Board of Regents

Capital Planning and Budget Committee - June 2012

Minutes

Capital Planning and Budget Committee

Thursday, June 7, 2012

The Joint Meeting of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee and the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee and was called to order at 2:55 pm by Regent Michael Falbo in the Ballroom West of the Union on the UW-Milwaukee campus.  Regents Charles Pruitt, Gerald Whitburn, Jeffrey Bartell, Edmund Manydeeds, John Drew, Katherine Pointer, and Gary Roberts were in attendance.  Regents David Walsh and Mark Bradley were absent at the time of the roll but joined the meeting shortly thereafter.

I.3.a.    UW-Milwaukee Presentation:  Building a Better Wisconsin, Construction Underway and Beyond

Vice Chancellor Christy Brown spoke of the status of the Milwaukee Initiative by describing the portions already completed and the building projects that are now underway or soon to begin.  Ms. Brown stated that this initiative will provide more than 4,000 construction jobs as well as enable grown in research, which itself will lead to new private sector jobs in Wisconsin. 

The meeting of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee was reconvened at 3:20 p.m. by Regent Jeffrey Bartell in the Ballroom West of the Union on the UW-Milwaukee campus.  Committee members present were Regents Bartell, Manydeeds, John Drew, Katherine Pointer, Gary Roberts, and David Walsh.

I.3.b.   Approval of the Minutes of the April 12, 2012 Meeting of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee

Upon the motion of Regent Pointer and the second of Regent Manydeeds, the minutes of the April 12, 2012, meeting of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee were approved as presented. 

I.3.c.    UW Colleges:  UW-Fox Valley - Authority to Amend the Lease Agreement with Outagamie County and Winnebago County to Add Acreage and Building Improvements

This item requested authority to amend the UW-Fox Valley lease agreement with Outagamie County and Winnebago County to add approximately 1.975 acres and building improvements.

This request involves the permanent addition of approximately 1.975 acres and a 19,907 GSF building to the UW-Fox Valley lease between the Board of Regents and Outagamie and Winnebago Counties.  The property, which was purchased in 2008, is adjacent to the UW-Fox Valley campus and provides both valuable land and an industrial building that, after renovations and improvements, will result in a number of benefits for UW-Fox Valley.

The campus and its county sponsors have identified the need for additional facilities to serve the successful and growing collaborative bachelor’s degree in engineering program with UW-Platteville.  This new building, which was renovated in 2011-12, will house all activities of the engineering program and also provide limited instructional and meeting facilities for general campus use.  The building contains an electrical engineering lab, three mechanical engineering labs, a computer lab, four classrooms and ten offices that will serve the engineering program. 

Upon the motion of Regent Pointer and the second of Regent Walsh, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.c.

Resolution I.3.c.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to amend the UW-Fox Valley lease agreement with Outagamie County and Winnebago County to add approximately 1.975 acres and building improvements.

I.3.d.   UW-Madison:  Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the General Library System Storage Addition Project 

This item requested approval of the Design Report of the General Library System Storage Facility project and authority to construct the project at a total cost of $1,500,000 Gift Funds.

The project will construct a 10,260 ASF/10,580 GSF addition to the existing Materials Distribution Services (MDS) warehouse on Thousand Oaks Trail in Verona to provide storage space for campus libraries.  The concrete pre-cast addition will provide space for storage of up to 850,000 volumes of library materials in high density storage racks.  There will be no offices, restrooms, processing space, or entry/exits other than those required for emergencies.  The existing MDS loading dock will be utilized to move materials for this storage space and no new parking spaces will be created.  The addition will be tied into the existing utility system including the fire suppression system.

The shelving purchase and installation will be phased in over time via the General Library System (GLS) operating budget, beginning with capacity for approximately 500,000 volumes.  A Request for Proposals (RFP) process is being used to competitively bid and purchase the shelving. 

