Board of Regents

Minutes of the October, 2011 Board of Regents meeting

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in Phoenix A/B
University Union
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Green Bay, Wisconsin 54311

Thursday, October 6, 2011
10:00 a.m.

PRESIDENTS’ GREETING
UW-GREEN BAY PRESENTATION: “UW-GREEN BAY:  DEEP ROOTS, STRONG WINGS”
Roots of UW-Green Bay
Recent Achievements
Current Priorities
Local Sights
TRANSFER DISCUSSION: SUPPORTING STUDENT MOBILITY THROUGH CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT AND INNOVATION
Background
Transfer-Student Data
Transfer Information System
Titan Transfer Center
Examples of Collaboration
Board Discussion

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in Phoenix A/B
University Union
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Green Bay, Wisconsin 54311

Thursday, October 6, 2011
10:00 a.m.

-President Spector Presiding-

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Edmund Manydeeds, Katherine Pointer, Charles Pruitt, Troy Sherven, Brent Smith, Mark Tyler, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, and David Walsh.

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  None.

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PRESIDENTS’ GREETING

President Spector greeted Board members and others and welcomed everyone to UW-Green Bay.  He said that it was a pleasure to see the beautiful and extensive campus first-hand and to be greeted so enthusiastically by those who provided directions to meeting attendees.  He expressed thanks to Chancellor Harden and to all of those who worked with him to help make everyone feel so welcome.  President Spector called upon President Reilly to make a few comments.
 
President Reilly began by introducing UW-Stevens Point Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Greg Summers.  Interim Provost Summers graciously stepped up to take on the ole when Provost Mark Nook agreed to serve as Interim Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs in UW System Administration, following Rebecca Martin’s departure.  Mr. Summers joined UW-Stevens Point as a faculty member in the Department of History in 2001.  His research and teaching interests are in U.S. environmental history, the history of technology, and consumerism.  Although serving in an administrative role, President Reilly said, he continues to work on his next book project, entitled “The Comforts of Nature:  A Brief Natural History of the American Home.”  President Reilly welcomed Interim Provost Summers.
President Reilly also recognized the passing of a UW colleague, former UW-Madison Vice Chancellor for Administration John Torphy, a long-time state and university official known for his brilliant mastery of budget issues.  He was Vice Chancellor at UW-Madison from 1989 to 2003, overseeing the university’s fiscal and administrative affairs.  He previously served as State Budget Director under Governor Lucey, Secretary of Administration for Governor Martin Schreiber, and in top positions in the Department of Health and Social Services in the Tony Earl and Tommy Thompson administrations.  President Reilly extended sincere condolences to Mr. Torphy’s family and friends, and his UW-Madison colleagues.   

President Reilly also noted that he had recently extended the appointment of David Ward as Interim Chancellor of UW-Madison.  A clamor to extend his interim appointment for a second year came from all of the shared governance groups on the campus and a wide variety of other UW-Madison stakeholder groups.  They believe that Interim Chancellor Ward is bringing the campus together and moving it forward.  In areas such as the new personnel system, block grant budgeting, and governance, their sentiment was that Chancellor Ward, with his unique blend of inside knowledge and outside experience, would move UW-Madison along in a two-year interim chancellorship in ways that would very nicely set the table for a national search for a new chancellor next year, and that person’s arrival in the summer of 2013.  President Reilly said that he agreed with this sentiment, as did the Board of Regents.  To his credit, Interim Chancellor Ward agreed, as well.  President Reilly expressed his gratitude for this decision. 

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UW-GREEN BAY PRESENTATION: “UW-GREEN BAY:  DEEP ROOTS, STRONG WINGS”

President Spector called upon UW-Green Bay Chancellor Tom Harden for his presentation, entitled “UW-Green Bay:  Deep Roots, Strong Wings.”  Chancellor Harden began by welcoming members of the Board of Regents, visitors, and guests.  He said that UW-Green Bay was proud to host the Board meeting and expressed the hope that all would enjoy their stay in Green Bay. 

Before beginning his presentation, Chancellor Harden introduced two members of the state Legislature who were present at the meeting:  Senator Dave Hansen and Representative Karl Van Roy.  He thanked both for being present and expressed appreciation for their support.  He also introduced and thanked the chair of UW-Green Bay’s Council of Trustees, who is also the president of UW-Green Bay’s new foundation, Lou LeCalsey.     

Chancellor Harden said that he had already been complimented many times for the hard work involved in preparing for the Board meeting.  Chancellor Harden recognized the planning committee, chaired by Dan Spielmann, and thanked them for the marvelous work they had done. 

Roots of UW-Green Bay

Chancellor Harden said that when he was pressed to put a name to what he was going to talk about, it was difficult.  “Deep Roots, Strong Wings” is a phrase that usually applies to the gifts we give our children.  Deep roots provide a sense of belonging, allow an individual to stand even during adversity, and make for a secure environment for growth and learning.  Strong wings refer to developing independence and autonomy, trying out new ways of thinking, and having the strength and confidence to ask the best questions and to act in ways that are consistent with a person’s convictions.  Chancellor Harden said that on an individual basis, the university provides these things for its students.  In addition, the university itself has deep roots and strong wings.  It strives to serve individual students, and is also proud of its origins as a university, the growth that the university has experienced, and the potential that the university has.

Chancellor Harden said that UW-Green Bay’s founding was not inconsistent with some of the other schools in the state, although it was founded somewhat later than others.  Two new four-year campuses, in Green Bay and in the Racine-Kenosha area (now UW-Parkside), were founded at about the same time and added to the University of Wisconsin statewide profile.  These institutions were not intended to be only a means to accommodate surplus enrollment, but were to respond to new ideas about the scope and content of post-secondary education.  The curricula at Green Bay and Parkside were to be eclectic, centering on the rapidly changing nature of contemporary life.  Green Bay would focus on the environment and communication; Parkside, because of its location in one of Wisconsin’s industrial communities, would concentrate on industry and technology. 

As it was founded, UW-Green Bay had its own mission as a distinct institution.  The mission was modified over the years, but UW-Green Bay still holds true to what it was supposed to do when founded, the chancellor said.  UW-Green Bay has a select mission that focuses on providing interdisciplinary problem-focused educational experiences to students.  It also includes embracing the educational value of diversity; promoting environmental sustainability; encouraging engaged citizenship; and serving as an intellectual, cultural and economic resource. 

Two of the major concepts that were at the origin of UW-Green Bay, when the institution was founded in 1965, were sustainability and inter-disciplinarity.  Chancellor Harden invited Board members to watch a ten-minute video which would illustrate UW-Green Bay’s commitment to these values, which distinguish UW-Green Bay and which he said are still carried out today. 

Following the video, Chancellor Harden said that inter-disciplinarity has great meaning for UW-Green Bay.  Sustainability also has been a long-standing value.  Within the prior couple of weeks, he said, the university had been recognized with a Sustainability Track Assessment and Rating System environmental rating at the silver level.

Recent Achievements

Chancellor Harden said that in preparation for the meeting, he considered how the institution had changed since the last time the Board of Regents met there.  Noting a few examples, Chancellor Harden said that in December of 2009, UW-Green Bay closed out a $30 million capital campaign, which exceeded the goal of $25 million.  With those funds, the university was able to build the new Kress Events Center, to establish the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business endowed chair, and to establish new named professorships and over 50 new scholarships, among other things.  The money generated in that campaign was extremely helpful to the university.  As of May 1, 2011, UW-Green Bay started its own foundation, which the chancellor said was working very well and would help provide a more systematic way of raising funds.  With a new foundation, Chancellor Harden expressed confidence that the university would be able to reach higher goals in the future. 

The chancellor said that he was struck by the popularity of UW-Green Bay’s adult degree program, which serves the institution’s fastest growing student population.  He said he looked forward to adding more adult students, age 25 and over, and returning students. 

UW-Green Bay also saw a great increase in the growth of online courses and the courses’ popularity.  In 2007, only 8 percent of students took at least one online course; Chancellor Harden said that number was now 27 percent and seemed likely to continue to go up. 

The chancellor also noted UW-Green Bay’s record enrollments, with current enrollment at about 6,600.  Job placement has been stellar, he said.  In 2010, the job placement rate was 96 percent, including students going to graduate school.  In the past year, it was 94 percent.   Chancellor Harden said that UW-Green Bay’s graduates are very well prepared and employers like getting them.  One particular employer in Green Bay has well over 100 UW-Green Bay graduates.  At the upcoming December graduation, UW-Green Bay expected to surpass a total of 30,000 graduates.  

In the last two years UW-Green Bay had the best scores that it had ever had for incoming freshmen.  The institution has always had good students, but the recent SAT scores and high school GPAs are up somewhat.

Chancellor Harden also noted that transfer students had increased in the years since the Board of Regents last met at UW-Green Bay.  Before discussing transfer further, he noted that NEW ERA – the Northeast Wisconsin Educational Resource Alliance – which Chancellor Wells had also highlighted at UW-Oshkosh, was very important to the institution and the region.  The organization was founded in 2000, and Chancellor Wells was its first chair. 

NEW ERA is a consortium that fosters regional partnerships among public colleges and universities in the New North area, to better serve the educational needs of the 1.2 million people who live in the region.  The organization works to provide quality seamless education among and across all of the colleges and universities in the New North, providing essential educational resources for communities, businesses, and government, thereby driving regional and state economic vitality.  Thirteen colleges and universities participate, including the two-year UW Colleges, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Green Bay, and the technical colleges in the New North region.  The organization is comprised of the CEOs of those thirteen institutions.  They meet regularly and talk about transfer agreements and seamless transitions from one school to another, and they work on collaborative programs.  Chancellor Harden said that this is a model that other regions should consider because it is working extremely well. 

Chancellor Harden said that one of his favorite parts of NEW ERA is the faculty dialogue group, a group of faculty who come together to identify and clarify collaborative issues among the 13 institutions.  They explore teaching and curriculum in the educational institutions, particularly in relation to credit transfer potential, and recommend specific strategies, activities, and events to build stronger relationships among faculty in the NEW ERA institutions.  It is extremely successful. 

With regard to transfer activities, Chancellor Harden said that about 900 UW-Green Bay students were seeking a Bachelor of Applied Studies program degree.  This curriculum is offered at other institutions in the state, as well.  It is the second or third most popular program at UW-Green Bay.  Students transfer in with a block of 60 degree credits that can apply toward an associate degree; however, the students who come to UW-Green Bay typically are from the technical colleges, and the credits apply to a bachelor’s degree. 

UW-Green Bay also has General Studies transfer-credit agreements with area technical colleges and is involved in a program that places full-time academic advisors on the campus at Fox Valley Technical College.  Students’ contact with advisers can help to generate enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Studies (BAS) degree program.  Chancellor Harden also noted that UW-Green Bay has a relationship with Nicolet College in Rhinelander and with the North Central Technical College in Wausau, where the Timberwolf Phoenix Alliance was recently started.  The Alliance calls for UW-Green Bay to offer bachelor’s degrees on the technical college campus in Wausau.  Other initiatives include the BAS degree being offered at Lakeshore Technical College in Cleveland, a “Return to the U” initiative at Fox Valley Technical College, and relationships with UW-Marinette, UW-Marathon County, UW-Manitowoc, Milwaukee Area Technical College, and Madison College in Madison.  Working actively with transfers and collaborative programs is the way of the present and the future. 

Another change since the Board’s last visit is good progress with regard to minority enrollment.  Minority enrollment has increased from about 5 percent to 10 percent, and the increase was occurring very systematically, Chancellor Harden said. 

UW-Green Bay is also part of Division I athletics, and when the Board last met at UW-Green Bay, the institution was just starting a phase of great success in the women’s basketball program, with participation over the last several years in the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Tournament.  In the past year, UW-Green Bay ended up ranked ninth in the country, despite being one of the smallest schools in the top 25 with regard to budget, and one of the smallest with regard to enrollment. 

Chancellor Harden mentioned the Phuture Phoenix program, which had just been started when the Board last visited.  He said that in the next week UW-Green Bay would host its 10,000th fifth grader on the campus.  During the past academic year, the first Phuture Phoenix graduates, who started with the program as fifth graders, entered UW-Green Bay.  This is a wonderful program that has been replicated at three other colleges and universities over the past few years.  It is not only that students come to the campus once when they are fifth graders, but UW-Green Bay follows up with them, with tutoring, until they graduate from high school.  He said that the tutoring is effective; teachers have indicated that the attendance on the days when the UW-Green Bay tutors are there is higher than the rest of the week.  This is a source of pride for UW-Green Bay. 

