Board of Regents

Minutes of the June, 2011 Board of Regents meeting

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

 

of the

 

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Held in the Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee Union

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 

Thursday, June 9, 2011

10:00 am

 

 

President’s Greeting.. 2

UW-MILWAUKEE PRESENTATION: “POWERFUL IDEAS PRODUCING PROVEN RESULTS WITH OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS”  2

UW-Milwaukee Enrollment Trends. 2

Research Expenditures Growth.. 3

UW-Milwaukee Master Plan.. 3

School of Public Health Project & Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett. 4

Kenwood Integrated Research Complex & Johnson Controls. 5

Innovation Park. 6

School of Freshwater Sciences. 6

Northwest Quadrant – Formerly Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital. 7

Student Recruitment Campaign.. 7

2011-13 Biennial Budget:  Action by the Legislative Joint Committee on Finance. 8

Joint Finance Committee & Preservation of Unified System... 8

Fewer Resources & Increased Leadership Flexibilities. 9

Overview of Joint Finance Omnibus Motion.. 10

Board Discussion of Joint Finance Motion.. 11

Telecommunications Provisions in Omnibus Motion.. 13

Board Discussion of Telecommunications Provisions. 14

University of Wisconsin Board of Regents Telecommunication Resolution. 15


 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

 

of the

 

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Held in the Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee Union

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 

Thursday, June 9, 2011

10:00 am

 

-President Pruitt presiding-

 

 

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffery Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad and Betty Womack

 

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regent Thomas Loftus

 

- - -

 

 

President’s Greeting

           

            President Pruitt welcomed Regents and other meeting attendees to UW-Milwaukee.  He thanked the hosts of the meeting, Chancellor Mike Lovell and his staff, for hosting the Board’s meetings.  For the first agenda item, President Pruitt turned to Chancellor Lovell, who had entitled his presentation, “Powerful Ideas Producing Proven Results With Our Community Partners.”

 

- - -

UW-MILWAUKEE PRESENTATION: “POWERFUL IDEAS PRODUCING PROVEN RESULTS WITH OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS”

UW-Milwaukee Enrollment Trends

 

            Chancellor Lovell welcomed the Regents to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.  He said that he was grateful, as past UWM chancellors have been, for the opportunity to demonstrate the progress being made at Wisconsin’s second-largest university.  He recalled that a year before, he was seated in the audience for the Board of Regents meeting at UW-Milwaukee, and he commented, “what a difference a year makes.”  The chancellor said that he had been blessed in many ways.  He said that he was very grateful to have been named the eighth chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee about a month prior.  He said that he felt fortunate during his interim tenure to have gotten to know the faculty, staff, and students of UW-Milwaukee in ways that were not possible as Dean of Engineering.  He remarked that they take great pride in UWM, and that he takes great pride in them.

 

            Chancellor Lovell said that he was especially proud of how efficient, innovative, and entrepreneurial the faculty and staff were.  Citing recent Goldwater Institute policy-report findings, based on an examination of spending at 198 leading United States universities, Chancellor Lovell said that UW-Milwaukee was 12th lowest in spending per student.  In dollars spent, that translated to UW-Milwaukee’s spending $13,000 annually per student, when the national average was more than $41,000. 

 

            According to the policy report, UW-Milwaukee also had the 12th-lowest ratio of instructional, research, and service staff per student, having 3.5 full-time instructional, research, and service employees per 100 students, half the national-average ratio of seven employees per 100 students.  According to the policy report, UW-Milwaukee was tied for 14th-lowest ratio of administrative staff per 100 students, with 3.6 full-time administrators per 100 students.  The national average ratio was 9.4 per 100 students.

 

            Despite how lean the university had been, he said, over the past decade UW-Milwaukee’s enrollment had grown 27 percent; the fall 2000 enrollment was 23,000, and fall 2010 enrollment was 30,500.  Also, over the prior decade, the number of degrees granted annually at UW-Milwaukee increased 37 percent.  In 1999-2000 UW-Milwaukee graduated 3,766 students; in 2009-2010, UW-Milwaukee graduated 5,164 students.

 

            The university’s growth included growth in students of color, to 20 percent of the total student body in fall 2010.  Also, four percent of students were military veterans or dependents, and three percent were international students.  The freshman class coming into the university in fall 2010 was 25 percent students of color.  

 

            Chancellor Lovell said that UW-Milwaukee led the UW System in enrollment in online and courses, with 6,600 students enrolled in at least one fully online course, and 1,500 students enrolled exclusively in online courses.

Research Expenditures Growth

 

            Despite the university’s leanness, the chancellor said that over the past decade research expenditures at UW-Milwaukee had increased 224 percent.  In fiscal year 2000, the university had $21 million in research expenditures, and in fiscal year 2011, it was projected to be at more than $75 million in research expenditures.

UW-Milwaukee Master Plan

 

            With significant growth in students and research at UW-Milwaukee, the chancellor said that more than ever, space is needed to maintain growth.  To that end, UW-Milwaukee began a master planning process in April 2008.  Completed over the following 20 months, the process involved more than 200 meetings with campus and community constituents and translated UW-Milwaukee’s values and aspirations into a plan.  It established a vision for the future of UW-Milwaukee’s presence in Greater Milwaukee and southeast Wisconsin.

 

            The master plan helped define a promising future for UW-Milwaukee, despite the budgetary worries.  To provide a sense of perspective, Chancellor Lovell said that there had been $320 million in capital projects at UW-Milwaukee over the prior 22 years.  During the current year, he said, $300 million in capital projects were under development.  He expressed appreciation for the Board of Regents’ and the state’s investments in the campus.

 

            Although capital projects are important, UWM must also have strong academic programs

and strong partners.  Chancellor Lovell said that he would be introducing some of UW-Milwaukee’s strategic partners, who help to make UW-Milwaukee’s academic and research programs strong.

 

School of Public Health Project & Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett

 

            Beginning with the School of Public Health, Chancellor Lovell said that this project would renovate an existing 33,000-square-foot, five-story building on the Pabst Brewery site and construct a 23,000-square-foot, five-story addition.  Construction and occupancy were expected to be complete by late summer 2012.

 

            Chancellor Lovell noted that some would remember UW-Milwaukee’s first guest community partner from an appearance he made at a Board of Regents meeting in 2005.  The chancellor, who was not there at the time, said that he was told that the mayor made a deeply passionate speech in support of a School of Public Health being located in Milwaukee.  He talked about how the health care challenges posed by Milwaukee required a school of public health in Milwaukee so that clinical programs could be sited where they were needed

most.  The chancellor said that he was grateful for the mayor’s strong support, then and now. 

 

            The chancellor introduced Mayor Tom Barrett, who began his remarks by alluding to the Governor’s budget proposal and expressing support for the Board of Regents’ efforts to maintain a strong UW System.  The mayor said that the city’s health care concerns suggested a need for a strong public health care system in the city of Milwaukee.  He focused his remarks on the issue of infant mortality, saying that the mortality rate was 6.4 per 1,000 for Caucasian babies, 7.4 percent for Hispanic babies, and 15.7 percent for African American babies.  He said that this disparity between Caucasian and African American babies was a public-health crisis.  That alone is one reason for a public-health presence in the city.  He reported progress through a partnership with United Way in reducing teen pregnancy.  However, sexually-transmitted diseases, asthma, and other health issues must also be addressed.  He said that many of Milwaukee’s public health indicators show that more needs to be done.  The city of Milwaukee will be a partner in the School of Public Health.  The mayor spoke about how important this effort is to the city, and how proud the city is to be a partner with the university in this effort. 

 

            The mayor said that the city is also excited about the School of Freshwater Sciences, on the south side of the city.  Both schools will help create hope in the community, and will be a launching pad for more great things for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 

 

Kenwood Integrated Research Complex & Johnson Controls

 

            Chancellor Lovell said that the second project he wanted to highlight was the first

phase of the Kenwood Integrated Research Complex, a $75-million showcase facility that would be the new gateway to the campus.  Construction would start in December 2012, with occupancy estimated for February 2015.  This would be the first of a multi-phase project, and would address urgent Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) academic and research needs.  The 150,000 square feet of total building area comprised of research labs/core facilities,

instructional/collaboration space, and office/support space would include relocation of the university’s award-winning Physics Department.

 

            The chancellor introduced Michael Andrew, Director of Government Affairs and External Communications at Johnson Controls.  The chancellor said that he spoke with Mr. Andrew on his second day on the job as dean, because he appreciated Johnson Controls’ role as a world leader in energy technology.  The university’s work with Johnson Controls became what he considered a model partnership for the university, he said.

 

            Mr. Andrew began by saying that Johnson Controls’ power solutions business was the largest supplier of automotive batteries in the world, which involved a major opportunity in alternative transportation – hybrid-electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles, pure electric vehicles, and start-stop vehicles. 

 

            Electric-energy storage challenges include systems, materials, processes, and modeling; Johnson Controls wants to be a thought-leader, quality-leader, and manufacturing-leader.  One way of achieving these goals is to be innovative.  A partnership approach is the way to do this.  Three key partners are federal and state government (Department of Energy and others); strategic, private-industry partners; and universities, which house brain power, equipment, and other resources.  Johnson Controls’ experience has traditionally been with the UW-Madison campus, but in the past two years, as Dean of the Engineering School, now-Chancellor Lovell was very engaged with industry.  Collaborative activities included design of a new modular battery system, direct sponsorship related to energy-storage research projects, membership in the Wisconsin Energy Research Consortium, and others.  All of this provided an opportunity for a strengthened manufacturing capability.

 

            Mr. Andrew particularly acknowledged Dr. Chen and Dr. Church, with whom Johnson Controls had been working closely on lithium ion batteries, with good mid-term results.  Future expansion of this partnership was anticipated, he said.  Mr. Andrew also provided additional examples of collaborative projects and shared facilities for exchanging equipment access and “mental capital.”  He outlined several goals for continuing to expand and strengthen the company’s relationship with UW-Milwaukee and to enhance the economic prospects for Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.

 

Innovation Park

 

            Chancellor Lovell introduced the discussion of a third major project, Innovation Park.  The purchase of the land was completed in February.  UW-Milwaukee would control about 71 acres at Innovation Park, including 60 acres for development and 11 acres for butterfly and wildlife habitat.  The location is eight miles west of the Kenwood campus; Innovation Park would become part of the research hub of southeastern Wisconsin, where billions of dollars of

investment had already created the heart for medical research in this region.  A federal grant would help construct the first building; the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration would be investing $5.4 million to construct a 25,000-square-foot building related to partnering within the region.  Groundbreaking was expected in the summer.  Having a presence would increase partnerships beyond science. 

 

            Chancellor Lovell said that the third partner to speak worked alongside UW-Milwaukee to advance nursing practice and research.  He introduced Peggy Troy, president and CEO of Children’s Hospital and Health System, part of the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center, a

consortium of six institutions that also includes the Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Hospital and the BloodCenter of Wisconsin. 

 

            Ms. Troy said that Children’s Hospital was just ranked the third-best children’s hospital in the United States.  She described the hospital’s caregiving, children’s advocacy, research, and education efforts.  She also stressed the hospital’s vision, “to establish and support the healthiest pediatric population in the nation through seamless integration of exceptional clinical care, research, education, community outreach, and advocacy; and powerful collaborations with local, regional and national partners.”  Milwaukee is one of the four most impoverished cities in the nation; attacking infant mortality and other issues can help improve this.  The Children’s Hospital needs to work with the city, UW-Milwaukee, and others to generate this improvement.  With more than 15,000 employees, the hospital is also a robust economic engine for the community; it also provides services in other areas around the state and has a research institute. 

 

            Ms. Troy said that Froedtert, Marquette, and UW-Milwaukee received a federal grant to collaborate on ways to advance health care.  One area of focus is how to evaluate the value of health care.  The hospital is a leader in genomics, a potential area for growth.  The hospital is working with the School of Nursing to develop affordable-care models.  In moving to Innovation Park, economies of scale would help to reduce costs.  She provided an example of a prospective partnership between the hospital’s surgeons and biomechanical engineering, which could help to produce an environment to enhance the quality of life for children awaiting heart transplants. Being on the same campus would produce a synergy that could change the landscape of children’s health care.  She expressed appreciation for UW-Milwaukee’s expertise and knowledge.

 

School of Freshwater Sciences

 

            Chancellor Lovell introduced a fourth area of collaboration, the School of Freshwater Sciences.  The $50-million addition to the Great Lakes Water Institute was due to start May 2012, with occupation projected for December 2013.  The initial phase would add 100,000 gross square feet for shared research core support facilities, research laboratories, teaching spaces, and

collaboration spaces.  The prior week, Chancellor Lovell said, UW-Milwaukee announced the hiring of founding dean David Garman, a specialist in water resources and pollution control.  An Australian, he is considered one of the world’s experts in pollution control and fresh water.

 

            The chancellor introduced a fourth speaker, who was engaged in regional efforts to promote southeastern Wisconsin as a water technology hub.  Rich Meeusen is Chairman, President, and CEO of Badger Meter and chair of the Milwaukee 7 Water Council.  The chancellor said that the month before, Rich had gone to Washington, D.C., to accept, on

behalf of the Water Council, an inaugural 2011 Water Prize from the Clean Water America Alliance.  The chancellor said that he was proud to work alongside Rich on the Water Council.

 

            Mr. Meeusen said that he was a graduate of UW-Whitewater, with a degree in accounting and a minor in history.  He said that in studying the history of the southeastern Wisconsin region, he learned that the area was developed based on industries that require fresh water, such as breweries, canneries, and food-processing industries.  While these industries have mostly disappeared, more than 150 water-technology companies still exist in southeastern Wisconsin, the largest concentration of such companies.  Mr. Meeusen said that More than 800 scientists and researchers work in this area – pumps, bathroom fixtures, etc.  The Water Council has several objectives:  to grow economic opportunities and jobs in southeastern Wisconsin around water; to grow a talent pipeline around water; and, using the available resources, to solve the world’s water problems (many children die each year because of a lack of fresh, clean water).

 

            Mr. Meeusen contrasted Disneyland with Disneyworld and the development of Anaheim, California as compared with Orlando, Florida.  The difference was that Orlando became the tourist capitol of the United States through collaborative efforts with universities and others.  He described efforts to work with UW institutions that are developing focuses in water.  In southeastern Wisconsin the synergy of many water-technology companies and the universities – the talent -- are co-located.  He expressed appreciation for the university’s part in this equation.

 

Northwest Quadrant – Formerly Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital

 

            Chancellor Lovell next discussed the Northwest Quadrant, formerly the Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital, which was acquired by the university in December 2010 for $20 million.  UW-Milwaukee was the second densest campus in the country; this purchase would increase the footprint of the campus by 20 percent.  It is 11 acres and 828,000 square feet.  The site would have almost 800 parking spaces.  Some first uses would be the children’s center, Honors College student housing, and surge space to relocate academic units during campus improvement projects.

 

Student Recruitment Campaign

 

            Chancellor Lovell closed his remarks by saying that he and other speakers had spoken about buildings, academic programs, and research partners.  These all exist to serve a very special audience:  students.  Chancellor Lovell said that the university must recruit the best and brightest from Wisconsin and elsewhere.  To do so, UW-Milwaukee developed “Powerful Ideas,

Proven Results,” a new student-recruitment campaign.  Significant investments have been

made in UW-Milwaukee; the new recruitment campaign would demonstrate the tremendous strides UW-Milwaukee has made.  For years the university was known as more of a commuter campus.  Today, students come from every county in Wisconsin, from all 50 states, and from more than 80 countries around the world.  Chancellor Lovell said that combined with a diverse faculty from around the world, UW-Milwaukee had grown into a truly international research university.  From its origins on Milwaukee’s east side, the university would now be moving out to new locations across the metropolitan area.  “Powerful Ideas, Proven Results” is the vehicle the university would use to help tell the story about its progress.  The chancellor said that this story had been condensed to a new video, which he presented for the Regents. 

 

            Chancellor Lovell closed his remarks by thanking all of his guests and briefly mentioning the strategic planning work that would begin in the summer.  He said that the strategic plan would focus on three key areas:  continuing the research-growth initiative, continuing to be an access campus and recruiting diverse faculty and staff, and focusing on campus climate and diversity.  He said that the university would have a busy year ahead and that he would keep the Regents informed of its progress.  He again thanked the Regents for being at UW-Milwaukee. 

 

- - -

 

2011-13 Biennial Budget:  Action by the Legislative Joint Committee on Finance

 

Joint Finance Committee & Preservation of Unified System

 

            President Pruitt, introducing the discussion of recent legislative action on the state budget, said that late the previous Friday, the Legislature’s Joint Finance Committee completed its work on the proposed 2011-13 biennial budget bill, including provisions related to the University of Wisconsin System.  Keeping with the budget proposal submitted by Governor Walker, the committee approved $250 million in reductions to general purpose revenue (GPR) support for UW System. Legislators offered many significant amendments to the bill, preserving a unified UW System and offering many long-sought administrative flexibilities to all UW institutions.

 

            President Pruitt said that he would ask President Reilly to provide some context for the budget presentation to the Board, and then Senior Vice President Michael Morgan and Associate Vice President Freda Harris would provide an overview of the Joint Finance Committee’s actions.  New provisions added to the budget regarding internet connectivity would also be discussed.

 

            President Pruitt said the prior week’s legislative action was the latest chapter in a bigger, ongoing conversation about the future of the University of Wisconsin.  Over the past year, an important discussion had occurred about the role of higher education in the state, and the role of the University of Wisconsin System.  He said that the state needs more college graduates and more well-paying jobs to thrive in an innovation economy.  If the university is to play a key role in addressing those needs, it needs a stable commitment from the state of Wisconsin.  President Pruitt said that in the early 1980s, the state allocated about 14 cents of every tax dollar to the UW System.  Today, fewer than 9 cents of every tax dollar go to the University of Wisconsin. Under the budget proposed by Governor Walker and advanced by the Joint Finance Committee, state support would drop to about 6 cents on the dollar.

 

            President Pruitt said that in discussing these issues with people all around the state, he had talked to legislators, chambers of commerce, editorial boards, Kiwanis Clubs and Rotarians, business organizations, and individual citizens.  He heard from many concerned citizens who care deeply about the UW System.  Remarking upon the passion reflected in the intense discussions about what public higher education in the state should look like, President Pruitt said that in spite of those differing opinions and strong feelings, there is a shared conviction that the UW System’s core offerings – education, research, innovative thinking and entrepreneurial spirit – need to be safeguarded and nurtured for future generations.

 

            As the legislature took up the proposed budget, they heard from people across the state about the importance of preserving a unified UW System that includes UW-Madison.  Legislators listened to their constituents in this regard, and the changes they made reflect that fact.  The chancellors spoke convincingly about the need for new administrative flexibilities for all UW institutions, and the JFC amendment reflected significant progress in that area. President Pruitt said he wanted to personally thank Senators Sheila Harsdorf and Alberta Darling for their leadership on the Joint Finance Committee.  He then turned to President Reilly to provide further background on the Joint Finance Committee’s actions.

 

Fewer Resources & Increased Leadership Flexibilities

 

            President Reilly said that the Joint Finance Committee amended the original budget bill in significant ways.  However, one thing that did not change was the magnitude of the financial challenges – some $250 million in reductions to the UW institutions over the next two years.

 

            President Reilly said that as the System implemented those cuts, it would need to focus on preserving broad access to a high-quality college experience, on safeguarding transformative research, and on fulfilling the promise of engagement and service to Wisconsin communities. With significantly fewer resources, registrar and financial-aid services would be slower and less effective, courses would be fewer, classes would be larger, and the UW’s outreach in areas like economic development would be crimped. 

 

            At the same time, the new leadership flexibilities, and the System’s ability to delegate that new authority to local institutions, would help, President Reilly said.  UW Chancellors, UW System Presidents, and Regents appointed by both Democratic and Republican Governors had long argued that UW institutions could operate more efficiently if relieved of cumbersome state rules. 

 

            Governor Walker showed that he was willing to consider bold changes, and that he recognized the UW’s unique operational needs.  Building on that original proposal, legislators worked to improve this budget in ways that would benefit all UW institutions and preserve the System. The leadership of Senator Harsdorf and Representative Strachota was especially instrumental.

 

            President Reilly said that to varying degrees, the legislation passed by the Joint Finance Committee would provide all UW institutions with new leadership flexibilities in areas addressed in the Wisconsin Idea Partnership -- budgeting, financial management, personnel, and purchasing, for example.  The end result was the most significant set of changes since the UW System was created 40 years ago.  President Reilly introduced Senior Vice President Michael Morgan to provide additional details.

 

Overview of Joint Finance Omnibus Motion

 

            Senior Vice President Morgan reviewed high points of the Omnibus Motion amending the Executive Budget, which was offered by the Joint Finance Committee.  He addressed three areas:  governance structure, budget amounts and management flexibilities.

 

            Mr. Morgan said that the proposal to separate UW-Madison from the UW System as a stand-alone public authority was not approved, and a proposal to study this status for UW-Milwaukee was also not approved.  However, Joint Finance did include a special task force that would study UW governance and operational flexibilities.

 

            Nothing changed with respect to the $250-million cut to the university’s budget.  However, the cut to UW-Madison did change; UW-Madison’s larger, 50-percent cut was reduced to its traditional-proportion, which would total $47.2 million.  A 25-percent cut to UW System Administration did not change, but UW System Administration was reduced by more positions, to a total of 51 positions.  The UW would be required to submit a plan, by September 1, 2011, to the Department of Administration and the legislature’s Joint Finance Committee for how it would operationalize the reduction.  Mr. Morgan said that President Reilly had put together an advisory committee to help work on this plan. 