The Building Commission will be asked to waive state statute to allow for the use of a single prime bid for this project.  The waiver will allow for the construction of a pre-engineered addition to the existing “tilt-up” warehouse building, which was constructed so that it could be expanded as efficiently as possible as future needs warranted.  This bid type is consistent with industry practice for this type of building which will not require the level of construction typically involved for state facilities.  Approval of the waiver will also allow for a faster construction of the gift funded addition and allow the General Library System to vacate 29,000 square feet of library space for updated library services, study, and computer-enhanced learning space.  

Regent Bartell asked whether the single-prime delivery method to be requested would significantly impact a project of this size.  Associate Vice President David Miller responded that it would streamline the bidding and contracting period and simplify management of the project.  Mr. Miller added that the university initially requested a design-build delivery method for the project due to the simplicity of the structure and that this was an example of the type of project that could be easily delegated to the university in the future.

Upon the motion of Regent Walsh and the second of Regent Manydeeds, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.d.

Resolution I.3.d.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the General Library System Storage Facility project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total cost of $1,500,000 Gift Funds.

I.3.e.    UW-Madison:  Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Elizabeth Waters Renovation Project

This item requested approval of the Design Report and authority to construct the Elizabeth Waters Residence Hall Renovation project at a total estimated project cost of $7,100,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

This project involves selective renovations in Elizabeth Waters Hall, which is a 143,600 GSF building consisting of five connected vertical unit blocks which step down from the center on each side.  The living area is comprised of 242 double resident rooms, 21 single rooms, and a staff apartment for a total of 506 residents and staff.  The dining area is approximately 12,000 GSF and serves Elizabeth Waters residents, residents from other halls, and walk-in campus customers.  There are three main components to the project: renovation to the hall’s food service functions; renovations of mechanical systems and upgrades to building finishes; and reconstruction and landscaping of the north terrace and patio.

Renovation of the food service functions will include the replacement of the traditional serving line with a marketplace retail food service operation of a flexible design for future change.  The “back of house” areas will be renovated to support the marketplace workstations and equipment.  Mechanical units will be replaced as required to support the dining and marketplace areas.  The existing freight elevator will be replaced, and the existing seating areas will receive new finishes.

The systems and finishes portion of the renovation project includes the removal of building system heating systems in their entirety and the installation of a two-pipe hot water heating system to allow the resident rooms to utilize baseboard radiation controlled by wall mounted thermostats for space heating.  Asbestos floor tile in the resident rooms will be removed and replaced with vinyl composition tile or carpet.  Carpet will also be replaced in the hallways on all floor levels.  The lobby and common area spaces in the third unit will be air-conditioned.  The existing passenger elevator will be replaced with a new 4,000 pound stretcher compliant hydraulic elevator. 

The project will reconstruct and landscape the north terrace and patio behind the residence hall.  After a thorough review of the project budget, it was determined that including this work would exceed the authorized construction budget.  To keep the project within budget, a decision was made to reduce the amount of new kitchen equipment and to bid the north terrace/patio work as an alternate to be constructed if favorable bids are received.  

In response to a question from Regent Walsh, Mr. Miller explained that this project did not require an increase in room rates because the project’s debt service will be paid from revenue generated through the existing rate structure.

Upon the motion of Regent Drew and the second of Regent Pointer, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.e.

Resolution I.3.e.

       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System the Design Report of the Elizabeth Waters Residence Hall Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total estimated project cost of $7,100,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

I.3.f.    UW-Madison:  Authority to Trade Land with the City of Madison

This item requested authority to trade approximately 7,247 square feet of land with the city of Madison for a parcel of the same size, which is located in the city of Madison.  No funds will be exchanged between the two parties.

The property to be received is located immediately adjacent to land owned by the Board of Regents and managed by the College of Agricultural Sciences for the West Madison Agricultural Research Station.  The land trade includes providing the city with 7,247 square feet of university land to accommodate realignment of the city’s right-of-way and providing the university with an equal amount of land area from the former right-of-way. 