Current Priorities

Saying that he would narrow down some of the institution’s current priorities to a small number, Chancellor Harden said that one priority is graduate studies.  Graduate programs have been offered for a long time, but there are only four of them and they are not very big.  He said that the programs have not been promoted well enough, and UW-Green Bay would be doing more to develop its graduate programs.    

The Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is a phenomenal venue, and it is remarkable that the school has a world class performance hall.  UW-Green Bay is in the midst of a re-visioning process for the Weidner Center that would entail a specific strategic plan with a workable, detailed business plan, staffing plan, and programming plan.  The program will be built up over the next five years. 

UW-Green Bay is working on branding and marketing, to improve the amount and effectiveness of promotional efforts.  The “three Ts” of the UW-Green Bay brand used to be trees, tunnels, and toilets.  This refers to the university’s 180-to-200-acre arboretum, the concourse system that connects all of the academic buildings, and a bathroom for every one or two students in the excellent residence halls.   

The chancellor noted that the institution is in the final stages of an initial draft strategic plan, and strategic planning themes have been developed.  A current and future priority is the library remodel.  The library is 40 years old, is not meeting educational needs, and is due for a   major revision.  

Another priority is faculty and staff compensation.  This has to be a high priority this year, next year, and going into the future. 

Local Sights


Chancellor Harden suggested visitors to Green Bay try to see the Kress Event Center; Curly Lambeau’s cottage and the park that sits on a half-mile of bay frontage on the campus; the Weidner center with its Chihuly glass sculpture; and the campus’s residential village, which houses 2,200 students in about 28 buildings, most of which have been constructed with non-state funds.  He expressed thanks to University Village Housing, Inc., a 501(c)(3) organization, for working with UW-Green Bay to help provide outstanding housing on campus.  Other locations worth seeing are the Cofrin Arboretum; Elvis Presley’s favorite roller coaster, the Zippin Pippin; and the 9-hole Shorewood Golf Course. 

Closing his remarks, Chancellor Harden said that Green Bay is a wonderful city, and he and his wife, Cathy, have enjoyed it during their two years there.  He said they were honored to host the Board of Regents meeting and looked forward to a productive meeting. 

President Spector thanked Chancellor Harden for his remarks and complimented the video which, along with the chancellor’s comments was very well done. 

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TRANSFER DISCUSSION: SUPPORTING STUDENT MOBILITY THROUGH CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT AND INNOVATION

President Spector introduced the next agenda item by saying that it would be an informational presentation about a very important topic:  how students transfer from one university, college, or technical college, either to or within the UW System, on their way to completing their college degree.  He turned to President Reilly to offer some preliminary remarks. 

Background

President Reilly said that more and more students – including the two student Regents – were choosing to start at one institution and continue their studies at a second college or university.  Students demand flexibility and transparency to facilitate easier transfers, and UW institutions have programs and systems in place to help them achieve their educational goals.  As public colleges and universities, UW System institutions pride themselves in upholding their broad access mission.  Successful transfers – from one UW campus to another, and between other institutions and the UW institutions – are one important indicator of access.

Looking at the big picture, the UW System is doing very well in this area. More than 17,000 students transferred into or within the UW System in 2009-10.  Of these transfer students, 87 percent (nearly 15,000) were new transfer students, those who had not previously enrolled at the institution to which they transferred.  UW-Milwaukee received the most new transfers, at 2,424; followed by UW-Madison, at 1,671; UW-Oshkosh at 1,436; and UW Colleges, at 1,429.

The System’s success in transfer has been due to 40 years of consistent attention and continuous improvements in processes and programs that help transfer students.  The System has come a long way, and there are things that can be done to further improve the ability of students to transfer. 

President Reilly introduced Interim Senior Vice President Mark Nook, who would lead off the presentation.  He said that each UW System institution had developed extensive articulation agreements and working relationships with Wisconsin’s technical colleges, UW colleges, and private college partners.  Many UW institutions have also worked with some of the institutions across state lines in Minnesota, Illinois, and Iowa to improve transfer.

The presentation would provide a brief outline of some of the reasons that transfer issues are so important to the System.  Dr. Nook first introduced Lynn Freeman, the Transfer Information System’s Outreach Consultant at UW System Administration.  She would be followed by Carleen Vande Zande,  Assistant Vice Chancellor for Curriculum Affairs and Student Academic Achievement at UW-Oshkosh, and Carla Rabe, Assistant Dean for Student Services at UW-Fox Valley, to talk about a new program being established at their institutions.  Laurie Kallstrom, Outreach Program Manager for UW-Stevens Point, and Keith Montgomery the Campus Dean and CEO at UW-Marathon County, would then talk about a transfer-without-transferring program available at UW-Marathon County, in collaboration with UW-Stevens Point. 

Transfer-Student Data

Interim Senior Vice President Nook, referring to slides, said that of the new students coming to campus, the number of transfer students had grown to about 17,000.  However, the percentage of students who are transferring is relatively flat.  All new student enrollments are increasing at about the same rate.  Transfer students represent 30 percent of the new students, although this varies a great deal from campus to campus.  At the UW Colleges the percentage of students who are transfer students is 21 percent.  The proportion is as high as 58 percent at UW-Superior; 58 percent of the new students on the Superior campus are transfer students.  The transfer issues are vital to all campuses. 

Dr. Nook said that the progress of freshmen is often followed.  Their retention rate, graduation rates, and GPAs are tracked.  However, transfer students are not typically tracked in this way.  All of the national measures for student success are based on first time, full-time students, which ignores 30 percent of the student population. 

The UW System does have a history of counting those students who transfer, tracking their retention rates to the second year, as well as their four- and six-year graduation rates.  One way to look at transfer-students’ success is to look at a graduating class instead of a new entering class.  Dr. Nook referred to a slide showing the make-up of the 2009-2010 graduates from the UW System.  Sixty-seven percent of these students came in as new freshman, but the other 31 percent came in as transfer students. 

The percentage of transfer students who graduate from a particular institution varies a great deal, just as the percentage of new students to a campus varies.  It ranges from 24 percent of graduates at one UW institution being transfer students, to as high as 65 percent.  At three institutions the percentage of graduates who are transfer students is above 50 percent.  Some UW institutions focus more than others on helping transfer students make that transition.  However, even at the institution at 24 percent, a quarter of the graduates came into the institution as transfer students.  It is important to have programs in place to make transfer effective.

One program is the Transfer Information System (TIS).  The TIS has made it possible for many students to know what will happen when they transfer, to know how their credits will count when they come from one of the Colleges, UW four-year institutions, Wisconsin Technical Colleges, or Wisconsin private schools.  Dr. Nook asked Lynn Freeman describe the Transfer Information System and new program development plans. 

Transfer Information System

Ms. Freeman spoke about TIS, saying that the system was funded by the state Legislature in 1989.  It allows students and advisors to see how their courses will transfer to another institution within the UW System.  Wisconsin was one of the earliest to adopt a transfer information system.  Wisconsin is ahead of almost all other states in the information it provides to transfer students.  When TIS originated, the intention was that it would grow to become a tool through which students would be able to enter their course work and see not only the equivalency at another campus, but also how those courses would actually apply to a major and degree at another campus.  TIS allows students to see how courses will transfer, breadth and depth requirements, General Education requirements, and contacts at each campus where students can get information about transferring. 

Ms. Freeman explained that when a student goes online to the TIS page, the course wizard will show them how Communications 111 at Oshkosh will transfer to Stevens Point.  The next phase of TIS is TIS 4, or Phase 4, and it has been discussed for more than ten years.  It is an enhancement that provides a “what if” transfer plan that summarizes how a student’s coursework at a UW or a WTC will transfer and apply toward a degree and a major at the institution to which they intend to transfer.  It does not show only course equivalencies, but provides additional information, in response to:  “I am a student at UW-Richland Center and I want to transfer to UW-Madison and I want to be a sociology student at UW-Madison.”  A student enters the coursework they have taken at UW-Richland Center, requests a plan for a Bachelor of Science in Sociology, and the tool produces an academic plan for them.

Phase 4 was initiated in April 2011.  Currently, transfer students from all UW institutions can receive a transfer plan for a UW-Madison program.  UW-Madison, at this stage, is the only receiving institution.  There is a plan in place, by December 2011, for students from technical colleges to be able to receive a plan for any program at UW-Madison.  It is hoped that in the next few years a few more four-year institutions would be brought online as receiving institutions. 

Ms. Freeman showed an example of a student at one of the UW Colleges campuses who wanted to find out how her coursework at the Colleges would transfer so that she could become a biology major at UW-Madison.  The plan showed completed requirements, what coursework was still needed, and what courses the student could take while at UW Colleges and transfer to UW-Madison in a particular program.  This gives the student and the advisor very structured information on what good course selection would be with an intention of earning a Bachelor of Science in biology at UW-Madison. 

Transfer information is complex.  Ms. Freeman said that her colleagues at the UW Colleges each has a one-inch binder, and each binder contains all the information from the UW institutions to which they have the most students transferring, and they manually keep these updated so they can give students accurate information.  They will still have the one-inch binders, but they are also going to have a very concrete tool, updated by the institution that owns the programs, that they can refer to with a student.   

The benefits are evident.  The biggest benefit is that Phase 4 shows courses at the current school that will fulfill the requirements at the transfer institution in particular programs.  This has the potential to reduce cost and time to degree if the student is active in using it and working with an advisor on both ends of the process.  It also supports advising and recruitment for campuses and enables a student to explore programs based on how their coursework will apply.  A lot of callers to advisors and admissions officers ask, for example, “if I come here, how will my courses transfer and how long will it take me.”  Thus, any transfer student -- students who transfer once, or “swirling” students who transfer more than once -- are very, very interested. 

Closing her remarks, Ms Freeman said that she was proud to be working with this next level of the Transfer Information System and reiterated that Wisconsin continues to be on the cutting edge of transfer.  She introduced Carleen Vande Zande to describe developments in the northeast part of the state.

Titan Transfer Center

Dr. Vande Zande of UW-Oshkosh spoke about the Titan Transfer Center, which was funded by a UW System grant from the Committee on Baccalaureate Education, or COBE.  The collaborative transfer program is grounded in many System and campus initiatives and research studies.  The projects and studies have helped inform campus retention efforts and have contributed to the creation of new ways of organizing campus work to support student success, to increase access, and to grow the number of graduates. 

Examining UW-Oshkosh graduating-class demographics led to the recognition that there is high percentage of transfer students among the student population.  Each year, between 35 and 45 percent of the graduating class consists of transfer students.  With this fact in mind, UW-Oshkosh began to disaggregate its data in terms of transfer students and freshman cohort students, which provided glimpses of how transfer students experience the learning environment and academic challenge in different ways than the freshman cohort.  Through the Give Students a Compass project sponsored by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, and using the lens of Inclusive Excellence, the institution looked at questions about equity in terms of access to high-impact practices and the participation rate of transfer students in these transformative experiences.  Policies and practices were also examined to make sure that transfer students are being treated equitably.  For example, one finding was that the University Honors program was structured in a way that made it very difficult for transfer students to participate.  The institution created a new pathway for transfer students to participate in the University Honors program.

As an institution in the midst of General Education reform, as many UW institutions are, Dr. Vande Zande said that UW-Oshkosh strongly encouraged collaboration among faculty members and advisors at the two-year colleges and four-year institutions.  They can identify areas of concern, possible bottlenecks of credit transfer, and explore issues that may influence the success of transfer students.  As co-participants in the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative, sponsored by AAC&U, UW System two-year and four-year campuses are all aligned to the same broad learning outcomes.  This shared vision for learning is the basis for a much more coherent undergraduate experience across institutions. 

NEW ERA campus dialogues and collaborations also were an inspiration for the creation of the Transfer Center.  These led institutions to discern missed opportunities for transfer students when they transitioned to four-year campuses.  Examples include their participation in undergraduate research and study abroad programs.  Such participation is a “high-impact practice,” which assists students to remain in college and to go on to graduate. 

