Board of Regents

Minutes of the February, 2011 Board of Regents meeting

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

Friday, February 11, 2011

9:00 a.m.

 

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE DECEMBER 9 AND 10, 2010 BOARD OF REGENTS MEETINGS. 4

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, PART I 4

Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report. 4

Pre-Biennial Budget Legislative, Community, and Other Visits. 4

Board’s Position on Voter Identification Bill. 5

BOARD OF REGENTS DIVERSITY AWARDS PRESENTATION.. 9

Opening Remarks by Regent Vásquez, Chair of the Diversity Awards Committee. 9

Individual Award:  Dr. Howard Spearman, Director of the Multicultural Mentoring Program of the UW-Milwaukee’s Lubar School of Business. 10

Team Award:  Admissions Counselors-Community Liaisons from UW-Oshkosh.. 11

Institution Award: UW-Milwaukee’s Southeast Asian American Student Services (SAASS) 12

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, PART II 13

Regent Policy Document Review Process. 13

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 14

Pre-Biennial Budget Visits with Business Leaders. 14

Budget Flexibilities Needed by UW Campuses. 15

UW System News. 18

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE. 19

Business, Finance, and Audit Committee Business. 19

Annual Public Forum on University Trust Funds. 19

2010 Annual Financial Report and Auditor’s Opinion. 19

Review and Adjustment of Differential Tuition Proposal:  UW-River Falls Falcon Promise. 19

Review and Adjustment of Differential Tuition Proposal:  UW-Superior Experience and UW-Superior Natural Sciences Differentials  19

Operations Review and Audit:  2011 Audit Plan and Student Involvement and Consultation in the Allocation of Segregated Fees  20

UW System Information Technology Report:  UW System Strategic Plans and Status Reports for Major IT Projects. 20

Report on Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (2nd Quarter) 20

Update on Nonresident Tuition Programs and Reauthorization of the Return to Wisconsin Program.. 20

Authorization to Recruit a Dean of the Law School and a Dean of the School of Business at UW-Madison at a Salary Above 75% of the UW System President’s Salary. 21

Approval to Submit Rules to the Legislature:  Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19 Relating to the Reinstatement Period for Sick Leave Benefits. 21

Status Update on the Human Resource System (HRS) 21

Consent Agenda.. 21

UW-River Falls Falcon Promise Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 21

UW-Superior Experience Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 22

UW-Superior Natural Sciences Differential Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 22

Reauthorization of the Return to Wisconsin Tuition Program.. 22

Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee (Dean of the Law School) at UW-Madison at a Salary above 75% of the UW System President’s Salary. 23

Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee (Dean of the School of Business) at UW-Madison at a Salary above 75% of the UW System President’s Salary. 23

Approval to Submit Rules to the Legislature: Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19 Relating to Reinstatement Period for Sick Leave Benefits. 24

CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE. 24

Joint Meeting with the Business, Finance & Audit Committee. 24

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business. 24

Authority to lease space for the UW-Madison Graduate School 24

Expansion of University Research Park II 25

Gift of land from the University of Wisconsin Foundation. 25

Autopsy and Pathology Suite in the Wisconsin Institutions for Medical Research Building (WIMR) 25

Federal Grant from the US Fish and Wildlife Agency. 25

Multi-Sport Facility Phase III Project, UW-Whitewater 25

Consent Agenda.. 26

Authority to Lease Space for the UW-Madison Graduate School, UW-Madison. 26

Authority to Acquire 75 Acres of Land for the Future Expansion of University Research Park II, UW-Madison. 26

Authority to Accept a Gift of Six Acres of Land from the University of Wisconsin Foundation, UW-Madison. 26

Approval to Construct an Autopsy and Pathology Suite Located in the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Building, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics Authority Board. 26

Authority to Purchase Three Parcels of Land Totaling 61.78 Acres, UW-Green Bay. 27

Approval of the Design Report for the Multi-Sport Facility – Phase III Project and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater 27