The city of Madison is currently developing plans to extend Elderberry Road near the West Madison Agricultural Research Station on the west side of Madison.  To bypass potential impacts to an historic burial site west of Pleasant View Road, the city requested a land trade with the Board of Regents.  The land trade does not benefit the university other than assuring that the university does not lose tillable land area during the process of the road extension. 

Upon the motion of Regent Pointer and the second of Manydeeds, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.f.

Resolution I.3.f.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to trade approximately 7,247 square feet of land with the city of Madison for a parcel of the same size, which is located in the city of Madison, Dane County. 

I.3.g.    UW Hospital and Clinics Authority:  Approval of the American Family Children’s Hospital Addition Project

This item requested authority to construct a two-story addition to the American Family Children’s Hospital, which is part of the Clinical Sciences Center on the UW-Madison campus, at a total cost of $28,000,000 ($20,000,000 Operating Revenue (non-state) and $8,000,000 Gift Funds).

This project will construct a two-story 64,300 GSF addition to the existing American Family Children’s Hospital, which is located at the western part of the existing Clinical Science Center.  The design and building materials will be identical to those used in the original construction and will reflect the west campus building standards.  The two new floors will include: (1) Eighth floor - a 12-bed Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a 14-bed Surgical Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and (2) Seventh floor - Shell space for a 28-bed Universal Care Unit to be constructed at a later date. 

The exterior of the new floors will match the existing exterior, and the interior layout of the new floors will closely resemble the existing patient floor plans.  The surgical neonatal intensive care unit will create a quiet and calming environment for the children who require surgical interventions during the first days of their lives. 

The UW Hospital and Clinics Authority (UWHCA ) has created a world-class children’s hospital that is dedicated to the care and treatment of children and their families.  Demand has exceeded the capacity of this 61-bed/crib hospital during the high admissions months of January to March.  During these times of high census, children must be boarded in the adult hospital, which does not provide the pediatric patient and patient’s family support that is provided in the American Family Children’s Hospital.  The projected occupancy will exceed the bed supply in all months by 2015.  This growth in bed demand has been driven by an increase in the number of pediatric emergency transports that bring patients from the surrounding region, and by the closure of one of the local pediatric intensive care units.

UWHCA used a competitive qualification-based selection process, similar to that used by the State of Wisconsin, for hiring the architect to design the project.  UWHCA determined that construction-manager-at-risk is the most advantageous delivery method to use for the construction of the project, therefore, the same type of selection process will be used to hire the construction manager for this addition. 

Regent Bartell asked for a clarification about the general scope of the UWHCA’s building authority.  Mr. Miller explained that as a public authority the UWHCA has the ability to issue revenue bonds, however the bond limit is approved by the state Legislature.  In addition, Miller added that the UWHCA has authority to undertake capital projects, however statutes require approval of the Board of Regents to construct new facilities.

Upon the motion of Regent Walsh and the second of Pointer, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.g.

Resolution I.3.g.

       That, upon the recommendation of the UW Hospital and Clinics Authority Board, authority be granted to construct a two-story addition to the American Family Children’s Hospital, which is part of the Clinical Sciences Center on the UW-Madison campus, at a total cost of $28,000,000 ($20,000,000 Operating Revenue (non-state) and $8,000,000 Gift Funds).

I.3.h.   UW-Milwaukee:  Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Northwest Quadrant Children’s Center Relocation Project

This item requested approval of the Design Report for the Northwest Quadrant (NWQ) Children’s Center Relocation project and authority to construct the project for a total estimated project cost of $11,981,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

The Northwest Quadrant (NWQ) Children’s Center Relocation project will renovate 38,220 ASF/54,980 GSF of existing space on the ground floor of Buildings C and D, and portions of the first floor of Building C of the Northwest Quadrant (previously known as the Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital property), with frontage on East Hartford Avenue and access from East Newport Avenue.  The new location at the NWQ will provide adequate space for the current program as well as allow for future growth of the center as the demand for its services increases.