UW-Oshkosh’s participation in the Wisconsin Transfer Equity Study allowed it to see that transfer-student orientation needs were distinct from those of other students.  The study concluded that students need to know about high-impact practices much earlier in their programs, and also that increased resources needed to be allocated to those who work with transfer students, to both recruit and retain transfer students.  The study also found that students of color had a high percentage of incomplete applications as they transferred, and that resources were needed to assist all students to complete applications.  Most importantly, Dr. Vande Zande said that the study showed the importance of maintaining advising relationships with advisors across institutions.

UW-Oshkosh’s Growth Agenda goals include a large number of transfer students.  Collaboration with the two-year colleges is also aimed at improving the transfer experience for all students, so that a greater number of students will be retained and persist until graduation. 

The goals of the Titan Transfer Center are to collaborate with the UW Colleges to increase access to four-year degrees, increase the number of four-year degrees obtained in the region, increase access and participation of transfer students in high-impact practices, provide ongoing support for transfer students to achieve higher graduation rates, assist students of color in the transfer process to increase representational equity, and increase transfer student participation in academic support services to ensure success.  The Center is committed to measuring the success of the pilot program and collaboration by measuring:  satisfaction with the transfer student experience; the retention rate, GPA, and graduation rate of transfer students; the participation of students in high-impact practices; representational equity in high-impact practices among transfer students; and the increase in students of color who transfer from partner institutions. 

Dr. Vande Zande called upon UW-Fox Valley Assistant Dean Carla Rabe to talk about her perspective on transfer. 

Examples of Collaboration

Assistant Dean Rabe said that each year UW-Fox Valley, part of the UW Colleges and the second largest of the UW Colleges, enrolls about 1,800 students.  Each year, 43.5 percent of students attending UW-Fox Valley as freshmen and sophomores transfer within the System.  Of that 43.5 percent, 20 percent of the students are transferring to UW-Oshkosh.  Having knowledge of this high percentage, UW-Fox Valley began discussions with faculty and staff at both UW-Oshkosh and within UW Colleges.  After carefully listening to students, faculty, and staff about the transfer process, they began to brainstorm and collaborate on various ways to assist students differently.  A very strong collaborative effort between UW-Oshkosh and UW-Fox Valley has developed. 

The overarching goal of the collaborative effort is to provide top-notch advising, while creating a smooth transfer process with an end result of seeing students complete their educational plan successfully.  Ms. Rabe said that this fall, UW-Oshkosh advisor Lisa Romenesko, who is the liaison and student advocate housed at three campuses -- UW-Fond du Lac, UW-Fox Valley, and UW-Oshkosh -- has been meeting with potential transfer students, holding brown-bag sessions with faculty advisors, and meeting with each institution to discuss student and campus needs.  This new collaborative transfer center would not be the success that it had already become without the strong collaborative efforts already in place. 

Dr. Vande Zande resumed speaking, noting the importance of having a transfer specialist physically present across the three campuses.  Walk-in access is also provided at UW-Oshkosh for new and continuing transfer students.  Collaboration among the high-impact practice coordinators is also occurring, with the goal of reaching out to transfer students in new ways.  An electronic virtual transfer center is being created to serve as a one-stop shop for transfer students where all of our electronic resources from all of the campuses will be collected.  Progress across the three campuses is constantly being measured.  Dr. Vande Zande said that ways are being found to organize everyday work around admissions advising and learning to support the transfer-student population. 

UW-Marathon Dean Keith Montgomery spoke next, about collaboration with UW-Stevens Point, which offers a selection of upper-level business courses at UW-Marathon County in Wausau.  These courses are taught by UW-Stevens Point faculty, as well as by UW-Marathon County faculty.  Having taken general education, as well as upper-level business courses, in Wausau, students can then choose two pathways toward degree completion.  They can transfer to UW-Stevens Point to complete their business degree there (traditional transfer), or they can choose to remain on the campus at UW-Marathon County and graduate specifically with a degree in business administration, with an emphasis in accounting or concentration in management.  This particular option, where the UW-Stevens Point student can remain on campus in Wausau, is called the Collaborative Degree Program, or the CDP. 

Both paths begin with the Associate of Arts and Sciences degree that the UW Colleges offer, with the usual low tuition and the addition of an on-site CDP advisor at UW-Marathon County, which assures that the students are well-advised and taking the most efficient pathway toward their degree.  Also, students who transfer can complete up to 93 credits at UW-Marathon County, which brings them much closer to degree completion at UW-Stevens Point; it brings them to within two semesters of degree completion. 

To assist students along the way, Dean Montgomery said, UW-Marathon County offers a new MyTrack program.  The MyTrack program offers the most common General Education courses that students need to complete their degree, and these courses are offered at night in seven-week blocks; an on-demand streaming video option is available, as well.  Students remain at UW-Marathon County even as UW-Stevens Point students completing the CDP program have ongoing access to student support services at UW-Marathon County -- the Writing Center, Math Lab, and faculty that they know.  Dean Montgomery turned to Laurie Kallstrom to provide more details about the CDP program.

Ms. Kallstrom, Outreach Program Manager in Continuing Education at UW-Stevens Point, spoke about the UW-Stevens Point degree completion program at UW-Marathon County.  She said that the program had been in existence since 1997.  However, in 2008, survey results showed overwhelmingly that students were interested in face-to-face instruction.  Prior to that, compressed video, with occasional faculty-member visits to campus, had been used.  By coordinating face-to-face courses at the UW-Marathon County campus, and bringing the UW-Stevens Point faculty there, students could attend extended lunch-hour and evening classes for eight weeks, or 16-week night classes. 

Only six sections per semester could be provided at UW-Marathon County, but the goal was for students to have access to the full cadre of offerings through the UW-Stevens Point School of Business and Economics Department.  The faculty are present, and students are encouraged to participate in programs.  Companies in the Wausau serve as corporate partners, visiting classrooms and providing tours of the companies.  Students also have access to local internships, as well as international internships. 

Ms. Kallstrom said that one of the best benefits for students is early advising, and catching students early so that they can plan.  Dual enrollment is an option.  Students do not have to finish their 60-credit associate degree and then become a UW-Stevens Point student.  They can take two courses from UW-Marathon County and two courses from UW-Stevens Point, all on the same campus, which helps with students’ costs and their financial aid eligibility. 

The six course sections offered each semester serve 57 students, who are enrolled across the six sections.  This is a cost-recovery program.  Ms. Kallstrom said that she works for UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education, and this program is being run without a budget because it is self-sustaining.

After showing a brief video highlighting one of the students in the Collaborative Degree Program, Ms. Kallstrom showed a photo of the student with a UW-Stevens Point group that
toured China, explaining that one corporate partner in Wausau is Greenheck Fan Corporation, which also has a plant in China.  This presented a great opportunity for students to be global learners, to have speakers from Greenheck come to the classroom, tour the Greenheck plant in Schofield, and then travel to China and see the operations there.  The goal is for students to support global companies in the local area. 

Ms. Kallstrom concluded by saying that the student in the video began her education seven years before at UW-Whitewater, had a child five years ago, completed her associate degree a year ago, and traveled to China on an internship five months ago.  In one year, she will be a UW graduate, having transferred from three institutions, and still graduating with 120 credits.  She has done this economically, moving through the UW Colleges, and with excellent advising by on-site advisors at UW-Marathon County. 

To conclude the presentation, Interim Senior Vice President Nook thanked all presenters, as well as Jan Sheppard, Interim Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Academic Support, who was instrumental in organizing the presentation. 

Dr. Nook said that the UW System has taken transfer very seriously.  Each campus is involved in helping students transfer effectively and efficiently, making the best use of their credits.  UW institutions are very autonomous and very different, which provides an excellent opportunity for transfer students to find an institution and a degree program that best serves their needs.  All UW institutions have programs with the depth and breadth just presented. 

Dr. Nook  also noted that the UW System institutions are very active in working with the Wisconsin Technical College System.  He invited questions and said that Vice Presidents Kathy Cullen and Annette Severson of the Wisconsin Technical College System were in the audience and were also available to answer questions.   

Board Discussion

Regent Crain stated that the presentation was important, because transfer is important to so many students and to the state of Wisconsin.  She observed that transfer issues are incredibly complicated and diverse, both because of the variety of institutions and the variety of students’ situations.  Also, the System stresses the need to retain students, but sometimes the reason for transfer later is because more was not done earlier to retain them.  It is very complicated thing.  She noted how essential it is to provide students as many opportunities as possible by working with them from the start, as well as at any point when they may enter again.  Regent Crain commented that there must be a difference between transfer students who originally start with the intention of transferring, which is often the case for those students who enter the UW Colleges, and those who drop out or whose lives change.

Interim Senior Vice President Nook agreed, saying that many of the students within the UW System know that they are going to be transferring.  One misconception is that most of those students who are going to transfer are at UW Colleges, or that they are in a pre-engineering, pre-nursing, or other preliminary program at a four-year institution.  Many students who transfer are not necessarily in one of those pre-programs; they know that they want to transfer from the institution at which they start, and they are starting there because of proximity. 

A new tool available nationally, a national clearinghouse, allows for tracking of students who transfer to an institution outside of the System.  This will also help provide a better understanding of students’ mobility.

President Spector recognized Regent Tyler, who commented that as a technical college graduate who struggled with reentering higher education later in life, he appreciates the efforts to make transfer easier.  He agreed with Regent Crain that the issue is complicated, saying that it must be addressed with a surgical knife, not a broad brush.  He expressed appreciation for the great work being done and the progress being made.  He said that it is difficult and important work.  Regent Tyler related a recent conversation with a couple, one of whom was raised in Birchwood, the other in Turtle Lake.  They were completely intimidated by the thought of going to UW-Madison or UW-Milwaukee, and starting closer to home was seen as an entry point.  Regent Tyler observed that there is a higher level of diversity among students who enter from the technical college system, perhaps in part because this is seen as a less intimidating, more comfortable route.  It is important for UW institutions to enable people to take the next step.

Dr. Nook agreed, saying that the importance of transfer had historically received inadequate attention nationally.  He said that through the Transfer Information System, academic plans, and articulation agreements that exist throughout the University of Wisconsin System and the technical colleges, close attention is being paid to the details and individual students.  While Wisconsin is ahead of most of the rest of the country, more needs to be done, he suggested.  Only UW-Madison is upgraded in the TIS, and work needs to be done on the other four-year institutions, to make transfer as easy and as efficient as possible.

President Spector recognized Regent Vásquez, who complimented the work that had been done.  At the same time, however, the topic of transfer receives negative attention in the media, the Legislature, and in businesses.  He said that he had heard examples of technical college students saying that Marquette University accepted all of their credits, but transferring credits to the UW System is more difficult.  He asked how to help people understand the work that is being done and how information about this progress can be better communicated to the public.

Interim Senior Vice President Nook said that transfer issues will always exist.  However, he suggested that it is important to adequately evaluate courses, including courses students take as electives, to consider how or whether they can be transferred.  The Transfer Information System and new transfer plans help students understand all of this better, but there will always be concerns in individual situations. 

Regent Sherven noted that when he chose to complete his degree, he ran into a number of roadblocks.  He picked a number of institutions to contact and to ask to review his transcripts.  At the time, his associate degree was 20 years old.  Also, however, he had 20 years of real-world business experience.  The roadblocks almost drove him to a private institution outside of the UW System.  Regent Sherven wondered what was being done to help students in similar situations. 

Dr. Nook said that this is a growing segment of students.  One thing that the UW System is doing is an initiative funded through the Lumina Foundation related to credit for prior learning.  This is separate from which courses transfer, but it provides for having faculty look closely at an individual’s experience and determine how it fits within the curriculum.  A committee of faculty and provosts is working to provide some broad guidelines and principles that might be used within the System and within UW institutions to evaluate credit earned through non-traditional learning environments. Another committee will work on transcripts and the mechanisms for recording the credit that is earned.  A mechanism is also needed for students taking credits at two different institutions at the same time through on-line endeavors or simply because the two are close enough and they are commuting.   

Regent Pointer expressed gratitude, as a transfer student herself, for the new TIS tool that will allow for better planning when transferring credits.  She wondered if there was a timeline in place for the other four-year institutions to receive the upgrade, and what type of accountability would be in place for institutions to keep things up to date so that students’ planning documents would be truly effective.

Ms Freeman fielded these questions, saying that an assessment was being done of the readiness of two more institutions to roll out this capability in the spring.  This would involve looking at curricular and information technology considerations.  There are some technology issues, but Ms. Freeman said she anticipated that within four to five years, all of the UW institutions would be participating.  As to the question about the accuracy of the curricular information for planning, Ms. Freeman said that institutions upload their curriculum into TIS four times a year. 

