Board of Regents

Minutes of the April, 2012 Board of Regents meeting

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Great Room
Yellowjacket Union
University of Wisconsin-Superior
Superior, Wisconsin

Thursday, April 12, 2012
9:00 a.m.

PRESIDENTS’ GREETING
UW-SUPERIOR RESENTATION BY CHANCELLOR RENÉE WACHTER: “SUPERIOR RESEARCH”
Lake Superior Research Institute
Research
Education
Outreach
Facilities
Logistics Research
Education and Advisory Services
Maritime Research
Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve
Regent Discussion
2013-15 BIENNIAL BUDGET PRIORITIES
More Graduates
More Jobs
Stronger Communities
Access and Affordability
Quality
Performance
RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR UW-EAU CLAIRE CHANCELLOR BRIAN LEVIN-STANKEVICH
Resolution of Appreciation for Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Great Room
Yellowjacket Union
University of Wisconsin-Superior
Superior, Wisconsin

Thursday, April 12, 2012
9:00 a.m.

-President Spector Presiding-

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Tony Evers, Michael Falbo, Tim Higgins, Edmund Manydeeds, Katherine Pointer, Gary Roberts, Troy Sherven, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Mark Tyler, José Vásquez and David Walsh, with Regent Gerald Whitburn attending the afternoon session

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents John Drew and Charles Pruitt

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PRESIDENTS’ GREETING

            President Spector greeted Regents and all attendees and welcomed them to Superior.  He thanked Chancellor Wachter and the many others at UW-Superior for their great hospitality and warm welcome. He recalled that he had been a mid-year commencement speaker at UW-Superior in December 2007, when the low temperature was 18 degrees below zero.  He said he was entertained at that time by then-Chancellor Erlenbach and Dr. Nick Sloboda, in both Superior and Duluth, and had a great time; he was pleased to be back at UW-Superior.   

            President Spector called upon President Reilly, who acknowledged new UW-Milwaukee Provost and Vice Chancellor Johannes Britz, who had previously held his new position on an interim basis.

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UW-SUPERIOR RESENTATION BY CHANCELLOR RENÉE WACHTER: “SUPERIOR RESEARCH”

                        President Spector turned to Chancellor Renée Wachter to make a presentation on behalf of the host campus.  On behalf of the faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends of the University, Chancellor Wachter welcomed the Board to Superior and the University of Wisconsin-Superior.  She said that UW-Superior was pleased to be able to show that the investment in the citizens of northern Wisconsin has resulted in an institution that is rich in programs, people, and places. 

            Chancellor Wachter said that the university had evolved quite dramatically since its opening as a normal school, especially and most recently with the move to its designation as a liberal arts institution.  The morning’s presentation would be a celebration of the core mission of the institution and how it is leveraged for Partnerships for Progress. 

            The chancellor observed that the university should be a seamless member of its community, and mentioned several examples, including the work of the Small Business Development Center with emerging and existing businesses, theater and music productions which occur throughout the year, summer camps, and student  athletes’ contributions to the community. 

            The chancellor introduced a short video presentation, prepared with the help of some of UW-Superior’s regional allies, which presented an overview of the roots of UW-Superior and its significance to northland citizens and its students.  Following the video, she thanked Brett Notbohm, the lead faculty member in Digital Cinema; Jacob Swanson, one of his former students; and Al Miller, of the Public Relations Department, for their work with UW-Superior’s partners to produce the video.

            Chancellor Wachter emphasized the creation of centers of research, through which UW-Superior was harnessing intellectual assets to solve real problems, whether tackling invasive species, assessing levels of mercury in fish, or converting ships to clean energy such as liquid natural gas.  Excluding UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee, she said, the university leads the comprehensives in the acquisition of federal research and grant dollars to the tune of $3.5 million in 2011.  At UW-Superior the Centers also provide tremendous opportunities for students to engage in the scientific method firsthand.  Chancellor Wachter said that she had invited a respresentative of each of the Centers to talk about their work. 

Lake Superior Research Institute

            The Chancellor first introduced Dr. Mary Balcer, a professor and Director of the Lake Superior Research Institute, which was created in 1967 and formally recognized by the Board of Regents in 1969.  Dr. Balcer said that she joined the university in 1973 as an undergraduate and gained very valuable experience that helped shape her career.

            The Institute was originally formed by a group of geologists, chemists and biologists who were concerned about the Lake Superior region.  They worked on grants, hired students in the summer, and eventually hired academic staff year round; the Lake Superior Research Institute currently employs 20 full-time research staff and 10 to 15 students on projects throughout the year.  The Institute relies completely on soft money, averaging more than $1.5 million in research grants over the past five years.

            The mission of the Lake Superior Research Institute is three-pronged, focusing on environmental research, especially applied research that helps solve problems of the local area; continuing environmental education to help produce scientists of the future; and outreach to allow user groups to take more of an ownership of problems themselves.

Research

            Some work is focused on the needs of the region.  She provided an example related to the easily-erodable red clay soils of the region, which can clog the gills of fish and affect other organisms in and near the lake.  The Institute is working with the county and other landowner groups to try to revegitate the local areas and prevent erosion.  Another example is restoration of areas that were contaminated in the past by industry.  The Institute’s studies have found that many of the sediments in the Duluth/Superior Harbor and in Ashland Harbor were contaminated and would cause harm to living organisms.  The Institute has worked with regulatory agencies to help remediate these areas and remove the sediments or cap them so they will no longer be available for exposure to the organisms.

            Other work involves tests, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency, of new chemicals that will be used by industry to find out whether they will be a toxic to aquatic life.  This work has resulted in three published manuals discussing the affects of various chemicals on aquatic life, and the results of this work are used internationally to help set discharge standards for the chemicals.  Another partnership involves work with the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission and Native American tribes to monitor the concentration of mercury in the fish that are a large portion of the diet of our Native American tribes.  Students help extract mercury from fish, determine the contamination levels, and disseminate these results to the tribes. 

            Environmental monitoring has been a mainstay of the Lake Superior Research Institute for many years.  By looking at the aquatic organisms that inhabit our areas, subtle changes in the environment can be identified before the problem impacts humans. The Department of Natural Resources employs UW-Superior scientists to monitor lakes and streams throughout the state of Wisconsin.  The Environmental Protection Agency hired the UW-Superior lab from 2001 to 2006 to help conduct monitoring studies of all five Great Lakes.   Current funding includes funds from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to continue monitoring 71 wetlands, streams and marshes along the Wisconsin shoreline of Lake Superior, to look at the effects of land use on the region’s water quality of the region.  This is in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, which will be using the data to help restore fish and wildlife communities in the region. 

            Some monitoring efforts have discovered that the major port of Duluth/Superior is receiving more visitors in the form of aquatic invasive species.  Small aquatic organisms coming into the Great Lakes in ballast water from other parts of the U.S. and the world can become established and start affecting the Great Lakes food chain and the environment.  Dr. Balcer said that UW-Superior had recently become a partner in an initiative based in Washington D.C., designed to help solve the problems of transport of aquatic invasive species.  She described the testing that would occur and treatment systems that would be installed in vessels coming into the Great Lakes. 

Education

            Another mission of the Lake Superior Research Institute is education.  The Institute had partnered with the Superior School District for many years, running a series of teacher workshops which help teachers develop an environmental curriculum.  Dr. Balcer said that the Institute had also for many years brought 4th-, 5th- and 6th-grade students out onto local lakes and rivers aboard its research vessel to see firsthand what scientists do and why water quality is important.  The institute also offers educational programs for university students, to provide them with hands-on research experience. 

Outreach

            Dr. Balcer said that research findings are disseminated through workshops, publications and working with the community.  A variety of programs with community leaders help them appreciate the fragile nature of the Lake Superior ecosystem.  UW-Superior currently employs the Douglas County Invasive Species Coordinator, who is working with lake owners and lake groups to let them know about the problems of invasive species.  Other efforts include encouraging citizens to be involved in monitoring their own lakes and streams. 

Facilities

            Dr. Balcer said that the Institute’s research space is on campus, which allows scientists to be actively involved with students.  She described recent remodeling and retrofitting, which had been beneficial, and indicated that the hope is always to expand and to keep working with more students.  She also noted that of the 20 staff currently employed at the Lake Superior Research Institute, more than 60 percent are former UWS graduates.  Many have gone on to earn master’s and doctorate degrees and have returned to the region to stay involved in helping to solve environmental problems facing the area.
Transportation and Logistics Research Center and the Great Lakes Maritime Research Institute

Logistics Research

            Chancellor Wachter next introduced the Transportation and Logistics Research Center (TLRC) and the Great Lakes Maritime Research Institute (GLMRI).  She said that, led by Dr. Richard Stewart, the internationally recognized TLRC and GLMRI, play vital roles in the economic well-being of the region. 
            Dr. Stewart spoke of the team effort involved in making the work a success.  He also stressed that the work is viewed as a global endeavor.  He said that although he had been asked to discuss 12 years of research, the brief time available would allow him only to provide a flavor of what had been done.  The applied research being conducted involves work with academia, industry, government, and non-government agencies.  Also, five modes of transportation are included -- highway, air, rail and marine, as well as pipeline; one of the largest pipelines in the United States terminates at Superior, which has the only refinery in the state of Wisconsin. 

            Logistics and supply chain management has always been a core component of the TLRC.  Dr. Stewart introduced a short video that described what logistics is and how pervasive it is.  He then drew attention to two of many studies, a partnership with a number of universities related to tracking and routing log truck movements in northern Wisconsin and northern Michigan, and another related to bio-mass movement studies in the state of Michigan regarding how to improve transportation to reduce greenhouse effects.

            Undergraduate research is a key component.  Students help in the research and publish and present papers.  Dr. Stewart provided an example of an unfunded research project that was done pro bono because it addressed an identified need.  The research showed that a ship moving from Shanghai to Prince Rupert in Canada, as compared with going into Long Beach/Los Angeles, could carry 60,000 more containers in a year, a 34% increase in asset utilization.  A review of the landside supply-chain routes further found that cargo coming through Prince Rupert to Minneapolis could be delivered 100 hours quicker than coming through Long Beach and Chicago to Minneapolis.  Analysis of a hypothetical container terminal in the Twin Ports showed that another 21 hours could be saved. 

Education and Advisory Services

            Another mission is to work with industry, making regional presentations and providing expert advice.   Youth summer programs are also offered, including the third session this year of a youth summer program in conjunction with Michigan Technological University, which has a Rail Program. 

Maritime Research

            Dr. Stewart, noting that Wisconsin is a maritime state bordered by navigable water on three sides, includes the 16th largest port in the United States at Superior, said that he and a colleague at
the University of Minnesota in Duluth realized eight years ago that for almost 25 years research into maritime commerce in the Great Lakes had disappeared.  The chancellors of the two universities agreed to create a research institute to do maritime research.  The creation in 2004 of a National Maritime Enhancement Institute, dedicated by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, provides access to special funding.  Eleven affiliate universities now work to do combined research throughout the Great Lakes, and more than $5 million in funding has been received since 2005 from a wide variety of sources, both industry and governmental agencies.  He cited the example of one research project, an EPA Clean Diesel Grant related to engines and emissions which, combined with matching funds, brought almost $15 million of business to Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.  Another project involves a maritime transportation system gap analysis. 

            Dr. Stewart also described a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Maritime Administration, which had provided $800,000 so far this year and would provide up to $1 million a year for the next five years.  In the current funding period, the feasibility of using liquefied natural gas to fuel Great Lakes ships was being examined.  He closed his remarks by expressing excitement about the future of the research. 

Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve

            Dr. Wachter introduced Dr. Ralph Garono, who has directed the work of the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve since its formation in 2010.  Dr. Garono said that the project was about one-and-a-half years old and had brought in just over $2.5 million.  Researchers had been brought in from New Zealand and from other Great Lakes states, and the reach of the UW System was being extended internationally.