 

            Significant gains were made in the flexibility area.  For example, in the area of budgeting, a block grant was provided in the Joint Finance motion.  Separate appropriations for operations and debt service, but most other separate appropriations were deleted.  Statutory limitations on tuition were deleted.  No new differential tuitions could be added.  A segregated fund would be established for program revenue, with three new appropriations.  Interest earnings in those funds would return to the campuses where the funds were generated.  Segregated student fees were separated out, and Joint Finance emphasized that they could be used only for certain purposes.

 

            In other changes, the Joint Finance action provided that pay plan increases could be provided to UW employees.  Any supplemental pay plan would also have to be approved by the Joint Committee on Employment Relations.  Board-of-Regents-approved personnel systems for the UW System and for UW-Madison were approved in the Joint Finance version of the bill, as were separate bargaining units for UW classified employees, effective July 1, 2013.  The Board of Regents and UW-Madison were also authorized to conduct collective bargaining.  UW System employees would continue to participate in state group health insurance plans and the Wisconsin retirement fund.  UW employees would not be counted as state employees after July 1, 2013.  In addition, the $12,000 cap on dual employment within the System would be removed.

 

            In the capital planning area, Senior Vice President Morgan said that Building Commission approval would not be required for gift- or grant-funded projects of less than $500,000.  Also, the threshold for Building-Commission approval of gifts of real property was increased to $150,000.

 

            In the area of procurement, the Department of Administration would be required to delegate to the Board of Regents and UW-Madison the authority to enter into purchasing contracts related to higher education.  The threshold for sealed bids was increased from $25,000 to $50,000.  Beginning July 1, 2013, the University of Wisconsin would establish travel policies for UW employees; UW System accounts for about 70 percent of state-employee travel, Mr. Morgan said.

 

            Along with granting more flexibility, the Joint Finance Committee sought more accountability by adding some new accountability measures on which the UW System would report, Mr. Morgan said. 

 

            Returning to the subject of the Special Task Force on Restructuring and Operational Flexibilities, Mr. Morgan said that the Task Force would consist of 17 members appointed by the Legislature and the Governor, which would study the structure of the System, transitioning employees to the new personnel system, tuition flexibility and the Legislature’s role, how pay plans should be determined, additional flexibilities that could be provided, and improvement of articulation and transfer of credits between UW institutions.  The work of the committee would need to be completed by January 1, 2012.

 

Board Discussion of Joint Finance Motion

 

            Regent Bartell asked a question about the 4-percent fees the Department of Administration charges for projects of $500,000 or less funded by gifts and grants.  He said that he could not remember any projects in this dollar category that had come before the Board’s Capital Planning and Budget Committee.

 

            Regent Bartell also noted that UW-Madison was given direct authority to make certain decisions; he asked if there was anything in the legislation to prevent the UW System from delegating to other UW institutions the same types of authority.  Mr. Morgan said that nothing in the legislation would prevent this.

 

            Regent Smith asked about the prohibition of new differential tuition.  Senior Vice President Morgan said that current differential tuitions remain, but new ones could not be added, perhaps as a way of limiting tuition overall.  Following up on this topic, Regent Vásquez asked how many UW institutions were working on coming forward with differential tuition proposals.  Associate Vice President Freda Harris responded to this question, saying that at least two campuses were working with students to develop differential proposals.  In response to a subsequent question from Regent Vásquez, she also clarified that the limitation on new differentials was for the current biennium.  The Task Force would look into what kind of flexibility the university should have in setting tuition and what the Legislature’s role would be.

 

            Regent Wingad commented that a lot of students benefitted from having a say in differential tuition.  He expressed concern about how students could have an impact on tuition decisions in the future.  He recalled a United Council resolution that called for continued student input in these kinds of tuition decisions.  He urged that the System continue to work with student groups to ensure students retain this level of “buy-in.”  President Reilly said that it would be important for student voices to be heard during the Task Force’s deliberations.  Regent Wingad reinforced this point, as well.

 

            Regent Danae Davis noted that appointments to the Task Force would be made by the Governor and the Legislature.  She wondered if there had been conversations about university input into the appointments; President Reilly said that those conversations would be occurring.  Senior Vice President Morgan then detailed the types of appointees that the Joint Finance Omnibus Motion included in the Task Force.  He also noted that the UW System President, Department of Administration, and Legislative Fiscal Bureau would provide staff for the Task Force.

 

            Regent Drew sought clarification of the position cuts to UW System Administration.  Mr. Morgan said that the relationship between the $250,000 cut and the cut of 51 positions had yet to be determined. 

 

            Regent Drew also asked about tuition for undocumented students.  Mr. Morgan said that the remission for undocumented students was deleted from the budget for future enrollments; this remission had allowed undocumented students to pay resident tuition.  Associate Vice President Harris said that the remission had applied only to students who met certain criteria, such as those who had been continuously in the state and who had been enrolled in a Wisconsin high school for three years.  Regent Drew asked if this negated a 2004 Regent policy that gave the authority to the chancellors to provide the remission to undocumented students.  Ms. Harris said that the Joint Finance action did not negate the Board’s position, which was that campuses should work with undocumented students in this area, but she said that after the Joint Finance action, the starting point would be non-resident tuition, rather than resident tuition.  President Reilly called upon General Counsel Tom Stafford, who said that the chancellors have the authority to remit tuition for needy or worthy students, and this could be one reason.  However, limited remissions are available for needy students in general.

 

            Regent Walsh commented that even achieving one flexibility was a victory, given how long the Board had been seeking new flexibilities.  At the same time, however, the Board has a long way to go with the flexibilities.  He commented that the System was not at the table when the $250,000 cut was negotiated.  He compared the current cut to a 2003-05 budget cut of a similar amount and commented that the Board had tremendous tuition flexibility then that allowed it to back-fill almost half of the amount that was cut.  Associate Vice President Harris said that the net ongoing reduction after this back-filling in the 2003-05 biennium was about $40 million.

 

            Chancellor Wells commented that when President Reilly and the chancellors met with the Governor early on, the Governor expressed support for the potential of additional management flexibilities.  The chancellor also offered a reminder that the UW’s third-party advocates, particularly chambers of commerce, were very supportive of the Wisconsin Idea Partnership.  President Reilly expressed appreciation to these and other advocates around the state.

 

            Chancellor Gow said that he preferred the word “responsibility” related to tuition, rather than “flexibility,” and he believed that the Board of Regents should have that responsibility.  The Regents are well qualified to have this responsibility.

           

Telecommunications Provisions in Omnibus Motion

 

            President Reilly initiated a discussion about new provisions the Joint Finance Committee included in its Omnibus Motion that he said posed a serious threat to WiscNet, the nonprofit consortium serving all UW campuses, hundreds of K-12 schools, public libraries, hospitals, technical colleges, private colleges, and other members. This same legislative language also would threaten several grant-funded partnerships, including the Metropolitan Unified Fiber Network project led by UW-Madison and the Building Community Capacity through Broadband project led by UW-Extension.

 

            President Reilly called upon Chancellor Ray Cross from UW-Extension and UW Colleges and Vice Chancellor Darrell Bazzell from UW-Madison to comment on the budget provisions.  Vice Chancellor Bazzell began, saying that the Joint Finance Committee’s action was unexpected and surprising.  UW-Madison had since been working to understand the implications.  He said that it would be difficult to overstate the potential negative effect that that the changes would have on UW-Madison’s $1 billion research enterprise.  The amendment could render UW-Madison’s research impossible, because it would eliminate access to broadband with the capacity needed for conducting the research.  WiscNet was started about 20 years before, with the type of high-speed connectivity needed for academic research and collaboration.  The impact would be extensive, on the social sciences, as much as on the “hard” sciences. 

 

            Examples of just three significant research grants that would be affected were:  (1) the Ice Cube grant, which allowed for the completion of a telescope at the South Pole; (2) the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center grant; and (3) an international research collaboration in Switzerland related to the world’s most powerful accelerator.  Mr. Bazzell also spoke of the threat to other projects and to job creation in the state.   

 

            Even if commercial telecommunications providers could participate in the networks, and this was not certain, it could come at an increased cost of four-fold to ten-fold, at a time of significant budget cuts. 

 

            Chancellor Cross spoke next, saying that about a year and a half before, UW-Extension was involved with four Wisconsin communities to develop a grant to build community capacity for broadband.  Another partnership would also increase business for private companies who provided services through broadband.  In August the federal government awarded UW-Extension a total of $32.3 million in grant funds; partners included the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, the Educational Communication Board, WiscNet, and others.  UW-Extension was facilitating the effort; its partners have already invested more than $2 million.  The grant would add fiberoptics which would not directly compete with other telecommunications companies.  The impact of the Omnibus Motion would be that most of the grant funds would need to be returned.  Ironically, the grants were not costing Wisconsin anything.  Also, without competing with the private sector, the grants would add almost 500 direct jobs and another 1,500 indirect jobs.

 

            Chancellor Cross said that currently, the state of Wisconsin ranked 43rd in connectivity to broadband systems, high-speed data-transmission systems.  If the Joint Finance provision passes, it would dramatically decrease high-speed broadband access in Wisconsin communities and would dramatically increase costs, limit economic development, and decrease the profits of those companies opposed to WiscNet.

 

Board Discussion of Telecommunications Provisions

 

            Regent Walsh asked whether the research issue was distinguishable from the issue of service to communities.  Vice Chancellor Bazzell and Chancellor Cross said the issues could be viewed differently.  Regent Walsh also raised a question about whether the activities of the grant were incompatible with the mission of the university, as some have argued.  General Counsel Stafford responded that the university had taken the position that the activities were consistent with the university’s mission.

 

            Regent Danae Davis, referring to an earlier comment by Regent Walsh, expressed concern about the UW’s not having been at the table during discussions that led to the telecommunications changes in the budget bill.  She asked what the System’s strategy to address this issue would be.  President Reilly said that the strategy, broadly speaking, would involve third-party advocates and partners who were very interested in the continuation of current telecommunications efforts.

 

            UW-Madison Provost Paul DeLuca added several points about the threat that would be posed if WisNet went down.  He said that the proposed changes were the largest threat he had seen to the research enterprise in the time he had been at UW-Madison.  The internet resources at risk are not viewed by the university community as a commodity, but rather as a tool for research and scholarship.  For example, the National Science Foundation has data-sharing agreements that specify how the data must be provided; the changes would not allow these agreements to be met.  Protocols, data compression, and access would all be affected.

 

            Regent Walsh asked about the history of UW-Madison’s dialog with alternative communications carriers.  Provost DeLuca speculated that WiscNet may have been swept up into the concerns of commercial carriers, without awareness of what WiscNet is.  WiscNet is a purchase of network services from UW-Madison’s Department of Information Technology. 

 

            Regent Evers suggested that the proposal was outrageous.  The cost to school districts would be perhaps $6 billion in addition to what they budgeted, on top of other cuts to the districts.  President Reilly commented that, in light of the complexity of the issue, it is likely that many legislators did not understand the implications of the proposal.

 

            Vice Chancellor Bazzell commented that if the legislation stood as it was, UW-Madison would be the only research institution in the country that would not be allowed to participate in some of the networks that had been described; this could not be allowed to happen.

 

            Regent Crain commented that there was a role for the Regents in fighting the legislation.  Regent Smith suggested the Board could vote on a resolution.  Regent Vásquez commented that the theme of “diminish public/grow private” seemed to be a motivating factor in the legislation; the System may want to look at this philosophy so as to anticipate possible future issues, rather than simply to react to them.

 

            President Pruitt then called for a motion on the telecommunications issue.  Regent Smith offered the motion, opposing the Joint Finance Committee’s amendment related to telecommunications; Regent Smith delegated to President Pruitt the ability to add explanatory clauses to the motion.  Regent Bartell seconded the motion, and the resolution passed on a voice vote:

 

        University of Wisconsin Board of Regents Telecommunication Resolution

 

Resolution 9919:         WHEREAS, the Wisconsin Legislature’s Joint Committee on Finance, on June 3, 2011, passed an omnibus motion relating to the University of Wisconsin System (System) that included four telecommunication provisions that, taken together:  (1) jeopardize the System’s research enterprise; (2) require the Board of Regents to reject $37 million in federal funding to promote access to broadband throughout the state; and (3) in effect, dismantle WiscNet, Wisconsin’s research and education network; and

 

WHEREAS, the $37 million in federal grant funding (and additional $9 million in community and private matching funds) would benefit Wisconsin public and private schools, municipalities, libraries, museums, and other public and non-profit organizations; and

 

WHEREAS, WiscNet has been the  System’s Internet service provider for the past 22 years, and UW-Madison, as a major research university, depends on secured, high-speed research networks to transmit large amounts of scientific data that lead to discovery and innovation, and all other UW System institutions similarly rely on access to specialized high-speed networks for teaching and research;

 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents urges the Legislature and Governor Walker to delete Sections 23, 24, 25, and 26 of University of Wisconsin System Omnibus Motion 489 of the 2011-13 Biennial Budget bill.

- - -

 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m.

 

 

Submitted by:

                                                                        /s/ Jane S. Radue                                

                                                                        Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Wisconsin Room
UW-Milwaukee Union
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Friday, June 10, 2011
10:00 am

 

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE FEBRUARY 25th and MARCH 10th MEETINGS
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board report.
President’s Farewell
Principles for Progress and Prosperity
Returning to What is Essential
Heartfelt Thanks
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Advisory Committee on Roles of System Administration
Federal visits
Leadership development conference
Rebecca Martin News
News from Around the System
Revisiting Undocumented Students Discussion
PRESENTATION OF THE 2011 TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS.
Introduction of Teaching Excellence Awards
Individual Award - Dr. Regan A. R. Gurung, Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development & Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Individual Award - Dr. Craig Berg, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Department Award - Professional Program in Education at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay , accepted by Dr. Timothy Kaufman, Chair of the Professional Program in Education
REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business.
Authority to release parcel – UW Barron County
Authority to seek a waiver to select a construction manager-at-risk for UW-Madison Badger Performance Center project
Authority to seek a waiver to allow single prime bidding for the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility
Authority to construct the Carlson Hall Renovation Project – UW-Whitewater
All Agency Maintenance Projects
Consent Agenda
Authority to Release Back to Barron County a Parcel of Approximately 0.764 Acres from the UW-Barron County Lease, UW Colleges: UW-Barron County
Authority to Seek a Waiver of § 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow Selection Through a Request for Proposal Process of a Construction-Manager-at-Risk for the Badger Performance Center Project, UW-Madison.
Contingent Upon Enumeration, Approval of the Design Report of the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Allow Single Prime Bidding and Construct the Project, UW-Madison
Approval of the Design Report of the Carlson Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater
Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System
Report of the Associate Vice President
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Education Committee Business
UW Colleges: Revised Mission and BAAS Degree
Revised Mission Statement, UW Colleges
Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, University of Wisconsin Colleges
Revised UW System Transfer Policy
UW System Undergraduate Transfer Policy
UW-Milwaukee Presentation
Report of the Senior Vice President
Consent Agenda
Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online Bachelor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership and Communication, UW-Eau Claire
Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business, UW-Eau Claire 
Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Arts in Japanese Studies, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Whitewater
Program Authorization (Implementation) Collaborative Online B.S. in Health and Wellness Management, UW-La Crosse, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Superior
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Organizational Change Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Supply Chain Management, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Distance Education Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Removal of Regent Policy Document 14-1, Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests
2011 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE
Joint Meeting of the Capital Planning & Budget Committee and the Business, Finance, & Audit Committee
Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business.
Wisconsin Small Business Advancement Program (Wiscap) 2010 Annual Report
Federal Update:  FY 2012 Federal Priorities
Program Integrity Regulations
Delegation of Certain Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted Under RPD 6-6
2011-12 Annual Budget Distribution Adjustments.
UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.
Quarterly Report of Gifts, Grants, And Contracts (3rd Quarter)
Human Resource System
Review and Approval of the FY 2012 Project Implementation Budget
Consent Agenda
Delegation of Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted under RPD 6-6: Delegation to System President
UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.
Human Resource System Review and Approval of the FY12 Project Implementation Budget
RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION FOR REGENTS’ SERVICE ON THE BOARD
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Emerita Schwalenberg
Resolution of Appreciation for Jessica Schwalenberg
Regent Emerita Schwalenberg’s Remarks
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Wingad
Resolution of Appreciation to Aaron Wingad
Regent Wingad’s Remarks
RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW-MILWAUKEE FOR HOSTING THE JUNE MEETING
Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee
ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS
Election of President
Election of Vice President
Election of Secretary of The Board, Assistant Secretaries, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers
COMMUNICATIONS, PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS
CLOSED SESSION
Authority to Name the Newly Constructed Addition and the Existing School of Human Ecology Building “Nancy Nicholas Hall,” UW-Madison
Authority to name the Regional Center for Arts and Humanities, the “Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities,” UW-Parkside
Authorization to Appoint: Five Deans at University of Wisconsin Colleges

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Wisconsin Room
UW-Milwaukee Union
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Friday, June 10, 2011
9:00 am

-President Pruitt presiding-

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffery Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  None.

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE FEBRUARY 25th and MARCH 10th MEETINGS

The minutes of the February 25, 2011 and March 10, 2011 meetings were approved as distributed.

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Wisconsin Technical College System Board report

A written report was provided.  There were no questions or comments.

President’s Farewell

Principles for Progress and Prosperity

President Pruitt said that he wanted to use his final President’s Report to the Board to offer a few reflections on the journey the System had been on over the previous year.  He said that it was a year ago in July that he and Jay Smith authored a paper entitled “Principles for Progress and Prosperity.”  President Pruitt said that he and Regent Emeritus Smith offered no earthshaking or dramatically different observations than many of their predecessors on the Board had been making for many years.  They talked about Wisconsin’s being at a crossroads. 

President Pruitt remarked that to thrive in a global economy where innovation and knowledge are vital, Wisconsin needed more college graduates and more jobs.  Also, the people in the University of Wisconsin System – at all of the campuses, and all faculty and staff – were ready, willing and able to help on both counts.

He and Regent Emeritus Smith talked about how the business model between the state and the university was a broken business model.  They urged candidates and office holders to reinvest in the university as an engine for economic growth.  They encouraged a new commitment to financial aid so that the university could educate more low- and moderate-income students, and free their families from crushing debt burdens.  They also called for new management flexibilities that would enable the chancellors to manage their campuses more effectively, pay their employees more competitively, and make limited dollars go further.  President Pruitt said that when the Governor’s budget was introduced in February 2011, “it was not exactly what we were hoping for.” 

Returning to What is Essential

Reflecting on the previous four months, since the budget was introduced, President Pruitt recalled a favorite quote from Robert Kennedy, when he was reflecting about the Gross Domestic Product and all that it measures and all that it does not.  Kennedy lamented that while the Gross Domestic Product measures many things, it “does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education, or the joy of their play.  It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages; the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials.”  Kennedy concluded that “it measures neither our wit nor our courage; neither our wisdom nor our learning; neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country.  It measures everything, in short, except what makes life worthwhile. And it tells everything about America except why we are proud that we are Americans.”

President Pruitt said that the debate over the last months about governance and boards and separations reminded him of Kennedy’s view of the Gross Domestic Product.  The debate has been about many things, but not about the most essential things that really matter.  President Pruitt said that he hoped that the focus could now return to those essential things.

Remarking that ties that bind the System were far stronger and more enduring than whatever short-term arguments or disagreements may temporarily divide it, President Pruitt said that in recent months a family argument had occurred.  Saying that his and other families have many arguments, but after cooling off, families return to the dinner table with a renewed appreciation for their commitment to each other, a recognition that they care about each other, and a realization that to move forward as a family, it is necessary to understand that “we are all in this together.”

Similarly, what brought together the University System and a university family 40 years before, and what will hold together the family in the next 40 years, was the Wisconsin Idea, and a deep and abiding commitment to the 182,000 students and 30,000 faculty and staff who depend on the System.  Saying that it was time to move forward and understand and appreciate that central commitment, President Pruitt said that he hoped that more time would be spent in the months and years ahead making the case, in a strong and united way, for the central role the university can play in the life of the state and the lives of students. 

President Pruitt urged a commitment to speaking clearly and in one voice to the state and all university stakeholders, to saying that continued deep cuts in state support are a short-sighted strategy for the state and for students.  He stressed the importance of returning to making the case for why the state needs to reinvest in its public university system.  Ten years before, students and their families paid 38 percent of the cost of their education.  Today, he said, they pay 60 percent; and at a time when more and more low- and moderate-income students need an education, that trend is unsustainable.

Saying that it was well known that the compensation of the UW’s world-class faculty, staff, and academic leadership did not measure up to the competitive national and international markets within which the university competes, President Pruitt said that more talented members of the academic community would be lost unless the case were made to turn around these trends.

On October 8, 1971, Governor Patrick Lucey signed the legislation creating the University of Wisconsin System and said, “This is the beginning of a new era in the education of Wisconsin’s young people. Merger is now a reality and we will all benefit because of it, through the new University of Wisconsin System.”  Forty years later, anyone would be hard pressed to say Governor Lucey got it wrong, President Pruitt said.  UW-Madison has become one of only four public universities in the top 20 universities in the country.  UW-Milwaukee is on an exciting upward trajectory.  UW-Oshkosh, UW-Stevens Point, UW-Green Bay, UW-Stout, and all of the other campuses are unrecognizable today from where they stood 40 years ago.  This did not happen by accident.  It happened because the union was strong, because the System stood together, and because the Regents’ predecessors understood what was important. 