Regent Bradley mentioned that when UW-Stevens Point and UW-Marathon County started to work collaboratively on transfer issues, a number of people told the leaders at those campuses why this wouldn’t work, or how it wouldn’t work.  He opined that it was a credit to the System and the leadership at UW-Stevens Point that the work continued; it is difficult work, and all of those involved should be commended. 

Interim Senior Vice President Nook said that one realization that had occurred was that colleagues at UW Colleges “look an awful lot” like those who teach at the four-year institutions.  They hold Ph.D.s, and their curricula are designed in the same way.  Therefore, it was not a leap of faith to think about having the colleagues at UW-Marathon County teach some of the upper division business courses.  The program at Stevens Point and Marathon County is not even unique.  There are several of them, such as one with UW-Sheboygan and UW-Oshkosh; they are throughout the System.

Regent Pruitt asked about the applicability of credit transfer to students who are interested in transferring from for-profit universities, particularly adult students who may have begun at a for-profit institution, and may be having “buyer’s remorse” and are interested in moving into the UW System. 

Ms. Freeman responded that the tool being discussed does not address this situation, because for-profit institutions’ curricula are not within the UW System’s records.  What does already exist at all of the campuses are staff in the admissions office who work specifically with transfers and who would work with those prospective transfer students directly.  Thus, a technology tool is not available, but a person would work on this with students. 

Regent Pruitt asked about obstacles standing in the way of advancing this.  Ms. Freeman said that the private institution would need to enter into an agreement include all of their curricula in the System’s TIS, and then Madison would have to evaluate it.  The equivalencies in TIS would have to happen first.  This is a surmountable roadblock if a for-profit institution were interested, but it may not be in their best interest to make it easier for their students to transfer to UW institutions; therefore, at this point there is no way for the UW System’s program to recognize their curricula. 

Vice President Smith observed that it is important to tell the story of the progress made on transfer, because members of the public, legislators, and the executive branch occasionally hear concerns and have a misperception about the reality of the situation.  Sometimes legislators introduce some legislation that would affect transfer, and this is not something that the System would want to encourage.  Telling the story accurately is important.

President Spector recognized Regent Tyler, who asked a question about what work was being done on establishing curricula that will blend across institutions in the future.  Dr. Nook said that this was happening primarily at the individual institutions because of the autonomy of our campuses.  Since all institutions have their own curricula, interfaces are built directly between institutions, rather than at the System level. 

President Spector recognized Chancellor Gow, who applauded the collaboration that was occurring.  Commenting on private institutions, he said that there is sometimes a rush to develop programs, and quality suffers and shared governance is not followed.  The right way to do it is to bring people together, even though it takes a little time.  He cited strong programs at UW-La Crosse with Western Technical College and also with UW-Baraboo.

To close the discussion, President Reilly reemphasized a point that Dr. Nook had made, about the way that data are analyzed at the federal level not having caught up with students’ behavior.  For example, if somebody starts as a freshman at UW-Oshkosh and then transfers to UW-Green Bay, because the feds’ data reporting tracks first-time, full-time students who graduate within six years, the Oshkosh student who transfers to Green Bay is counted as a drop-out and a non-success at UW-Oshkosh, and UW-Green Bay gets no credit for graduating the student.  As a result, at the federal level graduation-rate data are not accurate numbers.  As more and more students graduate with credits from more than one institution, that distortion will only get worse.  President Reilly said that he would raise this issue again at national meetings.

President Spector thanked Senior Vice President Nook and his fellow presenters and noted that the comments made clear that transfer is a very important topic. 

- - -

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o’clock noon.
      

Submitted by: 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in Phoenix A/B
University Union
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Green Bay, Wisconsin 54311

Friday, October 7, 2011
9:00 a.m.

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board and Other Reports
Legislative Committee Activity of Interest to the Regents
Regents’ Role after the Biennial Budget & President’s Advisory Committee
Continuing Board Responsibilities
Changing Roles of the Board
Appointment of Board Roles and Governance Committees
Board Discussion
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Legislative Task Force
Recommendations of President’s Advisory Committee
News from Around the System
Significant Donations from the Kaos to UW-River Falls
UW-Platteville Center for New Ventures
UW-La Crosse Athletes and Dedication of Centennial Hall
UW-Oshkosh Dedication of Sage Hall
UW-Stevens Point Old Main Cupola Restoration
4-H Foundation Auction
UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mike Lovell Elected to Lead Wisconsin Energy Research Consortium
UW System’s Military-Friendly Colleges
Increase in International Students at UW-Stout
UW-Washington County Community Lecture Series on China
UW-Madison Bucky Challenge
Early Career Awards at UW-Madison
Accessible Biology Program at UW-Whitewater
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Education Committee Business
Highlights from UW-Parkside Presentation on Academic Plan
Highlights from Green Bay Presentation on Cofrin Center
Report of the Senior Vice President
Consent Agenda
Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment
Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE
Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business
Joint Meeting with the Capital Planning and Budget Committee
Operations Review And Audit:  Adoption Of Audit Charter
Program Review Of The Higher Education Location Program (HELP)
Office Of Operations Review And Audit:  Quarterly Status Report
Trust Funds:  Asset Allocation Analysis
Trust Funds:  2011 Proxy Voting Season Results
Trust Funds:  Acceptance Of Bequests Over $50,000
Minutes of the July 14, 2011 Meeting
Report On Quarterly Gifts, Grants And Contracts (4th Quarters)
Report of the Senior Vice President
Consent Agenda
Operations Review and Audit Adoption of the Operations Review and Audit Charter
UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of New Bequests Over $50,000
REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
Committee Business
Joint Meeting with the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee
UW-Madison School of Nursing Building
UW-Madison Badger Performance Center Project
UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine
UW-Milwaukee School of Freshwater Sciences Project
UW-Milwaukee Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)
UW-Platteville Campus Boundary Modification
UW-River Falls Master Plan Changes
UW-River Falls Cascade Avenue Reconstruction Project
UW-Stout Facility Renewal Program
UW-Oshkosh Clow Social Science Center and Nursing/Education Building Renovation project
Consent Agenda
Approval of the Design Report of the School of Nursing Project, and Authority to:  Adjust the Project Scope and Budget; Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stats. § 16.855 to Allow Single Prime Bidding; and Construct the Project, UW-Madison
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Student Athlete Performance Center-Phase I Project, UW-Madison
Authority to Lease Space for the School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, UW-Madison
Approval of the Design Report of the School of Freshwater Sciences Project and Authority to: Adjust the Project Scope and Budget, Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stats. §16.855 to Allow Single Prime Bidding, and Construct the Project, UW-Milwaukee
Authority to Seek the Release of Additional Funds to Continue Planning the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)-Phase I Project, UW-Milwaukee
Authority to Modify the Campus Boundary of UW-Platteville, UW-Platteville
Authority to Modify the Campus Boundary, UW-River Falls
Authority to Reimburse the City of River Falls for Cascade Avenue Assessable Improvements, UW-River Falls
Authority to Seek Building Trust Funds for Facility Renewal Projects, UW System
UW-Platteville Real Estate Foundation Development of Private Residence Hall
Report of the Associate Vice President
RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR UW-GREEN BAY FOR HOSTING THE OCTOBER BOARD OF REGENTS MEETING
Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Green Bay
CLOSED SESSION
Closed Session Resolution
Approval of Amended Additional Compensation Agreement for Head Men’s Basketball Coach, University of Wisconsin-Madison



MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in Phoenix A/B
University Union
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Green Bay, Wisconsin 54311

Friday, October 7, 2011
9:00 a.m.

-President Spector Presiding-

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Edmund Manydeeds, Katherine Pointer, Charles Pruitt, Troy Sherven, Brent Smith, Mark Tyler, Michael Spector, and José Vásquez.

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents John Drew and David Walsh.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

 

Wisconsin Technical College System Board and Other Reports

President Spector noted that the written reports of the Technical College System Board and of the UW Hospital Authority Board had been filed, and members had received copies.  In the case of the Technical College Board, Regent members are Regents Tyler, Crain, Evers, and Smith.  In the case of the Hospital Board, Regent members are Regents Walsh, Bartell, and Falbo.  President Spector suggested that anybody who had questions should speak with one of those Regent representatives.

Legislative Committee Activity of Interest to the Regents

President Spector reported that the two student Regents, Troy Sherven and Katie Pointer, recently appeared before the Senate’s higher education committee for their confirmation hearings.  He said that he understood that they did an excellent job, very capably answering the questions they were asked.  A formal committee vote on their confirmations was scheduled for the next Wednesday.

President Spector noted that the Board was still awaiting three additional Regent appointments.  The Governor’s office indicated that an announcement of those appointments was expected sometime soon.  President Spector said that he continued to hope that would be the case, so that the Board could welcome and include the new appointees in the work of the Board.

President Spector reported that there had been an increasing amount of other legislative committee activity of interest to the Regents.  In the past month, the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Higher Education had met to hear Senator Harsdorf’s bill, SB 184, to extend the timing of the legislative Special Task Force on UW Restructuring and Operational Flexibilities (Task Force) for one more year.  The new chairperson of the committee, Senator Dale Schultz, has been a strong supporter of the UW System, and has expressed his willingness to have informational hearings on issues the System finds of interest, as well as on legislation.  President Spector said that the System looked forward very much to working with him in that regard. 

Representative Steve Nass convened the Assembly Colleges and Universities Committee, holding hearings on several financial aid bills of importance to the System, as well as the bills that provide for geographical representation for the Regents.  The Regents previously expressed their support for the geographical representation bills, and President Spector expressed appreciation for Representative Nass’s willingness to move that legislation through his committee. 

President Spector  reported that the Governor had recently introduced a jobs-package special session, with nearly 40 bills included, some of which may affect UW System institutions.  He noted that the bills were being analyzed and updates would be provided as more information was developed.

Regents’ Role after the Biennial Budget & President’s Advisory Committee 

President Spector spoke about the evolving role of the Regents, saying that, as the Board learned in September, the President’s Advisory Committee on the Roles of UW System Administration, ably chaired by Regent Pruitt, strongly recommended a “shift toward a decentralized model compared with current practice.”  In his response to that committee’s report, President Reilly emphasized new substantive roles for chancellors, a new leadership philosophy, and an examination of alternative board structures. 

As the System moves down the road set by the Advisory Committee report and President Reilly’s response, it must be increasingly mindful of the need to reconsider, and perhaps redefine, the role of the Board of Regents in the System.  For that reason, it is useful to consider which aspects of Regents’ future work are likely to remain the same and which may evolve into something new and different.

Continuing Board Responsibilities

The current Wisconsin statutes set forth a multitude of specific, clear directives to the Regents.  A few illustrations suffice:  offering night courses and part-time programs at the law school, operating the geological and natural history survey, establishing the state laboratory of hygiene, and conducting bovine brucellosis research.

President Spector said that the long-time general statutory language from the 1971 merger legislation is especially relevant, more open to interpretation, and the primary basis for the Board’s oversight responsibility.  Quoting from the statute, he read, “The primary responsibility for governance of the system shall be vested in the board which shall enact policies and promulgate rules for governing the system, plan for the future needs of the state for university education, ensure the diversity of quality undergraduate programs while preserving the strength of the state’s graduate training and research centers and promote the widest degree of institutional autonomy within the controlling limits of system-wide policies and priorities established by the board.”  This language still exists and sets the context in which the Board operates.

Not to be forgotten are other core-responsibility statutes that continue to authorize the Board, for example, to select the System President, to select chancellors, to set tuition, and other charges.

Changing Roles of the Board

Refreshing Regents’ memories about continuing statutory responsibilities, however, was but background for the morning’s discussion, President Spector said.  He said that he would like the Board to consider what path it should follow to determine changes that may be necessary in how it conducts its business and how it governs the System in light of the new realities resulting from the 2011-13 Budget Bill, the Advisory Committee report, and increased delegation of decision-making to System institutions. 

One area of concern is what will be the focus of our Education Committee going forward.  Although the UW institutions will now be primarily responsible for ensuring the quality of their programs, the Regents have continuing statutory responsibility for ensuring “the diversity of quality undergraduate programs.”  What does this mean for the Education Committee in particular and for the Board in general?  What type of analysis and information should be available for review?  With greater authority vested in the institutions, and less in the System office, what level of detail should the Board expect on general education matters?  How will the Board determine if there is an unmet need in program array, for example?