            Dr. Garono said that the program was new to the area, but the National Estuarine Research Reserve, was formed in 1972 through an act of Congress.  He said that the program involved partnerships, leveraging money, and return on investment.  He first described a partnership with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  Federal money comes into the university system through UW-Extension, and there is a partnership between Extension and UW-Superior, forming the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve for the purpose of long-term research projects.  Even though the partnership is only one and half years old, plans are being made to set up climate-change studies that would last far into the future. 

            The Reserve is part of the NOAA system.  Some of the 28 reserves are 25 years old or more.  The Reserve at Lake Superior is the newest and considered to be a research institute.  Most sites are located on the ocean.  The Lake Superior Reserve is one of two Great Lakes research reserves.  The goals of the project are applied research and monitoring.  Ph.D.-level scientists on staff are working with colleagues at other institutions, and professional educators and outreach staff are also involved. The goal is to take research results and package them up for different sectors.  Education specialists work with K-12 educators, and a recently-awarded federal grant is designed to enrich the curriculum for local educators.  As part of its stewardship, professional outreach educators work with decision makers, such as elected officials and city planners, to ensure they have the best available information when they make their decisions.

            Describing the estuary itself, Dr. Garono described one of the busiest ports in the world and wetlands and aquatic ecosystem areas upriver on a very tight gradient, which he said is very interesting to study.  The reserve itself is made up of publicly-held land near the mouth of the estuary.  Some of the property owners are the University, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and the city of Superior.  The point of the reserve is for all cooperating land owners that have united under a common management plan, with the ability to set up long-term research projects.  Eleven staff and students have come on board so far, and there should eventually be between 18 and 20 people on staff.  The projects bring graduate students to the area to work with students on campus and other researchers in the area.  Dr. Garono also described the reserve’s facilities on Barker’s Island, as well as plans to develop a publicly-accessible science and interpretive center and a resource center that the community can use.

            Dr. Garono closed his remarks by saying that during his first year, he had tried to let people know that there was such a thing as the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve, and the message had gotten out.  He said he was now explaining that the reserve involved more than aquatic science but, rather, work was being done with social scientists, historians, artists, and others on economic studies, chemistry studies, and other projects involving various disciplines.   

            Chancellor Wachter returned to the podium to comment on the connection of the region and resources to critical solutions to real problems and educational opportunities for the region’s citizens.  Before inviting questions, President Spector thanked all presenters for their very good, to-the-point, and substantive presentations. 

Regent Discussion

            President Spector called upon Regent Walsh, who asked about the history of the volume of shipping on Lake Superior.  Dr. Stewart responded, saying that shipping evolves, and it had been followed closely for five years, working with the Baltic region of the European community because the Baltic Sea is about 30 percent larger than the Great Lakes but has 20 percent less water and many issues are similar.  He said that two factors greatly impact shipping on the Great Lakes, the rise of energy costs (e.g., the cost of diesel fuel, which will continue to rise), and climate change.  One reason that marine transportation has not taken off in the Great Lakes is because the lakes on occasion freeze over.  Recent tracking shows that ice is leaving the lakes much earlier and coming in much later.  If climate change continues, and the cost of land transportation continues to increase, then there could be a natural modal shift to marine transportation.  Related is the question of how to link rail and truck transportation to marine, since all transportation in the United States is intermodal.  The European community can be looked to as an example of how to move over-sized, overweight cargo on high-density corridors to the marine field, and then off to another area.   

            Regent Higgins asked about the definition of an “estuary,” which is where essentially salt water meets fresh water, and how the local region qualifies to be involved in the federal project.  Dr. Garono said that the local estuary is a freshwater estuary; in this instance, an estuary is considered to be where the river meets the sea; Lake Superior is considered to be an inland sea.  The water that comes down from the watershed is very stained, with a lot of organic carbon and nutrients.  It comes into the lake, which is nutrient poor, very clear water, so there is a river-to-lake gradient.  The metal corrosion is affecting the ports, and this seems to be unique to Lake Superior ports, but not other Great Lakes ports.  The other freshwater estuary is in Lake Erie. 

            Regent Crain expressed appreciation for the presentation and said that it focused on what makes this University distinctive in the state. 

            Regent Bradley commented that the UW-Superior presentation was effectively one of the first presentations to the committee of the whole of the Research, Economic Development, and Innovation Committee, recently created by the Board of Regents.  He said that one of the purposes for that committee is to highlight for state decision makers what important roles are being fulfilled by each campus to take the work occurring on the campuses and in the classrooms and directly apply that for solutions that challenge Wisconsin communities and businesses.  He observed that the three presentations that had been given were evidence that the UW is an essential part of the solution, and not part of the problem, for the state. 

            Regent Tyler commented on the synergy between the research projects and the importance of monitoring such issues as climate change and invasive species.  He expressed appreciation for the research, saying it will have a great impact on the future. 

            Regent Manydeeds, expressing pride in having graduated from UW-Superior, echoed the appreciation of his fellow Regents and said that the presentation had shown the relationship between the UW-Superior campus and the economic situation in the area.

            President Spector asked Dr. Balcer about collaborations among UW-Superior and other UW institutions in the area of freshwater science that would be helpful for Regents, as System leaders, to understand.  Dr. Balcer cited some examples of cooperation among programs and said that this was an area that there was interest in developing. 

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2013-15 BIENNIAL BUDGET PRIORITIES        

            Turning to the next item on the agenda, President Spector introduced a discussion of the 2013-15 biennial budget, noting that in March, Senior Vice President Michael Morgan had presented a brief overview of discussions and decisions the Board must undertake over the next several months, pertaining to both the annual budget and to the 2013-15 biennial budget.  The present discussion would pertain only to the next biennium and would be an opportunity for Regents to begin the conversation about budget priorities.

            President Spector turned to President Reilly, who reviewed other recent Board discussions about the budget and said that the discussion to be led by Mr. Morgan would lay the groundwork for the August meeting, where the Board would be asked to act on the UW System’s official request for the next state budget.  He posed some of the questions integral to the UW System’s biennial budget, such as what resources would be needed to sustain current activities, what innovations would help do those things better or more efficiently, what unmet needs merit a response, and what new flexibilities would be needed in future years. President Reilly said that the latter question was important because of the statutory language changes that provided new flexibility for UW institutions in the 2011-13 biennial budget.  The next biennial budget would reflect some of those changes, including block grant flexibility.   

            President Reilly turned to Senior Vice President Morgan, who reviewed the timeline for budget discussions that would culminate in Board action on a proposal to be forwarded to the Department of Administration and the Governor in September and, hopefully, legislative action on the biennial budget in June 2013. 

            Mr. Morgan reviewed the UW strategic framework for the last several years, the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, saying that questions would be explored about why the Growth Agenda goals remain relevant, the challenges of balancing educational quality and ensuring affordable access for Wisconsin citizens into the University System, and state expectations for performance and return on investment.  He reviewed the components of the Growth Agenda, with its focus on three core needs:   the need for more well prepared college graduates in Wisconsin, the need for well paying jobs that support a high quality of life, and the need for stronger communities where citizens and businesses can thrive. 

More Graduates

            Referring to the more-graduates component of the Growth Agenda, Senior Vice President Morgan stated that the United States needs more well-prepared college graduates to grow the economy and to compete in an increasingly competitive global economy.  According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the United States is now 9th in the world in the number of adults with four-year degrees, he said.  Wisconsin is below the national average, ranking 29th in 2009 in the number of adults with four-year degrees.  In Wisconsin, 26 percent of adults in Wisconsin had a four-year degree, when the national average was 28 percent, and Minnesota’s average was 32 percent.  Dr. Morgan said that other studies show that the majority of new jobs in Wisconsin require some type of post-secondary credential in the future; thus, the Growth Agenda should be a powerful tool in helping Wisconsin to be competitive in the future. 

            The approach being taken at UW institutions is an institution-by-institution approach.  At each UW institution chancellors and their staffs determine what they can reasonably achieve, through increased efficiency, improved graduation rates, better retention, high-impact academic programs, and increased enrollment, in helping to reach the more-graduates objective.  Between 2000 and 2012, enrollment in the System increased by 22,000 students, including more nontraditional-aged students, students of color, first-generation students, and veterans.  Over that same timeframe, six-year graduation rates increased by 2.4 percent.  Also, the number of degrees awarded increased from 27,000 in 2000 to more than 34,000 by 2010, or by 28 percent.  Efforts in areas such as education, engineering, and health sciences have been increased to fulfill specific needs in the Wisconsin economy.  

Mr. Morgan said that while good progress was being made on the more-graduates plan, it is important to consider how many students can be supported without new state support before quality is eroded and how to find resources to support students who may be somewhat less prepared for post-secondary education.  Higher tuition rates paid by nonresident students have strengthened the university’s ability to support more resident students -- each nonresident student supports about two resident students – but the first obligation is to Wisconsin taxpayers, he said.  Mr. Morgan also posed a question about what the nonresident and resident mix should look like at UW institutions, and whether this should be considered on a systemwide basis or on a campus-by-campus basis, which is the current methodology.  He also noted that building access for nontraditional students requires new infrastructure, continuous development, and a balance of investment between the traditional student population and a nontraditional market that is already being served by for-profits and not-for-profits.  Mr. Morgan paused to seek input from the Board members.

Regent Falbo asked about the statistic related to the graduation rate, and whether the increase was 2.4 percent of all students or 2.4 percent more graduates.  After some discussion, Chancellor Wells provided an example at UW-Oshkosh, explaining that the increase in the graduation rate is a minor contributor at UW-Oshkosh to the increase in the total number of degrees awarded.

            Regent Crain emphasized that the priority should be on more resident graduates.  She said she valued nonresident students, who add an important dimension to the universities, but the priority is to improve in educating Wisconsin students.  Senior Vice President Morgan said that the majority of graduates throughout the System are residents of Wisconsin, also noting that nonresident graduates stay in Wisconsin, which enriches the environment.

            Regent Bradley remarked that if the Board controlled its revenue sources, then it could fulfill its statutory duty.  However, a separate group of people decides on the state portion of the investment and greatly influences the Board’s ability to raise funds through tuition.  He asked about the conversations with the Department of Administration, Governor’s Office, and Joint Finance Committee, which would help identify state goals as they relate to the Board’s responsibility.  Senior Vice President Morgan observed that it would be important to combine the Board’s sense of priorities with those of the administration and Governor’s Office, as well as an examination of past priorities.  He said he also thought that business and industry leaders should be consulted.  President Reilly added that the Legislature had identified more than 40 performance indicators in the last budget that could serve as a specific list of legislative priorities for the future.

            Vice President Smith asked about efforts being made to better serve nontraditional students.  Senior Vice President Morgan asked if chancellors might address this.  Chancellor Sorensen said that UW-Stout had developed customized instruction methods so that nontraditional students, such as Regent Sherven, could take programs over the Internet or through a hybrid method of face-to-face instruction and Internet.  He said that UW-Stout now had 1,600 students statewide in 20 programs; market rates are charged, the programs are self-sustaining, and no state dollars are used.  The revenue is used for program development, to hire faculty and staff, and to provide services for those students.  The number of participating students had grown from 50 students in 1999 to 1,600 today, with further growth planned as the marked would allow.  Chancellor Sorensen said that this was a good example of how the university had reached out to nontraditional students. 

Regent Sherven commented that UW-Stout had done an excellent job in reaching nontraditional students, as had UW-River Falls.  He observed that the UW System in general could do a better job of targeting marketing efforts at nontraditional students, to more effectively compete with for-profits, which are successfully marketing to adult students.

            Chancellor Shields mentioned that UW-Platteville had two collaborative engineering programs, in the Fox Valley and Rock County, and was investigating the opportunity to expand into Washington County.  This puts engineers in areas where they are needed.  

            Regent Falbo, returning to the topic of performance measures, said there may be a subset of these goals, or else more specific goals, that would help to measure the Board’s and chancellors’ macro goals, such as service to nontraditional students.  President Reilly said that Associate Vice President Heather Kim had begun working with chancellors regarding what their goals are, and some numerical goals may be reshaped as part of those conversations. 

