Learning Technology Development Council (LTDC)

2005-2006 Grant Awards and Reports

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Curricular Redesign Grant

Student Response Systems (SRS)-Exploring Potential and Assessing Impact

Amount Awarded:
$93,800
Primary Investigator(s):
Bob Kaleta, UW-Milwaukee
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Milwaukee,
UW-Eau Claire,
UW-Oshkosh,
UW-Whitewater 
Abstract:

Student Response Systems (SRS) have the potential to provide the means for introducing active student participation and engagement into lecture classes. Student response system technologies equip the student with a personal response unit, or "clicker", for answering questions posed by the instructor in class. The potential for transforming traditionally passive large lecture classes into stimulating interactive classes is great. Student response systems can engage the attention of students, make them active participants in their learning, and provide them with immediate feedback on their understanding of material. They also provide faculty with information on students' understanding of course concepts and the ability to adjust course activities based upon student responses. Class responses can also be used as a prompt for classroom discussion and other activities.

The UW SRS Project involves faculty and staff from four UW institutions and is designed to learn how instructors can use student response systems to actively engage students and facilitate student learning. Sixteen instructors from four UW campuses will be supported as they redesign their courses and integrate SRS-based learning activities. The impact of these SRS activities on teaching and learning will be assessed and "best practices" will be distilled and shared with other UW faculty. The project will also create a faculty development program to introduce instructors to student response systems and how to use them effectively. One of the outcomes of the project will be a Student Response System Web site for faculty, LTC staff, and faculty developers, which will include the best practices, resources on student response systems, and the faculty development program for integrating SRS into courses.

Grant documents
View SRS grant proposal

A Learning Objects Approach to Latin American Studies

Amount Awarded:
$34,859
Primary Investigator(s):
Seth Meisel, UW-Whitewater,
Eva Santos-Phillip, UW-Eau Claire,
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Eau Claire,
UW-Whitewater,
UW-Milwaukee
Abstract:

The principal challenge for Latin American Studies (LAS) on comprehensive UW campuses is the limited opportunities for collaborative curricular work for a program whose strength, and contribution to student learning, is its interdisciplinary nature. This project convenes Latin American specialists from UW-Eau Claire (UWEC), UW-Whitewater (UWW) and UW-Milwaukee (UWM) in two workshops to share their expertise in order to re-conceptualize the "Introduction to Latin American Studies" course and, as a result, develop 18 new learning objects-based curricula for the course. Formatted for a Desire2Learn (D2L) course, the curricula will be shared by LAS instructors teaching this and other LAS courses 2005-2006 on the UWEC and UWW campuses. After a one-year assessment and revision period, the curricula will be made available to interested UW System instructors.

The project enhances student learning by designing enriched supplementary instructional materials that draw upon the research and teaching specializations of contributors, incorporating a breadth of disciplinary perspectives that individual instructors would otherwise find difficult to reproduce. Moreover, UWW and UWEC Learning and Technology consultants will participate throughout the project and ensure that the new curricula result in learning objects that are adaptable, focus on problem-centered, active learning approaches, employ varied learning styles, and build in assessment criteria.

Evaluation will rely on the results of student assessment, instructors' experiences during the year, and external professional evaluation. For the latter, the project will be presented at the North Central Council of Latin Americanists (NCCLA) and at campus workshops. These presentations will also constitute part of the early dissemination effort while the final project will be made public through announcements on the UWM Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) mailing list and NCCLA newsletter.

Grant documents
View Latin American Studies grant proposal

Integrating Technology-based Student Wellness Assessments into Health and Wellness Courses to Improve Student Learning and Application of Change Theory

Amount Awarded:
$5,876
Primary Investigator(s):
Raymond Reinertsen, UW-Superior,
John Munson, UW-Superior
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Superior,
UW-Stevens Point
Abstract:

This project proposes to expand the use of technology in the teaching of change theory to students in required health and wellness courses at UW-Superior and UW-Stevens Point. Each year one-quarter of the student population at UW-Superior —over 500 students—are enrolled in the Health and Wellness course, and the Healthy American course has a similar impact on the Stevens Point campus. Project participants will develop an interactive, computer-based learning tool to help students compare and analyze objective assessment data and self-reported assessment data from three technology-based wellness assessment tools: FitnessGram (objective physical wellness data), Testwell (self-assessment data), and the Bod Pod (body fat percentage). In addition, project participants will collaboratively develop technology-based teaching tools on change theory to be used in each of five units on dimensions of wellness: Social, Intellectual, Spiritual, Physical, and Emotional. These teaching tools will expand on and coordinate with the materials previously developed by the National Wellness Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and Testwell, their online wellness inventory. The teaching and learning tools will help students not only to learn about change theory as a concept, but also to apply, analyze, and synthesize change theory with real-world work and life experiences using their own and their classmates' wellness assessments. The computer-based data analysis tool and teaching tools developed through this project will serve to shift the health and wellness curriculum toward higher order thinking and personal engagement for UW-Superior's Health and Wellness course, UW-Steven's Point's Healthy American course, and other wellness courses in the UW system.