Another area to explore is budgeting.  Certainly, the Board retains responsibility for reviewing, analyzing, and setting the overall budget for the System.  However, with the new flexibility of block grants for UW institutions, the nature of budget detail may well change; the Board may, for example, focus more on outcomes than inputs.

As to the annual accountability report, the biennial budget’s addition of specific new accountability indicators makes it likely that the Board will be assessing an even greater number of accountability measures.  President Spector posed the question, how should the Board best balance decentralization with oversight regarding accountability issues?

As the locus of authority for numerous management decisions changes, the Board still needs to be able to assure the citizens of the state of the soundness of those decisions.  At a minimum, President Spector said it was timely to consider the extent to which accountability measures, both longstanding and new, require changes to the type and amount of information available to the Board. 

In addition, President Spector suggested, careful consideration must be given to various crucial leadership questions:  How should the Board best monitor whether decentralization is in fact furthering current goals and objectives, or is instead a retrograde return to pre-merger problems?  How should the Board best initiate statewide consideration of necessary financial investment and reinvestment, especially from state GPR funds, to address the state’s higher-education needs through programs such as the Growth Agenda?   How should the Board, consistent with the worthy purposes of decentralization, coordinate internal resource allocations between and among UW institutions, encourage cross-institutional collaborations, and consider possible need-driven mission changes?

In sum, based on these examples, President Spector expressed the belief that it was timely to consider all aspects of Board members’ role as Regents.  He asked what Regents see as core responsibilities, in light of present-day fiscal and other realities, and what changes, if any, should be made in how Regents accomplish their business.

Appointment of Board Roles and Governance Committees

Regarding the topic of how best to accomplish the Board’s business, President Spector returned to a concept he raised in July, the possibility of changing the Board’s committee structure.  He reminded Regents that he asked at that time for their reaction to an idea that would involve three new Board committees, each intended to recognize the unique features of several components of the UW System:  (1) the two doctoral institutions; (2) the 11 comprehensive institutions; and (3) the UW Colleges and UW-Extension. 

The purpose of these new committees would be to focus attention on issues unique to each sector.  For example, the doctoral-institutions committee might consider issues such as graduate student remissions, Division I athletics or certain types of advanced research -- issues that are peculiar to those institutions, their missions, and their faculties.  Among the comprehensives, the question of how to build master’s program arrays, for instance, might be a topic.  As another example, specific concerns of  UW Colleges and UW-Extension might be best addressed by a “Colleges and Extension” Committee.

President Spector suggested that any changes in the committee structure be a means to an end, rather than an end in itself.  In other words, the Board’s responsibilities would first be defined with care in light of current circumstances, and then decisions could be made about whether specific structural changes would enable the Board to better carry them out.

Accordingly, President Spector said that he proposed to appoint an ad hoc committee of several Regents, President Reilly or his designee, various chancellors and Board Secretary Jane Radue, and charge them:  (1) to commit to writing the key functions and responsibilities of the Board going forward, statutory and otherwise; and (2) to examine how the Board can best meet those functions and responsibilities, whether through new Board committees or by any other means.  He said that he would request that the committee report its recommendations to the full Board at its December meeting.

Finally, in his Response to the Advisory Committee report, President Reilly recommended that President Spector appoint a special Regent committee to identify selected system governance structures from around the country, and to assess their strengths and weaknesses.  This recommendation was, in turn, a response to the Advisory Committee’s recommendation that a statewide conversation occur on the benefits and drawbacks of establishing campus‐based institutional boards. 

President Spector noted that a group of Regents, chancellors, and staff, created prior to President Reilly’s response, was already researching public-system governance structures in other states, in preparation for interaction with the legislative Task Force mentioned previously.  President Reilly is comfortable with having that group perform the tasks described in his response.  President Spector expressed his intention to establish the committee and also to ask the existing group to expand its jurisdiction.  He said that a response would be expected from this group at the December meeting, including the possibility of institution-level boards, whether advisory or otherwise.

The Board needs the best thinking of Regents, System leaders, chancellors and all other stakeholders on how to proceed with its work, President Spector said.  He welcomed questions or comments about the ideas that he put forward.

 Board Discussion

President Spector recognized Regent Bartell, who said that the idea of establishing three new committees had a lot of promise.  Each of the institutions that the Board governs has different needs, but the described categories make some sense.  Regent Bartell expressed a twofold concern, however.  First, he said that it is difficult to have committees that are responsible for a particular constituency and also committees that are responsible for certain functions, as currently exist.  The question arises, when an issue comes up, does it go to the committee that is responsible for the comprehensives, for example, or does it go to the education committee, which is responsible for all of the institutions?  It is not an unsolvable problem, but it is an obstacle to that kind of structure. 

Secondly, Regent Bartell expressed the concern that Regents are already split by function.  Some deal with capital planning and budget; some with education; and some with business, finance and audit.  Committee members do not have an opportunity to participate much in the other areas because the committees meet simultaneously.  If there are issues that some Regents do not get to address, except in the plenary session, where issues cannot be addressed as deeply, he said that he would be concerned about Regents’ being unable to participate in issues on which they would like to be heard.

President Spector responded that both issues that Regent Bartell raised would be perfect topics for the committee to consider.  He noted that Secretary Radue had already raised questions about the overlap that Regent Bartell described.  The Board has long had this timing problem, which could be exacerbated if not handled correctly.  On balance, however, President Spector said that he thought it was worth studying the possibilities, bearing in mind the issues that Regent Bartell raised.  President Spector thought it would be good for the Board to consider, going forward, whether it should do something different to respond to current realities. 

President Spector recognized Regent Crain, who said that she shared some of Regent Bartell’s concerns, but that she, too, thought that changes were worth considering.  She said she hoped that one thing that would not happen was that Regents, because of the committee that they were part of, would feel that they represent specific institutions, rather than the System as a whole.  This is something to watch for, because of the risk of Regents’ becoming specialists and losing the whole.

Regent Bradley asked to what extent the work of the to-be-appointed committee might be partially or completely undone by the state restructuring committee (i.e., the legislative Task Force).  President Spector said that it was important for the best results by the state restructuring committee, which would be in the capable hands of Regent Falbo, in part, to have the Board’s best thinking.  A number of questions, as for example, whether the Board would have three new committees, are internal questions that are not concerned with external governance as much as with how the Board conducts its business.  It is perfectly appropriate for the Board to comment on any of these matters.  Given the Board’s responsibilities, the Board certainly should be a player in what goes forward, and the sooner the Board can share its best thinking, the more helpful it will be overall to the Task Force.  Regent Spector said that he did not see any inconsistency. 

President Spector asked Regent Falbo if he would like to comment, as he had been named by Senator Darling and Representative Vos as the chair of the legislative Task Force.  President Spector expressed pride in this appointment and said that he was confident that President Spector would do a terrific job, and that he was being joined by other first-rate appointees.  He looked forward to the Board’s working closely with the Task Force. 

Regent Falbo expressed agreement about the composition of the Task Force that had been appointed and that it included good representation of UW System knowledge and history.  He said that he would take the role as chair as being not to promote any agenda that he might have.  Rather, he said he saw his role as facilitating and producing a prudent outcome that reflects a consensus of all groups that are represented, and that supports the goals and objectives of the UW System to maintain and continue to improve its status as one of the best in the country.  He said that he looked at his work as supporting everybody involved and being open to ideas that anybody would put forward.  He invited Regents to view him as always available.  He said that he did not view himself as any kind of expert, and that he would need a lot of help.  By the deadline for the Task Force, he would hope to have something that, as a main goal, focuses on students.

President Spector wished Regent Falbo good luck in this task.  Regent Bradley, saying he would like to speak on behalf of his colleagues, told Regent Falbo that all were delighted that he was appointed and that he had accepted the task. 

Regent Vásquez expressed support for moving into a new era.  He said, however, that he hoped that nothing would be created that looked like a shopping mall, with a big roof and a lot of businesses under it, the businesses having only retail sales in common.  The UW System is not an umbrella with a lot of independent businesses underneath.  In moving forward, it is important to keep in mind that the System is a unified System, one that requires a unified sense of direction and leadership.  In addition, Regent Vásquez said that he had a concern that there would be opportunities for the Regents as a group, whether as a committee of the whole or the entire body, to have the opportunity to engage in thoughtful discussion about systemwide issues.  Not everything that is Regent business should be conducted via the committees, with the Board only coming together to vote, without the opportunity to engage in very thoughtful discussion. 

President Spector said that these were words to the wise, both for the committee and the Board as a whole.  Prior agenda setters have tried to include bigger topics for discussion for the whole Board on Thursdays, and sometimes on Fridays, for the reasons that Regent Vásquez mentioned. 

President Spector also noted others who are participating as members of the Task Force – Chancellors Cross, Sheilds, and Wells and Regent Tyler.  He said that he was glad they were on the Task Force and wished them good luck.

Regent Pruitt observed that it is important for the Regents to decide proactively what their role should be.  Speaking for the President’s Advisory Committee, which he had chaired, Regent Pruitt said that it was never the Advisory Committee’s intention to suggest that the Board of Regents would have less authority.  It was always the expectation that it would be an evolving role, and that it would be focused in potentially different ways on the important issues of higher education.  It would be less micro-focused and more macro-focused.  It would look more at questions of how the Board can shape higher education policy, recognizing that “we’re all in this together” and that the Board must find a way forward with respect to the higher education needs of the state.  For these reasons, Regent Pruitt said that the course that President Spector had outlined – with a committee coming back to the Board in a proactive and positive way – was a good course.  He congratulated President Spector and expressed support for this direction.

President Spector expressed his thanks and affirmed that he would proceed accordingly.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

President Spector called upon President Reilly to present his report. 

Legislative Task Force

President Reilly added a few thoughts regarding the legislative Task Force, mentioning that the Task Force would take up six discrete topics, including the structure of the System, tuition flexibility, transfers, and personnel systems.  The way the law was written, the UW System was designated to staff the committee, working with the Legislative Fiscal Bureau and the Department of Administration.  Conversations had begun with both entities about how to best support the work of Task Force in a coordinated way. 

Mentioning some of the other appointees to the legislative Task Force, President Reilly said that the biennial budget called for 17 members.  The prior week, Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald and Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald announced their appointments.  On Wednesday, Senate Minority Leader Mark Miller had named Senator Chris Larson of Milwaukee to join the Task Force.  Earlier, Representative Steve Doyle from the La Crosse area was named as the appointee of the Assembly Minority Leader, Representative Peter Barca.  The Governor’s two appointees were expected soon.  President Reilly expressed his delight in Regent Falbo’s appointment to chair the group.

President Reilly said that the group appeared to be a very interesting, solid group.  He expressed hope that together, working with them, some of the important topics on the plate of public higher education in Wisconsin and around the country could be addressed.  He said that he thought that the Task Forces’ work would emphasize that the University of Wisconsin is a national leader.  He wrote to each of the Task Force members, expressing the System’s interest in working with them.  The UW System was also developing background informational packages that would address each of the six items that the Task Force would address. 

A bill was proposed to extend the deadline for the legislative Task Force’s report.  In the original budget bill the Task Force was to have its report done by January of 2012.  The proposed new deadline was January 2013, a year later.  If this holds true, the UW System will be developing its budget request for the 2013-15 biennium and submitting it well before the work of the Task Force is done.  A year from this fall – in September 2012 – the Regents will need to approve the next budget proposal.  It will be important to be mindful of those two timelines and see where coordination can occur as usefully as possible.

The Governor could still put some Task Force recommendations that might require legislation into his budget proposal request in February 2013, or the Legislature could include some of what comes out of the Task Force in its version of the budget as it considers the Governor’s submission of the budget.

Recommendations of President’s Advisory Committee

The recommendations that came from the President’s Advisory Committee on the Roles of UW System Administration informed some near-term decisions about the mandatory GPR budget reductions for UW System Administration, and will inform longer-term changes in the relationships among the Board, System Administration, and the institutions.  A number of additional steps have been made in responding to the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on the Roles of System Administration: (1) an extensive conversation with the chancellors occurred at the chancellors’ retreat in September, and chancellors provided good advice; (2) Senior Vice Presidents Michael Morgan and Mark Nook reported in Thursday’s committee meetings on operational changes being made; and (3) the process had begun to operationalize the newly-gained flexibilities, which would involve painstaking, detail-oriented work.  President Reilly said that he would provide further progress updates at future meetings.  