            Regent Evers, expressing appreciation for the presentation and the work involved in moving forward, asked how the System could possibly increase graduates and decrease state support.  Either it is necessary to figure out how this is realistically done, or the goal may need to be reexamined.  Senior Vice President Morgan said that at some point it would not be possible to accomplish this.  He expressed the hope that more state investment would result from the UW’s formulating a compelling argument that greater investment will help the UW to meet the state’s performance goals and produce the high-quality graduates that the state needs.

            Regent Higgins referred to the book, “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance,” which he had been assigned to read as a student and which suggested that quality is in the eye of the beholder.  He said that in industry, “quality” is what the customer wants.  So in answering the question of what quality is, it is necessary to decide who the customer is and then answer from the point of view of the customer.  He expressed interest in hearing Regents’ views on this. 

            Regent Crain observed that it was important to do more than maintain quality and, rather, to improve quality.  In order to meet the needs of customers or the state, it is necessary to improve quality, as the times demand more than maintenance of quality, she said. 

More Jobs

            Senior Vice President Morgan moved on to the second core component of the Growth Agenda, more jobs, noting that the Growth Agenda goals of more graduates and more jobs are interdependent.  Contrasting more jobs with more graduates, Mr. Morgan said that the university’s role in job creation is often more indirect.  The UW plays the role of partner and catalyst, collaborating with state businesses and economic development agencies in an effort to develop a healthy economy ecosystem where innovation and entrepreneurism intersect with intellectual curiosity and demonstrated research expertise.  However, the University can also be a direct source of new business and new jobs in the form of technology transfer and spin-off businesses that emerge directly from UW Research.  The University is critical to both preparing the workforce and fostering job creation. 

            Mr. Morgan said that the Wisconsin Technology Council had determined a couple of years before that academic research and development was a little over a billion-dollar industry in Wisconsin, which translated into more than 38,000 direct and indirect jobs.  A March 2011 report for UW-Madison by NorthStar Economics found that the campus had a total economic impact of $12.4 billion.  A 2000 report showed that the entire UW System in 1998 to 2000 had about a $10 billion impact.  Mr. Morgan also listed other examples:  (1) the Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology at UW-Stevens Point is developing a pilot biorefinery that will produce biofuels from renewable sources, such as wood paste and switch grass, and other byproducts that will replace petroleum-derived chemicals; (2) since 1994, UW-Stout’s Discovery Center has completed 5,000 technical-assistance activities with more than 2,700 companies, with activities in product development, workforce optimization, technology development, strategic planning and quality improvement resulting in client-reported impacts of more than a half-billion dollars; (3) the Whitewater University Technology Park creates and fosters businesses and jobs through close alignment of UW Whitewater’s research and educational competencies, with its first building opening in 2011 and nearly 70-percent occupied. 

            Mr. Morgan also cited examples of UW institutions that have formed research partnerships with industry:  (1) Johnson Controls partnered with UW-Milwaukee and UW-Madison on three energy-storage research laboratories aimed at speeding commercial development of the next generation of battery technology; (2) the Wyse Technology Foundation works hand in hand with comprehensive universities to support research and technology development, link campus innovation with industry leaders, and speed technology transfer through patent and licensing opportunities; and (3) a statewide network of Small Business Development Centers, led by UW-Extension, provides educational assistance to strengthen small businesses, facilitating 230 business start-ups, holding 397 training events attended by 7,100 business leaders, and helping 120 entrepreneurs create businesses in the state of Wisconsin in 2011. 

            Senior Vice President Morgan said that there were threats to these development efforts, among them the competitive-compensation issue.  He said that UW institutions are more than 14 percent behind peer institutions in faculty pay, and the gap is anticipated to grow.  He posed questions about how the UW can use its limited resources and increase flexibility to attract and retain top faculty and staff and exceptional graduate students who support advanced research led by the faculty members.  He also asked whether the UW was adequately explaining to policymakers the connection between research and jobs.

            President Spector turned to the chancellors to see if they wanted to add to what Mr. Morgan had outlined.  Chancellor Wells pointed to the Business Success Center at UW-Oshkosh, which helped more than 70 businesses last year, as well as the Wisconsin Family Business Forum and Environmental Research and Innovation Center.  He also mentioned a recent purchase, solely with private funds and through the foundation, along with two private-sector hoteliers and restaurateurs, of a downtown hotel that had fallen into disrepair.  A $9 million renovation will create immediately 150 to 200 construction jobs and, thereafter, dozens of hospitality jobs.  Chancellor Wells also mentioned three biodigester projects which could lead to more manufacturing jobs, emphasizing that none of the projects had any state funding behind them. 

            Chancellor Wells also noted the importance of the compensation issue.  In talking with external stakeholders, business leaders, and elected officials, he said he often asks them to identify another industry in the state of Wisconsin that has increased its productivity 15 to 20 percent in the past five to six years and whose employees have not received a raise or pay plan in six years.  Unless something is done to keep and attract talent, the unique and innovative work that is occurring will not be built upon, he observed.

            Chancellor Sorensen, noting that UW-Madison had been a research university for a long time, said that he wanted to underscore that UW-Stout and others are emerging research universities.  They are trying to take teaching universities with 12-hour teaching loads and then squeeze research into that in a productive way, which is very difficult to do.  UW-Stout is developing a biomedical device research center and bringing in scientists to do the research.  As a result, teaching faculty are trying to work with research scientists, and there are conflicts about how they operate, how they work, and what the expectations are.  This is a very complex situation, trying to take teaching schools and make them more productive as research schools.  It is hard to drive down a high 12-hour teaching load with no state support.  Chancellor Sorensen said that pay schedules are pathetic, in the lower 12 percent in the nation among state universities.  He asked how to attract people to come to a state that is promising no pay raises and expect them to perform. 

            Chancellor Patterson, mentioning that UW-Stevens Point was implementing a new strategic plan, said that the university was being repositioned to be more relevant and responsive to community, regional, and state problems.  Partnership for Thriving Communities has four initiatives, one of which is a health-care initiative with the CEOs of the major health-care systems in the state and educators at the UW School of Medicine and the Medical College of Wisconsin.  Other partners include technical colleges and the two-year Colleges in the area.  A second initiative is the development of more public-private partnerships. UW-Stevens Point is going to establish an office of Economic Development Entrepreneurship. 

            Regent Tyler referred to “a job probability index,” which he had recently heard discussed and which would predict the probability of a positive career outcome at the end of a program.  He noted that it is important to highlight current successful partnerships between the UW and industry.   

            Regent Crain asked about an item on Senior Vice President Morgan’s slides, “preserving objectivity and knowing our value in public-private partnerships.”  She said that she assumed that this was an issue of academic integrity.  Mr. Morgan asked Senior Vice President Nook to comment.  Dr. Nook, commenting on the public-private partnership, said that universities play many roles in educating students.  One role is to prepare them for a career.  Another is to prepare them for civic life; this is also an important role.  It is important that the university not become a four-year technical college.  Graduates need to be ready to step into careers that require critical thinking skills, the ability to work in groups and teams, and other characteristics around which a liberal arts education is centered. 

            President Reilly commented on the importance of public-private partnerships and making these ethical and of appropriate value for all parties.  However, in some ways, this is “a brave new world” for the university, and it is necessary to be attentive to establishing good practices and policies related to this.  UW-Madison, through entities such as WARF, has long experience with successful partnerships.  New relationships are being formed between universities and outside entities, and this has been a topic of national meetings of college and university presidents and partners, he said.

            Chancellor Wells commented regarding the value of  private-public sector partnerships, noting UW-Oshkosh’s involvement with a hotel and the convention center, as well as with biodigesters.  The foundation will manage the revenues generated from the hotel and will be invested back in the community, including for the purpose of providing scholarships for Oshkosh High School graduates to come to UW-Oshkosh.  In the case of the biodigester, a large Rosendale dairy will be involved, and an education center will be developed.  There will be significant faculty, staff, and student participation.  Public-private partnerships have been a great educational experience.

Stronger Communities

            Returning to his remarks, Senior Vice President Morgan said that if Wisconsin is compared to other states, the comparison will show a remarkable difference in the way the population is more evenly distributed across the state in small- to mid-sized cities that include vibrant UW campuses, as well as UW Extension faculty.  By extending the boundaries of the university to the furthest boundaries of the state, in the tradition of the Wisconsin Idea, universities and Extension networks enrich the economy of their regions.  For example, a 2009 study of the UW-Oshkosh found that the institution’s economic impact was approximately a half billion dollars a year, a yield directly and indirectly of 9,000 jobs, and about $37 million in tax revenue.  Mr. Morgan also mentioned the impact of UW-Oshkosh’s collaborations with NEW ERA and New North, Inc. in the northeastern region, as well as other UW collaborations in the southeastern region and elsewhere in the state.  He said that UW System institutions are engaged public universities, identifying needs in the community, involving citizens, and leveraging UW expertise to enact positive research based solutions. 

            Wisconsin communities are also strengthened by the people and talent that the university attracts. More than 81 percent of graduates who start out as Wisconsin residents remain in Wisconsin after graduation.  The university also brings in nonresident students who enhance diversity and increase income for the state as they pay for housing, food, and entertainment.  Mr. Morgan also showed a slide that illustrated that those with more education earn more once they are employed and are less likely to become unemployed.  He said that the UW System will have to play a central role in building the economic vitality of Wisconsin communities by providing a skilled, educated workforce to create and attract new businesses. 

Access and Affordability

            Senior Vice President Morgan said that entry into the economy of the early 21st century demands a higher degree of educational attainment.  The university must be mindful of the impact that its policies have on the ability of individual Wisconsin family members to attend the university.  A university education should remain within the grasp of working class families in Wisconsin.  The UW has ensured that tuition is moderate and affordable for Wisconsin families.  In 2009-11, the state of Wisconsin provided a tuition assistance grant which offset the cost of tuition increases for students of need from families from incomes of $60,000 or less who did not receive a Wisconsin Higher Education Grant.  He said that there was no increase in funding this biennium for that program, but the UW System continues to provide base grants to students who fit in this category. 

            UW Colleges and universities are improving quality while reducing the costs of educating students in many different ways.  UW-Madison, for example, engaged a consultant to determine the best use of its limited resources and worked creatively to find ways to reduce costs within the university that can then be invested into the core mission.  Other UW institutions are involved and engaged in benchmarking, lean manufacturing process reviews, and looking for other opportunities to collaborate with one another in cost reduction measures, all with the goal of keeping the cost of college education down. 

            Mr. Morgan provided a number of examples of collaborative efforts among UW institutions, such as UW-Stout’s work with UW-Eau Claire and UW-River Falls on selling surplus property and other initiatives, and the BSN-at-Home Program -- a collaboration among UW-Milwaukee, Madison, Eau Claire, Green Bay, and Oshkosh that allows students to take the majority of required course work online, culminating in a 4-year degree in nursing.  He also noted that UW institutions were working to welcome place- and time-bound students in innovative ways, such as by expanding prior learning assessment programming with the support of a Lumina grant, and are developing transfer plans to connect students to their educational goals.

            Mr. Morgan asked whether there were other areas that should be explored, such as a way of expanding financial aid.  The university can do all that it can to operate efficiently, but at some point, investment from the state in the form of GPR is also essential.  He invited ideas or comments from Regents. 

            Regent Sherven commented on creative ways for students to obtain an affordable education, such as taking general education requirements through UW Colleges, technical colleges, or on-line programs.  Many students do not think about the affordability aspect of college; he suggested there is a need for more education of high school students on the impact of college costs and debt. 

            Senior Vice President Morgan agreed with Regent Sherven’s comments and mentioned the Wisconsin Covenant Program.  The program is not due to be funded in the future, but it was designed to advise  8th graders about what they needed to do in high school to prepare themselves to get into college, both in the classroom and with respect to paying for college.  Many students come into the System as first-generation college students, and their need for more information must be addressed, as well. 