The newly renovated space will provide a facility that can be licensed and accredited for a minimum of 294 children and can accommodate 356 enrolled children.  The space will contain classrooms, staff teaching and observation areas, and support spaces including indoor play areas, kitchen/laundry facilities, administrative offices, and staff areas.  Work will also include redevelopment of 25,280 GSF of existing parking areas as outdoor play space, site work, and landscaping.  The new location at the NWQ will provide adequate space for the current program as well as allow for future growth of the center as the demand for its services increases.

This project will also meet all the Department of State Facilities (DSF) sustainability requirements and it has been designed with the goal of securing a US Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) rating of Gold, with the intention of receiving a minimum of Silver. 

Regent Roberts asked for an explanation of the revenue sources that support the operations and construction of this project.  Associate Vice Chancellor Geoff Hurtado explained that funding would be provided from operations revenue, reserve funds accrued in Fund 128, and student segregated fees.

Upon the motion of Regent Drew and the second of Regent Walsh, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.h.

Resolution I.3.h.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report for the Northwest Quadrant Children’s Center Relocation project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project for a total estimated project cost of $11,981,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

I.3.i.     UW-Milwaukee:  Authority to Enter into a Lease of Space to Support the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the College of Health Sciences

This item requested approval for the Department of Administration to enter into a new lease of

23,713 gross square feet at the Innovation Accelerator Building on behalf of UW-Milwaukee

The Innovation Accelerator Building at Innovation Park is a first step for UW-Milwaukee to expand and strengthen research and development with regional partners.  Details of the lease terms can be found in the request document.

This lease will accomplish the creation of 23,713 GSF research development space together with the land, buildings, improvements, and parking to support the College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS), and the College of Health Sciences.  UWM Real Estate Foundation, Inc. secured a grant from the Economic Development Administration to provide the initial research development space at Innovation Park.  It provides space for UW-Milwaukee’s Research Growth Initiative, building on collaborations such as the UW-Milwaukee – Medical College of Wisconsin relationship. 

Innovation Park provides an ideal site for research facilities, being located near Wisconsin’s largest academic health cluster that includes the Blood Center of Wisconsin, the Blood Research Institute, the Medical College of Wisconsin, Children’s Hospital and Health System, Curative Care Network, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division, GE Healthcare, and the Milwaukee County Research Park.

The space at the Innovation Accelerator Building will be designated for development and consolidation of the proof of concept prototypes.  It allows investors to review and undertake due diligence and to undertake work related to the patenting process – such as broadening and demonstrating experimental applications.  Development will be accelerated.  Investors will identify with the separation of development and research, and the new investment will be incentive for new jobs.  

In response to a question, Mr. Miller explained that the lease rate is “at cost” to the UWM Real Estate Foundation and is not actually paying for the building, but only cover actual operating expenses. 

Upon the motion of Regent Roberts and the second of Regent Pointer, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.i.

Resolution I.3.i.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to enter into a new lease of 23,713 gross square feet of space at the Innovation Accelerator Building on behalf of

UW-Milwaukee.

I.3.j.    UW-Milwaukee:  Authority to Enter into a Lease of Space to Support the Division of Academic Affairs and Research

This item requested approval for the Department of Administration to enter into a new lease of the Cozzens-Cudahy Research Center premises including the building of approximately 18,000 gross square feet, together with the land, and all other buildings, improvements, and appurtenances on behalf of the UW-Milwaukee Division of Academic Affairs and Research. Rent payments will be provided from the UW-Milwaukee 150 Research Funds.  Details of the lease terms can be found in the request document.

This is continuation of an existing lease transferring to a new owner.  It also expands the research space from 3,300 to 18,000 GSF, the entire building.  The lease space has ranged from 3,300 to 9,900 GSF over the past ten years.