President Pruitt said that the last four months had renewed his faith in both the importance of the System’s mission and the critical need to stand together.  In these most challenging of times, this Board of Regents, these Chancellors and this System President kept the faith, stayed the course, and shared a commitment to the Wisconsin Idea and to a vision Governor Lucey worked hard to realize 40 years before.

Dr. Martin Luther King used to remind people to keep their eyes on the prize.  President Pruitt reminded Regents that the recipients of the Regents Awards for Teaching Excellence would be honored that morning, a reminder of what the university is about.  He said that he was privileged to serve on the Teaching Excellence Awards selection committee when John Koker from UW-Oshkosh was chosen.  President Pruitt said that a couple of months earlier Professor Koker sent him an op-ed piece he submitted to the Oshkosh Northwestern.  President Pruitt, saying that Professor Koker had his eyes on the prize at UW-Oshkosh, quoted from the op-ed piece:

If nothing else, recent events in our state have more than ever heightened awareness and solidified the consensus regarding the precious value of education.  We at the University do not try to teach students what to think; rather we strive at every turn to teach them how to think.

We use the power of arts, the humanities, the sciences and the social sciences to present students with the knowledge and skills to navigate through these complicated and uncertain times.  No one wants to leave our children and grandchildren in debt.  Simply leaving them debt free, however, with no means to think critically, problem solve and learn is a short-sighted goal, one that may make us feel better now but leaves the future population unequipped to deal with issues that seem eternal.

Heartfelt Thanks

Concluding his remarks, President Pruitt extended heartfelt thanks to his colleagues on the Board, who stood together, unified, committed, and with one voice.  He extended special thanks to Vice President Mike Spector, saying that Vice President Spector’s wise counsel, brilliant mind, and steady hand had been invaluable over the previous four months and the prior two years. 

President Pruitt also thanked System President Kevin Reilly, who demonstrated how fortunate the System was to have him at its helm.  He thanked the System staff, saying that he feared leaving someone out if he attempted to list them all, and especially acknowledged Jessica Tormey of the Communications and External Relations team, who he said played a vital role in shuttling between offices in the Capitol over the prior four months. 

President Pruitt offered special thanks to Board of Regents Secretary Jane Radue, with whom he had worked during the prior year and a half, and to Emily Gleason, Ann Nottestad, and Jess Lathrop in the Board of Regents Office.  Joking that two weeks into his term as President, he did what 12 presidents before him had not done -- chasing Board Secretary Jude Temby into retirement -- he thanked Ms. Radue and her team for their support to the Board.

The “stars of the show,” President Pruitt said, were the chancellors and deans, who stood together during difficult times.  He expressed awe and deep appreciation for their leadership and efforts to preserve the 40-year union.  He suggested that this work was something in which the chancellors and deans could take great pride.

Concluding his last report as President, President Pruitt said that it had been an honor to serve.  He had promised to do his best, and given the importance of the cause, he expressed hope that his best had been good enough.

President Pruitt’s remarks were met with a standing ovation by all present.

President Reilly noted that President Pruitt had been a stalwart, committed leader of the Board and of the university and said that he had been unstinting in his commitment of time, energy, and intelligence as the System worked its way through the events of the prior four months.

 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Advisory Committee on Roles of System Administration

President Reilly began his update, saying that it had been a busy, interesting time.  The 2011-13 biennial budget included a proposal to reduce the UW System Administration operating budget by 25 percent.  There were also several proposals under consideration that would provide new administrative and management flexibilities to the Board of Regents, flexibilities that would in turn be made available to each UW institution.

President Reilly said that the System was at a pivotal point.  The significant changes would require careful and strategic consideration if UW System Administration were to be reshaped in a manner that preserves what is necessary and effective, sheds what is best done elsewhere or not at all, and considers the opportunities to better serve core stakeholders – the Board of Regents, the UW System institutions, and the people of Wisconsin.

Recalling that at the April Board meeting, President Reilly had announced plans for a President’s Advisory Committee, specifically to address these issues, President Reilly said that President Pruitt had agreed to chair the committee.  Other members of the Board who agreed to serve were Regents Jeff Bartell, Judy Crain, and Brent Smith.  Several Chancellors would be represented on the committee: Chancellors Debbie Ford of UW-Parkside, Tom Harden of UW-Green Bay, and Rick Wells of UW-Oshkosh.  The committee held its first meeting on May 31. 

President Reilly said that he asked the committee -- within the context of the UWSA mission statement, the proposed 25 percent reduction in base funding, and the new management flexibilities under consideration -- to advise him on potential changes in the structure, function, and support of System Administration, including operations currently assigned to both System Administration and Systemwide accounts.  He asked that the committee work to:  (1) consider what the law requires the Board of Regents and System Administration to do, and (2) sustain a commitment to the fundamental values of the Growth Agenda and Inclusive Excellence.  He said that he planned to use the work and recommendations of the Advisory Committee to inform and shape his thinking on the future role of System Administration.

Federal visits

President Reilly reported that in early May, he and President Pruitt had visited with members of Wisconsin's Congressional delegation in Washington, D.C.  The purpose of the visit was to draw attention to the inordinate impact that cuts to student financial aid and scientific research would have on UW System campuses and UW students.  They asked the delegation to support the Pell Grant program, which affects nearly 40,000 UW System students and is the foundation for college affordability for low-income students.  The suggested cutting of Pell grants to 2008-09 levels would result in fewer needy students being able to afford college at a time when investment in the nation's workforce is key to growing the nation's economy.  The President’s proposed budget request would freeze the maximum Pell grant at $5,550 in 2011-12, while the budget bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives would roll the maximum back to 2008-09 levels.

President Reilly said that they also discussed concerns of the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, the Wisconsin Technical College System, and the UW System regarding proposed administrative rules by the U.S. Department of Education that would, among other things, establish a federal definition of “credit hour” and establish a complaint process under which states would receive, review, and respond to complaints regarding postsecondary education.  They also thanked the delegation for its strong support in seeking a favorable interpretation from the federal Department of Veterans Affairs about the relationship between the federal post-9/11 GI Bill and the Wisconsin GI Bill. 

Leadership development conference

Earlier during the week of the Board meeting, President Reilly reported, the UW System held a Leadership Development workshop for department chairs.  The workshop brought together academic department chairs from all UW institutions.  Department chairs are critical leaders within their institutions, he said.  President Reilly thanked those from the American Council on Education and the UW System who devoted their time to organizing this event, and all the department chairs for participating.

Rebecca Martin News

President Reilly shared with the Board the news that Rebecca Martin, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, would be leaving the University of Wisconsin System in July to accept a position with the U.S. Education Delivery Institute in Washington, D.C.  He said that she would be at the July Board meeting, as her final meeting.

President Reilly also reported that Mark Nook, Provost and Vice Chancellor at UW-Stevens Point, agreed to serve in the capacity of Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs for one year, effective August 1.  President Reilly said he looked forward to working with Mr. Nook in his new capacity.  In the coming months, a national search would be begun to fill the position on a permanent basis.

News from Around the System

President Reilly indicated that due to the length of the day’s meeting, he would defer his report on descriptions of initiatives and accomplishments from around the System, instead sending these to Board members at a later time.

Revisiting Undocumented Students Discussion

President Reilly said that he would like to revisit the previous day’s brief conversation, in the context of the budget bill, about undocumented students.  He said that it was a complex topic, and he worried that some might misinterpret some of what was said. 

In the previous biennial budget, new statutory language was approved that let certain undocumented Wisconsin residents pay in-state tuition at UW institutions.  In the current budget bill, that language was removed, meaning that undocumented Wisconsin residents would again be charged non-resident tuition.  President Reilly said that it was the university’s intent to comply fully with this law, if it were passed. 

President Reilly clarified that chancellors do not have unilateral authority to set tuition differently for certain students.  Their financial aid offices do have a very limited pool of resources available to provide additional assistance for a small number of students who need more help to stay in school.  The number of students with documented financial aid already exceeds the capacity to provide financial aid by a significant amount.  This situation likely would worsen. 

President Reilly said that in responding to questions the day before, General Counsel Stafford had answered correctly, by saying that chancellors do have the authority to provide supplemental financial aid to needy students.  Some people came away from that exchange with the impression that the UW would earmark those financial aid dollars in some way for undocumented students; this is simply not the case, President Reilly said.  That kind of earmarking would not occur.  The finite pools of financial aid would continue to be used to help more low-income students stay in school and complete their degrees.

PRESENTATION OF THE 2011 TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

Introduction of Teaching Excellence Awards

President Pruitt said that the Board was honored to welcome some special guests, the recipients of the 2011 Regents Teaching Excellence Awards.  He turned to Betty Womack, chair of the awards selection committee, to introduce the awards ceremony.

Thanking Regent Pruitt, the Board, and chancellors for their diligent efforts over the past five months, Regent Womack expressed pleasure in welcoming the recipients of the 2011 Regents Teaching Excellence Awards and their families, friends and supporters.  The Regents Teaching Excellence Awards recognize and honor some of the UW System’s most outstanding teachers, departments, and programs.  She the awards were a welcome reminder of what a treasure the UW System has in its faculty and academic staff.  Writing in support of one of the day’s honorees, a colleague noted that the professor had a certain “magic” in the classroom – that he creatively inspired students not only to learn, but also to want to learn.  Regent Womack said that all of the honorees could be said to have that “magic touch.”

Saying that this is the highest recognition bestowed by the UW System to members of its faculty and academic staff for outstanding career achievements in teaching, Regent Womack said that three award recipients would be honored:  two professors and one academic program.  She also thanked her fellow Regents who had joined her on the selection committee, – Regents Jeff Bartell, John Drew, and Ed Manydeeds.  She thanked them for their thoughtful participation. 

Individual Award - Dr. Regan A. R. Gurung, Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development & Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Regent Womack called upon Regent Bartell to present the first award, to UW-Green Bay’s Ben J. and Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development and Psychology, Dr. Regan Gurung.   Regent Bartell said that Professor Gurung sees learning as something that rarely happens automatically. The learner has to work hard.  The teacher has to work hard.  Dr. Gurung’s goal as an educator is to make students realize that they can do better than what they think is their best, to exceed their own expectations.

As a teacher, Professor Gurung had been variously described as “intelligent, never compromising in the caliber of the material, quick-witted and humorous, and just simply fascinating.”  Ever the pedagogic scholar, his classes frequently employ innovative techniques and styles, and he has regularly solicited student feedback, Regent Bartell said. 

Professor Gurung, known for going the extra mile to connect with students, learns the names of all his students, even in lecture halls.  Regent Bartell told of Professor Gurung’s holding office hours in a campus coffee shop or the student union, so students are more likely to stop by; emailing every student who receives an “A” with a congratulatory note; and emailing any student who fails, inviting them to his office to talk about what happened.  Along the way, Dr. Gurung built a reputation as an outstanding teacher and scholar; he is nationally known for his research and publications on teaching and pedagogy, and wrote a major text entitled “Health Psychology: A Cultural Approach.”

Among Professor Gurung’s previous honors were the UW-Green Bay Founders’ Awards for both Excellence in Teaching and Excellence in Scholarship. In 2009, he was named the Wisconsin Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. At the present time, he serves as president of the National Society for the Teaching of Psychology and also as co-director of UW-Green Bay’s Teaching Scholars Program.

Regent Bartell congratulated and introduced Professor Gurung.  Professor Gurung, taking the podium, expressed appreciation for the recognition. He said he was proud to be a teacher and a member of the UW System.

Many academics, when asked what they do, often respond with their university affiliations or research areas.  Professor Gurung queried, “How often do you hear ‘I teach’?”  He said that this award nicely highlights the importance of teaching.

Professor Gurung said that 2011 had already seen the best of times and the worst of times for educators in Wisconsin.  The changes to state worker benefits and associated protests made many people say many bad things about educators.  It also brought faculty and staff together and elicited more appreciation for teaching.  It was heartwarming to see support from different parts of the university and community.  Earlier in the year, he said, he was leaving school when he was stopped by a member of the custodial services, who commented on how hard faculty work and said that he hoped that what was happening would not drive Dr. Gurung away.  Professor Gurung commented that the custodian was not concerned about his impending hardship, but his concern was for the students.

It would be easy to get bogged down by the dark implications of the budgetary changes. While it is important for faculty to be active in letting their voices be heard in response to the situation, faculty should not forget why they do what they do:  to improve lives with education.  

Professor Gurung expressed respect for what the Board does for education and appreciation for the efforts of the administration and the actions of the Board of Reagents.  He said that for his peace of mind, he takes pride in teaching and strives to do his best in the classroom and out.

Pride in teaching is not always easy to develop or express.  Professor Gurung said that he was lucky in that he kept in touch with his undergraduate mentor, a passionate teacher who cultivated his own passion for teaching.  Helping colleagues to nurture “the teachers inside” is important.  The efforts of the Board of Regents and of the Office of Professional and Instructional Development (OPID) were critical. He said it was critical to let budding academics and junior colleagues know that good teaching is valued and that one should take pride in teaching well. 

Taking pride in what one does is important.  This especially holds for teaching.  Recalling the Vince Lombardi biography, When Pride Still Mattered, Professor Gurung said that Lombardi advocated taking pride in what one did and doing it to the best of one’s capacity.

Teachers who can outline good pedagogy are a dime a dozen; the ones whose students’ learn, get inside their students heads and motivate.  He expressed pride in knowing good teachers are always looking for ways to improve their teaching, sharing their successes and helping grapple with teaching conundrums.

When university or state budget woes get him down, Professor Gurung said, or when poor student writing or other challenges make teaching difficult, he was rejuvenated by thinking of all the students whose lives were changed for the better by thoughtful, hardworking teachers.  Saying that the System and UW-Green Bay abound in high caliber, passionate teachers, Professor Gurung expressed gratitude and humility to be honored with the Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award.  He said that he was thankful to be surrounded by great colleagues and many hardworking students who helped him enjoy teaching -- faculty in Human Development and Psychology, his supportive Dean, colleagues and students at UW-Green Bay, UW System’s OPID, and his family.

In closing his remarks, which were met with a standing ovation, Professor Gurung thanked the Board for the recognition of the value of teaching and the opportunity to celebrate the effort that goes into education.  He expressed pride in being a teacher and a member of the UW System and said that “pride still matters.”

Individual Award - Dr. Craig Berg, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Regent Womack introduced Dr. Craig Berg, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction in the School of Education at UW-Milwaukee, to receive the second individual Teaching Excellence Award.  She said that Professor Berg started out teaching in the late 1970s at a small school in North Dakota.  After about six years, he decided he didn’t know enough about teaching, so he went back to school, at the University of Iowa.  Quoting him, she said that he “learned then, what is still reinforced every day, that highly effective teachers get that way through practice, reflection, time, feedback from students, feedback from colleagues, and a whole bunch of energy and dedication toward that end.”

In the more than two decades since, as a member of the UW-Milwaukee faculty, Dr. Berg  focused his energy on building a top-notch science teacher preparation program, developing and directing the rigorous and highly-respected Milwaukee Area Collaborative Science Teacher Education Program, also known as MACSTEP.  Regent Womack said that Dr. Berg was an ardent advocate for improving the lives of urban children and increasing their chances for success and had invested thousands of hours of professional development contact time with teachers in Milwaukee public schools and the surrounding districts.

A recipient of the 2007 Wisconsin Society of Science Teachers Excellence Award, Professor Berg also developed approximately 60 new courses for UW-Milwaukee’s Curriculum and Instruction department, and initiated a complete revamping of how the department assesses its own teaching.  He has regularly collaborated across campus with other departments, crafting and submitting teaching improvement grants.  Regent Womack said that the 41 grants he worked on to date attracted more than $4 million in funding.

Indicating that students’ reviews were consistently glowing, evidencing Dr. Berg’s success as a model teacher, Regent Womack introduced Dr. Berg to accept his award.

Dr. Berg first expressed thanks to the Board for recognizing teaching and for working to evaluate the award nominations.  He also thanked the UW-Milwaukee campus committee, provost, and chancellor for supporting his nomination. 

He said that he was pleased, honored, and thrilled to receive the award.  Although the expectation was that he be highly productive with regard to scholarship and service, teaching was still the central core of his daily life, he said, and the most important part of being a faculty member at UW-Milwaukee.  Whether writing grants, doing and publishing research, or developing new courses, his daily job connects to teaching, improving teaching, or improving teacher education programs.

Dr. Berg said that a long time before he decided that he had one of the world’s greatest jobs, getting to direct and teach in a grades 6-12 science teacher preparation program.  One of the joys of his life was getting to help others learn how to be effective teachers.  He said that he had a burning desire to be an effective teacher and a burning desire to help others become more effective teachers.

However, that was not always the case.  Dr. Berg said that he grew up in Minnesota on a farm; went to a small school with a graduating class of 40; went to college at North Dakota State University; and, five years later, finished his biology and education degree.  He took a job, and six years later, deciding there was more he needed to learn about teaching, enrolled in graduate school.  By way of graduate programs at the University of Iowa, earning a Masters of Science and Ph.D. in Science Education, he began a faculty position at UW-Milwaukee in 1989 “to test out the job.”  The job worked out, and he has held it for 22 years.  Dr. Berg said that he went from assistant, to associate with tenure, to full professor; these were all nice milestones, but the Board’s recognition for teaching topped anything that he had received.   

Acknowledging people who contributed to his growth as a teacher, including his first mentor, Dr. Don Scoby at NDSU and his professors at Iowa, his students, as well as his wife -- also a teacher -- Dr. Berg said that most of his knowledge about powerful teaching came from his former professors, and from students and area teachers who taught him how to be a much better teacher.  He expressed thanks to all who had shaped him as a teacher.

Dr. Berg emphasized two points about teaching:  (1) teaching is more complex and challenging than people realize, because of the variety of students, with different abilities and backgrounds, and teachers who have a positive impact on their students know that each student is an individual, with unique talents and gifts, and the expectations must fit the student; and (2) with regard to quality teachers, many “alternative teacher certification programs” are not preparing high-quality teachers, and teacher education programs need to be held to the highest standard, with only the best teachers placed in classrooms.

In closing, Dr. Berg expressed great pleasure and said he felt very honored to receive the Teaching Excellence Award and emphasized that he shared the award with all those who contributed to his becoming a better teacher and shaping his teaching.  Dr. Berg received a standing ovation from all in attendance.  

Department Award - Professional Program in Education at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay , accepted by Dr. Timothy Kaufman, Chair of the Professional Program in Education

Regent Manydeeds awarded the 2011 Regents Teaching Excellence Award for a Department or Program to the UW-Green Bay Professional Program in Education, represented at the Board meeting by its Chair, Professor Timothy Kaufman.  The Professional Program in Education was long one of UW-Green Bay’s most heavily enrolled programs, with more than 500 students who were majors, pre-majors or candidates for teaching certification in elementary education, or who were pursuing disciplinary majors and certification in secondary education.

Regent Manydeeds said that the Professional Program in Education was a program firmly grounded in UW-Green Bay’s campus-wide commitment to “connecting learning to life,” with an emphasis on helping students see the big picture and break through barriers to find practical solutions.  He explained that students were provided with varied opportunities to bring the ideas and concepts of effective education to life in relevant “real world” contexts, working with children and families from different ethnic, cultural, and economic groups, as well as children with exceptional educational needs.  

Regent Manydeeds said that the faculty strives to make teaching a public and collaborative activity, with many courses taught using a “co-teaching” approach in the field or combined as a sequence of courses directed by professional teams.  The Professional Program in Education also developed important partnerships in Green Bay and the surrounding areas, one example being the program’s involvement with Literacy Green Bay, through which students have the opportunity to work with second-language learners in area schools and immigrant parents. 

Regent Manydeeds described the program’s commitment to developing teachers with the ability to identify and meet the needs of diverse learners, learning to select and implement appropriate pedagogical strategies, and appreciate the unique contributions of all learners.  He referred to one graduate, who noted that the program spurred her interest in taking on greater leadership roles within her school and the district.

Among the department’s initiatives is the nationally-recognized “Phuture Phoenix” mentoring program, which encourages at-risk youngsters to graduate from high school and pursue a college education.  The Phuture Phoenix program has received numerous awards, including recognition as a Wisconsin Program of Distinction by the Department of Public Instruction.

The program also partnered with tribal elders in the state to create a Center for First Nation Studies, to help future educators be better prepared to teach youth about the history, culture, sovereignty, and contemporary issues of the indigenous people of North America.  Regent Manydeeds said that the program’s commitment to excellence was reflected in the high quality of teachers it had produced.  He presented the Regents Award for Teaching Excellence to Dr. Timothy Kaufman, accepting the award on behalf of the UW-Green Bay Professional Program in Education.

Dr. Kaufman accepted the award, expressing appreciation on behalf of the faculty, staff and students of the Professional Program in Education at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.  He thanked Regent Manydeeds for the humbling introduction and also thanked members of the Board of Regents, Regent Womack, and members of the Regent Teaching Excellence Awards Committee for the honor.  He also thanked Regent Crain for her past and continued support to UW-Green Bay and Chancellor Thomas Harden and Provost Julia Wallace for their support in helping prepare the teachers of tomorrow.  

Dr. Kaufman said that he was joined in accepting the award by several faculty members, Dr. James Coates, Dr. Pao Lor, and Dr. Susan Copper.  Other members unable to attend the ceremony include Dr. Scott Ashmann, Dr. Mark Kiehn, Dr. Linda Tabers-Kwak, Dr. Steve Kimball, Dr. Karen Lieuallen, Karen Bircher, Art Lacey, Lynne Kimball, Amy Bartelme, Kim Desotell, and Dr. Lisa Poupart from the Education Center for First Nations Studies.