News from Around the System

President Reilly shared news from around the System:

Significant Donations from the Kaos to UW-River Falls

UW-River Falls reports that Charles and Anne Kao are donating their River Falls residence to the University to be used as an international center and temporary residence for visiting scholars.  Charles Kao is the founder and chairman of the Commonwealth Publishing Company in Taipei, Taiwan.  He taught in the Department of Economics at UW-River Falls for more than 30 years, from 1964 to 1998, and served as department chair from 1971-80.  He also received the Distinguished Teacher award in 1974.  Earlier in the year, the Kaos established the Charles Kao Faculty Development Fund at UW-River Falls.  Through this fund, the College of Business and Economics will receive $25,000 a year to support faculty development.  These recent gifts, combined with their past support of the university, make the Kaos the most generous living donors to UW-River Falls.  Chancellor Van Galen said that through their generosity, the Kaos have not only supported excellence within the College of Business and Economics, but have helped the university build international relationships to support its goal of global engagement.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Van Galen and the rest of the UW-River Falls community.

UW-Platteville Center for New Ventures

UW-Platteville is moving forward with the inaugural year of its Center for New Ventures.  The center’s focus is to promote economic growth in Wisconsin by connecting faculty with businesses, to help develop new sources of revenue, and to position the university to become more entrepreneurial.  Over the summer, Michael Gay, former business development coordinator for the City of Madison joined UW-Platteville as the Center’s director.  President Reilly said that he would serve as a link between the faculty and companies to make it easier for UW-Platteville to aid economic development opportunities in southwestern Wisconsin and across the state.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Shields and UW-Platteville for the new initiative.

UW-La Crosse Athletes and Dedication of Centennial Hall

President Reilly said that UW-La Crosse shared the news that its student athletes excel not only in competition, but also in the classroom.  UW-La Crosse’s student-athletes had a 3.21 GPA in 2010-11, the highest of any school in the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference.  It was the 10th straight year that UW-La Crosse student-athletes’ GPA exceeded that of the general student body.  Other news to celebrate at La Crosse is the official dedication of the new Centennial Hall at UW-La Crosse, the institution’s first new academic building in 35 years. 

UW-Oshkosh Dedication of Sage Hall

UW-Oshkosh recently dedicated Sage Hall, its first new academic building in 40 years.  Sage Hall, with its 27 state-of-the-art classrooms, 23 labs, and two lecture halls is home to the College of Business, as well as five departments and five programs of the College of Letters and Science.  As Chancellor Wells noted, Sage Hall is more than just a building, but is “a remarkable story of collaboration” among the university, UW-Oshkosh Foundation, and the state of Wisconsin.  President Reilly congratulated the UW-Oshkosh campus community.

UW-Stevens Point Old Main Cupola Restoration

At UW-Stevens Point, a well-known campus landmark, the cupola that sits atop historic Old Main, is getting repairs to re-establish structural support, update its paint job and moldings, and replace lighting.  The cupola is a primary symbol of the campus, so maintaining its repair, integrity, and appearance has significant meaning  The 22-foot tall cupola had begun to lean, sections of the fascia molding both above and below its columns had fallen off, and paint was peeling.  This is good news for Chancellor Bernie Patterson and the UW-Stevens Point community.

4-H Foundation Auction

UW-Extension’s Cooperative Extension reported that at the Wisconsin State Fair in August, the Wisconsin 4-H Foundation brought in $58,000 through the 4-H Governor’s Sweepstakes Meat Products Auction, a $22,000 increase from the previous year’s event.  The foundation raises money throughout the year for scholarships for college students who were part of 4-H as young adults, for statewide program grants, and to help high school-aged students participate in statewide 4-H events.  

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mike Lovell Elected to Lead Wisconsin Energy Research Consortium

President Reilly reported that Chancellor Mike Lovell and Mary Ann Wright, a Vice President with Johnson Controls, were elected to lead the Wisconsin Energy Research Consortium. The year-old organization, headquartered in Milwaukee, will help position Wisconsin as a nationally recognized hub for energy, power, and controls research by increasing university-industry partnerships and federal funding.  It brings together industry and the state’s largest engineering schools and technical colleges to stimulate research discovery that will lead to new products and processes, develop an energy-related workforce statewide, and boost economic growth of Wisconsin companies.  The academic members include the engineering schools at UWM, UW-Madison, Marquette University, and the Milwaukee School of Engineering, along with Lakeshore Technical College and the Milwaukee Area Technical College.   

UW System’s Military-Friendly Colleges

G.I. Jobs Magazine recently released its 2012 listing of military-friendly colleges nationwide, all 13 of four-year UW institutions, as well as UW-Waukesha made the list.  This list, which considers both financial and non-financial efforts to recruit and retain military and veteran students, honors the top 15 percent of colleges, universities, and trade schools nationwide that are doing the most to embrace America’s service members and veterans as students.  

Increase in International Students at UW-Stout

In news from UW-Stout, President Reilly reported that the university expected about a 60 percent increase in the number of new international students on campus in the fall as a result of new programs in the Office of International Education.  About 80 students from a variety of countries, including as far away as China, Nepal, and Saudi Arabia, were enrolled, up from 51 last fall.  Program director Hong Rost says the university is aiming for at least 10 percent growth each year.  Changes this year include restarting two programs to support international students:  the English as a Second Language Institute, for students who need additional language skills; and Friends of International Students, for local families to befriend a student.  

UW-Washington County Community Lecture Series on China

UW-Washington County reports that “Focus on China” is the theme of a month-long community lecture series presented on campus, with topics including “The Significance of Education in China” presented by Dr. Gilles Bousquet, Dean of the Division of International Studies at UW-Madison, and “Outsourcing to China,” a panel discussion with area business leaders and a Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation representative.  President Reilly complimented Dean Paul Price and the UW-Washington County campus.

UW-Madison Bucky Challenge

The recent Bucky Challenge at UW-Madison found a new and innovative use for social media.  The idea was the brainchild of Will Hsu who graduated from UW-Madison in 2000, after majoring in finance, Chinese languages and literature, and East Asian Studies.  He is now a senior finance manager at General Mills in Minneapolis.  Over a two-week period, Will and his family pledged to donate one dollar for every new Facebook friend or Twitter follower to connect with the UW-Madison, the Wisconsin Alumni Association, or both, with the money, up to $50,000, going to the university’s Great People Scholarship fund.  The idea is not just to donate to his alma mater, Will said, but to try to make sure people stay connected with the university.  The Bucky Challenge drew media attention from all over, from the New York Times to the Chronicle of Higher Ed, to the UK’s Guardian newspaper.  By the deadline, the Challenge raised more than $19,400 in new likes and follows, and the donor apparently agreed to make a $50,000 donation to the Great People Scholarship fund at Madison.

Early Career Awards at UW-Madison

President Obama announced that a pair of UW-Madison researchers and a recent alumnus are among this year’s recipients of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers.  Materials science and engineering professor Michael Arnold, chemistry professor Daniel Fredrickson, and UW-Madison graduate Samuel Zelinka, now a researcher at the USDA’s Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, will receive the awards, considered the highest honor the federal government bestows on young science and engineering professionals.  The Early Career Awards program was established in 1996 to encourage the development of scientists and engineers embarking on their independent careers.  The directors of federal agencies that fund research select finalists for the awards, which are passed on to the White House.  Chancellor Reilly congratulated Dr. Arnold, Dr. Fredrickson, Dr. Zelinka, Chancellor Ward, and the rest of the UW-Madison community.

Accessible Biology Program at UW-Whitewater

President Reilly said that five or six years before, UW-Whitewater biology professor George Clokey was approached by a student with disabilities, inquiring whether he could take part in the school’s field trip to Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.  At the time they were not set up to accommodate the student, but Professor Clokey made a promise to get a course going for students with disabilities.  Last summer, three UW-Whitewater biology students who use wheelchairs were part of Professor Clokey’s trek to Yellowstone.  President Reilly congratulated the professor, Chancellor Telfer, and the UW-Whitewater community.

Closing his remarks, President Reilly told Chancellor Harden that he had written a limerick for him and his UW-Green Bay colleagues, to celebrate the Board’s visit to UW-Green Bay:

We came to this school by the bay,
So compelling we wanted to stay.
With deep roots and strong wings,
Their inter-disciplinarity still sings,
Making Phoenix the bird of the day.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

President Spector called upon Regent Vásquez to present the report of the Education Committee.  Regent Vásquez began by saying that the Education Committee agenda called for only one formal vote, yet the discussions that ensued and the presentations that were made were really very thought provoking.  One presentation was on the UW-Parkside Campus Academic Plan, and a second one was the presentation on UW-Green Bay’s Vision and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

Education Committee Business

Highlights from UW-Parkside Presentation on Academic Plan

Regent Vásquez reported that Provost Terry Brown shared with the committee the work underway at UW-Parkside, framed by the development of the campus academic plan.  The university is engaged in the strategic alignment and coordination of multiple activities and efforts, resulting in a renewed commitment to student success as the UW System’s most diverse campus and one with real challenges in terms of student retention and graduation.  Provost Brown shared a progress report on the rebuilding of UW-Parkside’s teacher education program, and assured the committee that it would hear more about that as the program moves forward.  The committee is very interested, Regent Vásquez said, because one of its overall priorities is teacher preparation.  Additionally, UW-Parkside is the last of the UW degree-granting institution to present its academic plan to the Education Committee under the process followed since 2008. 

Highlights from Green Bay Presentation on Cofrin Center

The second presentation to the committee was from UW-Green Bay, and in her introduction of Dr. Robert Howe, Director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, Provost Julia Wallace called the Cofrin Center a stunning example of how UW-Green Bay implements the education described in Chancellor Harden’s Thursday-morning presentation.  The Cofrin Center reinforces UW-Green Bay’s select mission, centered on problem-solving, interdisciplinarity, and sustainability.  What the Center offers to students, faculty and staff, as well as K-12 students, is remarkable, Regent Vásquez said.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Regent Vásquez reported that Interim Senior Vice President Mark Nook addressed four areas singled out by the System President:  academic program planning and review, UW System grants made to UW institutions, transition of certain advisory groups and programs to the institutions, and addressing the surfeit of UW System initiatives.  Dr. Nook’s office, with input from the institutions, is reforming the Academic Affairs grant programs to provide the majority of funding in the form of Institutional Change grants to advance the Growth Agenda goals of the UW institutions.  A draft of the Request for Proposals was distributed to Provosts and System Administration staff for review, and then for distribution later in the month.   

As part of the commitment to transition, programs to be moved out of the central administration have been identified.  They are:  the Institute for Urban Education, the International Advisory Council, the Women’s Studies Consortium, and the System Advisory Group on Liberal Arts.  The Office of Academic Affairs has already had discussions with Provosts about the transfer of these groups, and a Request for Proposal process will be developed for institutions to submit their interest in hosting one of these programs. The Office of the Senior Vice President is also working to streamline the selection of systemwide academic initiatives, while continuing the System’s commitment to the Growth Agenda and Inclusive Excellence. 

The Education Committee, with input from chancellors and provosts, had a helpful discussion of the appropriateness (or inappropriateness) of some of the required indicators that have been asked of the UW System under Act 32, which is imposing a new system of accountability reporting.  The new accountability requirements will be challenging to meet, and work is underway to comply with them.  There will be a lot of discussion on the definition of some of the accountability indicators, such as the UW System’s responsibility in job creation or job placement.    

Regent Vásquez reported on the goal of having a new program planning and review process in place by September 2012.  Revising the current academic program approval and review process will require changes to Board of Regents policy and System administrative policies.  The first step includes forming a task force, with representation from across the System of faculty, staff, and administrators, to develop both new policy and a new process.  Overall, the restructuring will entail a deliberate reconsideration of the roles of UW institutions, UW System Administration, and the Regents.  In  his response to the Advisory Committee response, President Reilly recommended that UW System Administration remain responsible for program array and be removed from the quality assessment of new academic programs, with the quality piece left to the institutions.   Much of the Committee’s discussion focused on the question of quality, and what role and responsibility the Regents have in ensuring this.