The Cozzens-Cudahy Research Center was donated to the UWM Real Estate Foundation (REF) in 2011.  UW-Milwaukee is continuing research operations in the building under a License Agreement until a new lease is completed.  The Endeavors Group, LLC and UW-Milwaukee entered into a lease dated August 27, 2001, as amended by a First Amendment for certain premises within the building, which is located at 8803 West Fairy Chasm Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and commonly known as the Cozzens – Cudahy Research Center.  The Building was conveyed to UWM REF by the Endeavors Group and the lease was assigned to UWM REF pursuant to an Assignment of Lease, which was dated November 15, 2011. 

The continuation of this lease will allow the College of Engineering and Applied Science to continue research work without disruption in optical imaging, biophotonics, and biomedical instrumentations.  This lease will expand the space by providing additional space to support robust and diverse research opportunities.

Mr. Miller explained that the annual management fee will be paid to the UWM Real Estate Foundation to cover administrative costs.

Upon the motion of Regent Roberts and the second of Regent Manydeeds, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.j.

Resolution I.3.j.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to enter into a new lease of the Cozzens-Cudahy Research Center premises including the building of approximately 18,000 gross square feet, together with the land, and all other buildings, improvements, and appurtenances on behalf of the UW-Milwaukee Division of Academic Affairs and Research.

I.3.k.   UW-Milwaukee:  Approval of the Design Report for the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex-Phase I Project and Authority to Construct the Project

This item requested approval of the Design Report for the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)-Phase I project and authority to: ( a) increase the scope and budget by $5,000,000 Agency Cash and (b) construct the project at an estimated total project cost of $80,010,000 ($43,330,000 2011-13 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $1,600,000 Gift/Grant Funds, and $5,000,000 Agency Cash for a total of $49,930,000 in 2011-13, and $30,080,000 2013-15 General Fund Supported Borrowing, available July 1, 2013).

The Kenwood IRC-Phase I project will construct a five story building plus basement and penthouse, of approximately 82,800 ASF/152,700 GSF in two locations.  The first location will construct a new building, approximately 76,000 ASF/143,500 GSF, of research labs and core facilities, instructional and collaboration space, and office and support space, with the Physics Department as the primary occupant.  This project will begin to address the existing deficit of lab space of approximately 240,000 ASF that was identified in the 2010 campus master plan.

This will be the initial phase of a multi-phase major redevelopment on the southwest precinct of campus that will address the acute need for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) facilities at UW-Milwaukee.  The first phase will target the most urgently needed academic and core research needs.  The project will physically connect to adjacent Lapham Hall, home to the Biology Department and the campus central vivarium facility.  The inclusion of various branches of sciences as occupants and collaborators is a prime goal of this facility.  The fifth floor will house offices and laboratories for the Zilber School of Public Health.

Future phases of the complex will include additional new buildings to accommodate current unmet space needs, core facilities, and anticipated growth; ultimately, it is anticipated that the overall complex will contain nearly 500,000 gross square feet.  Future construction will require the demolition of the Kunkle Center and the Physics building, which are obsolete.

Regent Bartell asked whether the funding in 2013-15 needed to complete the project was guaranteed.  Mr. Miller commented that strategic budgeting for this project allows for the spread of funding over two biennia and the project will be phased to use available funding.  While it is technically possible that the Legislature and Governor could rescind the 2013-15 bonding already authorized in state statute for this project such an event is highly unlikely and has never occurred. 

Regent Roberts asked about the source of funding for the additional $5 million to build out space.  UWM School of Public Health Magda Peck responded that existing grant reserves would be reduced in the expectation that greater grants would be leveraged in the future with the completed space through opportunities to win sponsored research.

Regent Roberts asked whether there was a plan to cover the increased operating costs?  Mr. Hurtado stated that the operations would have to be absorbed within the existing operating budget.  Regent Roberts pointed out that was an unsustainable model and suggested that campuses should develop more specific operational plans.

Upon the motion of Regent Drew and the second of Regent Walsh, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.k.

Resolution I.3.k.