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 27

Education Committee Business. 28

Charter School Authorizations and Renewals. 28

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Approval, Milwaukee Scholars Charter School 29

Precollege Programs. 30

Report of the Senior Vice President 30

Consent Agenda.. 31

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.F.A. in Design, University of Wisconsin-Stout 31

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension, Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park  31

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Approval, Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights  31

The University of Wisconsin-Parkside Charter School Contract Extension, 21st Century Preparatory School 32

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension, Seeds of Health Elementary School 32

ELECTION OF NEW ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS. 32

CLOSED SESSION.. 32

Approval of Compensation Adjustment, Head Football Coach, University of Wisconsin-Madison. 33

Approval of Compensation Adjustment, Assistant Football Coach - Offensive Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Madison  33

Authorization to Appoint: Interim Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Superior 33

Student Request for Review of a UW-Madison Decision. 34

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

Friday, February 11, 2011

9:00 a.m.

 

– President Pruitt presiding–

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regent John Drew

- - -

 

APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE DECEMBER 9 AND 10, 2010 BOARD OF REGENTS MEETINGS

 

The minutes of the December 9 and 10, 2010 meetings were approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, PART I

 

Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

A written report was provided.  There were no questions or comments.

 

Pre-Biennial Budget Legislative, Community, and Other Visits

President Pruitt began his report by stating that the university was awaiting the release of the Governor’s proposed budget, planned for February 22.  While awaiting the budget, Board members and UW System staff have been busy with legislative visits, meeting with both new and returning state officials, including visits with Governor Walker’s office and key leaders in the Department of Administration, including Secretary Mike Huebsch.  President Pruitt and President Reilly met directly with the Governor as recently as the Tuesday prior to the Board meeting.

UW System officials have met with numerous legislators; chancellors have been reaching out to legislators, as well; and President Pruitt, President Reilly, and others have met with the business community to present the case for a new partnership between the University and the state, with recent visits to Hudson and Fond du Lac.  President Pruitt said that he and Chancellor Van Galen addressed the Rotary Club in Hudson, a city that recently celebrated the grand opening of UW-River Falls Hudson Center, which will serve adult students in that growing region.  President Pruitt and President Reilly travelled to Fond du Lac to meet with the Rotary Club to discuss the call for a new state/university relationship that would provide stable support for higher education and greater management flexibility for our UW campuses. President Pruitt thanked Dean Short from UW-Fond du Lac for helping to arrange that visit.

President Pruitt reported that the message has been generally well received.  People understand that the university is asking for stable support from the state in return for accountability and being held accountable for the results of state support.  Regents’ packets included strong editorials from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Wisconsin State Journal, as well as news coverage from recent visits around the state and an op-ed piece by President Reilly from the January 30thMilwaukee Journal Sentinel calling attention to UW research as a powerful and job-producing asset.  Also included was one of several letters of support from local business leaders, this one from Green Bay Packers CEO Mark Murphy, who wrote to Governor Walker highlighting the need for the upcoming budget to put a high priority on the university in the Green Bay area and throughout the state.

Board’s Position on Voter Identification Bill

Continuing his report, President Pruitt mentioned Senate Bill (SB) 6, the proposal to require photo identification to vote in Wisconsin.  The Board of Regents had taken a clear position on this legislation, calling on the authors to amend the legislation to allow student IDs to be one of the permitted forms of voter identification at the polling place.  Should such an amendment be included, the Board would then have a neutral position on the underlying legislation.

President Pruitt, sharing his perspective on how this conclusion had been reached, said that as Regents, the Board’s first responsibility is to consider the effect of any legislation on the 182,000 students in the UW System.  The failure to include student IDs as an acceptable form of identification would have a serious and deleterious effect on the right of students to vote.  The Board needs to speak clearly on this point and encourage students, faculty, chancellors and others to join their voices with the Board’s in stating their stance that, without this amendment, they strongly oppose SB 6. 