Quality

            Senior Vice President Morgan noted that quality is one of the key factors distinguishing University of Wisconsin institutions from others around the country.  The UW is responsible to the state for educating students; its shareholders are the people of Wisconsin.  An American Council on Education survey of UW alumni showed an exceptionally high level of satisfaction on the part of alumni who graduated from UW institutions.  He also cited other quality indicators, such as UW-Madison’s #10 ranking among top public universities by “US News & World Report” and seven UW comprehensive universities’ being listed in the top 20 public Midwest Regional Universities.  He concluded that quality is present, but posed questions about whether the university’s classrooms, labs and technology are adequate to keep faculty in the classrooms; how to develop the right high-quality options for adult nontraditional students; and how the market should change to adjust to nontraditional students.

            Regent Higgins, focusing on defining the UW’s customers and defining what those customers want as quality, referred to a Wisconsin Alumni Association survey of alumni from about 2005, which compared the experience of non-minority students, essentially white students, to the experience of students of color.  A striking finding was that there was no statistical difference between the reactions of graduates, no matter what their ethnic background; however, the university has difficulty retaining students of color.  He suggested that a survey of graduates may not help identify opportunities to assess why students leave prior to graduating.  He asked Chancellor Sorensen for his comments, in light of UW-Stout’s Baldridge Award, which suggests an effort to identify customers and their needs. 

            Chancellor Sorensen commented that UW-Stout did identify the customer as the student, which was an unpopular approach among colleagues at other campuses.  Through the Baldridge process, the university identified internal stakeholders and external stakeholders and then modified and adjusted programs to meet their identified needs.  A self assessment is a valuable tool, he said.

            Regent Higgins asked whether the processes used at UW-Stout would be transferable to the System in general.  Chancellor Sorensen, acknowledging that he was biased on this point, said that he thought it was.  Although Baldridge is being unfunded, the concepts are transferable and are useful; they require addressing questions about leadership style, what stakeholders think about leadership, and the institution’s planning process. 

            Senior Vice President Morgan, responding to the issue of under-represented minorities who do not persist to graduation said that the Office of Academic Affairs had done good work with chancellors and other university leaders to apply high-impact practices that promote retention of minority students into their second year.  He noted that Associate Vice President Washington and her team had been working on climate-related issues and how to help ensure all students feel they are part of the university community.

            Regent Crain commented, saying that she had been on the Board for seven years and wanted to affirm the emphasis that the System had placed in this area.  This needs to continue to be a priority, she said, including improving connections with K-12.  Regent Higgins said that he did not mean to imply that he thought the System was lacking in the effort to recruit and retain students of color, noting that he used this only as an example of effort and result.  Senior Vice President Morgan commented that he
knew of Regent Higgins’ work in this area and did not doubt his sincerity. 

Performance

            Senior Vice President Morgan said that the UW has a long history of being accountable to the state and its citizens.  The UW System was one of the first systems in the country to create an accountability report.  In addition to the traditional accountability measures already in place, new accountability measures were included in legislative Act 32.  None of the goals can be reached without adequate resources.  Over the past 30 years, the UW System had not seen the kind of investment it would have liked from the state of Wisconsin.  Nevertheless, quite a bit was accomplished.  Tuition had been used to fill the void created by insufficient GPR.  Tuition had been kept modest, Mr. Morgan said. 

            The UW’s resource needs would need to be addressed in the budget.  Mr. Morgan said that the university was willing to make the commitment that it would meet the performance measures that the legislature had identified, so long as there is investment sufficient to drive quality, access, and affordability. 

            Closing his remarks, Senior Vice President Morgan summarized his earlier comments and then asked for consideration of whether the right priorities had been identified as budget objectives.  President Spector thanked him for an excellent presentation.

- - -

            The Board recessed for lunch at 11:50 a.m. and reconvened at 1:05 p.m.

RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR UW-EAU CLAIRE CHANCELLOR BRIAN LEVIN-STANKEVICH

            President Spector asked Regent Manydeeds to present a resolution of appreciation to UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich, who was attending his last UW System Board of Regents meeting.  Regent Manydeeds observed that it was two years earlier, when he was appointed to the Board of Regents, that he first met the chancellor.  Chancellor Levin-Stankevich initiated a breakfast meeting with him when he was appointed, and Regent Manydeeds soon realized that they had similar backgrounds and had been brought up in similar ways, even though the chancellor was from New York and Regent Manydeeds was raised in South Dakota and northern Wisconsin. 

            Chancellor Levin-Stankevich invited Regent Manydeeds to campus for several events, and Regent Manydeeds concluded that the chancellor was a great communicator, was someone who cared about all phases of his campus community, had built relationships in the community, and was a great advocate for the System during the issues of the previous year.  He effectively presented the System’s position to the Chamber of Commerce and other groups in the area.   

            Saying that the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire and the community would miss the chancellor, Regent Manydeeds read the resolution of appreciation.  The resolution was approved by acclamation and met with a standing ovation. 

Resolution of Appreciation for Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich

            Resolution 10045:       WHEREAS, Brian Levin-Stankevich served as the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire from 2006 to 2012, infusing a student-first approach into all major initiatives and decisions, especially the Blugold Commitment, a unique partnership between students and the university to provide high-impact educational experiences to all UW-Eau Claire students; and
                                                WHEREAS, Brian oversaw the successful reaccreditation of the university by the Higher Learning Commission, and led a collaborative strategic planning effort that resulted in a new mission statement and an eight-year “Centennial Plan,” which has guided annual priority-setting and budget decisions; and 
                                                WHEREAS, in support of the UW System’s Growth Agenda, Brian oversaw enrollment growth from 10,766 in 2006 to 11,234 in 2011; created the NanoSTEM initiative and major in Materials Science; and launched the System’s first Bachelor of Professional Studies degree; and
                                                WHEREAS, Brian enhanced a university-wide focus on equity, diversity, and inclusiveness that resulted in an increase in the percentage of underrepresented minority students from 3.2% of new freshmen in 2005 to 8.1% in 2011, and also supported the creation of Blugold Beginnings, a pre-college access program for more than 2,000 underrepresented fifth-through-12th grade students; and
                                                WHEREAS, Brian reflected the university’s values of stewardship and sustainability by becoming a signatory of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, and witnessed under his tenure the university’s energy use decline by 19.4%; and
                                                WHEREAS, Brian undertook creation of the first-ever Campus Facilities Master Plan, which received a Planning and Analysis award from the American Society of Landscape Architects, and developed nearly $100 million in campus construction projects, including a new student center, education building, and Children’s Center; and
                                                WHEREAS, Brian concluded the university’s first comprehensive capital campaign, which exceeded the campaign goal by raising more than $54 million, and during his tenure the university received the largest single gift in its history -- $4.3 million -- and in all six years of his chancellorship annually raised more than $4 million in gifts;
                                                BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offers thanks to Brian Levin-Stankevich for his outstanding service as Chancellor of UW-Eau Claire, and wishes him well as he continues his career as President of Westminster College in Utah.

            Chancellor Levin-Stankevich thanked Regent Manydeeds for his remarks.  He thanked all of the Regents for having the faith to ask him to lead the wonderful UW-Eau Claire campus and for supporting his leadership over the years.  He reflected on some of his relationships with individual Regents, including Regent Wingad, a UW-Eau Claire graduate currently in Washington, D.C. on a Truman Fellowship internship, who represented UW-Eau Claire and all UW students extremely well.  He thanked all of the Regents with whom he had the opportunity to work, all of whom he said had listened and given him the time whenever he asked.  He mentioned Regent Falbo’s attention, in particular, in connection with difficult issues surrounding UW-Eau Claire’s differential tuition, which he said allowed the campus to make a difference in its academic programs and other areas. 

            Chancellor Levin-Stankevich thanked President Reilly for his leadership of openness and willingness to hear criticisms and work through differences.  He also thanked System staff, who he said were extremely dedicated to higher education.  Because so much of his tenure was involved in the development of new and improved facilities, he gave special acknowledgement to Associate Vice President David Miller for his work with Regents, the Department of Administration, and others.  He urged continued work toward freeing institutions’ foundations from restraints that limit their ability to work on improvements in campuses’ physical facilities, faculty development, and faculty excellence. 

            The chancellor acknowledged his fellow chancellors, particularly Chancellors Wells and Sorensen, the “senior members of the crew,” who had been generous with their advice and mentorship.  He said they had a great relationship, one of mutual respect and healthy competition.  He also acknowledged the tremendous line-up of provosts at the UW institutions. 

            Chancellor Levin-Stankevich extended his greatest thanks to UW-Eau Claire, saying that it had been a privilege to serve an extraordinary campus with its own culture and emphasis on students, the quality of education, and unique mission.  The campus has great support from the community; legislative delegations; foundation; and faculty and staff.  He recognized faculty representative Jeff Peterson and Provost Pat Klein, who were present at the meeting, and the outstanding group of people who had gone above and beyond what was expected. 

            He said that Eau Claire, like all UW campuses, needs Regents’ help to aggressively support and assure the value of public higher education in Wisconsin.  Most importantly, he said, it needs support in continuing the effort begun last year – with the Wisconsin Idea Partnership – to free up the restrictions and limits on campuses so that they can be all that they can be.  It is necessary to focus on faculty and staff who work hard to provide the highest-quality education for students, often in an increasingly difficult environment with fewer resources, negative public rhetoric, and compensation restrictions that demoralize them and threaten the culture that is the greatest asset campuses have – a culture of caring about the students, the work, and each other. 

            Closing his remarks, Chancellor Levin-Stankevich urged that Regents create for campuses, the System, faculty, staff, and students an environment that encourages innovation and experimentation, rewards achievement, and values staff members’ contributions.  If this is done, he said, the Regents will preside over a system of higher education that excels beyond any expectations.  He extended best wishes and expressed his thanks for the privilege of serving the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, the Board of Regents, and the state.

            President Spector thanked Chancellor Levin-Stankevich and wished him good luck.

- - -

            Before adjournment for committee meetings, President Spector announced that committee reports would be sent electronically that evening for the first time, with a goal of streamlining the committee chairs’ reports on Friday.

- - -

The meeting was adjourned at 1:20 p.m.

Submitted by:
/s/ Jane S. Radue                          
Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Great Room
Yellowjacket Union
University of Wisconsin Superior
Superior, Wisconsin

Friday, April 13, 2012
9:00 a.m.

PRESIDENT’S GREETING
APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE FEBRUARY 10, 2012 MEETINGS
REMARKS BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT LEADERS ON CULTIVATING SHARED GOVERNANCE RELATIONSHIPS.
Background
Recommendations
Meetings with student leaders
Open forum during Board meetings
Board of Regents agendas
Policy review
Regent Discussion
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Update on Recent Events
News from Around the System
New Online Program for B.S. in Health Information Management & Technology
UW-Madison’s WID Named 2012 Laboratory of the Year
UW-Eau Claire Named to the 2012 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll
UW-Stout Receives $1 Million Scholarship Donation
UW-Madison Researchers among Nation’s Most Successful at Securing Research
UW-La Crosse’s Centennial Hall Selected as WI State Dept. of Facilities’ Best Project of 2011
UW-River Falls Hosts “Border Battle” Science Olympiad
UW-Green Bay Distinguished Alumni Award to Maria Hinton
UW-Whitewater’s Innovation Center Celebrates One-Year Anniversary
UW-Whitewater’s Warhawks Claim Many Championships
UW-Milwaukee’s Chancellor Lovell in Lakefront Marathon
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report
Update on recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee on Board Roles and Responsibilities and Ad Hoc Work Group on UW System Structure and Governance
Various Bylaws Revisions
Approval of Revisions to Update Chapter I of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents.
REPORT AND APPROVAL OF ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Committee Business
Consent Agenda
Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate
Program Authorization (Implementation) B.B.A./B.S/B.A. in Interactive Web Management,
UW-Oshkosh
Program Authorization (Implementation) B.F.A. in Interior Design, UW-Stout
Program Authorization (Implementation) B.F.A. in Industrial Design, UW-Stout
Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Public Health, UW-Milwaukee
REPORT AND APPROVAL OF ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE
Committee Business
Review of UW-Stevens Point’s Differential Tuition Proposal
Approval of Extension of Reviews of Differential Tuitions Previously Scheduled in 2011-13
Peer Endowment Benchmarking Report
Voting of 2012 Non-Routine Proxy Proposals
Review and Approval of the UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Pfizer, Inc.
Review and Approval of the UW-La Crosse Dining Services Contract
Report of the Senior Vice President
Committee Action
Extension of Differential Tuition Reviews
UW System Voting of 2012 Non-Routine Proxy Proposals
UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Pfizer, Inc.
UW-La Crosse Dining Services Contract with Sodexo Operations
REPORT AND APPROVAL OF ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
Joint Meeting with the Business, Finance, & Audit Committee
Committee Business
Committee Action
Approval of the Design Report of the All-Seasons Softball Practice Facility Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison
Authority to Accept a Gift of Twenty-five Acres of Land for the Future Expansion of University Research Park II, UW-Madison
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Increase the Project Scope and Budget and Construct the Student Athlete Performance Center–Phase III Project, UW-Madison
Authority to Grant a Permanent Easement to the Village of Shorewood Hills for Road Construction and Improvement Purposes, UW-Madison
Authority to Lease Space for the School of Freshwater Sciences and the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, UW-Milwaukee
Authority to Purchase the Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health Building, UW-Milwaukee
Authority to Develop a Residence Hall and Dining Facility under the Terms of a Lease Agreement with the University of Wisconsin-Platteville Real Estate Foundation, UW-Platteville
Authority to Construct Classroom Renovation/ Instructional Technology Improvement Projects,  UW System
Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System
UPDATE ON LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON UW RESTRUCTURING AND OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITIES
Capital Issues
Procurement
Institutional Boards
Regent Discussion
RECOGNITION OF TROY SHERVEN’S SERVICE ON THE BOARD
Resolution of Appreciation to Troy Sherven
RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW-SUPERIOR AS HOST OF THE APRIL MEETING
Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Superior
COMMUNICATIONS, PETITIONS, AND MEMORIALS
CLOSED SESSION
Closed Session Resolution
Authority to Change the Name of Carlson Hall to “Laurentide Hall,” UW-Whitewater