Dr. Kaufman said that the program’s vision and commitment was to produce the “teachers of tomorrow,” professionals who were not only well prepared, but highly desired by schools and districts, practitioners who were comfortable in diverse settings and adept and successful at serving the needs of young learners -- especially those who are “at-risk” or underserved.  This goal has been accomplished through some of the programs that were mentioned, such as the partnership program with area schools, “Phuture Phoenix Program,” Cuernavaca Mexico Program, and work with the Education Center for First Nations Studies.  

Dr. Kaufman again thanked the Board for the wonderful honor, and he and his colleagues received a standing ovation from all present.

 

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  Regent Bartell noted that the committee’s meeting began in joint session with Business, Finance, and Audit, for a presentation by UW-Milwaukee.  He deferred to Regent Smith to report on that presentation.

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business

Authority to release parcel – UW Barron County

Resolution 9920 requested authority to release a very small parcel of land from the UW-Barron County back to the county, so the parcel can be sold.  The parcel was originally part of the campus area; however, the construction of a new city street had separated this parcel from the rest of the campus, limiting its usefulness to the university.

Authority to seek a waiver to select a construction manager-at-risk for UW-Madison Badger Performance Center project

Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9921 requested authority to seek a waiver from the Wisconsin Building Commission to allow selection through a Request for Proposal process of a construction manager-at-risk for the UW-Madison Badger Performance Center project.  The project would remodel existing space and construct new space within the McClain Center and Camp Randall Stadium to house programs for the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics.  Work would be bid and sequenced in three phases that coordinate with the 2012 and 2013 fall football seasons.  The complicated nature of the project and its timing would necessitate careful coordination and project management.

Authority to seek a waiver to allow single prime bidding for the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility

Resolution 9922, brought by UW-Madison, and contingent upon enumeration, requested authority to seek a waiver to allow single-prime bidding for the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility project and construct the project at an estimated cost of $2.8 million in gift funds.  This would include a $300,000 budget increase to allow the addition of adequate water supply require by the fire department.

Authority to construct the Carlson Hall Renovation Project – UW-Whitewater

Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9923, brought by UW-Whitewater, and contingent upon enumeration, requested authority to construct the Carlson Hall Renovation project at an estimated cost of $17 million in General Fund Supported Borrowing.  This creative project would construct a small addition to the existing building and remodel the interior of the building, allowing for the consolidation of the College of Letters and Sciences into one facility from four separate buildings that offer inadequate space. 

All Agency Maintenance Projects

Resolution 9924 requested authority to construct seven all-agency maintenance and repair projects at five institutions totaling, $6.5 million.  One of these projects would implement energy conservation measures throughout six facilities at UW-Marathon. 

Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell reported that resolutions 9920, 9921, 9922, 9923, and, 9924 were passed unanimously by the committee, and he moved adoption of those resolutions.  Regent Drew seconded the motion, and the Board adopted the resolutions on a unanimous voice vote:

Authority to Release Back to Barron County a Parcel of Approximately 0.764 Acres from the UW-Barron County Lease, UW Colleges: UW-Barron County

Resolution 9920:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to permanently release a parcel of approximately 0.764 acres from the UW-Barron County lease back to Barron County.

Authority to Seek a Waiver of § 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow Selection Through a Request for Proposal Process of a Construction-Manager-at-Risk for the Badger Performance Center Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9921:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek a waiver of §16.855 Wis. Stats., under the provisions of  §13.48 (19) Wis. Stats., to allow selection, through a Request for Proposal process, of a Construction-Manager-at-Risk (CMAR) for construction of the Badger Performance Center project at a preliminary estimated budget of $76,800,000 ($49,200,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $27,600,000 Gift Funds).

Contingent Upon Enumeration, Approval of the Design Report of the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Allow Single Prime Bidding and Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9922:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, and contingent upon enumeration, the Design Report of the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility project be approved and authority be granted to seek a waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to solicit a single prime bid and construct the project at an estimated total project cost of $2,800,000 Gift Funds.

Approval of the Design Report of the Carlson Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9923:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, and contingent upon enumeration, the Design Report of the Carlson Hall Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total cost of $17,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing.

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9924:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $6,486,500 ($224,900 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $5,902,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $359,600 Program Revenue-Cash).

Report of the Associate Vice President

Regent Bartell continued his report, noting that Associate Vice President David Miller had told the committee that the Building Commission approved about $14 million for projects at UW System at its April and May meetings.  The funding for those projects was approximately $1 million inGeneral Fund Supported Borrowing, $5 million in program revenue, and $8 million in gift funds.

Mr. Miller also reported that at the April Building Commission meeting the Governor presented the 2010 Design and Construction Awards which recognized excellence in state building projects.  The award for Excellence in Architectural Design was presented to Workshop Architects of Milwaukee for the UW-Superior Yellow Jacket Union project at UW-Superior; the Excellence in Engineering Design award was given to Ayres and Associates of Eau Claire for the Lower Campus Steam Loop project at UW-Eau Claire; and the Excellence in Sustainable Design award was presented to KEE Architecture of Madison for the UW-Oshkosh Elmwood Center Remodeling project.

Associate Vice President Miller reported that the 2011-13 Capital Budget was passed by the legislature’s Joint Finance Committee as recommended by the State Building Commission.  As Mr. Miller described in April, the budget would fully fund the Regents biennial budget request and maintain the UW System Six-Year Physical Development Plan.

In closing his report, Regent Bartell noted that the Capital Planning and Budget Committee convened in closed session to discuss topics that would be taken up in the Board’s later closed session.

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education Committee.

Education Committee Business

UW Colleges: Revised Mission and BAAS Degree

One year earlier, Regent Crain reported, the Board heard the first readings of the UW Colleges revised mission and the proposed Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) degree.  In the Education Committee meeting on Thursday, both the revised mission and the BAAS degree came before the Education Committee for second readings.  Senior Vice President Martin provided background on the long process, beginning three years before, by which the degree proposal was allowed to come before the Board for authorization.  Ms. Martin made clear that, throughout the process, the UW System held the UW Colleges to a much higher standard of review than would normally be the case with new degree programs.

Regent Crain noted that Provost Greg Lampe then described the BAAS degree, which was developed with input from critical stakeholders, including those both internal and external to the Colleges.  The BAAS allows place-bound, underserved adult learners to obtain a bachelor’s degree and contribute to local workplace and community needs, while retaining the UW Colleges’ traditional transfer mission.  The revised mission for the UW Colleges reinforces the commitment to offering the first two years of a liberal arts general education, while specifying the additional offering of a “single baccalaureate degree that meets local and individual needs.”  Regent Crain said that the BAAS is a degree-completion program which builds on Association of American Colleges and Universities and Liberal Education and America’s Promise principles.

Once approved, the BAAS would be offered at six of the UW Colleges campuses, in partnership with six UW comprehensives in their service areas.  Regent Crain reported that in response to a question from the committee, presenters noted that this is a fixed number, as specified in the resolution, and that any expansion of campuses after the first five years would require Board approval.

Regent Crain said that the committee was very impressed with the degree proposal and approved both the revised mission and the BAAS degree unanimously.  She then moved approval of Resolution 9925, approving the revised mission of the University of Wisconsin Colleges, and Resolution 9926, authorizing the implementation of the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, to be offered regionally on six of the thirteen UW Colleges campuses and in partnership with six UW System comprehensive universities.  Regent Vásquez seconded the motion, and the Board unanimously approved the two resolutions on a voice vote.

Revised Mission Statement, UW Colleges

Resolution 9925:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the University of Wisconsin Colleges’ revised mission statement.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9926:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, to be offered regionally on six of the thirteen UW Colleges campuses and in partnership with six UW System comprehensive universities.

Regent Crain acknowledged the significance of the vote and congratulated UW Colleges and all who were responsible for the success of this effort.

Revised UW System Transfer Policy

Regent Crain said that the committee next heard three, interrelated presentations on the UW System’s transfer practices and policy, culminating in unanimous committee approval of the revised UW System undergraduate transfer policy.  Associate Vice President Heather Kim provided an overview of UW System data on undergraduate transfer.  Senior Vice President Martin presented the findings of the Wisconsin Transfer Equity Study, a collaboration among the UW System, the Wisconsin Technical College System, and the Center for Urban Education at USC, partners in the Equity Scorecard Project.  Associate Vice President Larry Rubin presented key changes in the UW System’s revised undergraduate transfer policy.

The most contentious change in the transfer-policy revisions came in the removal of the cap on the number of general education credits that students could transfer from the Technical Colleges to UW institutions.  The overarching principle is that UW institutions and their faculties would still determine how many, and which, credits and courses would be accepted for transfer.

With one exception, there was consensus on the revised policy by the campuses, and the committee heard support from the provosts at several of the four-year institutions.  The exception was the UW Colleges, and Provost Lampe read a statement opposing the revised policy.

Regent Crain moved approval of Resolution 9927, endorsing the revisions to Academic Information Series 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2, the UW System’s policies on undergraduate transfer.  Regent Danae Davis seconded the motion, and the Board unanimously approved the two resolutions on a voice vote.

UW System Undergraduate Transfer Policy

Resolution 9927:         That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents endorses the revisions to Academic Information Series 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2, the UW System’s policies on undergraduate transfer.

Regent Crain thanked all present at the prior day’s committee meeting for their thoughtful participation.  She added that the UW System transfer policy contained in the revised ACIS 6.0 was distinct from the Board of Regents policy, which would be taken up at a later date.

UW-Milwaukee Presentation

Among the other agenda items on the Education Committee’s agenda was a presentation from UW-Milwaukee Interim Provost Johannes Britz and Vice Provost for International Education, Patrice Petro, describing strategic initiatives on UWM’s digital future and internationalization.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin’s report to the committee included a presentation by the UW Colleges and UW-Extension of their outstanding Inclusive Excellence framework, an inspiring model of how this work can be done across not only one but two distinct yet intertwined institutions; a brief report on the cumbersome new federal Program Integrity Regulations and how the UW System is responding to them; and the Committee’s approval of the 2011 Tenure and Promotion Report.

The Tenure and Promotion Report is on the committee’s agenda each June, and the Board’s action becomes the final step in the tenure process for UW System faculty.  A resolution in support of the motion to approve that report would be included on the consent agenda; Regent Crain expressed congratulations to all faculty members who had worked so hard to earn tenure during the past year.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved adoption of Resolutions 9928, 9929, 9930, 9931, 9932, 9933, 9934, 9935, 9936 and 9937, which had been approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Vásquez, and was unanimously approved by the Board on a voice vote.  

Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

Resolution 9928:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents accepts the proffer of $5,531,039 made by the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Music. 

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online Bachelor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership and Communication, UW-Eau Claire

Resolution 9929:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Bachelor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership and Communication.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business, UW-Eau Claire

Resolution 9930:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Arts in Japanese Studies, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9931:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Arts in Japanese Studies.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Collaborative Online B.S. in Health and Wellness Management, UW-La Crosse, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Superior

Resolution 9932:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the Universities of Wisconsin-La Crosse, -River Falls, -Stevens Point, and -Superior, and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors be authorized to implement the Collaborative Online Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Organizational Change Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9933:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Master of Science in Organizational Change Leadership.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Supply Chain Management, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9934:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Master of Science in Supply Chain Management.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Distance Education Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9935:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Master of Science in Distance Education Leadership.

Removal of Regent Policy Document 14-1, Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests

Resolution 9936:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents authorizes the Secretary of the Board to remove from the Regent Policy Documents RPD 14-1, “Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests.”

2011 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status

Resolution 9937:         That, upon recommendation of the respective Chancellors and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2011 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status be approved.

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance and Audit Committee.

Joint Meeting of the Capital Planning & Budget Committee and the Business, Finance, & Audit Committee

Regent Smith noted that the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee met jointly with the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  The committees heard from Christy Brown, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administrative Affairs, on “UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiatives:  Implementation Begins.”  Her presentation focused on five major projects:  the Northwest Quadrant, which increases space on campus by 20 percent; the School of Public Health; the School of Freshwater Science; the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex; and Innovation Park.   

Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business

Wisconsin Small Business Advancement Program (Wiscap) 2010 Annual Report

Vice President for Finance Debbie Durcan provided an overview of the 2010 Annual Report of the Wisconsin Small Business Advancement Program (otherwise known as WiSCAP).  The program came about as part of the C.O.R.E. Jobs Act and was appropriated funding in the amount of $2 million.  The purpose of the program is to connect the needs of small businesses in the state of Wisconsin to the expertise of faculty at the comprehensive universities and to create jobs along the way.  Several speakers spoke of the importance of the partnership between the university and small businesses to grow jobs in the State of Wisconsin.

Federal Update:  FY 2012 Federal Priorities

Assistant Vice President for Federal Relations Kristine Andrews presented a summary of federal priorities for UW System institutions in the fiscal year 2011-12.  Kris provided a contextual background of the increased federal funding to all UW System institutions over the past ten years.  While UW-Madison has increased at an average of 10 percent per year, all others increased by an average of 7 percent per year.

Program Integrity Regulations

Paige Reed, Senior Legal Counsel, presented an overview of recent regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Education.  These regulations are expected to have wide ranging impact on institutions of higher education.  Among the goals of the Program Integrity regulations was to address aggressive and misleading recruitment practices on the part of some for-profit institutions.

Delegation of Certain Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted Under RPD 6-6

Regent Smith reported that the committee then turned its attention to the delegation of authority from the UW System President to UW Chancellors to appoint and set the salary of:  (1) UW Colleges interim Deans; (2) the State Geologist; (3) the Director of the State Laboratory of Hygiene;  (4) the Director of the Psychiatric Institute; and (5) the State Cartographer.

The committee also approved the delegation of additional authorities from the UW System President to UW chancellors:  (1) the approval of named professorships; and (2) the granting of unpaid, non-medical leaves of absence extending longer than five years.  Further, such extended leaves of absence would be reported to the Board upon request rather than in an annual report.

2011-12 Annual Budget Distribution Adjustments

Freda Harris, Associate Vice President for Budget and Planning, presented information on the distribution of state-mandated budget cuts based on the latest information available from the State budget process.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.

The committee approved a Clinical Trial Agreement between UW-Madison and Pharmacyclics, Inc.

Quarterly Report of Gifts, Grants, And Contracts (3rd Quarter)

Vice President Debbie Durcan presented the gift, grant, and contract awards through the 3rd quarter of the fiscal year.  Total awards through March 31, 2011 were nearly $1.2 billion, a decrease of $82 million from the prior year.

Human Resource System

Senior Vice President Michael Morgan provided the standard update on the status of the UW System Human Resource System project.  He reported that “go-live” was successful but, as with any major IT system, there were some challenges to be addressed.  The project remained on time and within budget, Mr. Morgan reported.

Review and Approval of the FY 2012 Project Implementation Budget

Regent Smith reported that the committee was presented an overview and then approved the $5.2 million annual Human Resource System budget for fiscal year 2012.

Consent Agenda

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith then moved adoption of Resolutions 9938, 9939, and 9940.  The motion was seconded by Regent Falbo and unanimously approved by the Board on a voice vote.

Delegation of Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted under RPD 6-6: Delegation to System President

Resolution 9938:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents:

   (1) endorses the delegation of the UW System President’s authority under Regent Policy Document (RPD) 6-6 to (a) the UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor to appoint and set the salary of UW Colleges Interim Deans and the State Geologist; (b) the UW-Madison Chancellor to appoint and set the salary of the Director of the State Laboratory of Hygiene, the Director of the Psychiatric Institute, and the State Cartographer; (c) the UW chancellors to approve named professorships; and (d) the UW Chancellors to grant an unclassified staff member an extension of a non-medical leave of absence beyond five years; and

   (2) approves a change to RPD 20-6, such that non-medical leaves of absence would be reported to the Board upon request, rather than in an annual report.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.

Resolution 9939:         That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contractual agreement between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Pharmacyclics, Inc.

Human Resource System Review and Approval of the FY12 Project Implementation Budget

Resolution 9940:         That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the Human Resource System implementation budget for fiscal year 2012.

RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION FOR REGENTS’ SERVICE ON THE BOARD

President Pruitt noted that the Board would be saying farewell to two Regents, Regent Emerita Schwalenberg and Regent Wingad, and that both were wished the best in their future endeavors.  He invited Regent Crain to present a Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Emerita Jessica Schwalenberg, whose appointment as a Regent was withdrawn in January 2011.

Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Emerita Schwalenberg

Regent Crain said that it was her great privilege to offer a resolution in recognition of Jessica Schwalenberg’s service on the Board of Regents.  After a competitive application and interview process, Jessica was selected as a student-Regent about a year before, filling the position designated for a non-traditional student.  She had just finished her first two years at one of the two-year colleges, UW-Waukesha, and she was about to become a psychology student at UW-Milwaukee.  

Regent Crain said that she appreciated everything about Jessica from the start.  Regent Crain said that Ms. Schwalenberg was obviously going to be a thoughtful and contributing Regent, and she approached her job with serious commitment.  She was not afraid to ask questions, and she had obviously read everything before a meeting.  When she had carefully considered the issues, she was then very willing to speak.  Regent Crain remarked that breaking into the discussion of the Board of Regents, all of whom like to talk, is no easy matter.  Regent Schwalenberg quickly learned how to get into the discussion, and she was thoughtful and effective.  She did a very responsible job in representing student opinions and the probable impact of the Board’s decisions on the great variety of students on the UW campuses.  She knew that there was wide diversity among UW students, and she offered that perspective.   

Regent Crain said that she wanted Jessica to know that Board members were very sorry that her term was cut short prematurely.  The Board greatly missed her contributions and had been less than whole without her.  Regent Crain said, however, that she had full confidence that Ms. Schwalenberg would be heard from in all that she would do in the future.  Saying that she is a “doer,” who is not afraid to extend her horizons and to make a difference -- for herself and for her young son – Regent Crain said that Jessica clearly knew the meaning of service.  The service of educated, principled people – and strong women -- like Jessica is essential, and Regent Crain said that she was proud to have been Regent Schwalenberg’s colleague.  She wished her success in her studies and in whatever paths she would pursue in the future.

The following resolution was then read by Regent Crain, and approved by acclamation:

Resolution of Appreciation for Jessica Schwalenberg

Resolution 9941:         WHEREAS, Jessica Schwalenberg served as a dedicated student representative on the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, from May 2010 until January 2011; and

   WHEREAS, Jessica drew upon her experience as a returning student to give voice to the unique needs of the growing non-traditional student population in the UW System; and

   WHEREAS, Jessica shared her passion for maintaining high-caliber higher education opportunities to serve all Wisconsin families, championing this ideal through her service on the Regents’  Education Committee; and

   WHEREAS, Jessica was an active member of the UW-Waukesha community, serving as student ambassador, orientation leader, tutor, and pre-college mentor, crediting her mentoring experiences, in particular, for helping her work more effectively with her student-of-color peers; and

   WHEREAS, Jessica is a proud alumna of UW-Waukesha, having earned her associate’s degree with honors in Spring 2010, and is now pursuing her bachelor’s degree in psychology at UW-Milwaukee; and

   WHEREAS, Jessica used to full advantage her academic credentials, life experience, and commitment to the UW System to act as a responsible and thoughtful steward of the state’s public  higher education system and, in addition,  is serving as a strong role model for both her son and  fellow students who decide to continue their education;

   BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System commends Jessica Schwalenberg for her exemplary service on behalf of the UW System and the citizens of Wisconsin, and wishes her every success in the future.   

Regent Emerita Schwalenberg’s Remarks

Regent Emerita Schwalenberg began her remarks by saying that when she was just getting her start at the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha, she was a very intimidated returning-adult student.  She felt quite new and possibly misplaced by her years spent out of school.  She said that she distinctly remembered saying in an interview for a position in Student Services that she wanted to learn everything she could about how the campus machine worked, in order to cope with her beginner’s anxiety.  Over the course of her two years there, that driving force evolved from the anxiety of a new student to the curiosity of a dedicated and appreciative student.

Ms. Schwalenberg said that she had been truly privileged to have spent the greater part of the past year as a student- Regent.  She said she had deeply enjoyed learning about the intricacies of managing such a unique and powerful machine as the UW system.  The unification of the 13 freshman and sophomore campuses with the 13 comprehensive campuses provides a well-spread root system that not only educates the state’s residents and more, but serves the state with the connection and ability to grow and innovate.  Also, the UW plays a vital role in moving the state forward.

Regent Emerita Schwalenberg said she would be forever grateful for the inspiration she found in working among such an impressive group of leaders. One of the first to encourage her was former-Chancellor David Wilson, who she said told her that the greatness in the opportunity that lay before her was ingrained in the great leadership in the company she would keep.  She said she felt blessed that Board members had come to play an integral part in her personal growth; with the Board, she was given the opportunity to practice using her voice in a public forum, and she received much useful and positive feedback.

Saying that she had profoundly appreciated the opportunities to use her voice as an individual, a student, a representative, and Regent, Regent Emerita Schwalenberg said that as a student and a representative of students, she hoped that her voice carried out the intended purpose of bringing the unique and varied needs of non-traditional students to light, and helping her fellow Regents to understand the nuance involved in the needs of these students.  She expressed gratitude for the experiences, opportunities, and many friends that she found through her service to the UW System and the Board of Regents.

Ms. Schwalenberg said that it was with a very heavy heart that she learned that her service would end prematurely due to a divisive political climate and her apparently untimely appointment amidst that climate.  A great contrast formed between the grandeur of her experience with the Board and the abrupt and absolute ending.  She said she had great difficulty coming to terms with the news, going through the various stages of loss, yet she came into her acceptance feeling gifted and blessed.

