Board of Regents

Education Committee Minutes - February 2011

MINUTES

EDUCATION COMMITTEE, BOARD OF REGENTS

1820 Van Hise Hall

Madison, Wisconsin

February 10, 2011

Regent Crain convened the meeting of the Education Committee at 1:15 p.m.  Regents Crain, Davis, Evers, and Vasquez were present.  Regent Crain noted that Regent Schwalenberg was no longer a member of the Board of Regents. 

1.      Consent Agenda

Regent Crain announced that the minutes from the December 9, 2010, meeting would be brought to the next meeting of the Education Committee for approval.  She then moved adoption of the following resolution as a consent agenda item: 

Resolution I.1.a.(2), authorizing implementation of the M.F.A. in Design at UW-Stout. 

The motion was seconded by Regent Evers and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

2.      Charter School Authorizations and Renewals

The Education Committee discussed proposals to approve three charter school contract extensions and two new charter contracts by UW-Milwaukee and UW-Parkside.  Dr. Bob Kattman, Director of the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools, and Dr. Paul Haubrich, Director of the UW-Parkside Charter School Office, presented the contracts to the Education Committee. 

a.       UW-Milwaukee:  Renewal of Seeds of Health Elementary School Charter

Dr. Kattman first presented the Seeds of Health Elementary School Charter for renewal, stating that the school had the highest satisfaction rate by parents of any UW-Milwaukee charter school.  It served a student population that was 90% Latino and 98% low-income.  Academic performance results indicated that 95% of the students were advanced in social studies and 78% were advanced in math.  It was financially stable and Dr. Kattman recommended the full five-year renewal.

Regent Davis requested that the results of the MAP exam, measuring “value added growth assessment,” be provided to Regents for all UW-Milwaukee charter schools and Dr. Kattman agreed to provide that.  Regent Davis also asked questions about the diversity of Seeds of Health teachers and suggested looking at the practice of other schools to improve diversity.

I.1.b.(1):  It was moved by Regent Vasquez, seconded by Regent Davis, that, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with the Seeds of Health, Inc., together with the amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the Seeds of Health Elementary School.

The resolution PASSED unanimously.

b.      UW-Milwaukee:  Renewal of Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park Campus Charter

The second charter school presented by Dr. Kattman was the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park, serving a student population that was 99% African-American and 82% low-income.  The school exceeded the state average in reading, math, and social studies.  There was a high level of satisfaction with the school it was financially secure.

Regent Evers thanked the representatives from Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park for their good work and asked how well students did in high school and college.  He was informed that 75% went on to college and 60% graduated from college.

I.1.b.(2):  It was moved by Regent Vasquez, seconded by Regent Davis, that, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with the M. C. Preparatroy School, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park.

The resolution PASSED unanimously.

c.       UW-Milwaukee:  Authorization of Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights Charter

The third charter school presented Dr. Kattman was the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Height.  The Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights had originally been planned as a replication of the Milwaukee College Prep-Metcalfe Park; subsequent planning determined that it would work to address the educational needs of its students more effectively as an independent school.  Composed of two buildings, the school would be structured to separate students by sex.  While the school administrators believed that the research provided evidence of the success of single-sex schools, Regent Evers noted that the research was not so clear.

I.1.b.(3):  It was moved by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Vasquez, that, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the charter school contract with the M. C. Preparatory School, Inc., establishing a charter school known as the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights, effective July 1, 2011.

The resolution PASSED unanimously.

d.      UW-Milwaukee:  Authorization of Milwaukee Scholars Charter School

The fourth charter school presented by Dr. Kattman was the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School.  This charter school would be run by a for-profit organization, the National Heritage Academy.  Dr. Kattman explained that the National Heritage Academy had a strong record of success nationally, having opened 68 schools in cities such as Detroit, Atlanta and Brooklyn, only one of which had not had its charter renewed.  He recommended a five-year contract.

Regents raised a number of questions about the contract with the National Heritage Academy.  Regent Evers was particularly concerned with the lack of local control.  Dr. Kattman assured the Regents that the National Heritage Academy had a good record of success.  Regent Davis asked about the diversity of the staff and was informed that the National Heritage Academy had an excellent record of diverse principles and deans.  While teaching staff were diverse, they were not where they wanted to be.

I.1.b.(4):  It was moved by Regent Vasquez, seconded by Regent Davis, that, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the charter school contract with the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School, Inc., establishing a charter school known as the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School, effective July 1, 2011.

The resolution PASSED with Regent Evers opposed.

Regent Crain observed that Dr. Kattman was retiring in June and would introduce his replacement and share his thoughts on charter schools with the Education Committee at the June meeting.

e.       UW-Parkside:  Renewal of 21st Century Preparatory School Charter

Dr. Paul Haubrich, Director of the UW-Parkside Charter School Office, then brought for approval the renewal of UW-Parkside’s one charter school, the 21st Century Preparatory School.  The charter application for the 21st Century School included an expectation that the academic performance of African American students would exceed that of their peers attending schools in the Racine Unified School District.

Dr. Haubrich reported that the school was making good progress towards that goal and the results for the school’s eighth-grade African-American students were especially impressive.  Fiscal management was exceptional.  Discussion also focused on past discipline issues.  Dr. Haubrich noted the importance of leadership stability in addressing this and other issues.