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Great Room
Yellowjacket Union
University of Wisconsin Superior
Superior, Wisconsin

Friday, April 13, 2012
9:00 a.m.

-President Spector Presiding-

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Tony Evers, Michael Falbo, Tim Higgins, Edmund Manydeeds, Katherine Pointer, Gary Roberts, Troy Sherven, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Mark Tyler, David Walsh and Gerald Whitburn

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents John Drew, Charles Pruitt, and José Vásquez

- - -

PRESIDENT’S GREETING

President Spector expressed appreciation for the Regents’ having been able to attend the inauguration of UW-Superior Chancellor Renée Wachter the evening before, congratulating her and stating that it was a wonderful event.

Since the February meeting, Governor Walker had appointed John Behling of Eau Claire and Regina Millner of Madison to full seven-year Regent terms.  President Spector announced that both were unanimously confirmed by the Senate and would officially take their seats at the June Board meeting in Milwaukee.  President Spector introduced Ms. Millner, who had travelled to Superior for the day’s meeting.  He noted that the Governor also appointed a new student-Regent, Tracy Hribar, a UW-Parkside student and Business Manager at James Hribar Trucking in Franksville, Wisconsin, in Racine County.  She would succeed Regent as the nontraditional student-Regent. 

- - -

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE FEBRUARY 10, 2012 MEETINGS

The minutes of the February 10, 2012 meeting had been distributed.  Upon the motion of Regent Bartell and a second by Regent Falbo, the minutes were approved on a unanimous voice vote.  There were no additions or corrections. 

- - -

REMARKS BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT LEADERS ON CULTIVATING SHARED GOVERNANCE RELATIONSHIPS

President Spector said that the first order of business had been added earlier this week at the request of Allie Gardner, Chair of the Associated Students of Madison, and at least one of her student-leader colleagues.  Ms Gardner was present to speak about shared governance.  President Spector said that he, Vice President Smith, and President Reilly had decided that it would be appropriate to grant Ms. Gardner’s request to speak.  He welcomed Ms. Gardner and observed that after his years on the Board, he had concluded that it is relatively easily to reach agreement in the abstract about shared governance principles, but it is much more difficult to apply those principles in real time.  .

Background

Ms. Gardner introduced herself, saying she was a junior at UW-Madison and chair of the Associated Students of Madison, the student governance group at UW-Madison.  She was joined by Dylan Jambrek, a student at UW-Eau Claire and vice president and chair of the Board of Directors for United Council of UW Students, the statewide student association.

Ms. Gardner began by thanking President Spector for being receptive to the students’ request to speak.  Mr. Jambrek said that the primary theme of their presentation was how to better the relationship between the student body in the UW System and the Board of Regents of the UW System.  Across the country we have seen such relationships had broken down, she said, to the point of violence at regents’ and trustees’ meetings in some instances.  Both student leaders and Regents would prefer to avoid this in Wisconsin.

Ms. Gardner mentioned specific incidents of violence at Georgia, Illinois, New Jersey, and Santa Monica College.  She said that in Wisconsin, Regents had been receptive to students, and she and other students wanted to ensure mechanisms were in place to continue to avoid such incidents.  She said that she and Dylan would offer some recommendations. 

Citing potentially-controversial issues such as tuition increases, although more moderate in Wisconsin than in other places; the proposed New Badger Partnership of the previous year; and current legislative discussions of the structure the UW System, Mr. Jambrek said that students were interested in ensuring that the relationship between students and the Regents stays strong. 

He said that, based on conversations with other students, there was a belief that students’ concerns are sometimes not heard.  Despite the tradition of shared governance in state law that applies to UW institutions, there is not necessarily shared governance at the Board level, except for the fact that two student-Regents are selected by the Governor.  He added that students had shown an unprecedented amount of activism and involvement in spring 2011 in protecting a unified UW System, fighting the $250-million cut to the System that the Governor proposed, and providing advocacy in other areas.   Mr. Jambrek suggested that in addition to having Regents and System Administration as advocates for students, students need to be allowed to be advocates for themselves.  Frequently, student input is solicited from chancellors or chief student affairs officers, but students should be allowed to advocate for students.

Recommendations

Meetings with student leaders

Ms. Gardner reiterated that if students perceive that they do not have a way to communicate with Regents, this is when frustrations can boil over, as had happened elsewhere.  Saying that she and Mr. Jambrek had consulted with students at other UW institutions, Ms. Gardner offered an initial recommendation that, to improve communication, each Regent come to one United Council event per year.  She said that this  would be a good way for Regents and administrators to interface with student leaders and others involved in student government.

Mr. Jambrek expressed thanks to Regent Falbo, who had attended a student representatives meeting at UW-Parkside.  United Council has four conventions a year, in addition to an inclusivity and empowerment conference, as well as a statewide lobby day.  The UW System President’s cabinet met with student leaders during the last lobby day, and Mr. Jambrek expressed appreciation for this. 

Open forum during Board meetings

Mr. Jambrek suggested Regents also consider an open forum or public comment section during their meetings, similar to what city councils and governing authorities sometimes have.  This would be a time during which students, as well as faculty and academic staff, could voice concerns to the Regents. 

Board of Regents agendas

Ms. Gardner asked that, in the spirit of shared governance, students receive agendas and meeting materials at the same time that the Regents do.  Students want to make sure they are well informed, and this would enhance communication, whether in pre-Board meeting teleconferences with the student-Regents or otherwise.   

Policy review

Mr. Jambrek said that the student representatives group, formed in 2005 to represent the elected student leadership of all UW institutions, is not always given the same policy-review opportunities given to chancellors, chief business officers, and provosts.  A policy pertaining almost exclusively to students, RPD 30-4, was discussed at student representatives meetings recently, Mr. Jambrek said, but that group was not given a formal consultation.  He suggested that it would be appropriate to have student representatives review policies together on a conference call, or in conjunction with one of their quarterly meetings, just as other groups do.
               
Ms. Gardner concluded the students’ remarks by saying that there will always be disagreements between students and Regents.  The recommendations are additional mechanisms for students who are becoming increasingly engaged to be able to communicate with the Regents.  Students talk about issues raised at Regent meetings, and having additional ways that they can communicate their engagement would be a positive thing.  Mr. Jambrek added his thanks for the opportunity and welcomed questions or comments.

Regent Discussion

President Spector complimented Ms. Gardner and Mr. Jambrek for adhering to the requested 20-minute time limit and said that they did a first-rate job.  He said he wanted to point out that student-Regents Sherven’s and Pointer’s presence, and the presence of other student Regents, was significant for the Board.  These students represent student interests very successfully. 

As to Ms. Gardner’s and Mr. Jambrek’s requests, President Spector commented that he did not think that sharing meeting agendas was a problem, because agendas are public documents.  He turned to Secretary Radue, who noted that student representatives receive Board-meeting agendas.  President Spector suggested that they ensure their names were placed on the list to receive agendas.  He suggested that the Board would take the students’ other comments under advisement and consider a reasonable way of proceeding.  He asked Regents if they had further comments.

Regent Falbo observed that he had had conversations with students other than at UW-Parkside, and President Spector noted that he and other Regents had met with them, as well.

                Regent Sherven said that, especially as a nontraditional student-Regent, he had struggled with how best to make connections with students.  He said that he had been unable to attend all of the Student Representatives’ meetings.  Consequently, he and Regent Pointer organized a regular conference call with student leaders; however, there was no student interest.  He had cancelled the last two calls due to lack of student response.  He asked what would be an effective way to receive input from students. 

                Ms. Gardner said that sometimes students are not familiar with issues until after decisions are made about them.  She said that she and Mr. Jambrek were advocating for direct lines of communication, rather than going through one or two Regents who serve as advocates.

                Regent Bartell complimented the student presenters, saying that their presentation was clear, organized, and effective.  He suggested that in order for Regents to attend United Council events, they need to be invited; Regents could be sent an email.  He also noted that he had received emails from individual students and had responded to some of them; when he receives 25 emails saying the same thing, he does not respond to all of those.  He encouraged the use of email, however, and said that he was happy to communicate with students or others regarding the function of the Board of Regents and his participation in it.  He said that Regents also receive the meeting agendas close to the meeting date; there is a lot of material for System staff to assemble, but students should be able to receive it when Regents do.  As for open forums, Regent Bartell said that he thought this was something Regents should consider.  Regents have a packed agenda, spend a lot of time, and are all volunteers; but direct student participation should be given some consideration.  He observed that Regents should definitely focus on considering ways for students to have input on new policies or rules that affect them. 

Regent Bradley noted that the Board of Regents has multiple constituencies and asked what advice Ms. Gardner and Mr. Jambrek would give if Regents were faced with an open forum request from unionized faculty, non-unionized faculty, classified staff, and unclassified staff.

Mr. Jambrek said that an open forum need not be limited to students but, rather, could be a general open forum, limited to a certain time period.  Given the array of constituencies, he suggested a general open forum could be divided among types of speakers or managed on a first-come-first-served basis

Regent Falbo said that he had had the pleasure of dealing with student leaders quite a bit, on both a formal and informal basis.  He suggested that students’ communications be more regular, and not only when they have an issue.   Ms. Gardner agreed and said that efforts had been made to facilitate meetings or encourage students to meet with Regents, but the students are sometimes intimidated because they do not know the Regents.  She said that the request was not only that students feel more comfortable about setting up meetings or emailing or calling Regents, but that Regents also show interest by setting up or having a point person for the Regents or from System to facilitate communication by email or otherwise.  She agreed that the communication should not be only about concerns and said that she would like to see a two-way effort.  Mr. Jambrek said that it is important to go to where students live, and they live on the Internet; the Internet could be used as a tool to collect input, perhaps through some sort of electronic digest, especially on an issue such as a tuition increase. 

Regent Pointer thanked both students for coming to the Board meeting and stressed that she and the other student-Regent were available to students and could be relied upon more heavily to, for example, facilitate meetings with System Administration.  She encouraged the students to contact individual Regents with concerns or questions.   