In closing, Regent Emerita Schwalenberg thanked the Regents and Regents’ staff, as well as her family and friends, expressing gratitude for their guidance, patience, acceptance and friendship.  Her remarks received a standing ovation.

Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Wingad

Regent Pruitt called upon Regent Falbo to present a resolution of appreciation to Regent Wingad, for whom the June meeting would be his last meeting as a student-Regent.  Regent Falbo presented a top-ten list of “ten things for Aaron to consider as he moves forward with what will be years of success and accomplishments.”  The list was as follows  

10. Don’t pick a major of study that you can't spell.
  9. Don't sheepishly ask for advice and then proceed to give the answers.
  8. Don't entice elderly members of the Board of Regents into student drinking games.
  7. Don't stop your current practice of being with someone that is way above you (which means, in case you missed the point, Paulina).
  6. Don't be patient at least until you qualify for social security. Which probably means, for you, don't ever become patient.
  5. Don't forget the wonderful people and family who have supported you without limits and will continue that level of support.
  4. Don't be in a rush to receive too many emeritus designations.
  3. Don't delay your education. Keep your commitments to yourself.
  2. Don't ever take another Regent’s parking space when they are trying to park in it. EVER!
  1. Don't let anyone or anything dampen your drive, your enthusiasm, or your commitment to do what is right.

Regent Falbo then read the following resolution, which was approved by acclamation:

Resolution of Appreciation to Aaron Wingad

Resolution 9942:         WHEREAS, Aaron Wingad has dedicated two years of exemplary service as a Student Regent of the University of Wisconsin System, from 2009 to 2011; and 

WHEREAS, Aaron – a first-generation college student – graduated in May from UW-Eau Claire with a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology, and with the distinction of being the university’s first Truman Scholar and the first UW-Eau Claire student to serve as a Regent; and

WHEREAS, Aaron’s passion to pursue a career in public health policy in part arose from his experience in numerous campus leadership positions, including that of student senator, a role he credits with allowing him to work with his peers on solving real-life, complex problems; and

WHEREAS, Aaron holds a deep belief in moving Wisconsin forward through a strong system of public higher education, and championed this value throughout his service on the committees of Business, Finance and Audit; Personnel Matters Review; and the Chancellor Search for UW Colleges and UW-Extension; and

WHEREAS, as a member of the Regents Diversity Awards selection committee, Aaron celebrated those educators who go the extra mile to create positive changes in campus climate and expand equitable opportunities for student success; and

WHEREAS, Aaron was responsive to the UW System student body, consistently advocating for continued affordable tuition, increased financial aid, enhanced academic quality, and respect for the student role in shared governance;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks Aaron Wingad for his distinguished and dedicated service to the citizens of Wisconsin and the UW System, and wishes him well as he opens the door to all of the exciting opportunities that lie ahead of him.

Regent Wingad’s Remarks

Regent Wingad began his remarks by saying that he had introduced many of the Regents to his mother, Suzanne, who was in attendance at the Board meeting.  He said that he had introduced her to Regent Mike and Sheila Falbo on Wednesday night, and they talked for a while.  He said that his parents lean Republican.  Afterward, he told his mother that Mike and Sheila are conservative and she said, "No wonder I liked them so much."  Regent Wingad said that as a fairly liberal person, he still had not figured out why he liked Mike so much.  On a more serious note, Regent Wingad said that Regent Falbo had been one of his greatest supporters and friends on the Board, and Regent Wingad expressed his thanks for this. 

As difficult it was to say farewell, Regent Wingad said that UW-Milwaukee was perhaps a fitting place at which to say it.  He travelled to UW-Milwaukee in May 2009, for his first Board of Regents meeting as a student, before he was appointed.  At the first meeting, he said he was invigorated by what he saw.  Upstairs, he saw Regent Walsh defending student rights in a Chapters UWS 17 and 18 debate.  Downstairs, he saw Regent Falbo defending student access to education at a Madison Initiative discussion.  Regent Wingad said that as a student, barely familiar with the Board of Regents, this commitment to students and this fight on behalf of thousands of students who see the Board of Regents as worlds away, was what drove him to apply to serve as a Regent.

After he was appointed, the day of his first board meeting, he was told to go to Bascom Hall and read a plaque that is on the wall.  It moved him when he read it, and it was very important to him. The plaque reads:  “Whatever may be the limitations which trammel inquiry elsewhere, we believe that the great state UNIVERSITY of WISCONSIN should ever encourage that continual and fearless sifting and winnowing by which alone the TRUTH can be found.”

This statement comes from a report issued in 1894 from the Board of Regents.  This statement has helped defend academic freedom around the world.  Regent Wingad said that he realized that day the importance of what Regents do, and that statement drove him to put everything into his service on the Board during the prior two years.  Saying that “sifting and winnowing” plaques are distributed around the UW System, Regent Wingad said that he had always taken the time to find them when visiting a campus.  Two months before, he had found the final one while visiting the 26th campus of the UW System.  

Regent Wingad said that he had learned much during his two-year journey.  He urged Regents to stay strong in defense of the System, to continue to defend the university system for students who would never quite know what Regents do (until Regents raise their tuition).  He stressed that it is important that Regents defend students’ access to an opportunity that will change their lives.

Regent Wingad said that he would like to share one key lesson from his two years as a Regent:  He said that he had learned to embrace overwhelming situations.  He learned that anything really worth doing should feel impossible at the beginning.  It was through those experiences, overcoming what seemed impossible, that he learned and grew the most as an individual.  He said he learned to love the insecurity found in facing the toughest challenges and he realized that through the process of overcoming the impossible, he learned more than he could have ever imagined.  

Regent Wingad then said that he would like to give a profound thank you.  Expressing particular thanks to Board of Regents Secretary Jane Radue, he thanked Jane, saying that she had been a constant advisor and had helped him through tough policy questions and tough situations.  Noting that as a new staff member for the National Committee on Rural Health he would be doing research for that committee and would be writing policy recommendations, he said he now saw things from the perspective of being on the other side of the situation.  In his new position, at his first meeting with the Director of the Office, the Director said of the committee, “We must make them feel important.”  Repeating his thanks, Regent Wingad said that Ms. Radue and others had made him feel more important than he should have over the previous two years.

Addressing Regents, chancellors, provosts, System staff, faculty, and student leaders, Regent Wingad said that their advice and friendship had meant a great deal to him.  Although he could not attempt to list everyone individually, he stressed that his experience with all within the System had changed the course of his life.  He said he felt honored and thankful to have been  accepted so fully as a colleague. 

The UW System is a special place, Regent Wingad said, and it was a privilege to be a small part of it for the past few years.  Regent Wingad’s remarks received a standing ovation.

RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW-MILWAUKEE FOR HOSTING THE JUNE MEETING

President Pruitt next called upon Regent Drew to present the resolution of appreciation to UW-Milwaukee for hosting the June meeting.  Regent Drew said that he was delighted to be a neighbor to and graduate of UW-Milwaukee.  He presented the resolution, which was approved by acclamation.

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9943:         WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System recognizes UW-Milwaukee as a crucial catalyst for the economic well-being of the city of Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin, and salutes the university’s commitment to both expanding its research capacity and providing quality higher education access to the broadest possible audience; and

WHEREAS, the Regents profited greatly from the presentation, “Powerful Ideas Producing Proven Results With Our Community Partners,” shared by Chancellor Michael Lovell and his co-presenters, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett; Michael Andrew, Director of Government Affairs and External Communications for Johnson Controls; Children’s Hospital President and CEO Peggy Troy; and Badger Meter Chairman, President, and CEO Rich Meeusen; and

WHEREAS, the Regents appreciate that UW-Milwaukee is “sailing with the wind” and embracing the challenges and opportunities presented by emerging technologies through its Digital Future planning initiative; and

WHEREAS, the Regents benefited from the knowledge shared on how the UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiatives are entering the implementation phase, including the successful acquisition of the Columbia Hospital Campus/Northwest Quadrant property and the pending construction projects for the School of Freshwater Sciences, School of Public Health, Kenwood Integrated Research Complex, and Innovation Park; and

WHEREAS, the Regents enjoyed visiting the Cambridge Commons Residence Hall, which is the latest product of the UW-Milwaukee Real Estate Foundation;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System is grateful for the warm hospitality extended by UW-Milwaukee faculty, staff, and students throughout this annual springtime visit.

ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

In announcing the election of officers, President Pruitt said that the bylaws of the Board specify that officers of the Board are elected at the annual meeting, which is held in June, and hold their offices for one year.  If there is only one nominee for an office, the election is by voice vote.  If there is more than one nominee, the election is by ballot.  Terms of office begin immediately after the June meeting.

Election of President

Regent Pruitt asked if there was a nomination for the office of President of the Board.  President Pruitt recognized Regent Bradley, who nominated Regent Michael Spector.  Regent Bradley recalled that when Regent Spector first joined the Board and was asked about his committee preferences, he said, characteristically for him, that he would be glad to serve wherever he could help.  In his career, he has been recognized for his mastery of the facts, his fairness, and his inclusive and respectful style.  He has held corporate leadership positions, school board leadership positions, statewide-committee leadership positions, and Regent leadership positions.  Regent Bradley said that Regent Spector had the respect of Governor Walker and the leaders of both the Republican and Democratic parties in the Legislature.  Most importantly, however, Regent Spector truly cares about higher education in the state; about students, staff, and faculty; and about the goals of the Board for higher education. 

Regent Pruitt called for a second to the nomination.  Regent Crain seconded the nomination, saying that Regent Spector’s wisdom, balance, fairness, rational approach, and respectfulness made him the right leader for the Board.

Calling for and receiving no further nominations, President Pruitt called for the vote.  Regent Spector was unanimously elected President of the Board of Regents on a voice vote, whereupon he received a standing ovation.

Election of Vice President

President Pruitt asked if there was a nomination for the office of Vice President of the Board.  President Pruitt recognized Regent Womack, who nominated Regent Michael Falbo, who she said continues to demonstrate his talent for understanding all facets of the UW System’s business, including his passion for educating the populace and his demonstrated compassion for the support of the leaders of the UW System, who work tirelessly and sometimes thanklessly to support teaching and learning.  Citing a quote from the Library of Congress, Regent Womack said that we must always shoot for the stars; any other destination is too low.  She said that Regent Falbo feels that way about the UW System.  She said that she enthusiastically supported his nomination.

Regent Pruitt called for a second to the nomination of Regent Falbo.  Regent Vásquez seconded the nomination of Regent Falbo, saying that Regent Falbo was a highly-respected individual in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.  Regent Vásquez referred to Regent Falbo’s dedication to professionalism, his work in the community, and his civic involvement, saying that he could reach out to all aspects of the community, political, economic, and social.  Consequently, Regent Vásquez said that Regent Falbo would be an excellent Vice President and would be respected by the community. 

President Pruitt asked if there were further nominations for Vice President.  Regent Manydeeds nominated Regent Brent Smith, saying that he had known Regent Smith for many years, and that they were classmates at the University of Wisconsin Law School.  Regent Manydeeds said that he had since then known Regent Smith professionally, and Regent Smith had developed a reputation in their part of the state as a well-prepared, competent, and ethical attorney.  He does difficult work, Regent Manydeeds said, representing people who are injured or have injured someone else.  He had taken his profession to the next level, realizing that being a trusted, compassionate, counselor is more important than simply winning cases.  Those were qualities that Regent Smith would bring, and had brought, to the Board, Regent Manydeeds said.  Regent Smith would act in the best interests of the citizens of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin, Regent Manydeeds said.

Regent Smith called for a second to the nomination of Regent Smith.  Regent Stan Davis seconded the nomination, saying that he had known Regent Smith since he was an undergraduate at UW-La Crosse, a little over 20 years before.  He said that he had been a strong supporter of UW-La Crosse and the UW System.  Regent Davis said he had also served with Regent Smith on the Wisconsin Technical College System Board and had seen his commitment to and understanding of what it takes to effectively run institutions of higher education.  Regent Davis said that he believed that Regent Smith would do an outstanding job as Vice President.

Receiving no further nominations for the office of Vice President, President Pruitt reiterated that if there is more than one nomination for an office of the Board, the election is by ballot.  He asked Secretary Radue to distribute, collect, and count the ballots.  After consultation with General Counsel, it was determined that the procedure for any Regents attending by phone would be for them to send their vote by email to Secretary Radue.  President Pruitt asked Regent Loftus, who was attending the meeting by phone, if he was able to vote in this manner; Regent Loftus said that he was able to do so.

Before the voting began, Regent Bartell asked to speak and was recognized by President Pruitt.  Speaking on behalf of both of the nominated Regents, Regent Bartell said that the Board was fortunate to have two such thoughtful, capable, and compassionate candidates, either one of whom would be a great leader.  Regent Danae Davis, agreeing with Regent Bartell, said that she felt compelled to say that in the more than eight years that she had been on the Board, there had never been a contested election.  She said that the time for signaling bipartisan commitment on the part of the Board is at this time; Regent Falbo would represent this.  Regent Davis said that the Board could not go wrong with either candidate and that her concern was not about which of the two individuals would be better; rather, she said was concerned about what would be in the best interests of the System, with a budget that had yet to be passed, and the 17-member legislative task force yet to come.  She asked Regents to consider this as they voted.

The vote by ballot was conducted.  Secretary Radue tabulated the results and then reported them to President Pruitt to be announced.  President Pruitt announced that the results of the Vice President election were that Regent Michael Falbo received five votes, and Regent Brent Smith received 12 votes; therefore, Regent Smith was elected Vice President of the Board.  The vote was met with applause, and a handshake between Regents Smith and Falbo.

Regent Pruitt echoed the sentiments of Regents Bartell and Danae Davis, saying that the Board was fortunate to have two such extraordinary candidates.  Vice President Spector commented, as well, on the strength of the two candidates, and said that he looked forward to working with Regent Smith as Vice President, with Regent Falbo in a variety of capacities, and with all Board members.  Vice President Spector said that President Pruitt had done a terrific job and that he had learned a great deal from President Pruitt, as well as from past Presidents Walsh and Bradley.  He said that he looked forward to the next year being successful with the help of all Regents and chancellors, provosts, and System staff.

Election of Secretary of The Board, Assistant Secretaries, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers

President Pruitt next called for a nomination to elect the incumbents to the other offices of the Board:  Jane Radue, Secretary; Jessica Lathrop and Ann Nottestad, Assistant Secretaries; Deborah Durcan, Trust Officer; and Tom Stafford and Doug Hoerr, Assistant Trust Officers.  Regent Walsh nominated the incumbents; the motion was seconded by Regent Bartell, and the Board elected the officers on a unanimous voice vote.  

COMMUNICATIONS, PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS

President Pruitt recognized Regent Walsh, who offered an observation about the budget process during the prior four months.  He said that the situation was difficult because of how it arose, that it was monumental, and that it was of great importance to the state of Wisconsin.  A positive outcome was the message from the citizens of the state that they love their higher education system and they like it the way it is; the positive outcome resulted because of the leadership and good judgment of President Pruitt, who had been a strong leader during trying times.  President Pruitt, expressing his appreciation, received a standing ovation.


The meeting recessed at 11:30 a.m. and reconvened at 11:45 a.m.

CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded by Regent Bradley, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Evers, Falbo, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Walsh, Wingad and Womack voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9944:         That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider personal histories related to the naming of facilities at UW-Madison and UW-Parkside, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider appointment of campus executive officers and deans for UW-Manitowoc, UW-Marathon County, UW-Marshfield, UW-Washington County and UW-Waukesha, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats; to discuss the report of the Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.; and to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(c).

The following resolutions were considered and approved during closed session.

Authority to Name the Newly Constructed Addition and the Existing School of Human Ecology Building “Nancy Nicholas Hall,” UW-Madison

Resolution 9945:         That, upon the recommendation of the of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the newly constructed addition and the existing School of Human Ecology building, which is located at 1300 Linden Drive, “Nancy Nicholas Hall.”

Authority to name the Regional Center for Arts and Humanities, the “Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities,” UW-Parkside

Resolution 9946:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Parkside Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the Regional Center for Arts and Humanities, facilities of which are located in multiple areas of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside campus, the “Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities.”

Authorization to Appoint: Five Deans at University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9947:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges/University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint the following University of Wisconsin Colleges Deans:  Charles E. Clark at the University of Wisconsin-Manitowoc, effective July 1, 2011, at an annual salary of $116,000; Alan Paul Price at the University of Wisconsin-Washington County, effective June 11, 2011, at an annual salary of $122,000; Patricia L. Stuhr at the University of Wisconsin-Marshfield/Wood County, effective August 1, 2011, at an annual salary of $116,000; Keith Montgomery at the University of Wisconsin-Marathon County, effective June 11, 2011, at an annual salary of $122,000; and Harry P. Muir, Jr. at the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha County, effective on a date yet to be determined in July 2011, at an annual salary of $130,000.

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m.      

 

Submitted by: 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Wisconsin Room
UW-Milwaukee Union
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Friday, June 10, 2011
10:00 am


APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE FEBRUARY 25th and MARCH 10th MEETINGS
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board report.
President’s Farewell
Principles for Progress and Prosperity
Returning to What is Essential
Heartfelt Thanks
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Advisory Committee on Roles of System Administration
Federal visits
Leadership development conference
Rebecca Martin News
News from Around the System
Revisiting Undocumented Students Discussion
PRESENTATION OF THE 2011 TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS.
Introduction of Teaching Excellence Awards
Individual Award - Dr. Regan A. R. Gurung, Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development & Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Individual Award - Dr. Craig Berg, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Department Award - Professional Program in Education at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay , accepted by Dr. Timothy Kaufman, Chair of the Professional Program in Education
REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business.
Authority to release parcel – UW Barron County
Authority to seek a waiver to select a construction manager-at-risk for UW-Madison Badger Performance Center project
Authority to seek a waiver to allow single prime bidding for the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility
Authority to construct the Carlson Hall Renovation Project – UW-Whitewater
All Agency Maintenance Projects
Consent Agenda
Authority to Release Back to Barron County a Parcel of Approximately 0.764 Acres from the UW-Barron County Lease, UW Colleges: UW-Barron County
Authority to Seek a Waiver of § 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow Selection Through a Request for Proposal Process of a Construction-Manager-at-Risk for the Badger Performance Center Project, UW-Madison.
Contingent Upon Enumeration, Approval of the Design Report of the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Allow Single Prime Bidding and Construct the Project, UW-Madison
Approval of the Design Report of the Carlson Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater
Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System
Report of the Associate Vice President
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Education Committee Business
UW Colleges: Revised Mission and BAAS Degree
Revised Mission Statement, UW Colleges
Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, University of Wisconsin Colleges
Revised UW System Transfer Policy
UW System Undergraduate Transfer Policy
UW-Milwaukee Presentation
Report of the Senior Vice President
Consent Agenda
Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online Bachelor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership and Communication, UW-Eau Claire
Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business, UW-Eau Claire 
Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Arts in Japanese Studies, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Whitewater
Program Authorization (Implementation) Collaborative Online B.S. in Health and Wellness Management, UW-La Crosse, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Superior
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Organizational Change Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Supply Chain Management, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Distance Education Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Removal of Regent Policy Document 14-1, Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests
2011 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE
Joint Meeting of the Capital Planning & Budget Committee and the Business, Finance, & Audit Committee
Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business.
Wisconsin Small Business Advancement Program (Wiscap) 2010 Annual Report
Federal Update:  FY 2012 Federal Priorities
Program Integrity Regulations
Delegation of Certain Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted Under RPD 6-6
2011-12 Annual Budget Distribution Adjustments.
UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.
Quarterly Report of Gifts, Grants, And Contracts (3rd Quarter)
Human Resource System
Review and Approval of the FY 2012 Project Implementation Budget
Consent Agenda
Delegation of Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted under RPD 6-6: Delegation to System President
UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.
Human Resource System Review and Approval of the FY12 Project Implementation Budget
RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION FOR REGENTS’ SERVICE ON THE BOARD
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Emerita Schwalenberg
Resolution of Appreciation for Jessica Schwalenberg
Regent Emerita Schwalenberg’s Remarks
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Wingad
Resolution of Appreciation to Aaron Wingad
Regent Wingad’s Remarks
RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW-MILWAUKEE FOR HOSTING THE JUNE MEETING
Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee
ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS
Election of President
Election of Vice President
Election of Secretary of The Board, Assistant Secretaries, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers
COMMUNICATIONS, PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS
CLOSED SESSION
Authority to Name the Newly Constructed Addition and the Existing School of Human Ecology Building “Nancy Nicholas Hall,” UW-Madison
Authority to name the Regional Center for Arts and Humanities, the “Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities,” UW-Parkside
Authorization to Appoint: Five Deans at University of Wisconsin Colleges

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Wisconsin Room
UW-Milwaukee Union
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Friday, June 10, 2011
9:00 am

-President Pruitt presiding-

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffery Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  None.

- - -

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE FEBRUARY 25th and MARCH 10th MEETINGS

 
            The minutes of the February 25, 2011 and March 10, 2011 meetings were approved as distributed.
- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

            Wisconsin Technical College System Board report

            A written report was provided.  There were no questions or comments.

            President’s Farewell

Principles for Progress and Prosperity

            President Pruitt said that he wanted to use his final President’s Report to the Board to offer a few reflections on the journey the System had been on over the previous year.  He said that it was a year ago in July that he and Jay Smith authored a paper entitled “Principles for Progress and Prosperity.”  President Pruitt said that he and Regent Emeritus Smith offered no earthshaking or dramatically different observations than many of their predecessors on the Board had been making for many years.  They talked about Wisconsin’s being at a crossroads. 