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin noted that the Board of Regents meeting in which the school was first authorized had been her first board meeting as Provost at UW-Parkside.  She commended the leadership of the Board, UW-Parkside, and the school for the improvements in test scores and overall strength of the school.

I.1.b.(5):  It was moved by Regent Vasquez, seconded by Regent Davis, that, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with Racine Charter One, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the 21st Century Preparatory School.

The resolution PASSED unanimously.

3.      Presentation of Precollege Programs

The Education Committee next heard a presentation on precollege programs, one of the priority areas identified by the Education Committee for this year.  The presentation focused on precollege programs for multicultural and disadvantaged students, which represented a very small slice of the hundreds of precollege programs operating at UW System institutions for middle and high school students. 

Associate Vice President Vicki Washington delineated the different kinds of precollege programs for multicultural and disadvantaged students, reminding the Committee that different programs served different purposes, including:  summer camps designed to develop aspiration; extensive year-round programs intended to improve preparation and achievement in high school; and bridge programs designed to ease the transition from secondary to post-secondary education.  Ms. Washington described some of the professional development her office was providing to campus personnel responsible for precollege programming, especially around program evaluation.  Of particular interest to the Committee was the use of the Logic Model, a tool used to improve precollege program development, planning, implementation, and assessment.

The Education Committee then heard from Ruby Paredes, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Climate, who discussed some of UW-Madison’s precollege programming, focusing in particular on the PEOPLE program.  The PEOPLE program had grown from 66 students when it began in 1999, to over 1600 students today.

Barbara Stewart, Associate Dean for Campus Climate and Diversity, and Kate Oganowski, Program Coordinator of Precollege Programs, from UW-La Crosse, then described the overall organization of their campus’s work on a variety of precollege programs, as well as successes and challenges.  The use of college students as mentors in precollege programs had had a positive impact on the retention of these students.  Both UW-Madison and UW-La Crosse increasingly viewed their precollege programming as an integral part of their Inclusive Excellence work.

Senior Vice President Martin noted the work that had been going on with assessment of UW precollege programs.  It was very important to know how many precollege students reached higher education.  UW System Administration had been building assessment expertise to share with campuses.

 Regents asked questions about outreach to charter schools, programs for future teachers, and the diversity of staff.  Dr. Martin noted the importance of these programs for the More Graduates and Closing the Achievement Gap initiatives.  Ms. Washington also noted that there were many more students than funding available to serve them.

4.      Report of the Senior Vice President

a.       Inclusive Excellence at the Institutions:  UW-La Crosse

As part of a regular feature of the Education Committee, UW-La Crosse Provost Kathleen Enz Finken described her campus’s Inclusive Excellence work.  Provost Enz Finken provided an overview of the set of comprehensive strategies and actions being undertaken to make Inclusive Excellence a guiding framework for the campus.  This was a multi-phase process and UW-La Crosse had identified specific goals, actions to reach those goals, and measures by which to determine if they were being met appropriately.  

Provost Enz Finken noted the importance of having Inclusive Excellence in front of people on a regular basis.  UW-La Crosse had also developed an online registry of what different units were doing and was conducting student exit surveys and surveys of faculty and staff to determine employee satisfaction.  The Education Committee was impressed with the presentation and asked about student involvement in the process.  Ms. Stewart noted that students were involved and they hoped to have more student involvement during the summer.

b.      Update on Four-Year Degree Completion

The Senior Vice President’s Report also included an update on the ways in which campuses were being more intentional in helping students complete their undergraduate degrees in four years. 

The Committee heard from Duane Ford, Dean of the College of Business, Industry, Life Science and Agriculture at UW-Platteville.  He described what was being done there to make the four-year pathway clearer to students, primarily by making available more extensive web materials as students explored and chose majors. 

Dr. Ford also shared with the Committee four-year and six-year graduations rates for UW-Platteville, which underscored the need to help students complete their undergraduate degrees more expeditiously.  Dr. Ford stressed the importance of building cultural interest among faculty for a four-year degree.  At the same time, he noted that students might be undecided on majors and interested in other activities.

Other Provosts noted that issues such as students placed on probation and students exploring academic areas impacted time-to-degree, while noting that there was a culture of five- or six-year degrees at their campuses.  The Provosts also noted that they were working on mapping out four-year degree plans for most majors on campuses.

Senior Vice President Martin noted that the March Board of Regents meeting would include a presentation on preparing quality teachers for more diverse learning environments, featuring Professor Gloria Ladson-Billings from UW-Madison and a panel of three responders.  In addition, the March meeting would also include the Growth Agenda Showcase, a poster session of projects funded by the UW System to move forward on the Growth Agenda.  The April Board meeting would include transfer policies and data, the Wisconsin Transfer Equity Study, and a review of Board policies related to the Education Committee.

5.      Full Board Consent Agenda

Resolutions I.1.a.(2), I.1.b.(1), I.1.b.(2), and I.1.b.(3), and I.1.b.(5) were referred to the consent agenda of the full Board of Regents at its Friday, February 11, 2011, meeting.  It was agreed that Resolution I.1.b.(4) would be brought separately before the full Board.

The meeting adjourned at 4:40 p.m.

Respectfully Submitted,
Bob Jokisch, Acting Secretary, Education Committee