President Reilly thanked Ms. Gardner and Mr. Jambrek for their thoughtful and constructive presentation.  He said that his door was always open to students and student leaders, and he always returned their calls promptly.  It is important to keep these channels open and wise to find more opportunities for communication.  He said that in years past he would regularly meet every month or every other month with United Council leadership to talk about current issues.  He extended the same offer to United Council leadership.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Update on Recent Events

President Spector turned to President Reilly for his report to the Board.  President Reilly noted that it had been a busy time in the state Capitol.  In March, the Legislature concluded its 2011-12 general session, and several bills affecting the UW System were passed and signed by the Governor:

  • Senate Bill 461 relates to the “Read to Lead” initiative, which contains provisions on teacher preparation, and helps to create more of a “one-stop shop” for information about UW institutions. Testimony from UW Education deans – particularly UW-Whitewater Dean Katy Heyning, and UW-Madison’s Dean Julie Underwood and Associate Dean Cheryl Hanley-Maxwell – helped to shape the provisions.
  • Assembly Bill 144 creates a commission on financial aid.  This is a continuation of a Legislative Council committee, which included at least five UW financial aid officers, worked to understand the complexities of financial aid. 
  • Assembly Bill 322 relates to making instructional materials more readily and more quickly available for students with disabilities, which should result in a tangible improvement for students.  

                In other news from the Capitol, on March 16, Republican Senator Pam Galloway of Wausau announced her resignation. As an immediate result of that decision, President Reilly said the Senate would now be split, with equal numbers of Democrat and Republican members.  Other changes would be forthcoming.  As of the current week, 11 members of the Assembly and two Senators announced they will not seek re-election. 

                On the federal front, Board members recently received the latest UW System Federal Priorities Binder.  This compilation of campus priorities is an important communications tool that helps to raise the UW System’s visibility, and is a means for articulating the UW’s goals, strengths, and priorities – both as individual institutions and as an integrated system of higher education.  It provides the federal delegation with a clear reference guide for their work on behalf of the university.  President Reilly thanked Assistant Vice President for Federal Relations Kris Andrews for her good work.

News from Around the System

New Online Program for B.S. in Health Information Management & Technology

                Sharing news from around the UW System, President Reilly began by describing a new online program being offered by a consortium of four UW campuses and coordinated by UW-Extension.  Starting in the fall, the new online Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management and Technology would provide students with the opportunity to earn a degree in one of the fastest-growing professions – health information.  Students can receive their degrees through UW-Green Bay, UW-Parkside, and UW-Stevens Point.  UW-La Crosse would also contribute courses.  According to Bureau of Labor statistics, employment of medical records and health information technicians is expected to increase 20 percent by 2018. 

UW-Madison’s WID Named 2012 Laboratory of the Year

                President Reilly said that the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, the innovative 330,000-square-foot public/private facility that opened just over a year before on the UW-Madison campus, was named the 2012 Laboratory of the Year.  The international competition, sponsored annually by R&D Magazine since 1966, is judged by a panel of industry experts to recognize the highest standards in architecture, laboratory design and “push-the-envelope” concepts in science buildings.  The unique facility, which houses the twin research institutes – the private, nonprofit Morgridge Institute for Research and UW-Madison’s public Wisconsin Institute for Discovery – features architecture that’s designed to encourage human interaction and foster new interdisciplinary collaborations.  The facility was made possible due to the generosity of UW-Madison graduates John and Tashia Morgridge whose funding was matched by the state of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the private nonprofit patent and licensing organization for UW-Madison.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Ward and the UW-Madison campus community.

UW-Eau Claire Named to the 2012 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll

                For the fifth time since 2006, UW- Eau Claire was been recognized for its outstanding community service programs by a federal agency charged with fostering an ethic of volunteerism and service in America.  UW-Eau Claire was among about 500 public and private colleges, universities, and professional schools named to the 2012 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by the Corporation for National and Community Service.  Launched in 2006, this honor roll is the most prestigious federal recognition a higher education institution can achieve for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement.  The program is designed to increase public awareness of the contributions that college students are making within their communities and across the country through volunteer service.

UW-Stout Receives $1 Million Scholarship Donation

                UW-Stout reported that two UW-Stout alumni recently contributed more than $1 million in scholarship funds to the institution they say launched them into a successful business – and brought them together as a couple.  Brian Jennerjahn, a 1964 graduate, and his wife, the former Ruth Hopfensperger, shared rides back and forth between the university and their hometowns in the Fox Valley.  Jennerjahn Machine in Matthews, Indiana, began as a two-person operation – with Brian designing and building the machines, and Ruth acting as bookkeeper and "gofer" for parts; now it produces machines used in countries around the world, including China, the United Arab Emirates, and South Africa.  The couple said that their UW-Stout education contributed to their success, and they wanted to extend that opportunity to others.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Sorensen and the UW-Stout community.

UW-Madison Researchers among Nation’s Most Successful at Securing Research

                New statistics from the U.S. National Science Foundation show that scholars at UW-Madison continue to be among the nation’s most successful at securing support for their research, President Reilly reported.  Research expenditures at UW-Madison for fiscal year 2010 were slightly more than $1 billion, an increase of about $15 million from the previous year, ranking UW-Madison third among all U.S. universities after Johns Hopkins University and the University of Michigan.

UW-La Crosse’s Centennial Hall Selected as WI State Dept. of Facilities’ Best Project of 2011

                President Reilly said that UW-La Crosse’s new academic building, Centennial Hall, has been selected by the Wisconsin State Department of Facilities as its Best Project of 2011.  Gov. Scott Walker recently recognized the building’s architect, River Architects, with the award at the State Building Commission.  Centennial Hall, which opened in August 2011, is the university’s largest academic building and is expected to receive at least a silver rating for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (or LEED), which recognizes features to save annual operating costs and conserve energy.  The hall is the first built predominantly with state funding on campus since 1974.

UW-River Falls Hosts “Border Battle” Science Olympiad

                As part of ongoing efforts to encourage increased student interest in the sciences, UW-River Falls recently hosted about 600 high school students from Wisconsin and Minnesota at the UW-River Falls “Border Battle” Science Olympiad Open Invitational Tournament.  The event, organized by physics Professor Earl Blodgett, featured 39 high school teams competing in 23 National Science Olympiad events. Unlike many other competitions, the international non-profit Science Olympiad mixes the various science disciplines of biology, earth science, chemistry, physics and technology together in one competition.  Now in its 29th year, the Science Olympiad has become the largest team science and technology competition in North America.

UW-Green Bay Distinguished Alumni Award to Maria Hinton

                President Reilly said that later in April, UW-Green Bay would present a Distinguished Alumni Award to Maria Hinton, a 1979 graduate in Communication and the Arts.  Mrs. Hinton, who is 101 years old, is a revered tribal elder who remains an active force in preserving Oneida stories, language and culture.  Her keen memory was critical to the Oneida preserve-the-language movement, in which UW-Green Bay was involved.  One of Wisconsin’s last surviving native speakers, Maria grew up in a household that spoke only Oneida, learning English at the government school at age 10.  After receiving her UW-Green Bay diploma she helped found the tribe’s Turtle Elementary School, and worked there well into her 90s.  Only two years ago, Mrs. Hinton and Professor Cliff Abbott completed their long-awaited recording of a spoken-word dictionary of Oneida, regarded as one of the world's most endangered languages.

UW-Whitewater’s Innovation Center Celebrates One-Year Anniversary

                UW-Whitewater would celebrate the following week the one-year anniversary of the Innovation Center at Whitewater University Technology Park, President Reilly said.  The $5.7-million, 38,000-square-foot business incubator is apparently nearly 70 percent full.  The park and innovation center, collaborative projects of the city, Whitewater Community Development Authority, and UW-Whitewater, are an example of UW-Whitewater’s commitment to regional engagement, economic growth, and the Wisconsin Idea. 

UW-Whitewater’s Warhawks Claim Many Championships

                In the past few months, UW-Whitewater claimed national championship titles in men’s football, men’s basketball, men’s and women’s wheelchair basketball, and gymnastics.  President Reilly detailed these accomplishments and congratulated Chancellor Telfer and the UW-Whitewater campus community.

UW-Milwaukee’s Chancellor Lovell in Lakefront Marathon

                UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Michael Lovell accepted a friendly challenge from Concordia University President Patrick Ferry to see which university would field the largest team of faculty, students, and staff at the Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon in October.  Under the “Claws vs. Paws Challenge,” the university team with the fastest team average at the end of the race will be declared the winner. 

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

                Beginning his report, President Spector said that the report for Wisconsin Technical College System Board had been provided.  He recognized Regent Tyler, who expressed appreciation on behalf of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board.  At that Board’s last meeting, it approved a number of new associate degrees that articulate into the UW System.  An example is Chippewa Valley Technical College, which has an engineering technologist associate degree with three tracks which articulate to UW-Stout; CVTC graduates can go to Stout as juniors.  He thanked the institutions involved for working on the expanded opportunities for technical college graduates. 

Update on recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee on Board Roles and Responsibilities and Ad Hoc Work Group on UW System Structure and Governance

                President Spector said that he was pleased to provide a brief second update on the status of the recommendations made by the 2011-12 ad hoc committees, in the “Smith Committee” Report on UW System Structure and Governance and the “Bradley Committee” Report on Board Roles and Responsibilities. 

                The Board’s February discussion regarding governance indicated general agreement that institution-level advisory boards, including the possibility of Regent involvement, were a worthy approach.  President Spector said that proposed revisions to relevant Regent policies were being drafted for consideration at a future meeting.  Equally important, the legislative Task Force, chaired by Regent Falbo, took up the subject of governance at its meeting on Wednesday, to be discussed by Regent Falbo later in the morning.

                As for the Roles and Responsibilities recommendations, implementation is moving ahead, President Spector said.  As one example, the new Research Economic Development and Innovation (REDI) Committee would be meeting for the first time that morning.  He said that a second example was Secretary Radue’s work with System personnel who work closely with each of the Board’s standing committees.  Committee staff identified routine agenda items that could be eliminated or delegated, as well as strategies that would enhance the ability of the committees to focus on necessary and substantive items.  President Spector said that he understood that at least two of the committees spent time on Thursday considering how to streamline and focus agendas; more changes are forthcoming.  It is expected that the format of the Friday committee reports would evolve over time.  He expressed confidence that through the use of written, primarily digital, reports, the Board would reduce the time of committee-chair reports, as suggested by the Bradley Committee.  He also expressed confidence that progress would continue on the engagement of Regents in more macro topics, including chancellor presentations that highlight strategic issues.  

                President Spector noted that Regent Bradley’s committee volunteered to reconvene at a later time to assess the implementation of its recommendations; he said that while he would no longer be on the Board, he thought that would be a worthwhile endeavor for his successors to consider.

Various Bylaws Revisions

                President Spector addressed proposed revisions to the Board of Regents Bylaws, Chapter 1, first providing some context for the changes.  He said that soon after Secretary Radue began her work as Board Secretary, he and then-President Chuck Pruitt, requested that she take on the long-term project of reviewing the bylaws and, as appropriate, recommending revisions.  This was done in part because of then-Vice President Spector’s long experience in public/government litigation, which suggested that judges like nothing better than to remind organizations that their bylaws say that an organization cannot do what it is trying to do.  It is important to keep the bylaws up to date, and Secretary Radue has been working on that. 

                He said that the currently proposed revisions were an early step in that process.  They accomplish several things, including:  (1) recognizing that the majority of the Board’s meetings are two-day meetings and that the Board recently reaffirmed its schedule of eight regular meetings per year; (2) updating notice requirements for special meetings; and (3) improving the special meetings language.  President Spector, noted that the proposed changes brought the bylaws into conformance with how the Board was operating and that the revisions were in Regents’ packets.  He moved adoption of  Resolution 10046.  The motion was seconded by Regent Tyler and adopted on a unanimous voice vote. 

Approval of Revisions to Update Chapter I of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents

           
            Resolution 10046:       That, upon the recommendation of the President of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the attached revisions to update Chapter I of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents.