Interim Senior Vice President Nook and the committee had a discussion about the Education Committee’s priorities for 2011-12.  Topics identified were:  changes to academic program planning and review; the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, including More Graduates and Inclusive Excellence; monitoring and being kept abreast of the legislative Task Force focus on transfer; teacher preparation; dual enrollment; meeting the needs and measuring the success of adult students and veterans; and prior learning assessment.  Regent Vásquez commented that the committee has a rather aggressive set of goals and priorities.           

Consent Agenda

Regent Vásquez concluded his report by saying that the committee moved on to approval of the consent agenda, which consisted of the approval of the minutes from the committee’s July 14, 2011, meeting, as well as two resolutions.  Resolution 9979 approved the appointment of Dr. Philip Farrell to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, to fill an unexpired term ending October 31, 2012.  Resolution 9980 approved revised faculty personnel rules at UW-Milwaukee.  Regent Vásquez moved adoption of resolutions 9979 and 9980.  Regent Crain seconded the motion, and the Board adopted the resolutions on a unanimous voice vote:

Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment

Resolution 9979:         That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the appointment of Dr. Philip Farrell to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, to fill an unexpired term ending October 31, 2012, effective immediately.

Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9980:         That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the amendments to Chapters 2 and 5 of the UW-Milwaukee Faculty Personnel Rules.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Spector called upon Regent Falbo to present the report of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.

Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business

Joint Meeting with the Capital Planning and Budget Committee

Regent Falbo first reported that the Business, Finance and Audit Committee met with the Capital Planning and Budget Committee to hear a presentation from UW-Green Bay on the 21st Century Library and received updates on master plans from UW-Platteville and UW-River Falls.  The Capital Planning and Budget Committee report would include more details on these items.

Operations Review And Audit:  Adoption Of Audit Charter

Regent Falbo reported that the committee took up adoption of the audit charter.  Elizabeth Dionne, Director of the UW System Office of Operations Review and Audit, spoke about the proposed charter.  The charter defines:  the  purpose, authority, and responsibility of the internal audit activity of the University of Wisconsin System Administration; establishes the Office of Operations Review and Audit; authorizes access to records, personnel, and physical properties relevant to the performance of engagements; defines the scope of internal audit activities; and identifies the standards of audit practice expected for personnel. 

Program Review Of The Higher Education Location Program (HELP) 

Director Dionne highlighted a recently-completed program review of HELP.  She indicated the program is very effective in meeting the needs of prospective students, parents, and high school guidance counselors.  HELP also manages the electronic application process for all UW Colleges and four-year universities.  User perceptions are very strong.  The review concluded that HELP was an effective and valuable program for external users and UW institution staff.   The review also made five recommendations, which UW-Extension is expected to implement by fiscal year 2012.

Office Of Operations Review And Audit:  Quarterly Status Report

Regent Falbo reported that the Office of Operations Review and Audit quarterly status report was presented by Director Dionne, who described on-going projects, as well as current or pending activities of the Legislative Audit Bureau which may impact the UW System.   The Legislative Audit Bureau is in the midst of their annual audit of UW System. 

In addition to the completed review of the Higher Education Location Program, current Operations Review and Audit projects include review of:  Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act implementation; NCAA Division III Athletics at UW-La Crosse; NCAA Division III Athletics at UW-Eau Claire; policies affecting students with disabilities; undergraduate academic and career advising; and privacy controls related to personally identifiable information.  Ms. Dionne also indicated that the Office had launched a survey to help determine areas of the highest risk and exposure to assist in selecting areas to include in the 2012 audit plan.

Trust Funds:  Asset Allocation Analysis

Doug Hoerr, UW System Trust Funds Director, presented information and analysis on current asset allocation within the long-term and intermediate funds.  He indicated that doing this type of quantitative analysis helps to confirm the asset allocation strategy.  This year the System was also able to take advantage of a planning model provided by Commonfund, called the Monte Carlo simulation.  Primary conclusions of the analyses are that investment policy decisions made by the committee are meeting objectives, and current spending plan continues to appear reasonable and prudent.

Trust Funds:  2011 Proxy Voting Season Results


The committee heard from Tom Reinders, Senior Portfolio Analyst, on the UW System Trust Funds participation in issues involving discrimination, the environment and substantial social injury via proxy voting of shareholder proposals.  The 2011 proxy season saw the filings of 348 proposals related to social issues, with nearly half of them coming to votes.  By June 30th, 164 social issue proposals resulted in shareholder votes, 120 were withdrawn, 53 were allowed to be omitted by the Securities Exchange Commission, and 11 are still pending.

Trust Funds:  Acceptance Of Bequests Over $50,000

The committee went on to a report of acceptance of bequests over $50,000.  The Committee formally accepted six bequests, with a total value of $1,125,288.

Minutes of the July 14, 2011 Meeting

The Committee approved the minutes of the July 14, 2011 meeting of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.

Report On Quarterly Gifts, Grants And Contracts (4th Quarters)

UW System Vice President for Finance Debbie Durcan presented information regarding gift, grant, and contract awards for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011.  Total awards for the period were $1.5 billion, a decrease of about $137 million compared to the prior year due to the significant amount of ARRA funding received during the prior fiscal year along with some timing differences in the reporting of award data.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs Michael Morgan provided the committee with an update on the changes underway as outlined in the President’s Response to the Report of the Advisory Committee on the Role of UW System Administration.  He indicated that in addition to the regular involvement of chancellors in the policy direction of the UW System through monthly meetings, new opportunities have been added.  Three chancellors are currently serving on the President’s Cabinet and two chancellors are participating in regular calls with Board leadership.  Within the area of Administration and Fiscal Affairs, Mr. Morgan indicated there are pending changes to the audits to be performed in 2012 and beyond.  In addition, efforts are underway to implement the Act 32 flexibilities and delegate to the institutions as appropriate.  Some of the flexibilities he mentioned included new block grant budgeting, new personnel systems, capital projects costing less than $500,000 and funded entirely by gifts, delegation authority for higher education purchasing and travel.

Mr. Morgan gave a status report on the Human Resources System (HRS) implementation.  He indicated there are still challenges with stabilization, but it is hoped most issues will be resolved by the end of the calendar year.

Finally, the committee identified possible priorities for the coming year including changing the audit focus, implementing ITMAC and the Act 32 flexibilities, developing the 2013-15 biennial budget, NCAA Division I athletics oversight, GPR fee allocation, and for-profit universities.

Consent Agenda

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Falbo moved adoption of Resolutions 9981, adoption of the Operations Review and Audit Charter, and Resolution 9982, acceptance of new bequests.  Regent Bartell seconded the motion, and the Board adopted the resolutions on a unanimous voice vote:

Operations Review and Audit Adoption of the Operations Review and Audit Charter

Resolution 9981:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents adopts the Operations Review and Audit Charter consistent with the Definition of Internal Auditing, the Code of Ethics, and the International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing.

UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of New Bequests Over $50,000

Resolution 9982:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, the bequests detailed on the attached list be accepted for the purposes designated by the donors, or where unrestricted by the donors, by the benefiting institution, and that the Trust Officer or Assistant Trust Officers be authorized to sign receipts and do all things necessary to effect the transfers for the benefit of the University of Wisconsin.

   Let it be herewith further resolved, that the President and Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, and the Deans and Chairs of the benefiting Colleges and Departments, express their sincere thanks and appreciation to the donors and their families for their generosity and their devotion to the values and ideals represented by the University of Wisconsin System.  These gifts will be used to sustain and further the quality and scholarship of the University and its students.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

President Spector then turned to Regent Bartell for the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.

Committee Business

Joint Meeting with the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee

Regent Bartell reported that the committee met jointly with the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee for several presentations.  The first, by UW-Green Bay Library Director Paula Ganyard, described the university’s vision for the renovation of the nearly 40-year-old Cofrin Library, to meet the learning and research needs of today’s students and faculty while trying to anticipate what technology holds in store for information storage and delivery in the future.  It was a very interesting presentation, including a discussion of how “the stacks” are being compressed; fewer and fewer books mean more electronic delivery of information. 

UW-Platteville and UW-River Falls also provided updates on their respective master plans.  The master planning process causes universities to consider what kinds of facilities they may need over the next decade and prioritize those facilities.  The process is very helpful both to the universities and to the Board of Regents.  A carefully prepared master plan is not merely a wish list, although it is that, Regent Bartell said.  It is the reflection of an extensive and deliberate evaluation of existing facilities, campus trends, and student and faculty needs; and such plans require regular updates. 

UW-Madison School of Nursing Building

Regent Bartell reported that Resolution 9983, brought by UW-Madison, requested authority to construct the $52 million School of Nursing building, at the corner of Highland Avenue and Observatory Drive on the Madison campus, near the medical school and the pharmacy school.  The request also included a minor increase to the scope and budget of the project and sought a waiver to allow single prime bidding for the project.  This project will be funded with almost $18 million in  gift and grant funding and will construct a five-story building to provide space for faculty and administrative offices, flexible research team space and instructional space that will allow the school to expand its instructional capacity and increase its enrollment.  The project was enumerated as part of the 2011-13 capital budget. 

UW-Madison Badger Performance Center Project

Resolution 9984 requested authority to construct the first phase of the Student Athlete Performance Center project, formerly known as the Badger Performance Center project.  This first phase, funded by $17.9 million in program revenue supported borrowing, will construct a new access tunnel from the basement of the McClain Center to the Camp Randall Stadium field and remodel the first and second floor areas of the stadium, which were not renovated during the 2005 Camp Randall Stadium renovation.  It will also replace the artificial turf.  The last replacement may have occurred in 2003, Regent Bartell said.  Damage occurs over time, and the turf must be replaced for the protection of student athletes. 

UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine

Regent Bartell reported that Resolution 9985, also brought by UW-Madison, requested authority to lease space for the School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, to replace the existing Wingra Clinic on the south side of Madison.  Following an RFP process that was begun a year before, a developer was chosen to construct a new clinic facility and lease it to the Department of Family Medicine.  A careful financial analysis led to the conclusion that a lease made more sense than constructing and owning this building, as far as the University is concerned.  The new clinic will provide comprehensive family medicine care, largely to a Medicaid clientele, and will also serve as a training site for the family medicine residency programs.  The issue of leasing, rather than constructing and owning, is being considered carefully, but it appears from the analysis so far that the unique construction needs of a clinic suggest that it makes more sense to lease.

UW-Milwaukee School of Freshwater Sciences Project

Resolution 9986, brought by UW-Milwaukee, and requested authority to construct the $53 million School of Freshwater Sciences project.  The request also includes a small increase of the project scope and budget relating to a heating system and seeks a waiver to allow single prime bidding for the project.  Regent Bartell reminded Regents that this project is the initial project in UWM’s master plan initiative in Milwaukee.  It will construct a beautiful three-story integrated research laboratory as an addition on the south side of the existing Great Lakes Research Facility for the School of Freshwater Sciences.  The new director described to the committee his excitement with this new program and new facility.  The addition will add multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research laboratories, shared core laboratory facilities, offices, and instructional and collaboration spaces to create an environment that everyone thinks will attract a diverse group of researchers.  This project will seek LEED™ Silver Certification.

UW-Milwaukee Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)

Regent Bartell reported that Resolution 9987 requested approval to seek the release of additional funds to continue planning the UW-Milwaukee’s Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)-Phase I Project.  Planning for this project has progressed, and additional planning funds are necessary to reach the design report milestone and satisfy project construction schedule goals.  The project is progressing. 

UW-Platteville Campus Boundary Modification

UW-River Falls Master Plan Changes

Regent Bartell reported that Resolutions 9988 and 9989 were brought by UW-Platteville and UW-River Falls to request authority to modify their campus boundaries.  These boundary changes would be consistent with their new master plans.  They represent minor changes, additions and deletions from the current campus boundaries. 

UW-River Falls Cascade Avenue Reconstruction Project

Resolution 9990, brought by UW-River Falls, requested authority to reimburse the city of River Falls for Cascade Avenue assessment improvements.  Regent Bartell said that the state and the city were engaging in a reconstructing process involving CascadeAvenue, a principal arterial for the city of River Falls and for the campus.  It will benefit the university and will benefit the city by improving the safety, functionality, and aesthetics of Cascade Avenue.  The cost, including two roundabouts, is being shared with the city, and property is being exchanged and some payments contributed by both parties. 