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report for the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)-Phase I project be approved and authority be granted to: ( a) increase the scope and budget by $5,000,000 Agency Cash and (b) construct the project at an estimated total project cost of $80,010,000 ($43,330,000 2011-13 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $1,600,000 Gift/Grant Funds, and $5,000,000 Agency Cash for a total of $49,930,000 in 2011-13, and $30,080,000 2013-15 General Fund Supported Borrowing, available July 1, 2013).

I.3.l.     UW System:  Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

This item requested authority to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $14,287,800 ($4,880,750 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $6,950,600 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $1,932,550 Program Revenue Cash, and $523,900 Gift/Grant Funds). 

Energy Conservation

COL - UW-Baraboo/Sauk County Multi-Building Energy Conservation ($1,432,000):  This project implements energy conservation measures (ECMs) based on a recently completed comprehensive investment grade energy audit for four buildings.  Six ECMs will be implemented throughout four buildings and 154,710 GSF (Aural M. Umhoefer Administration/Classroom Building, Fine and Performing Arts Center, Lange Student Center & Athletic Facility, and the TN Savides Library Building).

Project work includes interior lighting upgrades, building envelope improvements, new computer power management and vending machine controls, installation of a new hybrid geothermal system, and HVAC system controls retrofits.  This project will assist UW-Baraboo in complying with the energy reduction goals stipulated in Executive Order 145.

PLT - Multi-Building Energy Conservation, Phase 2 ($3,646,500):  This project implements energy conservation measures (ECMs) based on a recently completed comprehensive investment grade energy audit in eleven buildings and ~650,000 GSF of academic, support and residence life facilities. This project includes the implementation of specific ECMs throughout the Ag Tech Center, Art Building, Central Heating Plant, Children's Center, Doudna Hall, Glenview Commons, Pioneer Tower, Southwest Hall, Ullrich Hall, and Ullsvik Hall and some overall general measures.

Project work includes upgrading interior and exterior lighting; installing new vending machine controls, new occupancy sensors for the operation of HVAC systems, new automated pool cover, and new meters connected to the main campus dashboard; rebalancing and tuning up the HVAC systems, and eliminating rationalized printers and installing new printer management software.  This project will assist UW-Platteville in complying with the energy reduction goals stipulated in Executive Order 145.

 

Health, Safety, and Environmental Protection Requests

RVF - Johnson Hall Fire Sprinkler System Retrofit and Basement Remodeling ($929,000):  This project installs a new fire sprinkler system to enhance building life safety and partially renovates basement space to meet program need.  Fire sprinkler system retrofit work includes installing a wet pipe, automatic fire sprinkler system throughout the residence hall.  Fire sprinkler heads will be located to provide total facility coverage per NFPA 13 Fire Sprinkler Code requirements.  Floors will be core drilled to accommodate piping, a new fire pump will be installed if required, and the 4-inch water service will be replaced with a new 8-inch water service.  Basement remodeling work includes remodeling ~5,800 SF in the basement level to provide a mechanical equipment room (984 SF), storage room (446 SF), multi-purpose activity room (3,224 SF), conference room (363 SF), vending area and kitchenette (163 SF), men’s and women’s restrooms (540 SF), and a custodial closet (71 SF).  Partition walls, ceiling and wall finishes, and flooring will be replaced.  Modifications to the mechanical, electrical and telecommunications, and plumbing systems will be made to accommodate the new space configuration.

Utilities Repair and Renovation Requests

GBY - North Leon Bond Drive Reconstruction ($245,000):  This project reconstructs North Leon Bond Drive to repair damaged pavement, improve storm water management, and resolve safety concerns for pedestrians and bicyclists.  This project completes road renovations for the eastern and southern portions of campus.

Approximately 1,000 LF of 20-foot wide, 5-inch asphalt roadway will be replaced between the intersection at Campus Court and the intersection at Walter Way.  A new 5-foot wide asphalt pedestrian walkway and bike path will be constructed along this same section of roadway with a connection to an existing pedestrian walkway. 