As citizens, all Regents can and should have their own view of the wisdom of voter identification legislation.  However, if the legislation’s authors agree to this amendment, President Pruitt said that he believes that the Board’s “standing” in taking a Board of Regents position on the underlying legislation is far less clear and compelling.

Another bill which has begun to move in the legislature would eliminate same-day voter registration in Wisconsin.  This, too, would have a direct effect on the ability of students to participate in their democracy and, President Pruitt said, runs counter to a decades-long tradition in Wisconsin that has caused the state to consistently rank at the top of the list in voter turnout and participation.  Since the same-day registration legislation is not moving at the pace of SB 6, there is more time to consider the Board position on this particular legislation.

President Pruitt then called upon Regent Loftus, who said that he believed the Board should strongly oppose the bill, regardless of any amendments.  Voting is a “blood sport” in politics.  Students are voting because of the 26th Amendment to the Constitution, which lowered the voting age to 18.  The courts settled the question of where people could vote, which is where they are a resident.  Students vote where they go to school because this is where they reside.  Wisconsin now has a ten-day residency requirement.

Regent Loftus said that the Political Science Department at UW-Madison has looked at what the voter ID legislation does; requiring an ID issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles is particularly onerous for ethnic and racial minorities, college students, senior citizens, the disabled, women, and low-income persons.  Roughly half of African Americans and Hispanics in Wisconsin lack a valid driver’s license.  Students’ voting rights are threatened because their residential address does not appear on their ID.  Minnesota students would be the first to be prevented from voting under this law.  Between 80 and 90 percent of Wisconsin college students do not have a driver’s license that matches their campus residence.  Many senior citizens do not have valid driver’s licenses or government-issued IDs.  Women students are particularly hurt; according to the researchers, only about half of women have a birth certificate with their current legal name; one-third of women have no current ID.  Therefore, students are not gaining anything through support of the student ID; also, they are 18 and residents, so they should be able to vote.  The bill is a solution in search of a problem where there is no problem.  The Board should oppose the law in all iterations, Regent Loftus said.

Regent Wingad said that barriers to the right to vote will affect UW students.  UW students have sent letters to the Governor opposing the bill.  Regent Wingad said that without provisions protecting students’ rights, he would oppose the bill; he called upon students and others to join him.

Regent Vásquez, having not been born in the United States, obtained the right to vote by becoming an American citizen.  On the day he became a citizen, the judge said that voting is a requirement of citizenship.  Regent Vásquez expressed his concern regarding any actions that deprive citizens of their duty to vote.  It is frustrating that those requesting zero-tolerance of fraud in voting do little to address zero-tolerance in drunk driving.  Voting is a duty and responsibility, and the Board should not tolerate anything that creates obstacles to voting.

Regent Danae Davis sought clarification of the Board’s current position.  President Pruitt said that the position, which is subject to change, is to support an amendment to SB 6 to allow student IDs as an acceptable form of identification; with such an amendment, the Board’s position would be neutral.

Regent Loftus, commenting on the amendment, raised questions about whether student IDs have addresses or expiration dates.  Further, he said the amendment refers to student IDs from accredited institutions; somebody will need to define “accredited.”  Another issue is that researchers say that excluding IDs issued by tribal governments, which the current bill would do, gets close to violating the Voting Rights Act; Native Americans are a protected class under this Act.  Regent Loftus said that the amendment itself is problematic; therefore, we wouldn’t want to support the legislation, even if it is amended.

Regent Crain said that she is against the entire bill.  She said that she assumes that the position of the Board on the amendment and bill was taken because the amendment related to the Board’s business.  President Pruitt reiterated that the Board’s standing pertains to the 182,000 students of the UW System.  President Pruitt said that this is subject to Board discussion and a change of this position.

