Learning Technology Development Council (LTDC)

2008-2009 Grant Awards and Reports

View 2008-2009 grant information | Back to Latest Grant Information

Curricular Redesign Grant

Building a Collaborative EMR System with UW System Nursing

Amount Awarded:
$44,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Pam Scheibel, UW-Madison
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Madison, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Eau Claire, UW-Green Bay
Abstract:

21st century nurses need 21st century technologies to help patients accomplish their personal health goals and to support society in achieving the targets outlined in “Healthy People 2010.” Further, a motivated, confident cadre of nursing faculty form the necessary core resource required to educate students for 21st century health care practice. Enhancing the capabilities of the nursing faculty in the UW-System schools and their affiliated technical school partners to provide education with new technologies including distance-learning technologies, is a new goal of the highly successful Collaborative Nursing Program.

An essential piece of technology that all faculty and students need to be familiar with is Electronic Medical Records (EMR). The Federal government has mandated all medical records be in an electronic form by 2012. We are requesting monies to both purchase an educational version of an EMR system and to assist faculty and students learn how to use EMR in teaching and learning through an innovative, technology-supported educational approach. The EMR system would be available to all faculty and students in the UW-System Collaborative Nursing Program for integration into their courses. Project outcomes include: strengthening knowledge, skills, and abilities of nursing faculty, and subsequently students, in the use of EMR; integrating EMR into nursing curricula across the state; and enhancing existing educational alliances in nursing to improve nursing practice, increase patient safety and improve the health of the patient.

Grant documents
View EMR grant proposal | View EMR grant final report

Digital Storytelling Across the UW-System

Amount Awarded:
$34,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Cheryl Diermyer, UW-Madison
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Madison, UW-Superior, UW-Colleges
Abstract:

This project focuses on professional development for members of LTDC and faculty development across UW-campuses to discover how digital stories are being used in higher education to enrich curriculum and build community. This is an opportunity for technology and learning leaders to discover how digital storytelling can be used on their own campus.

Grant documents
View Digital Storytelling CR grant proposal | View Digital Storytelling CR grant final report

Web Based AJAX Enabled Query Tool

Amount Awarded:
$45,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Robert Dollinger, UW-Stevens Point
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Stevens Point, UW-Parkside, UW-Oshkosh
Abstract:

The Web Based AJAX Enabled Query Tool (AEQ tool) will be developed as an educational software application to support the activities related to the database classes. The AEQ tool is meant to enhance student activity and performance by addressing several difficulties they face in their work, particularly for the database classes or any other classes that assume specialized access to campus located database servers.

Over years of teaching experience, we, and our partners across the UW system campuses, identified several perspectives of the expected impact of a tool like AEQ on the instructional process: (1) Remote, on-line access to database servers via Internet - currently, most students do their work in the on-campus labs; few are using some sort of remoting approach to get into the campus network for solving their assignments. The AEQ tool will allow direct, on-line, authenticated access to the databases. (2) Unified query tool - the tool will act as an SQL client for various types of on-campus databases (Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL and other) by using one single, specifically tailored, Web based interface. (3) Course content provider and development tool - the students will be able to test the pre-loaded classroom query examples against the databases used in the class, as well as edit and test their own queries. (4) Collaborative learning tool - when using the AEQ tool the students will be able to login either into a private individual space or in a shared working environment, where they can engage in group activities, exchange messages, view live the queries issued by other users as well as the response returned from the database.

Grant documents
View AJAX Query Tool grant proposal | View AJAX Query Tool grant final report

Creating Engaging and Effective eLearning Experiences for Art and Design Courses that Enhance Students’ Learning Experiences

Amount Awarded:
$15,176
Primary Investigator(s):
Gautam Wadhwa, UW-Whitewater
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Whitewater, UW-Green Bay
Abstract:

One of the challenges of teaching graphic design courses is that the instructors must teach both soft design skills—design principles, complexity, and change—and hard design skills or technical skills.