            President Pruitt remarked that to thrive in a global economy where innovation and knowledge are vital, Wisconsin needed more college graduates and more jobs.  Also, the people in the University of Wisconsin System – at all of the campuses, and all faculty and staff – were ready, willing and able to help on both counts.

            He and Regent Emeritus Smith talked about how the business model between the state and the university was a broken business model.  They urged candidates and office holders to reinvest in the university as an engine for economic growth.  They encouraged a new commitment to financial aid so that the university could educate more low- and moderate-income students, and free their families from crushing debt burdens.  They also called for new management flexibilities that would enable the chancellors to manage their campuses more effectively, pay their employees more competitively, and make limited dollars go further.  President Pruitt said that when the Governor’s budget was introduced in February 2011, “it was not exactly what we were hoping for.” 

Returning to What is Essential

            Reflecting on the previous four months, since the budget was introduced, President Pruitt recalled a favorite quote from Robert Kennedy, when he was reflecting about the Gross Domestic Product and all that it measures and all that it does not.  Kennedy lamented that while the Gross Domestic Product measures many things, it “does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education, or the joy of their play.  It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages; the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials.”  Kennedy concluded that “it measures neither our wit nor our courage; neither our wisdom nor our learning; neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country.  It measures everything, in short, except what makes life worthwhile. And it tells everything about America except why we are proud that we are Americans.”

            President Pruitt said that the debate over the last months about governance and boards and separations reminded him of Kennedy’s view of the Gross Domestic Product.  The debate has been about many things, but not about the most essential things that really matter.  President Pruitt said that he hoped that the focus could now return to those essential things.

            Remarking that ties that bind the System were far stronger and more enduring than whatever short-term arguments or disagreements may temporarily divide it, President Pruitt said that in recent months a family argument had occurred.  Saying that his and other families have many arguments, but after cooling off, families return to the dinner table with a renewed appreciation for their commitment to each other, a recognition that they care about each other, and a realization that to move forward as a family, it is necessary to understand that “we are all in this together.”

            Similarly, what brought together the University System and a university family 40 years before, and what will hold together the family in the next 40 years, was the Wisconsin Idea, and a deep and abiding commitment to the 182,000 students and 30,000 faculty and staff who depend on the System.  Saying that it was time to move forward and understand and appreciate that central commitment, President Pruitt said that he hoped that more time would be spent in the months and years ahead making the case, in a strong and united way, for the central role the university can play in the life of the state and the lives of students. 

            President Pruitt urged a commitment to speaking clearly and in one voice to the state and all university stakeholders, to saying that continued deep cuts in state support are a short-sighted strategy for the state and for students.  He stressed the importance of returning to making the case for why the state needs to reinvest in its public university system.  Ten years before, students and their families paid 38 percent of the cost of their education.  Today, he said, they pay 60 percent; and at a time when more and more low- and moderate-income students need an education, that trend is unsustainable.

            Saying that it was well known that the compensation of the UW’s world-class faculty, staff, and academic leadership did not measure up to the competitive national and international markets within which the university competes, President Pruitt said that more talented members of the academic community would be lost unless the case were made to turn around these trends.

            On October 8, 1971, Governor Patrick Lucey signed the legislation creating the University of Wisconsin System and said, “This is the beginning of a new era in the education of Wisconsin’s young people. Merger is now a reality and we will all benefit because of it, through the new University of Wisconsin System.”  Forty years later, anyone would be hard pressed to say Governor Lucey got it wrong, President Pruitt said.  UW-Madison has become one of only four public universities in the top 20 universities in the country.  UW-Milwaukee is on an exciting upward trajectory.  UW-Oshkosh, UW-Stevens Point, UW-Green Bay, UW-Stout, and all of the other campuses are unrecognizable today from where they stood 40 years ago.  This did not happen by accident.  It happened because the union was strong, because the System stood together, and because the Regents’ predecessors understood what was important. 

            President Pruitt said that the last four months had renewed his faith in both the importance of the System’s mission and the critical need to stand together.  In these most challenging of times, this Board of Regents, these Chancellors and this System President kept the faith, stayed the course, and shared a commitment to the Wisconsin Idea and to a vision Governor Lucey worked hard to realize 40 years before.

            Dr. Martin Luther King used to remind people to keep their eyes on the prize.  President Pruitt reminded Regents that the recipients of the Regents Awards for Teaching Excellence would be honored that morning, a reminder of what the university is about.  He said that he was privileged to serve on the Teaching Excellence Awards selection committee when John Koker from UW-Oshkosh was chosen.  President Pruitt said that a couple of months earlier Professor Koker sent him an op-ed piece he submitted to the Oshkosh Northwestern.  President Pruitt, saying that Professor Koker had his eyes on the prize at UW-Oshkosh, quoted from the op-ed piece:
 
If nothing else, recent events in our state have more than ever heightened awareness and solidified the consensus regarding the precious value of education.  We at the University do not try to teach students what to think; rather we strive at every turn to teach them how to think.

We use the power of arts, the humanities, the sciences and the social sciences to present students with the knowledge and skills to navigate through these complicated and uncertain times.  No one wants to leave our children and grandchildren in debt.  Simply leaving them debt free, however, with no means to think critically, problem solve and learn is a short-sighted goal, one that may make us feel better now but leaves the future population unequipped to deal with issues that seem eternal.

Heartfelt Thanks

            Concluding his remarks, President Pruitt extended heartfelt thanks to his colleagues on the Board, who stood together, unified, committed, and with one voice.  He extended special thanks to Vice President Mike Spector, saying that Vice President Spector’s wise counsel, brilliant mind, and steady hand had been invaluable over the previous four months and the prior two years. 

            President Pruitt also thanked System President Kevin Reilly, who demonstrated how fortunate the System was to have him at its helm.  He thanked the System staff, saying that he feared leaving someone out if he attempted to list them all, and especially acknowledged Jessica Tormey of the Communications and External Relations team, who he said played a vital role in shuttling between offices in the Capitol over the prior four months. 

            President Pruitt offered special thanks to Board of Regents Secretary Jane Radue, with whom he had worked during the prior year and a half, and to Emily Gleason, Ann Nottestad, and Jess Lathrop in the Board of Regents Office.  Joking that two weeks into his term as President, he did what 12 presidents before him had not done -- chasing Board Secretary Jude Temby into retirement -- he thanked Ms. Radue and her team for their support to the Board.

            The “stars of the show,” President Pruitt said, were the chancellors and deans, who stood together during difficult times.  He expressed awe and deep appreciation for their leadership and efforts to preserve the 40-year union.  He suggested that this work was something in which the chancellors and deans could take great pride.

            Concluding his last report as President, President Pruitt said that it had been an honor to serve.  He had promised to do his best, and given the importance of the cause, he expressed hope that his best had been good enough.

            President Pruitt’s remarks were met with a standing ovation by all present.

            President Reilly noted that President Pruitt had been a stalwart, committed leader of the Board and of the university and said that he had been unstinting in his commitment of time, energy, and intelligence as the System worked its way through the events of the prior four months.
- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Advisory Committee on Roles of System Administration

            President Reilly began his update, saying that it had been a busy, interesting time.  The 2011-13 biennial budget included a proposal to reduce the UW System Administration operating budget by 25 percent.  There were also several proposals under consideration that would provide new administrative and management flexibilities to the Board of Regents, flexibilities that would in turn be made available to each UW institution.

            President Reilly said that the System was at a pivotal point.  The significant changes would require careful and strategic consideration if UW System Administration were to be reshaped in a manner that preserves what is necessary and effective, sheds what is best done elsewhere or not at all, and considers the opportunities to better serve core stakeholders – the Board of Regents, the UW System institutions, and the people of Wisconsin.

            Recalling that at the April Board meeting, President Reilly had announced plans for a President’s Advisory Committee, specifically to address these issues, President Reilly said that President Pruitt had agreed to chair the committee.  Other members of the Board who agreed to serve were Regents Jeff Bartell, Judy Crain, and Brent Smith.  Several Chancellors would be represented on the committee: Chancellors Debbie Ford of UW-Parkside, Tom Harden of UW-Green Bay, and Rick Wells of UW-Oshkosh.  The committee held its first meeting on May 31. 

            President Reilly said that he asked the committee -- within the context of the UWSA mission statement, the proposed 25 percent reduction in base funding, and the new management flexibilities under consideration -- to advise him on potential changes in the structure, function, and support of System Administration, including operations currently assigned to both System Administration and Systemwide accounts.  He asked that the committee work to:  (1) consider what the law requires the Board of Regents and System Administration to do, and (2) sustain a commitment to the fundamental values of the Growth Agenda and Inclusive Excellence.  He said that he planned to use the work and recommendations of the Advisory Committee to inform and shape his thinking on the future role of System Administration.

Federal visits

            President Reilly reported that in early May, he and President Pruitt had visited with members of Wisconsin's Congressional delegation in Washington, D.C.  The purpose of the visit was to draw attention to the inordinate impact that cuts to student financial aid and scientific research would have on UW System campuses and UW students.  They asked the delegation to support the Pell Grant program, which affects nearly 40,000 UW System students and is the foundation for college affordability for low-income students.  The suggested cutting of Pell grants to 2008-09 levels would result in fewer needy students being able to afford college at a time when investment in the nation's workforce is key to growing the nation's economy.  The President’s proposed budget request would freeze the maximum Pell grant at $5,550 in 2011-12, while the budget bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives would roll the maximum back to 2008-09 levels.

            President Reilly said that they also discussed concerns of the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, the Wisconsin Technical College System, and the UW System regarding proposed administrative rules by the U.S. Department of Education that would, among other things, establish a federal definition of “credit hour” and establish a complaint process under which states would receive, review, and respond to complaints regarding postsecondary education.  They also thanked the delegation for its strong support in seeking a favorable interpretation from the federal Department of Veterans Affairs about the relationship between the federal post-9/11 GI Bill and the Wisconsin GI Bill. 

Leadership development conference

            Earlier during the week of the Board meeting, President Reilly reported, the UW System held a Leadership Development workshop for department chairs.  The workshop brought together academic department chairs from all UW institutions.  Department chairs are critical leaders within their institutions, he said.  President Reilly thanked those from the American Council on Education and the UW System who devoted their time to organizing this event, and all the department chairs for participating.

Rebecca Martin News

            President Reilly shared with the Board the news that Rebecca Martin, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, would be leaving the University of Wisconsin System in July to accept a position with the U.S. Education Delivery Institute in Washington, D.C.  He said that she would be at the July Board meeting, as her final meeting.

            President Reilly also reported that Mark Nook, Provost and Vice Chancellor at UW-Stevens Point, agreed to serve in the capacity of Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs for one year, effective August 1.  President Reilly said he looked forward to working with Mr. Nook in his new capacity.  In the coming months, a national search would be begun to fill the position on a permanent basis.

News from Around the System

            President Reilly indicated that due to the length of the day’s meeting, he would defer his report on descriptions of initiatives and accomplishments from around the System, instead sending these to Board members at a later time.

Revisiting Undocumented Students Discussion

            President Reilly said that he would like to revisit the previous day’s brief conversation, in the context of the budget bill, about undocumented students.  He said that it was a complex topic, and he worried that some might misinterpret some of what was said. 

            In the previous biennial budget, new statutory language was approved that let certain undocumented Wisconsin residents pay in-state tuition at UW institutions.  In the current budget bill, that language was removed, meaning that undocumented Wisconsin residents would again be charged non-resident tuition.  President Reilly said that it was the university’s intent to comply fully with this law, if it were passed. 

            President Reilly clarified that chancellors do not have unilateral authority to set tuition differently for certain students.  Their financial aid offices do have a very limited pool of resources available to provide additional assistance for a small number of students who need more help to stay in school.  The number of students with documented financial aid already exceeds the capacity to provide financial aid by a significant amount.  This situation likely would worsen. 

            President Reilly said that in responding to questions the day before, General Counsel Stafford had answered correctly, by saying that chancellors do have the authority to provide supplemental financial aid to needy students.  Some people came away from that exchange with the impression that the UW would earmark those financial aid dollars in some way for undocumented students; this is simply not the case, President Reilly said.  That kind of earmarking would not occur.  The finite pools of financial aid would continue to be used to help more low-income students stay in school and complete their degrees.

- - -

PRESENTATION OF THE 2011 TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

Introduction of Teaching Excellence Awards

            President Pruitt said that the Board was honored to welcome some special guests, the recipients of the 2011 Regents Teaching Excellence Awards.  He turned to Betty Womack, chair of the awards selection committee, to introduce the awards ceremony.

            Thanking Regent Pruitt, the Board, and chancellors for their diligent efforts over the past five months, Regent Womack expressed pleasure in welcoming the recipients of the 2011 Regents Teaching Excellence Awards and their families, friends and supporters.  The Regents Teaching Excellence Awards recognize and honor some of the UW System’s most outstanding teachers, departments, and programs.  She the awards were a welcome reminder of what a treasure the UW System has in its faculty and academic staff.  Writing in support of one of the day’s honorees, a colleague noted that the professor had a certain “magic” in the classroom – that he creatively inspired students not only to learn, but also to want to learn.  Regent Womack said that all of the honorees could be said to have that “magic touch.”

            Saying that this is the highest recognition bestowed by the UW System to members of its faculty and academic staff for outstanding career achievements in teaching, Regent Womack said that three award recipients would be honored:  two professors and one academic program.  She also thanked her fellow Regents who had joined her on the selection committee, – Regents Jeff Bartell, John Drew, and Ed Manydeeds.  She thanked them for their thoughtful participation. 
           

Individual Award - Dr. Regan A. R. Gurung, Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development & Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

            Regent Womack called upon Regent Bartell to present the first award, to UW-Green Bay’s Ben J. and Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development and Psychology, Dr. Regan Gurung.   Regent Bartell said that Professor Gurung sees learning as something that rarely happens automatically. The learner has to work hard.  The teacher has to work hard.  Dr. Gurung’s goal as an educator is to make students realize that they can do better than what they think is their best, to exceed their own expectations.

            As a teacher, Professor Gurung had been variously described as “intelligent, never compromising in the caliber of the material, quick-witted and humorous, and just simply fascinating.”  Ever the pedagogic scholar, his classes frequently employ innovative techniques and styles, and he has regularly solicited student feedback, Regent Bartell said. 

            Professor Gurung, known for going the extra mile to connect with students, learns the names of all his students, even in lecture halls.  Regent Bartell told of Professor Gurung’s holding office hours in a campus coffee shop or the student union, so students are more likely to stop by; emailing every student who receives an “A” with a congratulatory note; and emailing any student who fails, inviting them to his office to talk about what happened.  Along the way, Dr. Gurung built a reputation as an outstanding teacher and scholar; he is nationally known for his research and publications on teaching and pedagogy, and wrote a major text entitled “Health Psychology: A Cultural Approach.”

            Among Professor Gurung’s previous honors were the UW-Green Bay Founders’ Awards for both Excellence in Teaching and Excellence in Scholarship. In 2009, he was named the Wisconsin Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. At the present time, he serves as president of the National Society for the Teaching of Psychology and also as co-director of UW-Green Bay’s Teaching Scholars Program.

            Regent Bartell congratulated and introduced Professor Gurung.  Professor Gurung, taking the podium, expressed appreciation for the recognition. He said he was proud to be a teacher and a member of the UW System.

            Many academics, when asked what they do, often respond with their university affiliations or research areas.  Professor Gurung queried, “How often do you hear ‘I teach’?”  He said that this award nicely highlights the importance of teaching.

            Professor Gurung said that 2011 had already seen the best of times and the worst of times for educators in Wisconsin.  The changes to state worker benefits and associated protests made many people say many bad things about educators.  It also brought faculty and staff together and elicited more appreciation for teaching.  It was heartwarming to see support from different parts of the university and community.  Earlier in the year, he said, he was leaving school when he was stopped by a member of the custodial services, who commented on how hard faculty work and said that he hoped that what was happening would not drive Dr. Gurung away.  Professor Gurung commented that the custodian was not concerned about his impending hardship, but his concern was for the students.

            It would be easy to get bogged down by the dark implications of the budgetary changes. While it is important for faculty to be active in letting their voices be heard in response to the situation, faculty should not forget why they do what they do:  to improve lives with education. 

            Professor Gurung expressed respect for what the Board does for education and appreciation for the efforts of the administration and the actions of the Board of Reagents.  He said that for his peace of mind, he takes pride in teaching and strives to do his best in the classroom and out.

            Pride in teaching is not always easy to develop or express.  Professor Gurung said that he was lucky in that he kept in touch with his undergraduate mentor, a passionate teacher who cultivated his own passion for teaching.  Helping colleagues to nurture “the teachers inside” is important.  The efforts of the Board of Regents and of the Office of Professional and Instructional Development (OPID) were critical. He said it was critical to let budding academics and junior colleagues know that good teaching is valued and that one should take pride in teaching well. 

            Taking pride in what one does is important.  This especially holds for teaching.  Recalling the Vince Lombardi biography, When Pride Still Mattered, Professor Gurung said that Lombardi advocated taking pride in what one did and doing it to the best of one’s capacity.
Teachers who can outline good pedagogy are a dime a dozen; the ones whose students’ learn,     get inside their students heads and motivate.  He expressed pride in knowing good teachers are always looking for ways to improve their teaching, sharing their successes and helping grapple with teaching conundrums.

            When university or state budget woes get him down, Professor Gurung said, or when poor student writing or other challenges make teaching difficult, he was rejuvenated by thinking of all the students whose lives were changed for the better by thoughtful, hardworking teachers.  Saying that the System and UW-Green Bay abound in high caliber, passionate teachers, Professor Gurung expressed gratitude and humility to be honored with the Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award.  He said that he was thankful to be surrounded by great colleagues and many hardworking students who helped him enjoy teaching -- faculty in Human Development and Psychology, his supportive Dean, colleagues and students at UW-Green Bay, UW System’s OPID, and his family.

            In closing his remarks, which were met with a standing ovation, Professor Gurung thanked the Board for the recognition of the value of teaching and the opportunity to celebrate the effort that goes into education.  He expressed pride in being a teacher and a member of the UW System and said that “pride still matters.”

Individual Award - Dr. Craig Berg, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

            Regent Womack introduced Dr. Craig Berg, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction in the School of Education at UW-Milwaukee, to receive the second individual Teaching Excellence Award.  She said that Professor Berg started out teaching in the late 1970s at a small school in North Dakota.  After about six years, he decided he didn’t know enough about teaching, so he went back to school, at the University of Iowa.  Quoting him, she said that he “learned then, what is still reinforced every day, that highly effective teachers get that way through practice, reflection, time, feedback from students, feedback from colleagues, and a whole bunch of energy and dedication toward that end.”

            In the more than two decades since, as a member of the UW-Milwaukee faculty, Dr. Berg  focused his energy on building a top-notch science teacher preparation program, developing and directing the rigorous and highly-respected Milwaukee Area Collaborative Science Teacher Education Program, also known as MACSTEP.  Regent Womack said that Dr. Berg was an ardent advocate for improving the lives of urban children and increasing their chances for success and had invested thousands of hours of professional development contact time with teachers in Milwaukee public schools and the surrounding districts.

            A recipient of the 2007 Wisconsin Society of Science Teachers Excellence Award, Professor Berg also developed approximately 60 new courses for UW-Milwaukee’s Curriculum and Instruction department, and initiated a complete revamping of how the department assesses its own teaching.  He has regularly collaborated across campus with other departments, crafting and submitting teaching improvement grants.  Regent Womack said that the 41 grants he worked on to date attracted more than $4 million in funding.

            Indicating that students’ reviews were consistently glowing, evidencing Dr. Berg’s success as a model teacher, Regent Womack introduced Dr. Berg to accept his award.

            Dr. Berg first expressed thanks to the Board for recognizing teaching and for working to evaluate the award nominations.  He also thanked the UW-Milwaukee campus committee, provost, and chancellor for supporting his nomination. 

            He said that he was pleased, honored, and thrilled to receive the award.  Although the expectation was that he be highly productive with regard to scholarship and service, teaching was still the central core of his daily life, he said, and the most important part of being a faculty member at UW-Milwaukee.  Whether writing grants, doing and publishing research, or developing new courses, his daily job connects to teaching, improving teaching, or improving teacher education programs.

            Dr. Berg said that a long time before he decided that he had one of the world’s greatest jobs, getting to direct and teach in a grades 6-12 science teacher preparation program.  One of the joys of his life was getting to help others learn how to be effective teachers.  He said that he had a burning desire to be an effective teacher and a burning desire to help others become more effective teachers.

            However, that was not always the case.  Dr. Berg said that he grew up in Minnesota on a farm; went to a small school with a graduating class of 40; went to college at North Dakota State University; and, five years later, finished his biology and education degree.  He took a job, and six years later, deciding there was more he needed to learn about teaching, enrolled in graduate school.  By way of graduate programs at the University of Iowa, earning a Masters of Science and Ph.D. in Science Education, he began a faculty position at UW-Milwaukee in 1989 “to test out the job.”  The job worked out, and he has held it for 22 years.  Dr. Berg said that he went from assistant, to associate with tenure, to full professor; these were all nice milestones, but the Board’s recognition for teaching topped anything that he had received.   

            Acknowledging people who contributed to his growth as a teacher, including his first mentor, Dr. Don Scoby at NDSU and his professors at Iowa, his students, as well as his wife -- also a teacher -- Dr. Berg said that most of his knowledge about powerful teaching came from his former professors, and from students and area teachers who taught him how to be a much better teacher.  He expressed thanks to all who had shaped him as a teacher.