Regent Manydeeds said that he understood that some may think that a group such as the Board should address only an issue that affects students, however faculty and staff and parents of students must be considered, as well.  With these groups considered, the bill affects a large portion of the population of the state of Wisconsin.  Regent Manydeeds, expressing agreement with Regent Loftus, said that the Board has a leadership obligation also.  The Board should therefore oppose the entire bill, because of the Board’s greater obligation to the state.

Regent Womack offered a motion that the Board of Regents oppose SB 6 in its entirety.  The motion was seconded, and discussion continued.  (The motion was later effectively withdrawn.) 

Vice President Spector said that there is a legitimate principle at stake in people being asked to identify themselves when they vote.  He expressed agreement with Regents Loftus and Manydeeds, and said that there is not much voter fraud; but as a matter of principle, the idea that voters should have to show identification is not irrational.  By opposing the bill, the Board would be saying they would be opposing identification, when identification may not be irrational.

General Counsel Tom Stafford at this point expressed concern that Board action on this item had not been included in the meeting notice; therefore, taking a formal position at the meeting may raise questions about compliance with the Open Meetings Law.

Regent Stan Davis noted that the Board’s current position on the bill was developed through a process that was not noticed.  He questioned why the current process would not therefore be proper.  Mr. Stafford responded that the Board’s position was developed through the passive-review process that the Board has had in place for a period of years.  If an action is to be taken during a meeting, he would advise properly noticing the item as an action item.

Regent Danae Davis, commenting on the passive-review process and seeking clarification, asked for confirmation of her understanding:  if the UW System Communications Office sends a recommended position on SB 6, and the Board takes a position through this process, this is acceptable, but the Board’s taking a position during this meeting is not acceptable.  This understanding was confirmed by Regent Spector and others, based on the Open Meetings Law.

Regent Walsh, returning to Vice President Spector’s earlier point, commented that there may be nothing wrong with requiring some proof of identification.  He asked if Regent Spector was suggesting that the existing system does not require this.  Regent Spector said that the current system does not do this completely, and the amount of failure has not been great; however, if the Governor and legislature choose to take action, he gives them a presumption that there is a reason for it.

President Pruitt suggested that an alternative would be to distribute to the Board a proposed bill position in opposition to SB 6 through the passive-review process.  Regent Bartell commented that would be a reasonable approach, but it does not give Board members an opportunity to respond to each others’ arguments.  An open meeting would be a better way to make a decision.  President Pruitt, in response, suggested that if there is unlikely to be action on SB 6 before the next Board meeting, then it would be possible to notice this item, to be discussed in open session at the March meeting.

Regent Stan Davis asked about the timing of the bill.  Executive Director David Giroux said that most recently, the bill did not seem to be moving quickly enough to be passed before the next election.

Regent Falbo renewed the discussion of the process.  He asked if the neutrality position had been published, and received confirmation that it has.  He questioned the process, given the negative input of Regents on this bill and potentially on others.  President Reilly commented that many bills are introduced in an active legislative session; in a passive review process, a suggested position is sent to Regents on bills that may affect the university.  Regents can respond to President Pruitt, President Reilly, or Mr. Giroux if they have a concern; Regents Loftus and Drew did so during the SB 6 review process.  Much time could be spent discussing every bill during meetings.  Individual Regents may have individual views on particular legislation; the goal is to focus on bills that most directly affect university interests.  Regents argued during the current meeting that this bill may have broader ramifications, and the debate deserves to be continued at the next meeting.

Regent Falbo, commenting further on the passive-review process, noted that a lack of response is taken as support of a proposed position; he suggested that perhaps it should be noted that the majority of the Board supports a particular position, if that is the case.  In this case, some Board members clearly opposed the position that was ascribed to the Board as a whole.  If the position is not unanimous, it needs to be stated in a different way.