MIL - Spaights Plaza Water Main Replacement ($397,000):  This project replaces a section of the domestic water underground distribution system piping.  Project work includes replacing ~250 LF of 10-inch direct buried domestic water main in the northern end of Spaights Plaza.  This section connects the water main from Maryland Avenue to the water main from Downer Avenue, which feeds the south-east quadrant of the campus.

OSH - Central Plant Cooling Towers Replacement ($1,438,000):  This project replaces the cooling towers serving two 1,400-ton electrical centrifugal chillers located at the campus Central Chiller Plant to ensure that both chillers can be operated at their full rated capacity and provide adequate campus chilled water system capacity to serve the campus load.  Project work includes replacement of four cooling tower cells with two double-cell induced draft counter-flow cooling towers to serve the two 1,400-ton chillers. 

OSH - Kolf Physical Education Center/Reeve Memorial Union Pedestrian Mall and Parking Lot Redevelopment ($1,310,800):  This project constructs a new pedestrian mall between the Kolf Physical Education Center and Reeve Memorial Union, redevelops the adjacent parking lots to accommodate the new pedestrian pathway, redesigns and reconstruct an 84-stall expansion to Parking Lot 7A, and constructs a new vehicular link between Parking Lot 7A and Parking Lot 13.  Parking Lots 15 and 32 will be redeveloped to accommodate the new pedestrian mall extension. 

OSH - Pits A9c to H7 Steam Conduit Relocation ($1,591,000):  This project relocates a concrete box conduit containing steam and condensate return lines which serve as a backup steam loop to all buildings on the southern portion of the UW-Oshkosh campus.  This will eliminate a steam conduit ground water flooding issue and allow this line to be returned to service.

PKS - Utility Tunnel Renovation and Repair ($2,877,000):  This project repairs the underground poured concrete utility tunnel structure; primary and signal vault roofs; utility tunnel vent assemblies; and utility piping, anchors, supports, and insulation to resolve groundwater infiltration issues and correct the damage already incurred.  Project work includes repairing leaks at the tunnel entrances and the enclosure, spalled concrete enclosure surfaces, high-pressure steam and condensate and chilled water piping supports, and piping insulation and protective coatings.

STP - Treehaven Domestic Water System Replacement ($421,500):  This project replaces the site domestic water system at the Treehaven Field Station to resolve chemical and mineral contamination in the current system.  The water supply wells, distribution system, and enclosure facility will all be replaced.  Project work includes installing a new 8-inch diameter domestic water well at a depth of 125 to 150 feet within a 12-inch casing along with new distribution mains to connect to the current system.  A new enclosure facility will be constructed to house the new water supply system, chemical feed equipment, and future pressure filter equipment.  Chemical feed equipment injecting blended phosphate at the well discharge will include a liquid chemical pump and storage container.  The 440 GSF enclosure facility will be constructed with a removable roof section for installation of well equipment and future pressure filtration equipment.  The project will also replace a failed 3,000-gallon pressure storage tank. 

Mr. Miller stated that investment grade audits are completed prior to contracting for energy conservation projects to justify the authenticity of the payback models.

Upon the motion of Regent Drew and the second of Regent Roberts, the Committee approved Resolution I.3.l.

Resolution I.3.l.

That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System,

authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $14,287,800 ($4,880,750 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $6,950,600 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $1,932,550 Program Revenue Cash, and $523,900 Gift/Grant Funds). 

I.3.m.  Report of the Associate Vice President

Associate Vice President David Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $129M for projects at its April meeting.  The funding for those projects is comprised of approximately $74M General Fund Supported Borrowing, $19M Program Revenue, and $36M Gift Funds.

I.3.n.   Closed session for purposes of considering personal histories, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats., related to the naming of facilities at UW-Madison and
UW-Whitewater

Upon the motion of Regent Pointer and the second of Regent Roberts, the Capital Planning and Budget Committee adjourned to closed session at 4:05p.m.  Present were Regents Bartell, Manydeeds, Pointer, Roberts, and Walsh.  Regent Drew was absent.

The closed session concluded at 4:15 p.m., at which time the meeting was adjourned.