Grant documents
View Change Theory grant proposal

Arts Management D2L Course Development Project

Amount Awarded:
$47,650
Primary Investigator(s):
Ellen Rosewall, UW-Green Bay,
Megan Matthews, UW-Whitewater,
Tiffany Wilhelm, UW-Green Bay,
Debra Karp, UW-Parkside
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Green Bay,
UW-Whitewater,
UW-Stevens Point,
UW-Parkside
Abstract:

Arts management is a relatively new academic field which has undergraduate programs on four UW-System campuses: UW-Green Bay (program begun in 2000), UW-Parkside (program begun in 1998), UW-Whitewater (program begun in 1992) and UW-Stevens Point (program begun in 1988). Because of the rapid change and growth of the field, consistent teaching materials for undergraduate students do not exist. The four programs mentioned above, like others nationally, have taught arts management concepts and practices using a cobbled-together combination of online resources, articles and books more appropriate for use by professionals in the field. Faculty representatives from these four programs have been meeting for two years to develop joint programs, opportunities for students and academic standards.

Our rapidly changing field, the nature of available resources and our need to collaborate to provide the best opportunities for our students lends itself to the development of online resources. The need to keep materials current and relevant lends itself uniquely to a technology-driven format. We are requesting funding for the development of D2L course materials with distinct modules in various arts management topics and relevant supplementary materials, which could be used in whole or in part by all of us as well as being made available to other System schools who do not current have arts management programming. Our consistency in philosophy and Wisconsin's traditional leadership in the field of arts management give this project potential for national significance.

We propose to work collaboratively beginning in summer, 2005 and throughout the academic year to develop course materials, modules and technology. In the spring of 2006, material developed will be tested on students at a Student Summit at UW-Green Bay. The resulting evaluations will be used to complete the project by June, 2006. Thank you for your consideration of our request.

Grant documents
View Arts Management grant proposal | View Arts Management final report

Developing a D2L Resource Site and an Instruction Shell for Freshman Composition

Amount Awarded:
$34,000
Primary Investigator(s):
Chuck Rybak, UW Colleges,
Holly Hassel, UW Colleges,
Nancy Chick, UW Colleges,
Nerissa Nelson, UW-Stevens Point,
Brian Sutton, UW-Green Bay,
Sara Moellendorf, UW Colleges
Chris Williams, UW-Stevens Point
Involved Campus(es):
UW-Colleges (UW-Washington County, UW-Marathon County, UW-Barron County, and UW-Waukesha),
UW-Stevens Point,
UW-Green Bay
Abstract:

Arts management is a relatively new academic field which has undergraduate programs on four UW-System campuses: UW-Green Bay (program begun in 2000), UW-Parkside (program begun in 1998), UW-Whitewater (program begun in 1992) and UW-Stevens Point (program begun in 1988). Because of the rapid change and growth of the field, consistent teaching materials for undergraduate students do not exist. The four programs mentioned above, like others nationally, have taught arts management concepts and practices using a cobbled-together combination of online resources, articles and books more appropriate for use by professionals in the field. Faculty representatives from these four programs have been meeting for two years to develop joint programs, opportunities for students and academic standards. Our rapidly changing field, the nature of available resources and our need to collaborate to provide the best opportunities for our students lends itself to the development of online resources. The need to keep materials current and relevant lends itself uniquely to a technology-driven format. We are requesting funding for the development of D2L course materials with distinct modules in various arts management topics and relevant supplementary materials, which could be used in whole or in part by all of us as well as being made available to other System schools who do not current have arts management programming. Our consistency in philosophy and Wisconsin's traditional leadership in the field of arts management give this project potential for national significance. We propose to work collaboratively beginning in summer, 2005 and throughout the academic year to develop course materials, modules and technology. In the spring of 2006, material developed will be tested on students at a Student Summit at UW-Green Bay. The resulting evaluations will be used to complete the project by June, 2006. Thank you for your consideration of our request.

Grant documents
View Resource Site grant proposal

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