            President Spector recognized Regent Bradley, who said he wanted to make a comment, especially for the benefit of relatively newer Regents.  Saying that there were many good examples, he suggested that the bylaws revisions were another in a series of examples of how the Board made a good decision in hiring Secretary Radue, with her combination of experience in the University of Wisconsin System, an educational background that includes a law degree, and attention to detail.  When she was hired, there was discussion about the kinds of things that the President of the Board could delegate; delegation can only occur if the person has the requisite skills, and this was an example.  President Spector expressed his agreement, and Ms. Radue thanked Regent Bradley for his remarks (which were very kind).

                President Spector announced that the Board would recess its meeting and reconvene immediately as a committee of the whole, which would mean that the Board would meet as a committee consisting of all members, for the purpose of having a meeting of the REDI Committee.  He said that he felt it important to show “the world,” as well as the Board, that the subject matter of this committee is of significant importance and that the full Board should be involved, at least for one or more meetings, after which the committee would probably become more of a typical committee. 

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                The meeting was recessed at 10:05 a.m. for a meeting of the Research, Economic Development, and Innovation Committee, as a committee of the whole, and reconvened at 11:25 a.m.

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REPORT AND APPROVAL OF ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

                President Spector turned to Regent Crain, vice chair of the Education Committee, to provide the report of the committee on behalf of Regent Vásquez, the committee chair.  Regent Vásquez had participated in the Thursday-afternoon committee meeting by phone, but was unable to attend the Friday Board meeting. 

Committee Business

                Noting that Board members had received the written report of the Education Committee, Regent Crain said that the report accurately conveyed the meeting highlights.  She said that she wanted to especially mention the high quality of the committee’s discussions and the two presentations that the committee heard, one on a new Ph.D. program in Public Health at UW-Milwaukee, and another by  UW-Superior Provost Hensrud about UW Superior’s high-impact practices.

Consent Agenda

                In the interest of implementing in good faith one of the key recommendations of the Bradley Report (i.e., brief reports from committee chairs), Regent Crain said she would add nothing more and would move onto the consent agenda.  The Education Committee unanimously approved the meetings of the February 9, 2012 meeting, along with Resolutions 10047, 10048, 10049, 10050 and 10051, which she moved for adoption.  The motion was seconded by Regent Bartell and adopted on a unanimous voice vote. 

Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

Resolution 10047:       That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the request to the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for $4,546,369 for fiscal year July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, subject to availability, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Music. 

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.B.A./B.S/B.A. in Interactive Web Management,

UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 10048:       That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.B.A, the B.S, and the B.A. in Interactive Web Management.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.F.A. in Interior Design, UW-Stout

Resolution 10049:       That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.F.A. in Interior Design.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.F.A. in Industrial Design, UW-Stout

Resolution 10050:       That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.F.A. in Industrial Design.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Public Health, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 10051:       That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Ph.D. in Public Health.
               
                Regent Crain added that she had been a member of the Education Committee for most of her tenure on the Board, and this had been very important in her life as a Regent.  She said she had great respect for the leaders in UW institutions in the academic areas.  The provosts had been wonderful to interact with, she said; she also expressed great regard for UW System academic staff.  She emphasized that as the Education Committee moves ahead in a restructured way and looks at things differently, the work of the committee remains important, because it is where the Regents learn and think about how to provide the best possible quality education to students. 

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REPORT AND APPROVAL OF ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

                President Spector called upon Regent Falbo for a report of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.  Regent Falbo reported that there was a joint meeting of the Business Finance and Audit and the Capital Planning Committee, which Regent Bartell would describe.  

Committee Business

Review of UW-Stevens Point’s Differential Tuition Proposal

                Regent Falbo reported that the Business Finance and Audit Committee heard from UW-Stevens Point Chancellor Bernie Patterson and student body representatives from UW-Stevens Point and UW-Eau Claire, who spoke about the importance of the new differential tuition proposal at Stevens Point.  A letter was also read, offering an alternative viewpoint. 

Approval of Extension of Reviews of Differential Tuitions Previously Scheduled in 2011-13

                The committee approved a resolution delaying the scheduled five-year review of a number of previously-approved differential tuitions until February 2013. 

Peer Endowment Benchmarking Report

                Trust Funds Senior Portfolio Analyst Tom Reinders presented highlights from the annual Peer Endowment Benchmarking Study, Regent Falbo said.

Voting of 2012 Non-Routine Proxy Proposals

                Mr. Tom Reinders presented highlights from the annual Peer Endowment Benchmarking Study, and the committee approved voting of 2012 non-routine shareholder proxy proposals. 

Review and Approval of the UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Pfizer, Inc.

                The UW Madison contractual agreement with Pfizer, Inc., was approved by the committee.

Review and Approval of the UW-La Crosse Dining Services Contract

                The committee approved the UW-La Crosse Dining Services contract with Sodexo Operations.

Report of the Senior Vice President

                In the report of the Senior Vice President, Mr. Morgan offered an update on the status of the HRS implementation.  Associated Vice President for Human Resources and Workforce Diversity Al Crist addressed the activity of the University Personnel System and the potential items of focus for future reports.  In addition, Mr. Morgan gave an overview of the annual distribution adjustments for new GPR fee funding in the 2012-2013 fiscal year. 

Committee Action

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Falbo then moved adoption of Resolutions 10052, 10053, 10054 and 10055, which along with the February 9, 2012 minutes, had been approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Sherven and adopted unanimously on a voice vote.

Extension of Differential Tuition Reviews

            Resolution 10052:       That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents suspends review of any current differential tuition programs until February 2013.

UW System Voting of 2012 Non-Routine Proxy Proposals

            Resolution 10053:       That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the non-routine shareholder proxy proposals for UW System Trust Funds, as presented in the attachment.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Pfizer, Inc.

Resolution 10054:       That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contractual agreement between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Pfizer, Inc.

UW-La Crosse Dining Services Contract with Sodexo Operations

Resolution 10055:       That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contract with Sodexo Operations to provide Dining Services at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse effective July 1, 2012, for a period of one (1) year with the option of six (6) additional one-year periods.

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REPORT AND APPROVAL OF ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

                President Spector called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.

Joint Meeting with the Business, Finance, & Audit Committee

                The committee met, Regent Bartell said, with the Business, Finance and Audit Committee to hear two presentations.  The first concerned the physical transformation of the UW-Superior Campus, a wonderful presentation by Vice Chancellor of Administration Jan Hansen and her colleagues. The second was a presentation by Associate Vice President David Miller on items taken up by the Legislative Task Force on UW Restructuring and Operational Flexibilities.  Mr. Miller mentioned the management flexibilities that are requested in the areas of capital planning and procurement. 

                The committee discussed briefly the recommendation of the Bradley Committee concerning agenda items that might be delegated or abbreviated in some fashion to streamline the committee meetings.  In particular, the committee discussed delegating decision making on minor real estate transactions, such as accepting gifts of small pieces of property or granting easements on small parcels and approving routine all-agency maintenance and repair projects as to which there are almost never any issues.  The committee is open to such efficiencies if it appears appropriate, Regent Bartell reported.

Committee Business

                In addition to approving its minutes, Regent Bartell said that the committee adopted nine resolutions which were unanimously approved by the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  They were covered in the written committee report.  He said that he would spend time discussing only one of them, Resolution 10062, brought by UW-Platteville to request authority to develop a residence hall and dining facility in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Platteville Real Estate Foundation, a foundation formed for the purpose of handling real estate for the campus.  Under this proposal which is somewhat different from anything the Board had approved before, the campus will lease two acres of Regent-owned land to the foundation.  The foundation would develop and construct a $28.7-million building on the land.  Once completed, UW-Platteville will have the option to purchase it back, and it intends to do so.  It will operate this facility as a residence hall and dining facility.

                The committees discussed the terms of this agreement.  As a result of avoiding various obstacles, expenses, and delays typical in the capital planning process, it is anticipated that this project will cost about $7.5 million less than the cost of a traditional state built-facility, which is $7.5 million of a $28.7-million project.  Of that, about $6 million will be in savings to the students who will be renting rooms at the residence hall and the dining room facility.  An additional $1.5 million will go to the Real Estate Foundation,which will give the campus a memorandum describing what they plan to do with the funds; it is expected, according to Chancellor Shields, that it will be used for scholarships and other campus purposes to benefit students.

                Regent Bartell remarked that this structure benefits the UW System, UW-Platteville, and students.  It is hoped that the operational flexibilities currently being considered by the Task Force would include at least some efficiencies that would provide this kind of cost effectiveness in the capital planning process. 

                In response to a Regent question about the cost of the project if it were not done this way, Regent Bartell clarified that savings were not only in the “soft cost” to the project.  The university is building a different building than the state would build.  Most of the savings is in the quality of the building, which will be more like a commercial-code building, not a traditional state-built building.  For example, all interior walls will be drywall instead of block, which represents a significant savings.   

                Asked about other state requirements being shortcut, Regent Bartell responded that the university would not need to pay the usual fee of four percent of the construction cost to the Department of Administration, which represents a significant savings.  Because it is a state building, the prevailing wage will be paid, which may be more of an added cost than if it were private; but this is similar to a state building.  The other cost is the architectural and engineering fee, which is significantly less.  He said he believed the Real Estate Foundation had negotiated a substantially lower fee than the state would have negotiated, probably with the same firm.  Ground will be broken on this, if approved at the State Building Commission, in June.  The building will open next August.  Regent Bartell said the building has 400 beds and a very large dining facility, and it will be done very well. 

Regent Falbo asked about a $1.5 million amount that was going to the Foundation and expressed concern that this money would need to be borrowed to pay the Foundation.  Regent Bartell said that part of the $28.7 million purchase price includes $1.5 million as a development fee to the Foundation, and this is coming out of the purchase price. 

Committee Action

On behalf of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee, Regent Bartell moved adoption of Resolutions 10056, 10057, 10058, 10059, 10060, 10061, 10062, 10063 and 10064, which along with the March minutes, had been approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Roberts and adopted unanimously on a voice vote.

Approval of the Design Report of the All-Seasons Softball Practice Facility Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 10056:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the All-Seasons Softball Practice Facility project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at an estimated total project cost of $2,325,000 Gift Funds.

Authority to Accept a Gift of Twenty-five Acres of Land for the Future Expansion of University Research Park II, UW-Madison

Resolution 10057:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to accept a gift of approximately twenty-five acres of land, which is located in the Town of Middleton, Dane County, for the future expansion of University Research Park II.  The value of this gift is estimated at approximately $1,500,000. 

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Increase the Project Scope and Budget and Construct the Student Athlete Performance Center–Phase III Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 10058:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to increase the project scope and budget by $9,365,000 Gift Funds and construct Phase III of the Student Athlete Performance Center project at a cost of $33,315,000 Gift Funds, for a revised total estimated project cost of $86,165,000 ($49,200,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $36,965,000 Gift Funds).

Authority to Grant a Permanent Easement to the Village of Shorewood Hills for Road Construction and Improvement Purposes, UW-Madison

Resolution 10059:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Interim Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, a permanent easement 367.5 feet long and 27 feet wide along Oxford Road be granted to the Village of Shorewood Hills.

Authority to Lease Space for the School of Freshwater Sciences and the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 10060:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted for the Department of Administration to enter into a new lease of 15,107 gross square feet at the Water Accelerator Building on behalf of the UW-Milwaukee School of Freshwater Sciences and the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Authority to Purchase the Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health Building, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 10061:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to request the release of $12,250,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing to purchase the Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health building at 1240 North 10th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and to exercise the request to purchase the building in July 2012.

Authority to Develop a Residence Hall and Dining Facility under the Terms of a Lease Agreement with the University of Wisconsin-Platteville Real Estate Foundation, UW-Platteville

Resolution 10062:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to permit the development of a residence hall and dining facility under the terms of a lease agreement with options to purchase with the University of Wisconsin – Platteville Real Estate Foundation. 

Authority to Construct Classroom Renovation/ Instructional Technology Improvement Projects,  UW System

Resolution 10063:       That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the allocation of the Classroom Renovation/Instructional Technology Improvement Program funds be approved and authority be granted to construct the related projects at an estimated total cost of $10,585,250 ($5,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $5,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing All Agency Remodeling Funds, and $585,250 Institutional Funds).

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 10064:       That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $2,683,100 ($1,684,500 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $267,600 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $731,000 Program Revenue Cash).

