK grant proposal | View TPACK final report

CHE-NET: Using technology to connect on-campus and in-practice learning in Public Health

Amount Awarded:
$4,664.38
Primary Investigator(s):
Robert Jecklin,, UW-La Crosse
Involved Campus(es):
UW-La Crosse
Abstract:

For over 30 years the undergraduate community health education program at UW-La Crosse has required a full-time mentored practice experience during the final semester called the preceptorship to help students transition from educational preparation to professional practice. Meeting needs related to this transition requires that the program overcome the problems of geographic, temporal, contextual, and conceptual distance between on-campus learning and the in-practice learning of students in professional settings. Forty-five students in 2009-10 are aligned with sites around the state, nation, and globe. In addition to geographic distance, student retention of what was learned on campus is eroded with the passage of time. The varied contexts for practice and the varied concepts associated with specific populations and health concerns all require interpretation and adaptation of what was learned on campus. The emerging technology in this proposal overcomes distance and creates reciprocating opportunities for influence between on-campus and in-practice learning that is beneficial to both. Building on student experience with blogs, websites, D2L, and Mediasite webcasting, the project introduces a Ning social networking application called CHE-NET creating a rich media gallery of photo, video, and audio. CHE-NET neutralizes distance by engaging faculty and students through blogging, group formation, discussion, and other forms of interaction. CHE-NET compacts temporal distance by creating a virtual time line that connects and encourages communication between students at different points in the program curriculum sequence. CHE-NET also bridges campus learning and the many specific practice settings, service populations, and health concerns experienced by students off campus, and this allows all learners to better understand contextual differences and interpret the different ways of applying theoretical concepts and principles learned in classes. CHE-NET is evaluated by membership, the quality of participation, and the degree to which participation connects the occurrence of on-campus and in-practice learning.

Grant documents
View CHE-NET grant proposal | View CHE-NET final report

Social Media in Education - Exploring Potential and Assessing Impact

Amount Awarded:
$4,200
Primary Investigator(s):
Tanya Joosten, UW-Milwaukee,
Alan Aycock, UW-Milwaukee
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Milwaukee
Abstract:

Social media tools, such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, and YouTube, have the potential to increase communication among faculty and students, increase engagement in the classroom, and create peer networks among students, faculty, and the community. Social media tools are becoming increasingly popular in the mainstream. According to Bulik (July 8th , 2009) "Out of the 110 million Americans (or 60% of the online population) who use social networks, the average social networking user logs on to these sites quite a bit. They go to social networking sites 5 days per week and check in 4 times a day for a total of an hour per day. Nine percent of that group stay logged in all day long and are 'constantly checking what's new'" (para 7). It is obvious that many students already use these social media tools in their day to day lives and campuses across the country are already exploring their potential impact on learning (e.g., http://tinyurl.com/ox92ds).

Due to current budget restrictions facing campuses, social media tools are becoming a more attractive option because of their small price tags and their widespread diffusion among college students. Many college students are already familiar with some of the social media tools (e.g., Facebook), so the learning curve and resources needed to train and support students is low. Along with the already existing, large body of current social media tool users on campus, the lack of funding opportunities for large scale software solutions leads educators to look for low-cost solutions. Examining the learning benefits of these technologies in order to meet existing pedagogical needs in the classroom is necessary. This proposal is to implement social media tools in the classroom in pedagogically effective ways to explore the impact on the classroom, communication and engagement, and student learning.

Grant documents
View Social Media Impact grant proposal | Access Social Media Impact Wiki (serves as final report)

Resources and Best Practices in Online and Blended Teaching and Learning

Amount Awarded:
$5,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Kristin Koepke, UW-La Crosse,
Karen Skibba, UW-Whitewater,
Scott Wojtanowski, UW-River Falls
Involved Campus(es):
Statewide
Abstract:

The purpose of the project is to set-up a collaborative workspace where system Learning Technology Center (LTC) and/or Instructional Design (ID) individuals at UW colleges and universities can easily share and gather resources for use in their work related to faculty training and development. The project will allow collaboration across UW colleges and universities, creating and sharing training resources while increasing productivity for all that participate. The collaborative wiki workspace will focus on sharing faculty training resources focused on online and hybrid course design and delivery. The project will not only benefit Learning Technology Center (LTC) and/or Instructional Design (ID) individuals at UW colleges and universities by increasing job efficiency, but the output from these individuals will increase the competence and quality of instructors, ultimately benefiting students.

Grant documents
View Resources proposal

Enhancing a Student Tutorial on 21st Century Literacy

Amount Awarded:
$4,995
Primary Investigator(s):
Lisa Larson, UW-Superior
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Superior
Abstract:

This project will enhance assessment functionality and improve distribution of a student tutorial titled, "How to Search for, Select, and Cite Multimedia for Papers and Presentations: A Tutorial for 21st Century Literacy." The current interactive tutorial, pilot tested in Fall 2009 by 46 students in three, mostly-freshmen classes, consists of four sections: Ethics, Search, Select, and Cite. Each is completed in 20 to 30 minutes. The tutorial engages students using drag-and-drop, pulldown menus, and other interactive input methods in exercises that guide them to create graphic organizers and develop analyses. A "Check Answer" button provides "correct/try again" feedback on initial skill-building exercises in each section. In each section's concluding exercises, students engage in higher-level critical thinking about cases, then print out their screens for use in in-class small group or whole-class discussions. The current tutorial is a set of stand-alone executable files created in Director, requiring installation of a folder containing multiple files onto individual computers. This proposal allows for moving the tutorial online, which will facilitate assignment of the tutorial as homework and distribution across UW campuses and beyond. Project work will include re-export of the Director files as Shockwave files, testing, and redesign of sections as needed. Due to faculty feedback, answer checking and scorekeeping will also be enhanced. The enhanced tutorial will provide a score on each section's initial exercises. It will maintain the open-ended focus of the sections' final exercises by indicating percent-completed for each section and for the whole tutorial. This enhanced assessment functionality will facilitate assigning the tutorial as homework. To achieve this, project work will connect the Director files to a database via the Internet using ASP pages. Besides allowing for cumulative scoring through multiple sittings, the database will also enhance data gathering on the tutorial's use and effectiveness.

Grant documents
View Student Tutorial grant proposal | View Student Tutorial final report

The Kindle e-Reader as a Tool for Teaching and Learning

Amount Awarded:
$500
Primary Investigator(s):
Anne Stinson, UW-Whitewater
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Whitewater
Abstract:

This project (The Kindle e-Reader as a Tool for Teaching and Learning) will allow faculty and staff in the College of Education to explore the Kindle e-reader as a tool for teaching and learning in elementary, secondary, and post-secondary classrooms. Participants have already been provided with e-readers and will soon be provided with Adobe Acrobat; this project will provide each participant with $50.00 to used for the purchase of electronic texts (e-books), and will result in 1) faculty and academic staff being well-versed in the usefulness of the e-reader as a tool for learning and teaching, 2) a well-articulated research plan for the Kindle-enhanced section of ELEMMID 324 for Fall 2010 will be written (including IRB), and 3) a Curricular Redesign Grant proposal for further exploration of the usefulness of e-readers as tools for teaching and learning.

Grant documents
View Kindle grant proposal | View Kindle final report

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