            Dr. Berg emphasized two points about teaching:  (1) teaching is more complex and challenging than people realize, because of the variety of students, with different abilities and backgrounds, and teachers who have a positive impact on their students know that each student is an individual, with unique talents and gifts, and the expectations must fit the student; and (2) with regard to quality teachers, many “alternative teacher certification programs” are not preparing high-quality teachers, and teacher education programs need to be held to the highest standard, with only the best teachers placed in classrooms.

            In closing, Dr. Berg expressed great pleasure and said he felt very honored to receive the Teaching Excellence Award and emphasized that he shared the award with all those who contributed to his becoming a better teacher and shaping his teaching.  Dr. Berg received a standing ovation from all in attendance.
 

Department Award - Professional Program in Education at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay , accepted by Dr. Timothy Kaufman, Chair of the Professional Program in Education

            Regent Manydeeds awarded the 2011 Regents Teaching Excellence Award for a Department or Program to the UW-Green Bay Professional Program in Education, represented at the Board meeting by its Chair, Professor Timothy Kaufman.  The Professional Program in Education was long one of UW-Green Bay’s most heavily enrolled programs, with more than 500 students who were majors, pre-majors or candidates for teaching certification in elementary education, or who were pursuing disciplinary majors and certification in secondary education.
            Regent Manydeeds said that the Professional Program in Education was a program firmly grounded in UW-Green Bay’s campus-wide commitment to “connecting learning to life,” with an emphasis on helping students see the big picture and break through barriers to find practical solutions.  He explained that students were provided with varied opportunities to bring the ideas and concepts of effective education to life in relevant “real world” contexts, working with children and families from different ethnic, cultural, and economic groups, as well as children with exceptional educational needs.  

            Regent Manydeeds said that the faculty strives to make teaching a public and collaborative activity, with many courses taught using a “co-teaching” approach in the field or combined as a sequence of courses directed by professional teams.  The Professional Program in Education also developed important partnerships in Green Bay and the surrounding areas, one example being the program’s involvement with Literacy Green Bay, through which students have the opportunity to work with second-language learners in area schools and immigrant parents. 

            Regent Manydeeds described the program’s commitment to developing teachers with the ability to identify and meet the needs of diverse learners, learning to select and implement appropriate pedagogical strategies, and appreciate the unique contributions of all learners.  He referred to one graduate, who noted that the program spurred her interest in taking on greater leadership roles within her school and the district.

            Among the department’s initiatives is the nationally-recognized “Phuture Phoenix” mentoring program, which encourages at-risk youngsters to graduate from high school and pursue a college education.  The Phuture Phoenix program has received numerous awards, including recognition as a Wisconsin Program of Distinction by the Department of Public Instruction.

            The program also partnered with tribal elders in the state to create a Center for First Nation Studies, to help future educators be better prepared to teach youth about the history, culture, sovereignty, and contemporary issues of the indigenous people of North America.  Regent Manydeeds said that the program’s commitment to excellence was reflected in the high quality of teachers it had produced.  He presented the Regents Award for Teaching Excellence to Dr. Timothy Kaufman, accepting the award on behalf of the UW-Green Bay Professional Program in Education.

            Dr. Kaufman accepted the award, expressing appreciation on behalf of the faculty, staff and students of the Professional Program in Education at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.  He thanked Regent Manydeeds for the humbling introduction and also thanked members of the Board of Regents, Regent Womack, and members of the Regent Teaching Excellence Awards Committee for the honor.  He also thanked Regent Crain for her past and continued support to UW-Green Bay and Chancellor Thomas Harden and Provost Julia Wallace for their support in helping prepare the teachers of tomorrow.  

            Dr. Kaufman said that he was joined in accepting the award by several faculty members, Dr. James Coates, Dr. Pao Lor, and Dr. Susan Copper.  Other members unable to attend the ceremony include Dr. Scott Ashmann, Dr. Mark Kiehn, Dr. Linda Tabers-Kwak, Dr. Steve Kimball, Dr. Karen Lieuallen, Karen Bircher, Art Lacey, Lynne Kimball, Amy Bartelme, Kim Desotell, and Dr. Lisa Poupart from the Education Center for First Nations Studies.
 
            Dr. Kaufman said that the program’s vision and commitment was to produce the “teachers of tomorrow,” professionals who were not only well prepared, but highly desired by schools and districts, practitioners who were comfortable in diverse settings and adept and successful at serving the needs of young learners -- especially those who are “at-risk” or underserved.  This goal has been accomplished through some of the programs that were mentioned, such as the partnership program with area schools, “Phuture Phoenix Program,” Cuernavaca Mexico Program, and work with the Education Center for First Nations Studies.
 
            Dr. Kaufman again thanked the Board for the wonderful honor, and he and his colleagues received a standing ovation from all present.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

            President Pruitt called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  Regent Bartell noted that the committee’s meeting began in joint session with Business, Finance, and Audit, for a presentation by UW-Milwaukee.  He deferred to Regent Smith to report on that presentation.

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business

Authority to release parcel – UW Barron County

            Resolution 9920 requested authority to release a very small parcel of land from the UW-Barron County back to the county, so the parcel can be sold.  The parcel was originally part of the campus area; however, the construction of a new city street had separated this parcel from the rest of the campus, limiting its usefulness to the university.

Authority to seek a waiver to select a construction manager-at-risk for UW-Madison Badger Performance Center project

            Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9921 requested authority to seek a waiver from the Wisconsin Building Commission to allow selection through a Request for Proposal process of a construction manager-at-risk for the UW-Madison Badger Performance Center project.  The project would remodel existing space and construct new space within the McClain Center and Camp Randall Stadium to house programs for the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics.  Work would be bid and sequenced in three phases that coordinate with the 2012 and 2013 fall football seasons.  The complicated nature of the project and its timing would necessitate careful coordination and project management.

Authority to seek a waiver to allow single prime bidding for the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility

            Resolution 9922, brought by UW-Madison, and contingent upon enumeration, requested authority to seek a waiver to allow single-prime bidding for the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility project and construct the project at an estimated cost of $2.8 million in gift funds.  This would include a $300,000 budget increase to allow the addition of adequate water supply require by the fire department.

Authority to construct the Carlson Hall Renovation Project – UW-Whitewater

            Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9923, brought by UW-Whitewater, and contingent upon enumeration, requested authority to construct the Carlson Hall Renovation project at an estimated cost of $17 million in General Fund Supported Borrowing.  This creative project would construct a small addition to the existing building and remodel the interior of the building, allowing for the consolidation of the College of Letters and Sciences into one facility from four separate buildings that offer inadequate space. 

All Agency Maintenance Projects

            Resolution 9924 requested authority to construct seven all-agency maintenance and repair projects at five institutions totaling, $6.5 million.  One of these projects would implement energy conservation measures throughout six facilities at UW-Marathon. 

Consent Agenda

            Regent Bartell reported that resolutions 9920, 9921, 9922, 9923, and, 9924 were passed unanimously by the committee, and he moved adoption of those resolutions.  Regent Drew seconded the motion, and the Board adopted the resolutions on a unanimous voice vote:

Authority to Release Back to Barron County a Parcel of Approximately 0.764 Acres from the UW-Barron County Lease, UW Colleges: UW-Barron County

Resolution 9920:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to permanently release a parcel of approximately 0.764 acres from the UW-Barron County lease back to Barron County.

Authority to Seek a Waiver of § 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow Selection Through a Request for Proposal Process of a Construction-Manager-at-Risk for the Badger Performance Center Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9921:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek a waiver of §16.855 Wis. Stats., under the provisions of  §13.48 (19) Wis. Stats., to allow selection, through a Request for Proposal process, of a Construction-Manager-at-Risk (CMAR) for construction of the Badger Performance Center project at a preliminary estimated budget of $76,800,000 ($49,200,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $27,600,000 Gift Funds).

Contingent Upon Enumeration, Approval of the Design Report of the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Allow Single Prime Bidding and Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9922:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, and contingent upon enumeration, the Design Report of the University Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility project be approved and authority be granted to seek a waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to solicit a single prime bid and construct the project at an estimated total project cost of $2,800,000 Gift Funds.

Approval of the Design Report of the Carlson Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9923:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, and contingent upon enumeration, the Design Report of the Carlson Hall Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total cost of $17,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing.

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9924:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $6,486,500 ($224,900 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $5,902,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $359,600 Program Revenue-Cash).

Report of the Associate Vice President

            Regent Bartell continued his report, noting that Associate Vice President David Miller had told the committee that the Building Commission approved about $14 million for projects at UW System at its April and May meetings.  The funding for those projects was approximately $1 million inGeneral Fund Supported Borrowing, $5 million in program revenue, and $8 million in gift funds.

            Mr. Miller also reported that at the April Building Commission meeting the Governor presented the 2010 Design and Construction Awards which recognized excellence in state building projects.  The award for Excellence in Architectural Design was presented to Workshop Architects of Milwaukee for the UW-Superior Yellow Jacket Union project at UW-Superior; the Excellence in Engineering Design award was given to Ayres and Associates of Eau Claire for the Lower Campus Steam Loop project at UW-Eau Claire; and the Excellence in Sustainable Design award was presented to KEE Architecture of Madison for the UW-Oshkosh Elmwood Center Remodeling project.

            Associate Vice President Miller reported that the 2011-13 Capital Budget was passed by the legislature’s Joint Finance Committee as recommended by the State Building Commission.  As Mr. Miller described in April, the budget would fully fund the Regents biennial budget request and maintain the UW System Six-Year Physical Development Plan.

In closing his report, Regent Bartell noted that the Capital Planning and Budget Committee convened in closed session to discuss topics that would be taken up in the Board’s later closed session.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

            President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education Committee.

Education Committee Business

UW Colleges: Revised Mission and BAAS Degree

            One year earlier, Regent Crain reported, the Board heard the first readings of the UW Colleges revised mission and the proposed Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) degree.  In the Education Committee meeting on Thursday, both the revised mission and the BAAS degree came before the Education Committee for second readings.  Senior Vice President Martin provided background on the long process, beginning three years before, by which the degree proposal was allowed to come before the Board for authorization.  Ms. Martin made clear that, throughout the process, the UW System held the UW Colleges to a much higher standard of review than would normally be the case with new degree programs.

            Regent Crain noted that Provost Greg Lampe then described the BAAS degree, which was developed with input from critical stakeholders, including those both internal and external to the Colleges.  The BAAS allows place-bound, underserved adult learners to obtain a bachelor’s degree and contribute to local workplace and community needs, while retaining the UW Colleges’ traditional transfer mission.  The revised mission for the UW Colleges reinforces the commitment to offering the first two years of a liberal arts general education, while specifying the additional offering of a “single baccalaureate degree that meets local and individual needs.”  Regent Crain said that the BAAS is a degree-completion program which builds on Association of American Colleges and Universities and Liberal Education and America’s Promise principles.

            Once approved, the BAAS would be offered at six of the UW Colleges campuses, in partnership with six UW comprehensives in their service areas.  Regent Crain reported that in response to a question from the committee, presenters noted that this is a fixed number, as specified in the resolution, and that any expansion of campuses after the first five years would require Board approval.

            Regent Crain said that the committee was very impressed with the degree proposal and approved both the revised mission and the BAAS degree unanimously.  She then moved approval of Resolution 9925, approving the revised mission of the University of Wisconsin Colleges, and Resolution 9926, authorizing the implementation of the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, to be offered regionally on six of the thirteen UW Colleges campuses and in partnership with six UW System comprehensive universities.  Regent Vásquez seconded the motion, and the Board unanimously approved the two resolutions on a voice vote.

Revised Mission Statement, UW Colleges

Resolution 9925:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the University of Wisconsin Colleges’ revised mission statement.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9926:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences, to be offered regionally on six of the thirteen UW Colleges campuses and in partnership with six UW System comprehensive universities.

            Regent Crain acknowledged the significance of the vote and congratulated UW Colleges and all who were responsible for the success of this effort.

Revised UW System Transfer Policy

            Regent Crain said that the committee next heard three, interrelated presentations on the UW System’s transfer practices and policy, culminating in unanimous committee approval of the revised UW System undergraduate transfer policy.  Associate Vice President Heather Kim provided an overview of UW System data on undergraduate transfer.  Senior Vice President Martin presented the findings of the Wisconsin Transfer Equity Study, a collaboration among the UW System, the Wisconsin Technical College System, and the Center for Urban Education at USC, partners in the Equity Scorecard Project.  Associate Vice President Larry Rubin presented key changes in the UW System’s revised undergraduate transfer policy.

            The most contentious change in the transfer-policy revisions came in the removal of the cap on the number of general education credits that students could transfer from the Technical Colleges to UW institutions.  The overarching principle is that UW institutions and their faculties would still determine how many, and which, credits and courses would be accepted for transfer.

            With one exception, there was consensus on the revised policy by the campuses, and the committee heard support from the provosts at several of the four-year institutions.  The exception was the UW Colleges, and Provost Lampe read a statement opposing the revised policy.

            Regent Crain moved approval of Resolution 9927, endorsing the revisions to Academic Information Series 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2, the UW System’s policies on undergraduate transfer.  Regent Danae Davis seconded the motion, and the Board unanimously approved the two resolutions on a voice vote.

UW System Undergraduate Transfer Policy

Resolution 9927:         That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents endorses the revisions to Academic Information Series 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2, the UW System’s policies on undergraduate transfer.

            Regent Crain thanked all present at the prior day’s committee meeting for their thoughtful participation.  She added that the UW System transfer policy contained in the revised ACIS 6.0 was distinct from the Board of Regents policy, which would be taken up at a later date.

UW-Milwaukee Presentation

            Among the other agenda items on the Education Committee’s agenda was a presentation from UW-Milwaukee Interim Provost Johannes Britz and Vice Provost for International Education, Patrice Petro, describing strategic initiatives on UWM’s digital future and internationalization.

Report of the Senior Vice President

            Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin’s report to the committee included a presentation by the UW Colleges and UW-Extension of their outstanding Inclusive Excellence framework, an inspiring model of how this work can be done across not only one but two distinct yet intertwined institutions; a brief report on the cumbersome new federal Program Integrity Regulations and how the UW System is responding to them; and the Committee’s approval of the 2011 Tenure and Promotion Report.

            The Tenure and Promotion Report is on the committee’s agenda each June, and the Board’s action becomes the final step in the tenure process for UW System faculty.  A resolution in support of the motion to approve that report would be included on the consent agenda; Regent Crain expressed congratulations to all faculty members who had worked so hard to earn tenure during the past year.

Consent Agenda

            Regent Crain moved adoption of Resolutions 9928, 9929, 9930, 9931, 9932, 9933, 9934, 9935, 9936 and 9937, which had been approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Vásquez, and was unanimously approved by the Board on a voice vote.  

Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

Resolution 9928:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents accepts the proffer of $5,531,039 made by the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Music. 

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online Bachelor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership and Communication, UW-Eau Claire

Resolution 9929:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Bachelor of Professional Studies in Organizational Leadership and Communication.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business, UW-Eau Claire

Resolution 9930:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Arts in Japanese Studies, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9931:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Arts in Japanese Studies.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Collaborative Online B.S. in Health and Wellness Management, UW-La Crosse, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Superior

Resolution 9932:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the Universities of Wisconsin-La Crosse, -River Falls, -Stevens Point, and -Superior, and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors be authorized to implement the Collaborative Online Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Organizational Change Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9933:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Master of Science in Organizational Change Leadership.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Supply Chain Management, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9934:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Master of Science in Supply Chain Management.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Online M.S. in Distance Education Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9935:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Online Master of Science in Distance Education Leadership.

Removal of Regent Policy Document 14-1, Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests

Resolution 9936:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents authorizes the Secretary of the Board to remove from the Regent Policy Documents RPD 14-1, “Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests.”

2011 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status

Resolution 9937:         That, upon recommendation of the respective Chancellors and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2011 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status be approved.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

            President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance and Audit Committee.

Joint Meeting of the Capital Planning & Budget Committee and the Business, Finance, & Audit Committee

            Regent Smith noted that the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee met jointly with the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  The committees heard from Christy Brown, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administrative Affairs, on “UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiatives:  Implementation Begins.”  Her presentation focused on five major projects:  the Northwest Quadrant, which increases space on campus by 20 percent; the School of Public Health; the School of Freshwater Science; the Kenwood Interdisciplinary Research Complex; and Innovation Park.   

Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business

Wisconsin Small Business Advancement Program (Wiscap) 2010 Annual Report

            Vice President for Finance Debbie Durcan provided an overview of the 2010 Annual Report of the Wisconsin Small Business Advancement Program (otherwise known as WiSCAP).  The program came about as part of the C.O.R.E. Jobs Act and was appropriated funding in the amount of $2 million.  The purpose of the program is to connect the needs of small businesses in the state of Wisconsin to the expertise of faculty at the comprehensive universities and to create jobs along the way.  Several speakers spoke of the importance of the partnership between the university and small businesses to grow jobs in the State of Wisconsin.

Federal Update:  FY 2012 Federal Priorities

            Assistant Vice President for Federal Relations Kristine Andrews presented a summary of federal priorities for UW System institutions in the fiscal year 2011-12.  Kris provided a contextual background of the increased federal funding to all UW System institutions over the past ten years.  While UW-Madison has increased at an average of 10 percent per year, all others increased by an average of 7 percent per year.

Program Integrity Regulations

            Paige Reed, Senior Legal Counsel, presented an overview of recent regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Education.  These regulations are expected to have wide ranging impact on institutions of higher education.  Among the goals of the Program Integrity regulations was to address aggressive and misleading recruitment practices on the part of some for-profit institutions.

Delegation of Certain Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted Under RPD 6-6

            Regent Smith reported that the committee then turned its attention to the delegation of authority from the UW System President to UW Chancellors to appoint and set the salary of:  (1) UW Colleges interim Deans; (2) the State Geologist; (3) the Director of the State Laboratory of Hygiene;  (4) the Director of the Psychiatric Institute; and (5) the State Cartographer.

            The committee also approved the delegation of additional authorities from the UW System President to UW chancellors:  (1) the approval of named professorships; and (2) the granting of unpaid, non-medical leaves of absence extending longer than five years.  Further, such extended leaves of absence would be reported to the Board upon request rather than in an annual report.

2011-12 Annual Budget Distribution Adjustments

            Freda Harris, Associate Vice President for Budget and Planning, presented information on the distribution of state-mandated budget cuts based on the latest information available from the State budget process.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.

            The committee approved a Clinical Trial Agreement between UW-Madison and Pharmacyclics, Inc.

Quarterly Report of Gifts, Grants, And Contracts (3rd Quarter)

            Vice President Debbie Durcan presented the gift, grant, and contract awards through the 3rd quarter of the fiscal year.  Total awards through March 31, 2011 were nearly $1.2 billion, a decrease of $82 million from the prior year.

Human Resource System

            Senior Vice President Michael Morgan provided the standard update on the status of the UW System Human Resource System project.  He reported that “go-live” was successful but, as with any major IT system, there were some challenges to be addressed.  The project remained on time and within budget, Mr. Morgan reported.

Review and Approval of the FY 2012 Project Implementation Budget

            Regent Smith reported that the committee was presented an overview and then approved the $5.2 million annual Human Resource System budget for fiscal year 2012.

Consent Agenda

            On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith then moved adoption of Resolutions 9938, 9939, and 9940.  The motion was seconded by Regent Falbo and unanimously approved by the Board on a voice vote.

Delegation of Unclassified Personnel Flexibilities Permitted under RPD 6-6: Delegation to System President

Resolution 9938:         That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents:

                                    (1) endorses the delegation of the UW System President’s authority under Regent Policy Document (RPD) 6-6 to (a) the UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor to appoint and set the salary of UW Colleges Interim Deans and the State Geologist; (b) the UW-Madison Chancellor to appoint and set the salary of the Director of the State Laboratory of Hygiene, the Director of the Psychiatric Institute, and the State Cartographer; (c) the UW chancellors to approve named professorships; and (d) the UW Chancellors to grant an unclassified staff member an extension of a non-medical leave of absence beyond five years; and

                                    (2) approves a change to RPD 20-6, such that non-medical leaves of absence would be reported to the Board upon request, rather than in an annual report.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pharmacyclics, Inc.

Resolution 9939:         That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contractual agreement between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Pharmacyclics, Inc.

Human Resource System Review and Approval of the FY12 Project Implementation Budget

Resolution 9940:         That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the Human Resource System implementation budget for fiscal year 2012.

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RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION FOR REGENTS’ SERVICE ON THE BOARD

            President Pruitt noted that the Board would be saying farewell to two Regents, Regent Emerita Schwalenberg and Regent Wingad, and that both were wished the best in their future endeavors.  He invited Regent Crain to present a Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Emerita Jessica Schwalenberg, whose appointment as a Regent was withdrawn in January 2011.

Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Emerita Schwalenberg

            Regent Crain said that it was her great privilege to offer a resolution in recognition of Jessica Schwalenberg’s service on the Board of Regents.  After a competitive application and interview process, Jessica was selected as a student-Regent about a year before, filling the position designated for a non-traditional student.  She had just finished her first two years at one of the two-year colleges, UW-Waukesha, and she was about to become a psychology student at UW-Milwaukee.
 
            Regent Crain said that she appreciated everything about Jessica from the start.  Regent Crain said that Ms. Schwalenberg was obviously going to be a thoughtful and contributing Regent, and she approached her job with serious commitment.  She was not afraid to ask questions, and she had obviously read everything before a meeting.  When she had carefully considered the issues, she was then very willing to speak.  Regent Crain remarked that breaking into the discussion of the Board of Regents, all of whom like to talk, is no easy matter.  Regent Schwalenberg quickly learned how to get into the discussion, and she was thoughtful and effective.  She did a very responsible job in representing student opinions and the probable impact of the Board’s decisions on the great variety of students on the UW campuses.  She knew that there was wide diversity among UW students, and she offered that perspective. 
 