Soft design skills like aesthetics, intuition, balance, recognizing harmony in page design, stirring emotions through design, etc. are ephemeral parts of design. These are best taught in a face-to-face meeting where students can interact, observe, create and analyze, i.e.—a classroom setting. Technical skills are better learned by observing and then creating the same or simultaneously observing and creating. eLearning lends itself well to teaching technical skills in a way that facilitates simultaneous observation and creation. eLearning can also introduce students to technical skills in a measured and paced way. This innovation would not only improve the quality of design education but also the quality and quantity of student learning and work.

The project will create eLearning components for graphic design courses to teach technical (hard design) skills. UW–Whitewater (UWW) and UW-Green Bay (UWGB) will collaborate to create interactive tutorials to accomplish this. These self-paced tutorials will be made available to the students through D2L. These eLearning components will not only help to achieve the above but also help in better accommodating students with different skill-levels within the same class. The tutorials will integrate teaching technical skills with design problem solving to make them more relevant to the specialized needs of design students.

Two modules (50% of the course), each consisting of a collection of interactive tutorials will be created, tested and implemented in a course. Opportunities to implement these tutorials in an online course or creating a bank of such tutorials (to be used by the department, college, university or the UW system) will also be explored.

Grant documents
View eLearning Experiences grant proposal | View eLearning Experiences grant final report

The Use of Technology to Track Student Progress in Music Study

Amount Awarded:
$28,190
Primary Investigator(s):
David Hastings, UW-Stevens Point
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Stevens Point, UW-Colleges (Marshfield/Wood County, Marathon County)
Abstract:

Our team of investigators is seeking seed money and work time through the UW-System Curricular Redesign Grant to research, develop and implement a pilot system of measuring and tracking music students’ learning outcomes throughout their first two years of study. The impetus for this project stems from our observations regarding student learning outcomes and retention.

While the traditional methods of assessment certainly do provide some insight with regard to learning outcomes, there is really no centralized way of examining each student’s aggregate progress and therefore no effective way of systematically noticing each student’s weaknesses and areas for improvement. In our current age, we believe that the answer for a more comprehensive and effective means of examining each student carefully and monitoring their work effectively lies in technology.

The first task will be to define a new and more comprehensive set of criteria that would best evaluate each student. Then, we will research best methods, tools and formats, to record, store, and measure the criteria. By using innovative technology applications, we will develop a consistent, quantitative method of assessing student work. The different tools will include audio and video tapings of student. Each student’s “electronic portfolio” will be examined periodically and will provide us with a way to “look” at each student in a comprehensive and centralized way. It is our belief that examining student work in this new way will greatly enhance our teaching and improve learning outcomes for our students. We will also be able to address retention issues, and better assist with the transition from the two-year experience to the final two years of their respective specialization.

A significant part of this project includes the involvement of both two-year and four-year programs. The time provided to us by this grant will allow a collaborative effort so we can examine the similarities and differences among our students. In turn, this kind of discussion will allow us to design the most efficient way of looking at our students. With a system of this kind, we will be able to share information about our curricula within our departments as well as within our shared mission between our two-year and four-year campuses. We also believe that this way of monitoring students’ work has the potential to translate into other disciplines outside of music and it is our intention to share the results of our pilot program with other departments, programs within our own universities as well as other institutions across the UW-System.

Grant documents
View Music Student Progress grant proposal | View Music Student Progress grant final report

Impact on Student Learning of a Live, Remote Electron Microscopy Experience in Freshman Chemistry Courses in Combination with Active Learning Approaches: An Exploratory Study

Amount Awarded:
$45,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Peter Geissinger, UW-Milwaukee
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Milwaukee, UW-Colleges
Abstract:

Infusing advanced technology into classrooms in support of inquiry-based discovery experiences can be of great value for teaching difficult concepts. One such concept is “scale,” which the American Association for the Advancement of Science identified in its report "Benchmarks for Science Literacy" as one of four “common themes” that are relevant for many disciplines. Grasping scale outside the visual realm is difficult. High-school students and undergraduate students in introductory chemistry courses, for example, are required to begin thinking about certain concepts in chemistry on a particle level, which are orders of magnitude smaller than the resolving ability of the human eye. The development of a student’s scale conception outside the concepts of chemistry has been noted as an important component of a student’s overall science literacy. Research has shown that students need to continue cultivating their understanding of scale, particularly down to the nanometer size, beyond their elementary and secondary education years.