UW-Stout Facility Renewal Program

Resolution 9991, brought by UW-Stout, requested authority to seek $2.3 million in building trust funds for the preparation of pre-design and preliminary design documents for two facility renewal projects pursued under the new categorical enumeration of the Facility Renewal Program.  This is the new flexibility legislation initiated as a system-wide categorical enumeration for the purpose of upgrading the condition of university facilities, particularly those with substantially deferred maintenance, a major problem with facilities all around the System.  The two initial projects addressed in the resolution are UW-Stout Harvey Hall Renovation Phase II project and UW-Oshkosh Clow Social Science Center and Nursing/Education Building Renovation project.

The Harvey Hall project addresses deferred maintenance and upgrades infrastructure in a building that is almost a hundred years old.  Harvey Hall was built in 1916, and Regent Bartell said that he asked if this was a building worth saving; that is always an issue when investing in old facilities.  He said that the building is worth saving; the upgrade will support programmatic remodeling of general assignment classrooms, several departments of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, and the department of Psychology. 

UW-Oshkosh Clow Social Science Center and Nursing/Education Building Renovation project

Renovation of the UW-Oshkosh Clow Social Science Center and Nursing Education Building will address deferred maintenance and upgrade the infrastructure in a 1966 building.  Regent Bartell said that this building is also one worth saving; funding will support remodeling for general assignment classrooms, teaching labs, instructional and support space for the College of Nursing, the College of Education and Human Sciences, and the College of Letters and Science.

Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell reported that nine resolutions were passed unanimously by the Capital Planning and Budget Committee, and he moved adoption of Resolutions 9983, 9984, 9985, 9986, 9987, 9988, 9989, 9990, and 9991.  Regent Bartell seconded the motion, and the Board adopted the resolutions on a unanimous voice vote:

Approval of the Design Report of the School of Nursing Project, and Authority to:  Adjust the Project Scope and Budget; Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stats. § 16.855 to Allow Single Prime Bidding; and Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9983:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the School of Nursing project be approved and authority be granted to (a) waive Wis. Stats s. 16.855 under the provisions of s. 13.48 (19) to allow single prime bidding; (b) increase the project scope and budget by $622,000 ($250,000 Grant Funds and $372,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing [GFSB]); and (c) construct the project for a total project cost of $52,862,000 ($17,413,500 2011-13 GFSB, $17,413,500 2013-15 GFSB, $372,000 GFSB, and $17,413,000 Gifts and $250,000 Grant Funds).

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Student Athlete Performance Center-Phase I Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9984:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct Phase I of the Student Athlete Performance Center project at a cost of $17,870,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing as a portion of the total estimated project cost of $76,800,000 ($49,200,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $27,600,000 Gift Funds).

Authority to Lease Space for the School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, UW-Madison

Resolution  9985:        That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to request that the Department of Administration execute a lease for 30,000 GSF of clinic space for the UW-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine.

Approval of the Design Report of the School of Freshwater Sciences Project and Authority to: Adjust the Project Scope and Budget, Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stats. §16.855 to Allow Single Prime Bidding, and Construct the Project, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9986:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the School of Freshwater Sciences project be approved and authority be granted to: (a) increase the project scope and budget by $3,013,800 ($450,000 Existing General Fund Supported Borrowing and $2,563,800 General Fund Supported Borrowing - All Agency-UW Infrastructure); (b) seek a waiver of Wis. Stats. §16.855 under the provisions of Wis. Stats. §13.48 to allow single prime bidding; and (c) construct the project for a total project cost of $53,013,800 ($50,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $450,000 Existing General Fund Supported Borrowing; and $2,563,800 General Fund Supported Borrowing-All Agency-UW Infrastructure).

Authority to Seek the Release of Additional Funds to Continue Planning the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)-Phase I Project, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9987:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek the release of an additional $975,000 ($91,000 Building Trust Funds–Planning, $20,000 Program Revenue-Cash, and $864,000 Gifts/Grant Funds) to continue planning for the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex (IRC)-Phase I project with a current total project cost of $75,000,000 ($73,400,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing and $1,600,000 Gift/Grant Funds).

Authority to Modify the Campus Boundary of UW-Platteville, UW-Platteville

Resolution 9988:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, approval be granted for the campus boundary change associated with a new master plan at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville.

Authority to Modify the Campus Boundary, UW-River Falls

Resolution 9989:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-River Falls Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, approval be granted for various campus boundary changes associated with a new master plan at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

Authority to Reimburse the City of River Falls for Cascade Avenue Assessable Improvements, UW-River Falls

Resolution 9990:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-River Falls Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, in regard to projects to expand a parking lot and improve Cascade Avenue, River Falls, authority be granted to:
   (a) convey 1.567 acres of Board of Regents-owned land for use as  2.013 acres of land, which is currently used as a right-of-way;
   (b) reimburse the city of River Falls for assessable improvements valued at $1,729,706 using $607,369 of  2011-13 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $309,375 of 2009-11 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $253,125 residual funds from a utility project, and $559,837 Program Revenue-Cash; and
   (c) reimburse the city of River Falls for discretionary improvements that will be undertaken to further improve the  roadway, which are valued at $564,449, using $564,449 Program Revenue-Cash.

Authority to Seek Building Trust Funds for Facility Renewal Projects, UW System

Resolution 9991:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek release of $2,330,000 Building Trust Funds – Planning for the preparation of pre-design and preliminary design documents for projects pursued under the categorical enumeration of the Facility Renewal Program:  UW-Stout Harvey Hall Renovation Phase II project and UW-Oshkosh Clow Social Science Center and Nursing/Education Building Renovation project.

UW-Platteville Real Estate Foundation Development of Private Residence Hall

        
Regent Bartell separately addressed one item that was in the meeting materials but removed from the consent agenda, partly because of significant questions that relate to this form of development.  The development is a UW-Platteville proposal that involved the university and the UW-Platteville Real Estate Foundation’s development of a private residential hall on the campus, on state land, to house approximately 400 students and a dining facility. 

This is a situation where the foundation would be a partner with the university, and questions have to be addressed as to how the state or the university would be protected.  If the private facility went out of business, what would become of the real estate investment?  Who would operate it?  Is it going to be operated by a private firm, and what role would the university play in the operations?  Chancellor Shields would like this procedure to work so that it is seamless as far as the students are concerned, so that they wouldn’t notice the difference between living in a university-owned residence as compared with a privately owned residence hall.  This is important, but various issues have to be addressed, Regent Bartell said.  Once the issues are addressed, this could become a prototype method for the development of residence halls on campuses.  It is also likely that this could be done much less expensively than the way residence halls have been constructed in the past.  The subject deserves attention and care. 

Report of the Associate Vice President

Regent Bartell reported that Associate Vice President David Miller told the committee that the Building Commission approved about $33 million of UW System projects during the prior month. 
        
Thanking Regent Bartell for his report, President Spector remarked that the Capital Planning and Budget Committee report offered an illustration of a point made during the earlier discussion about Board committees, and the importance of not losing sight of the whole of what the Board does.  President Spector said that this point was well taken, but the committees are valuable, as the Capital Planning and Budget report demonstrated.  There is no way that, as a group, the Board could take on all of the resolutions and all of the questions about the resolutions, the way that Regent Bartell had just done.  President Spector said that he appreciated this about all of the committees. 

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RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR UW-GREEN BAY FOR HOSTING THE OCTOBER BOARD OF REGENTS MEETING

President Spector called upon Regent Crain to present the resolution of appreciation to UW-Green Bay.  Regent Crain said that she felt very honored to offer the resolution of appreciation to wonderful UW-Green Bay, which had been part of her community life for a very long time.  She said that she is at the campus often and felt extremely comfortable in the meeting room and others on the campus. 

Regent Crain noted that she was “the resident Regent,” and was happy to be joined by student Regent Katie Pointer, who is also from the community.  She said that she was also glad for Katie’s presence in this particular configuration of the Board, as “it is nice not to be the only woman.”  Regent Crain mentioned that there had been several other Regents from the area over time, and she gave special mention to Regent Emerita Ruth Clusen, a member of the Board of Regents in the 1980s, who was an inspiration to Regent Crain.

Regent Crain said that she had lived in Green Bay since 1971, and so had been there since the infancy of the university, if not the actual moment of its birth.  She was there when UW-Green Bay occupied one building on Green Bay’s east side, now Ann Sullivan Elementary School which is part of the Green Bay Public School system.  She said she came to know well the first Chancellor, Ed Weidner, who was so important to developing what the university became.

She was there to see the beginnings of the beautiful campus and watched the growth and increasing strength of the university in the region.  Along with many in the community, Regent Crain said that she was a beneficiary of much that the university offers; she said she valued the use of the library, learned from and worked with UW- Green Bay professors, and attended many wonderful university events over the years.  She was involved in a number of advisory and support groups, including the Council of Trustees.  She participated in the outreach of the university, including the extraordinary Phuture Phoenix program, and had made many friends among the faculty, staff, and students.  Regent Crain expressed her tremendous pride in UW-Green Bay and noted how important it is to the people of northeast Wisconsin, as well as to its many students and alumni from everywhere.  Many others from the community have the same kind of relationship with this fine institution of higher learning.

Regent Crain said that she was sure that all would agree that the Board’s time at UW-Green Bay had been a great couple of days.  On behalf of the Board, she thanked the university for its warm hospitality, the careful preparation that ensured that everything ran extremely smoothly, the meeting rooms and amenities, and wonderful food and fun.  She expressed appreciation for the inspiring and informative presentations about the university.  She also expressed gratitude for the weather and the beautiful autumn color.  Regent Crain acknowledged the tremendous amount of work that is required when the Regents meet on a campus and expressed sincere thanks to Chancellor Harden, Provost Wallace, and all who made the Board of Regents meeting a great experience.  She also thanked those from the university and the community who were involved in welcoming and informing the Board. 

Regent Crain offered the resolution, which was adopted by acclamation:

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Green Bay

Resolution 9992:         WHEREAS, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay advances the educational, cultural, and economic well-being of its region and the state of Wisconsin; and

   WHEREAS, the UW System Board of Regents is delighted to gain a better understanding of the unique nature of UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary academic approach and its success in leading students to become creative problem-solvers engaged in their communities; and

   WHEREAS, the Board of Regents appreciates the rich history of the original “Eco U” and the ongoing commitment of today’s UW-Green Bay to green initiatives, especially through the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and the Environmental Management and Business Institute; and

   WHEREAS, the Board takes notice of the University’s recent, targeted success in enrolling more students of color, in increasing online offerings for returning adult students, and in boosting both first-year retention and the overall number of graduates; and

   WHEREAS, the Board applauds Chancellor Thomas Harden and the institution’s systematic approach to strategic planning across the University; and

   WHEREAS, the Board appreciates UW-Green Bay’s strong ties to the community; partnerships with other institutions and agencies; impressive record of private financial support; formation of the new UW-Green Bay Foundation, Inc.; and effective citizen advocacy on behalf of the University and UW System initiatives, including the Wisconsin Idea Partnership; and

   WHEREAS, the Board of Regents embraces the spirit of Titletown in recognizing not only the NFL champion Packers but also the Phoenix women’s basketball team, which last spring finished 34-2, reached the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Division I Tournament, achieved a Top 10 national ranking, earned high academic honors, and captured the admiration of basketball fans around the state;

   BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that the UW Board of Regents hereby expresses its gratitude to Chancellor Harden and the entire University of Wisconsin-Green Bay community for sharing their warm hospitality and providing an engaging and instructive experience.

President Spector added his thanks to Chancellor Harden and his team and expressed how much the Board learns from and appreciates its visits to all of the UW System institutions. 

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The meeting was recessed at 10:50 a.m. and reconvened at 11:05 a.m.

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CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was presented by Regent Vice President Smith, seconded by Regent Tyler, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Jeffery Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Edmund Manydeeds, Katherine Pointer, Charles Pruitt, Troy Sherven, Brent Smith, Mark Tyler, Michael Spector, and José Vásquez voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Closed Session Resolution

Resolution 9993:         That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider UW-Madison honorary degree nominations, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider a compensation adjustment for the UW-Madison men’s basketball head coach, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

The following resolution was adopted during closed session:

Approval of Amended Additional Compensation Agreement for Head Men’s Basketball Coach, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Resolution 9994:         That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents does hereby approve the attached amended additional compensation agreement for Head Men’s Basketball Coach William F. Ryan, Jr.

The meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a.m.

 

Submitted by: 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board