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UPDATE ON LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON UW RESTRUCTURING AND OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITIES

 

                President Spector turned to Regent Falbo to provide an update on the Legislative Task Force on UW Restructuring and Operational Flexibilities, which had met on Wednesday, April 11, in Madison.  Regent Falbo said that the discussion had been lively and covered capital issues, procurement issues, and institutional boards. 

Capital Issues

                The Task Force heard presentations on the capital budget and planning process from Associate Vice President David Miller, Chris Schoenherr, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Administration (DOA) and Summer Shannon-Bradley, Administrator for the DOA Division of State Facilities.

                The UW presentation included several proposals for improving the current process, including revising the process to allow the UW to use its expertise to manage the planning, design, and operations phases, while DOA would leverage its skills in the bidding, contracting, and construction  phases.  Under this approach, the UW would handle the architect and engineering selection, while DOA would be retained as the state’s construction authority. 

                In addition, the enumeration process would be revised with two categories of projects:  (1) those exceeding $1 million and involving the construction of new space would be considered major projects; (2) all other projects, those of less than $1 million or involving facility maintenance, repair, or renovation, which would be requested as a block of funds though the Board of Regents capital budget.  thus encouraging investment in existing facilities.  In addition, the enumeration process would be streamlined to allow projects in existing facilities to move faster.  This would also empower the Board of Regents with the authority to enter into leases for space. 

                DOA expressed support for the current centralized process, stating that it provides consistency and efficiency and allows a comprehensive perspective on the entire process.  It also provides synergies across all state projects.  DOA believes that the current 4 percent in administrative fees is money well spent and that the existing centralized process has served the state well.  The Task Force has expressed interest in understanding whether the 4 percent fee is appropriate, how it relates to charges in other states and the private sector, what services it covers and how these funds are being used.  The Task Force also discussed whether the existing dollar thresholds are too low to provide a meaningful distinction, as almost no gift-funded projects fall below the new $500,000 level. 

                Regent Falbo reported that there was much discussion.  Overall, it seemed that in both the capital and procurement areas, the UW was perceived as making very good, constructive presentations, and DOA offered very little.

Procurement

                The Task Force also heard presentations on Procurement by Assistant Vice President Ruth Anderson; UW-Madison Purchasing Director Mike Hardiman; Chris Schoenherr, Deputy Secretary of DOA; and Helen McCain, Administrator for the DOA Division of Enterprise Services. 

                The UW presentation covered several topics.  Regent Falbo noted that even if some levels of approvals are removed or eliminated, multiple checks and controls would remain, including review by the business community, required posting on the contract-sunshine website, and auditing requirements.  Even without UW purchases, state agencies procure more than $50 million of goods and services each year and participate in many purchasing consortia.  This reduces the impact of the UW on any contracts.  In addition, the UW makes its contracts available for use by other public entities.  

                The design of the current procurement process creates many unintended delays, which can have major impacts, especially on UW research projects.  Therefore, Regent Falbo said that the appropriate question to ask is what value is added by the each of the multiple layers of approval.  UW recommendations for reforming the procurement process are:  (1) vesting procurement authority with the Board of Regents, including decisions regarding the use of mandatory state contracts; (2) allowing UW institutions to support their communities and local businesses; and (3) continuing to assure accountability through reporting and auditing requirements and the use of the contract-transparency website.

                Regent Falbo said that DOA’s presentation focused on the following:  The UW represents approximately 40 to 50 percent of the state’s purchasing, and removing it would increase prices from vendors by between 5 and 25 percent.  This could increase prices for other state agencies and local governments that purchase off of state contracts.  The UW has already been granted authority over the procurement of items that are unique to higher education, and that authority will begin on July 1, 2013.  DOA is interested in modernizing the procurement process and implementing efficiencies, providing that the process continues to provide accountability transparency and protection against litigation. 

                The Task Force expressed interest in finding ways to allow UW institutions to find savings or better values in their local communities or to allow the UW to opt out of mandatory state contracts.  The Task Force also stressed the importance for reforming the state waiver process.  It currently takes the UW an average of 21 days to receive a waiver.  The Task Force also discussed ways to leverage the UW’s E-Procurement System and buying power to secure better prices, lower bids which could be extended to all state agencies. 

                In addition, the UW could be used as a pilot for other procurement changes or proposals.  For both procurement and capital budgeting, several members of the Task Force requested that DOA provide suggestions and recommendations for reforms that DOA would support. 

Institutional Boards

                Regent Falbo said that the Task Force then moved on to institutional boards, making a first attempt to draft a position.  Some of the ideas that were presented included:  (1) allocating more authority to UW institutions, either with or without the creation of institution-level boards; (2) having institutional governing boards with statutory authority; and (3) securing additional flexibilities.  This discussion would be continued at the next meeting.

Regent Discussion

                Vice President Smith expressed concern about the discussion on institution-level boards, saying that it sounded as though the discussion was wide-ranging, and did not reflect an earlier consensus among chancellors and Regents that institution-level boards should be advisory and not governing.  He asked if Regent Falbo thought there was a need to reestablish the Regents’ and chancellors’ position on this. 

                Regent Falbo responded that “board” may not be the correct term.  Based on presentations to the Task Force by Chancellor Lovell and Chancellor Ward, there was discussion that their two research institutions should have institution-level groups to advance some of their unique needs and goals.  This was the way the conversation started, it was optional as to whether any of the other institutions could or should have a board or a group.  He suggested the Chancellor-members of the Task Force might wish to comment. 

                Chancellor Wells, a member of the Task Force, commented that at the last Chancellors’ meeting with the System President, the chancellors summarized their position.  At the prior day’s Task Force meeting, he agreed to bring a three-point summary of that position to the next Task Force meeting.  Regent Higgins, another Task Force member, said that several members had not weighed in on this issue, and it is too early try to describe a Task Force position.

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RECOGNITION OF TROY SHERVEN’S SERVICE ON THE BOARD

                President Spector called upon Regent Falbo to present a resolution of appreciation for Regent Troy Sherven and to thank him for his service.  Regent Falbo said that Regent Sherven had brought a new and significant voice into the Board’s discussions.  He may be the first member of the Board to have been enrolled in an online degree program during his service, he said.  He was active and engaged from day one.  He had been especially good at keeping in contact with the UW System student representatives and working before each Board Meeting to understand any concerns that students might have about topics on the agenda.  Regent Sherven’s comments and reflections, especially during the tuition and budget discussion, were also appreciated. 

                Regent Falbo recalled the first time he met with Regent Sherven, saying that he knew then that he was dedicated and inquisitive.  Getting to know Regent Sherven gave him a feeling of comfort and confidence that the future is in good hands. 

                Regent Falbo presented the resolution of appreciation, which was adopted by acclamation and met with a standing ovation:

Resolution of Appreciation to Troy Sherven

Resolution 10065:       WHEREAS, Troy Sherven has served as an insightful and dedicated Student Regent on the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents from July 2011 through April 2012; and

                                    WHEREAS, Troy drew upon his experiences as a returning adult student, having made the decision, after 18 years in the workforce, to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Management from UW-Stout through an online degree program; and

                                    WHEREAS, Troy articulated the unique needs of the growing nontraditional student population in the UW System, emphasizing the need to assist nontraditional transfer students by including options such as credit-for-prior-learning; and

                                    WHEREAS, through his service as a member of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Troy showed his commitment to the UW System’s tradition of sound stewardship and financial preparedness; and

                                    WHEREAS, Troy has a firsthand perspective on the difficulties arising from the university’s budget cuts and the resulting impact on tuition – being both a current UW student and the father of a UW student – and has urged UW leaders to clearly communicate that increased tuition revenues offset only a portion of reduced state funding; and

                                    WHEREAS, Troy has served students through his engaged participation in student government as a Regent liaison to the UW student representatives;

                                    BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System commends Troy Sherven for his exemplary service on behalf of the UW System and the citizens of Wisconsin, and wishes him every success in the future.   

                Regent Sherven said hello to his four-year-old son, James, who was at home watching the meeting on the computer by webcast.  He thanked Governor Walker for the incredible opportunity, saying that it had been an outstanding end to his educational experience.  He also acknowledged his wife, Beth; without her strong support, continuing his education and serving on the Board would not have been an option.

                Regent Sherven said that no manual comes along with serving as a Regent.  He was appointed to the Board one week prior to his first meeting.  He remembered feeling overwhelmed.  His first meeting was the tuition-increase meeting, and he said he had a lot of groundwork to do.  He said he realized then how valuable Secretary Radue is to the organization, and he thanked her for answering his questions and helping him along.

                Regent Sherven thanked Regent Falbo for taking his time to mentor him.  He said Regent Falbo is a tremendous asset to the Board, and he thanked Regent Falbo. 

                Regent Sherven said that when he was appointed, he was full of ideas about what he wanted to accomplish, saying that it is easy for an outsider looking in to have all the answers.  He quickly realized that those answers are not as easy as they seem.  Many challenges and difficult decisions lie ahead.  Regent Sherven said that he was truly encouraged about the future of the System when thinking of the men and women who are leading it. 

                He closed his remarks by thanking everyone with whom he had worked on the Board and in the UW System.  He said that he had learned much, and it was his pleasure to serve with them. 

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RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW-SUPERIOR AS HOST OF THE APRIL MEETING

                President Spector called upon Regent Tyler to present the resolution of appreciation to UW-Superior for hosting the April Board meeting.  Regent Tyler said that one of the most fun things about being a Regent is having the opportunity to, rather than look at text on a page, visit a campus and see the buildings, see what programs are helping to accomplish, and see students growing wings.  He presented the resolution of appreciation:

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Superior

Resolution 10066:       WHEREAS, the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents is delighted to have met UW-Superior students, faculty, and staff dedicated to the liberal arts mission, and to have learned more about the high-impact practices that are better preparing the UW-Superior students for a lifetime of learning; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Board is inspired by UW-Superior's "Partnerships for Progress" with the local community and region, designed to provide mutual benefits and connect the public with UW-Superior and the UW System; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Board appreciates the substantial positive impact that UW-Superior research centers and institutes have on the community, region, state, and environment, along with the excellent educational opportunities they provide to undergraduate students; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Board has been impressed to see first-hand the physical transformation of campus and the resulting energy and excitement this has brought to the UW-Superior campus and surrounding community; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Board appreciated the opportunity to participate in the inauguration of Chancellor Renée Wachter, alongside students, faculty, and staff; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Board has been pleased to learn more about the new NorthWERD project, short for Northwest Wisconsin Educators for Regional Development, which aims to connect regional higher education institutions to each other and the region they serve;

                                    BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the UW Board of Regents hereby congratulates the University of Wisconsin-Superior on its leadership in academics, community connections, and state-of-the-art learning facilities, and expresses its gratitude to the entire campus community for its hospitality during this April 2012 meeting.

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COMMUNICATIONS, PETITIONS, AND MEMORIALS

                President Spector called for any communications, petitions, or memorials.  Vice President Smith, acknowledging that something more formal would be done at the June Board meeting, recognized that the current meeting would be the last for Regent Crain and Regent Spector.  He said that all Regents around the table knew what a commitment of time and energy it is to be on the Board.  These two Regents exemplified that ten-fold, he said.  Both held leadership positions and had been tremendous assets to the Board. 

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            The meeting recessed at 12:05 p.m. and reconvened at 12:20 p.m.

CLOSED SESSION

President Spector called upon Vice President Smith to present Resolution 10067, to move into closed session.  The motion was seconded by Regent Whitburn and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Evers, Falbo, Higgins, Manydeeds, Pointer, Roberts, Sherven, Smith, Spector, Tyler, Walsh, and Whitburn voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Closed Session Resolution

Resolution 10067:       That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider personal histories related to the naming of facilities at UW-Whitewater, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

                The following resolution was adopted during closed session:

Authority to Change the Name of Carlson Hall to “Laurentide Hall,” UW-Whitewater

Resolution 10068:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to change the name of Carlson Hall to “Laurentide Hall.”

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            The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p.m.


Submitted by:
/s/ Jane S. Radue                          
Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board