Recently, NSF awarded to UWM a Major Research Instrumentation Grant for a high-end scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM acquisition includes */remote operation/* modules for */remote, real-time viewing/* of SEM sessions and for */real-time, remote operation/* of the SEM through a web browser. */This proposal describes a collaborative, exploratory program for remote, interactive, real-time use of the new SEM to support inquiry-based learning experiences (in an active learning format)/* in freshman chemistry courses at UW-Milwaukee and UW-Washington County, with focus on the instructional theme of “scale.” Rigorous formal and informal assessment will be carried out to determine the impact of SEM use on student learning of scale. Remote SEM use is not limited to freshman chemistry courses; we expect the outcomes to be broadly applicable to many courses in various disciplines at all UW campuses. Moreover, we will establish guidelines for effective use of remote instrumentation in general.

Grant documents
View Microscopy grant proposal | View Microscopy grant final report

Emerging Technology Grant

Improving Student Teacher Reflection and Professional Collaboration using Blogs and Web Conferencing

Amount Awarded:
$2,167.50
Primary Investigator(s):
Matthew Vick, UW-Whitewater
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Whitewater
Abstract:

The project seeks to analyze the use of two technologies in the final preparation of new teachers. Blogs will be used as a reflective medium between students in place of weekly reports only to the supervisor. Web conferencing will be used for the final two of four meetings between student teachers and the university supervisor. Web conferencing will save time and transportation costs as well as model effective use of an emerging technology for collaboration on lesson plans to be used for the student’s portfolio needed for initial licensure as a teacher in Wisconsin.

Blogs have the potential of improving student professional collaboration using emerging technologies. Traditionally reflections have been emails sent to the supervisor allowing for no feedback or sharing amongst colleagues. Web conferencing will not only have economic savings, but it also will allow for greater collaboration amongst on the students on their portfolios as they will be able to share and critique each others’ artifacts for use in their portfolio rather than just receiving a summary score from the supervisor.

Two interviews will be conducted with consenting student teachers to analyze how their thinking about teaching, collaborating, and reflection changes through the semester and after exposure to the web conferencing technology. The interview transcripts and blog will also be analyzed for emerging themes that will guide future use of these technologies when working with student teachers. Results will be published for the UW System and other audiences.

Grant documents
View Blogs/Conferencing grant proposal | View Blogs/Conferencing grant final report

Pilot Electronic Portfolio for Secondary and Elementary Teacher Preparation Programs

Amount Awarded:
$2,600
Primary Investigator(s):
James Hartwick, UW-Whitewater
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Whitewater
Abstract:

As the Portfolio Coordinator for the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (C&I), I, the principal investigator, am seeking $5,000 of funding for Spring 2009 to support the development of a pilot electronic portfolio for the secondary and elementary teacher preparation programs—the largest group of pre-service teachers in the College of Education (COE)—in the C&I Department. By creatively utilizing existing technology, the development of an electronic portfolio and digital video, will serve to: (1) enhance student reflection, (2) promote the technical competence of future teachers, and (3) create a professional electronic portfolio that administrators will use in the hiring process.

There are three major issues that this proposal is designed to address. First, a digital video and an electronic portfolio will enhance reflection about teaching and learning. By digitally video recording themselves teaching, student teachers will individually and collectively evaluate and reflect on their instruction and how students respond. Second, the development of an electronic portfolio will not only enhance students’ technological expertise, but will help students to seamless connect reflections with evidence, which will naturally enhance the quality of professional reflection. And third, while the C&I department offers a quality paper-based portfolio, an electronic portfolio will be more usable as a professional portfolio.