            Regent Crain said that she wanted Jessica to know that Board members were very sorry that her term was cut short prematurely.  The Board greatly missed her contributions and had been less than whole without her.  Regent Crain said, however, that she had full confidence that Ms. Schwalenberg would be heard from in all that she would do in the future.  Saying that she is a “doer,” who is not afraid to extend her horizons and to make a difference -- for herself and for her young son – Regent Crain said that Jessica clearly knew the meaning of service.  The service of educated, principled people – and strong women -- like Jessica is essential, and Regent Crain said that she was proud to have been Regent Schwalenberg’s colleague.  She wished her success in her studies and in whatever paths she would pursue in the future.

            The following resolution was then read by Regent Crain, and approved by acclamation:

Resolution of Appreciation for Jessica Schwalenberg

Resolution 9941:         WHEREAS, Jessica Schwalenberg served as a dedicated student representative on the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, from May 2010 until January 2011; and

                                    WHEREAS, Jessica drew upon her experience as a returning student to give voice to the unique needs of the growing non-traditional student population in the UW System; and

                                    WHEREAS, Jessica shared her passion for maintaining high-caliber higher education opportunities to serve all Wisconsin families, championing this ideal through her service on the Regents’  Education Committee; and

                                    WHEREAS, Jessica was an active member of the UW-Waukesha community, serving as student ambassador, orientation leader, tutor, and pre-college mentor, crediting her mentoring experiences, in particular, for helping her work more effectively with her student-of-color peers; and

                                    WHEREAS, Jessica is a proud alumna of UW-Waukesha, having earned her associate’s degree with honors in Spring 2010, and is now pursuing her bachelor’s degree in psychology at UW-Milwaukee; and

                                    WHEREAS, Jessica used to full advantage her academic credentials, life experience, and commitment to the UW System to act as a responsible and thoughtful steward of the state’s public  higher education system and, in addition,  is serving as a strong role model for both her son and  fellow students who decide to continue their education;

                                    BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System commends Jessica Schwalenberg for her exemplary service on behalf of the UW System and the citizens of Wisconsin, and wishes her every success in the future.    

Regent Emerita Schwalenberg’s Remarks

            Regent Emerita Schwalenberg began her remarks by saying that when she was just getting her start at the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha, she was a very intimidated returning-adult student.  She felt quite new and possibly misplaced by her years spent out of school.  She said that she distinctly remembered saying in an interview for a position in Student Services that she wanted to learn everything she could about how the campus machine worked, in order to cope with her beginner’s anxiety.  Over the course of her two years there, that driving force evolved from the anxiety of a new student to the curiosity of a dedicated and appreciative student.

            Ms. Schwalenberg said that she had been truly privileged to have spent the greater part of the past year as a student- Regent.  She said she had deeply enjoyed learning about the intricacies of managing such a unique and powerful machine as the UW system.  The unification of the 13 freshman and sophomore campuses with the 13 comprehensive campuses provides a well-spread root system that not only educates the state’s residents and more, but serves the state with the connection and ability to grow and innovate.  Also, the UW plays a vital role in moving the state forward.

            Regent Emerita Schwalenberg said she would be forever grateful for the inspiration she found in working among such an impressive group of leaders. One of the first to encourage her was former-Chancellor David Wilson, who she said told her that the greatness in the opportunity that lay before her was ingrained in the great leadership in the company she would keep.  She said she felt blessed that Board members had come to play an integral part in her personal growth; with the Board, she was given the opportunity to practice using her voice in a public forum, and she received much useful and positive feedback.

            Saying that she had profoundly appreciated the opportunities to use her voice as an individual, a student, a representative, and Regent, Regent Emerita Schwalenberg said that as a student and a representative of students, she hoped that her voice carried out the intended purpose of bringing the unique and varied needs of non-traditional students to light, and helping her fellow Regents to understand the nuance involved in the needs of these students.  She expressed gratitude for the experiences, opportunities, and many friends that she found through her service to the UW System and the Board of Regents.

            Ms. Schwalenberg said that it was with a very heavy heart that she learned that her service would end prematurely due to a divisive political climate and her apparently untimely appointment amidst that climate.  A great contrast formed between the grandeur of her experience with the Board and the abrupt and absolute ending.  She said she had great difficulty coming to terms with the news, going through the various stages of loss, yet she came into her acceptance feeling gifted and blessed.

            In closing, Regent Emerita Schwalenberg thanked the Regents and Regents’ staff, as well as her family and friends, expressing gratitude for their guidance, patience, acceptance and friendship.  Her remarks received a standing ovation.

Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Wingad

            Regent Pruitt called upon Regent Falbo to present a resolution of appreciation to Regent Wingad, for whom the June meeting would be his last meeting as a student-Regent.  Regent Falbo presented a top-ten list of “ten things for Aaron to consider as he moves forward with what will be years of success and accomplishments.”  The list was as follows
 
10. Don’t pick a major of study that you can't spell.
  9. Don't sheepishly ask for advice and then proceed to give the answers.
  8. Don't entice elderly members of the Board of Regents into student drinking games.
  7. Don't stop your current practice of being with someone that is way above you (which means, in case you missed the point, Paulina).
  6. Don't be patient at least until you qualify for social security. Which probably means, for you, don't ever become patient.
  5. Don't forget the wonderful people and family who have supported you without limits and will continue that level of support.
  4. Don't be in a rush to receive too many emeritus designations.
  3. Don't delay your education. Keep your commitments to yourself.
  2. Don't ever take another Regent’s parking space when they are trying to park in it. EVER!
  1. Don't let anyone or anything dampen your drive, your enthusiasm, or your commitment to do what is right.

            Regent Falbo then read the following resolution, which was approved by acclamation:

Resolution of Appreciation to Aaron Wingad

Resolution 9942:         WHEREAS, Aaron Wingad has dedicated two years of exemplary service as a Student Regent of the University of Wisconsin System, from 2009 to 2011; and 

                                    WHEREAS, Aaron – a first-generation college student – graduated in May from UW-Eau Claire with a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology, and with the distinction of being the university’s first Truman Scholar and the first UW-Eau Claire student to serve as a Regent; and

                                    WHEREAS, Aaron’s passion to pursue a career in public health policy in part arose from his experience in numerous campus leadership positions, including that of student senator, a role he credits with allowing him to work with his peers on solving real-life, complex problems; and

                                    WHEREAS, Aaron holds a deep belief in moving Wisconsin forward through a strong system of public higher education, and championed this value throughout his service on the committees of Business, Finance and Audit; Personnel Matters Review; and the Chancellor Search for UW Colleges and UW-Extension; and

                                    WHEREAS, as a member of the Regents Diversity Awards selection committee, Aaron celebrated those educators who go the extra mile to create positive changes in campus climate and expand equitable opportunities for student success; and

                                    WHEREAS, Aaron was responsive to the UW System student body, consistently advocating for continued affordable tuition, increased financial aid, enhanced academic quality, and respect for the student role in shared governance;

                                    BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks Aaron Wingad for his distinguished and dedicated service to the citizens of Wisconsin and the UW System, and wishes him well as he opens the door to all of the exciting opportunities that lie ahead of him.

Regent Wingad’s Remarks

            Regent Wingad began his remarks by saying that he had introduced many of the Regents to his mother, Suzanne, who was in attendance at the Board meeting.  He said that he had introduced her to Regent Mike and Sheila Falbo on Wednesday night, and they talked for a while.  He said that his parents lean Republican.  Afterward, he told his mother that Mike and Sheila are conservative and she said, "No wonder I liked them so much."  Regent Wingad said that as a fairly liberal person, he still had not figured out why he liked Mike so much.  On a more serious note, Regent Wingad said that Regent Falbo had been one of his greatest supporters and friends on the Board, and Regent Wingad expressed his thanks for this. 

            As difficult it was to say farewell, Regent Wingad said that UW-Milwaukee was perhaps a fitting place at which to say it.  He travelled to UW-Milwaukee in May 2009, for his first Board of Regents meeting as a student, before he was appointed.  At the first meeting, he said he was invigorated by what he saw.  Upstairs, he saw Regent Walsh defending student rights in a Chapters UWS 17 and 18 debate.  Downstairs, he saw Regent Falbo defending student access to education at a Madison Initiative discussion.  Regent Wingad said that as a student, barely familiar with the Board of Regents, this commitment to students and this fight on behalf of thousands of students who see the Board of Regents as worlds away, was what drove him to apply to serve as a Regent.

            After he was appointed, the day of his first board meeting, he was told to go to Bascom Hall and read a plaque that is on the wall.  It moved him when he read it, and it was very important to him. The plaque reads:  “Whatever may be the limitations which trammel inquiry elsewhere, we believe that the great state UNIVERSITY of WISCONSIN should ever encourage that continual and fearless sifting and winnowing by which alone the TRUTH can be found.”

            This statement comes from a report issued in 1894 from the Board of Regents.  This statement has helped defend academic freedom around the world.  Regent Wingad said that he realized that day the importance of what Regents do, and that statement drove him to put everything into his service on the Board during the prior two years.  Saying that “sifting and winnowing” plaques are distributed around the UW System, Regent Wingad said that he had always taken the time to find them when visiting a campus.  Two months before, he had found the final one while visiting the 26th campus of the UW System. 
           
            Regent Wingad said that he had learned much during his two-year journey.  He urged Regents to stay strong in defense of the System, to continue to defend the university system for students who would never quite know what Regents do (until Regents raise their tuition).  He stressed that it is important that Regents defend students’ access to an opportunity that will change their lives.

            Regent Wingad said that he would like to share one key lesson from his two years as a Regent:  He said that he had learned to embrace overwhelming situations.  He learned that anything really worth doing should feel impossible at the beginning.  It was through those experiences, overcoming what seemed impossible, that he learned and grew the most as an individual.  He said he learned to love the insecurity found in facing the toughest challenges and he realized that through the process of overcoming the impossible, he learned more than he could have ever imagined.
 
            Regent Wingad then said that he would like to give a profound thank you.  Expressing particular thanks to Board of Regents Secretary Jane Radue, he thanked Jane, saying that she had been a constant advisor and had helped him through tough policy questions and tough situations.  Noting that as a new staff member for the National Committee on Rural Health he would be doing research for that committee and would be writing policy recommendations, he said he now saw things from the perspective of being on the other side of the situation.  In his new position, at his first meeting with the Director of the Office, the Director said of the committee, “We must make them feel important.”  Repeating his thanks, Regent Wingad said that Ms. Radue and others had made him feel more important than he should have over the previous two years.

            Addressing Regents, chancellors, provosts, System staff, faculty, and student leaders, Regent Wingad said that their advice and friendship had meant a great deal to him.  Although he could not attempt to list everyone individually, he stressed that his experience with all within the System had changed the course of his life.  He said he felt honored and thankful to have been  accepted so fully as a colleague. 

            The UW System is a special place, Regent Wingad said, and it was a privilege to be a small part of it for the past few years.  Regent Wingad’s remarks received a standing ovation.

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RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW-MILWAUKEE FOR HOSTING THE JUNE MEETING

            President Pruitt next called upon Regent Drew to present the resolution of appreciation to UW-Milwaukee for hosting the June meeting.  Regent Drew said that he was delighted to be a neighbor to and graduate of UW-Milwaukee.  He presented the resolution, which was approved by acclamation.

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9943:        WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System recognizes UW-Milwaukee as a crucial catalyst for the economic well-being of the city of Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin, and salutes the university’s commitment to both

expanding its research capacity and providing quality higher education access to the broadest possible audience; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Regents profited greatly from the presentation, “Powerful Ideas Producing Proven Results With Our Community Partners,” shared by Chancellor Michael Lovell and his co-presenters, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett; Michael Andrew, Director of Government Affairs and External Communications for Johnson Controls; Children’s Hospital President and CEO Peggy Troy; and Badger Meter Chairman, President, and CEO Rich Meeusen; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Regents appreciate that UW-Milwaukee is “sailing with the wind” and embracing the challenges and opportunities presented by emerging technologies through its Digital Future planning initiative; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Regents benefited from the knowledge shared on how the UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiatives are entering the implementation phase, including the successful acquisition of the Columbia Hospital Campus/Northwest Quadrant property and the pending construction projects for the School of Freshwater Sciences, School of Public Health, Kenwood Integrated Research Complex, and Innovation Park; and

                                    WHEREAS, the Regents enjoyed visiting the Cambridge Commons Residence Hall, which is the latest product of the UW-Milwaukee Real Estate Foundation;

                                    BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System is grateful for the warm hospitality extended by UW-Milwaukee faculty, staff, and students throughout this annual springtime visit.

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ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

            In announcing the election of officers, President Pruitt said that the bylaws of the Board specify that officers of the Board are elected at the annual meeting, which is held in June, and hold their offices for one year.  If there is only one nominee for an office, the election is by voice vote.  If there is more than one nominee, the election is by ballot.  Terms of office begin immediately after the June meeting.

Election of President

            Regent Pruitt asked if there was a nomination for the office of President of the Board.  President Pruitt recognized Regent Bradley, who nominated Regent Michael Spector.  Regent Bradley recalled that when Regent Spector first joined the Board and was asked about his committee preferences, he said, characteristically for him, that he would be glad to serve wherever he could help.  In his career, he has been recognized for his mastery of the facts, his fairness, and his inclusive and respectful style.  He has held corporate leadership positions, school board leadership positions, statewide-committee leadership positions, and Regent leadership positions.  Regent Bradley said that Regent Spector had the respect of Governor Walker and the leaders of both the Republican and Democratic parties in the Legislature.  Most importantly, however, Regent Spector truly cares about higher education in the state; about students, staff, and faculty; and about the goals of the Board for higher education. 

            Regent Pruitt called for a second to the nomination.  Regent Crain seconded the nomination, saying that Regent Spector’s wisdom, balance, fairness, rational approach, and respectfulness made him the right leader for the Board.

            Calling for and receiving no further nominations, President Pruitt called for the vote.  Regent Spector was unanimously elected President of the Board of Regents on a voice vote, whereupon he received a standing ovation.

Election of Vice President

            President Pruitt asked if there was a nomination for the office of Vice President of the Board.  President Pruitt recognized Regent Womack, who nominated Regent Michael Falbo, who she said continues to demonstrate his talent for understanding all facets of the UW System’s business, including his passion for educating the populace and his demonstrated compassion for the support of the leaders of the UW System, who work tirelessly and sometimes thanklessly to support teaching and learning.  Citing a quote from the Library of Congress, Regent Womack said that we must always shoot for the stars; any other destination is too low.  She said that Regent Falbo feels that way about the UW System.  She said that she enthusiastically supported his nomination.

            Regent Pruitt called for a second to the nomination of Regent Falbo.  Regent Vásquez seconded the nomination of Regent Falbo, saying that Regent Falbo was a highly-respected individual in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.  Regent Vásquez referred to Regent Falbo’s dedication to professionalism, his work in the community, and his civic involvement, saying that he could reach out to all aspects of the community, political, economic, and social.  Consequently, Regent Vásquez said that Regent Falbo would be an excellent Vice President and would be respected by the community. 

            President Pruitt asked if there were further nominations for Vice President.  Regent Manydeeds nominated Regent Brent Smith, saying that he had known Regent Smith for many years, and that they were classmates at the University of Wisconsin Law School.  Regent Manydeeds said that he had since then known Regent Smith professionally, and Regent Smith had developed a reputation in their part of the state as a well-prepared, competent, and ethical attorney.  He does difficult work, Regent Manydeeds said, representing people who are injured or have injured someone else.  He had taken his profession to the next level, realizing that being a trusted, compassionate, counselor is more important than simply winning cases.  Those were qualities that Regent Smith would bring, and had brought, to the Board, Regent Manydeeds said.  Regent Smith would act in the best interests of the citizens of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin, Regent Manydeeds said.

            Regent Smith called for a second to the nomination of Regent Smith.  Regent Stan Davis seconded the nomination, saying that he had known Regent Smith since he was an undergraduate at UW-La Crosse, a little over 20 years before.  He said that he had been a strong supporter of UW-La Crosse and the UW System.  Regent Davis said he had also served with Regent Smith on the Wisconsin Technical College System Board and had seen his commitment to and understanding of what it takes to effectively run institutions of higher education.  Regent Davis said that he believed that Regent Smith would do an outstanding job as Vice President.

            Receiving no further nominations for the office of Vice President, President Pruitt reiterated that if there is more than one nomination for an office of the Board, the election is by ballot.  He asked Secretary Radue to distribute, collect, and count the ballots.  After consultation with General Counsel, it was determined that the procedure for any Regents attending by phone would be for them to send their vote by email to Secretary Radue.  President Pruitt asked Regent Loftus, who was attending the meeting by phone, if he was able to vote in this manner; Regent Loftus said that he was able to do so.

            Before the voting began, Regent Bartell asked to speak and was recognized by President Pruitt.  Speaking on behalf of both of the nominated Regents, Regent Bartell said that the Board was fortunate to have two such thoughtful, capable, and compassionate candidates, either one of whom would be a great leader.  Regent Danae Davis, agreeing with Regent Bartell, said that she felt compelled to say that in the more than eight years that she had been on the Board, there had never been a contested election.  She said that the time for signaling bipartisan commitment on the part of the Board is at this time; Regent Falbo would represent this.  Regent Davis said that the Board could not go wrong with either candidate and that her concern was not about which of the two individuals would be better; rather, she said was concerned about what would be in the best interests of the System, with a budget that had yet to be passed, and the 17-member legislative task force yet to come.  She asked Regents to consider this as they voted.

            The vote by ballot was conducted.  Secretary Radue tabulated the results and then reported them to President Pruitt to be announced.  President Pruitt announced that the results of the Vice President election were that Regent Michael Falbo received five votes, and Regent Brent Smith received 12 votes; therefore, Regent Smith was elected Vice President of the Board.  The vote was met with applause, and a handshake between Regents Smith and Falbo.

            Regent Pruitt echoed the sentiments of Regents Bartell and Danae Davis, saying that the Board was fortunate to have two such extraordinary candidates.  Vice President Spector commented, as well, on the strength of the two candidates, and said that he looked forward to working with Regent Smith as Vice President, with Regent Falbo in a variety of capacities, and with all Board members.  Vice President Spector said that President Pruitt had done a terrific job and that he had learned a great deal from President Pruitt, as well as from past Presidents Walsh and Bradley.  He said that he looked forward to the next year being successful with the help of all Regents and chancellors, provosts, and System staff.

Election of Secretary of The Board, Assistant Secretaries, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers

            President Pruitt next called for a nomination to elect the incumbents to the other offices of the Board:  Jane Radue, Secretary; Jessica Lathrop and Ann Nottestad, Assistant Secretaries; Deborah Durcan, Trust Officer; and Tom Stafford and Doug Hoerr, Assistant Trust Officers.  Regent Walsh nominated the incumbents; the motion was seconded by Regent Bartell, and the Board elected the officers on a unanimous voice vote.  

- - -

COMMUNICATIONS, PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS

            President Pruitt recognized Regent Walsh, who offered an observation about the budget process during the prior four months.  He said that the situation was difficult because of how it arose, that it was monumental, and that it was of great importance to the state of Wisconsin.  A positive outcome was the message from the citizens of the state that they love their higher education system and they like it the way it is; the positive outcome resulted because of the leadership and good judgment of President Pruitt, who had been a strong leader during trying times.  President Pruitt, expressing his appreciation, received a standing ovation.

- - -
            The meeting recessed at 11:30 a.m. and reconvened at 11:45 a.m.

CLOSED SESSION

            The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded by Regent Bradley, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Evers, Falbo, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Walsh, Wingad and Womack voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9944:         That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider personal histories related to the naming of facilities at UW-Madison and UW-Parkside, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider appointment of campus executive officers and deans for UW-Manitowoc, UW-Marathon County, UW-Marshfield, UW-Washington County and UW-Waukesha, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats; to discuss the report of the Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.; and to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(c).

The following resolutions were considered and approved during closed session.

Authority to Name the Newly Constructed Addition and the Existing School of Human Ecology Building “Nancy Nicholas Hall,” UW-Madison

Resolution 9945:         That, upon the recommendation of the of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the newly constructed addition and the existing School of Human Ecology building, which is located at 1300 Linden Drive, “Nancy Nicholas Hall.”

Authority to name the Regional Center for Arts and Humanities, the “Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities,” UW-Parkside

Resolution 9946:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Parkside Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the Regional Center for Arts and Humanities, facilities of which are located in multiple areas of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside campus, the “Rita Tallent Picken Regional Center for Arts and Humanities.”

Authorization to Appoint: Five Deans at University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9947:         That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges/University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint the following University of Wisconsin Colleges Deans:  Charles E. Clark at the University of Wisconsin-Manitowoc, effective July 1, 2011, at an annual salary of $116,000; Alan Paul Price at the University of Wisconsin-Washington County, effective June 11, 2011, at an annual salary of $122,000; Patricia L. Stuhr at the University of Wisconsin-Marshfield/Wood County, effective August 1, 2011, at an annual salary of $116,000; Keith Montgomery at the University of Wisconsin-Marathon County, effective June 11, 2011, at an annual salary of $122,000; and Harry P. Muir, Jr. at the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha County, effective on a date yet to be determined in July 2011, at an annual salary of $130,000.

- - -

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m.
                                                                                                                                   

Submitted by:

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board