This support will be used for a 2-credit release from supervision ($2,600 salary + $1,157 benefits = $3,757) for the principal investigator, and to purchase digital cameras ($1,243) to enhance reflection on teaching and to enable the infusion of web-streamed video into the digital portfolio. I intend to pilot the D2L electronic portfolio platform in Spring 2009. In the future, experience gained from this pilot electronic portfolio will likely affect approximately 150 students per semester who will enroll in elementary and secondary student teaching through the C&I Department.

Grant documents
View ePortfolio grant proposal | View ePortfolio grant final report

A Pilot Study: Adopting Emerging Technologies and Tools in Classrooms.

Amount Awarded:
$5,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Tom Lo Guidice, UW-Platteville
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Madison
Abstract:

All students’ learning styles are not the same and traditional power-point class lecture and/or writing in whiteboard/blackboard lectures model might not be enough or appropriate to teach, connect, and engage all of our new generation’s and technology-enhanced students. Our aim is to provide more visual and active learning scopes for our students to improve their overall learning experience and performance. The proposed project utilizes a successful Curricular Redesign project emphasized on Students Response System (SRS) done by four other UW campuses and reported in 2007. In addition to the SRS system, we would like to adopt two other existing technologies to improve electronic presentations to attract or connect students and enhance their overall learning experience. To document faculty delivery instructions and to determine students learning outcomes, the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) program at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville (UWP) will assist with this project. Forty faculty will be trained in the technologies and tools; of the forty, ten will develop Scholarship of Teaching and Learning studies to document student outcomes.

Grant documents
View Technologies and Tools grant proposal | View Technologies and Tools grant final report

Promoting Widespread Use of Clickers

Amount Awarded:
$1,536
Primary Investigator(s):
Kenneth Menningen, UW-Stevens Point
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Stevens Point
Abstract:

Workshops will be heald at UW-Stevens Point to help faculty members overcome reluctance to use the new TurningPoint clickers which have been adopted as the campus standard. The workshops will demonstrate the pedagogical potential of the devices, illustrate their use in a variety of situations, and give participants an opportunity for hands-on practice.

Grant documents
View Clicker grant proposal | View Clicker grant final report

Sharing Campus and Community Cultural Connections

Amount Awarded:
$4,775
Primary Investigator(s):
Cheryl Diermyer, UW-Madison
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Madison
Abstract:

In the Fall 2008, Margaret Nellis from the School of Human Ecology will teach a Special Topics 501: Campus Community Connections course (with a target student enrollment of 25) where students will study cultural identity, health, and patterns of human interaction. The course focuses on the UW-Madison campus environment and the Madison community. The course is designed to give majority students the opportunity to learn how minority students experience these environments. The course also gives minority students insight to experiences of majority students. As one student said in a similar course taught by Margaret Nellis:

“My eyes and ears were widely opened when one of the members of my group who was a Caucasian said that she too felt like a minority. I instantly thought about how she could feel that way seeing that she was one of the majorities of the faces seen on campus from day to day.

She soon reassured me that because she was Caucasian everyone expected her to be rich and close-minded to those outside of the Caucasian race. I was shocked to know that she was afraid to make friends with people outside of her race because she felt like she would be overlooked.

Through place-based learning and partnerships with the South Metropolitan Planning Council (SMPC - http://www.madison.com/communities/smpc/) and Park Street Partners (http://www.madison.com/communities/parkstpartners/), students are immersed into the ethnicity of the UW-Madison campus and the Madison community. They are given opportunities to observe and participate in on and off campus cultural events.

Margaret Nellis, with the support of UW-Madison Academic Technology, is proposing to implement a method in her course that will help students make meaning of their experiences and by sharing these experiences gain cultural awareness and understanding.

Grant documents
View Connections grant proposal | View Connections grant final report

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