Regent Bartell responded by saying that the University of Wisconsin System Administration speaks in many different ways.  When it does, the Board of Regents does not approve every last word or sentence.  He said that he does not necessarily regard some of the messages from System staff, when the staff has sought feedback from the Board, as representing the position of the Board of Regents.  Regent Falbo asked how the bill positions are described.  President Reilly said that they are portrayed as the Board of Regents’ positions; Executive Director Giroux confirmed this.  He said that there is not normally much feedback.  The subjects are fast-moving and cover a lot of ground; he affirmed that the focus is on issues most relevant to the university as an institution.  Students, faculty, and others are free to engage on any of the subjects as they deem necessary, regardless of the stated System positions.  The System looks for guidance from the Board so that a common voice can be expressed on behalf of the System as an institution.

Regent Walsh, disagreeing with Regent Falbo’s earlier point about majority positions on bills, said that the number of Regents that disagree is not important when the position of the Board is expressed.  The message of the Board can be sent, regardless of how it was arrived at.

President Pruitt said that the current process is an educational one; looking at alternative ways of doing business is appropriate.  He raised the voter ID issue in the President’s Report in light of the Regent concerns that he knew existed.  Concluding the discussion, he said that Regents’ concerns and the status of the legislation could be further discussed at the March meeting.

President Pruitt then suspended his President’s Report in order to take up the Regents Diversity Awards, as special guests were present for the awards presentation.

BOARD OF REGENTS DIVERSITY AWARDS PRESENTATION

President Pruitt turned to Regent Vásquez, chair of the Regents Diversity Awards Committee, to lead the awards presentation.

Opening Remarks by Regent Vásquez, Chair of the Diversity Awards Committee

Regent Vásquez began by saying that as a Regent he particularly enjoys participating in graduation ceremonies and, through the Regent Awards, recognizing the good things happening at the campuses.  Welcoming this year’s Diversity Award recipients, and their families, friends, and colleagues, he said that this is the third year that the Board of Regents has presented its Diversity Awards, which are meant to recognize the outstanding contributions to diversity and inclusion by people and programs at UW institutions. While the awards are relatively new, these are ideals that the UW System has promoted for more than 20 years.

These awards are part of a special family of awards that Regents sponsor.  They include the Regents Teaching Excellence Awards, which recognize outstanding teaching, and the Regents Academic Staff Excellence Awards, which honor non-instructional administrative and professional academic staff for their exceptional service to their respective UW System institutions.

The Regents Diversity Awards program was established through a Board directive calling for the formal recognition of individuals, teams, or units within the UW System who have successfully fostered greater access and success for historically underrepresented populations.

These efforts are vitally important, both because it is the socially just and fair thing to do, but also because of the educational and economic value to this University and beyond.  Each recipient shows a genuine respect for human differences, a deep attentiveness to the learning process, and a keen responsiveness to students and their educational needs.

Regent Vásquez said that this year’s selection committee included Regents Danae Davis, Ed Manydeeds, and Aaron Wingad.  (Regent Womack was also a member of the selection committee; her name was inadvertently left out, and this was corrected shortly thereafter.)   Regent Vásquez thanked his fellow Regents for their time and effort in carefully reading and evaluating the portfolio submissions received on behalf of the UW System institutions.  Noting that it was difficult to choose, he encouraged campuses to step forward and share even more of their accomplishments in the coming years of this award. 

Individual Award:  Dr. Howard Spearman, Director of the Multicultural Mentoring Program of the UW-Milwaukee’s Lubar School of Business

Regent Wingad presented the 2011 Board of Regents Diversity Award in the individual category to Dr. Howard Spearman of UW-Milwaukee.  Regent Wingad said that Dr. Spearman is Director of the Multicultural Mentoring Program in UWM’s Lubar School of Business. As part of this growing program, multicultural students are connected with business professionals in the Milwaukee area for a one-on-one year-long mentoring relationship. The mentors assist students with developing their academic and career goals, as well as enhancing their networking skills, an acknowledgement that success is about more than just coursework.  Under Dr. Spearman’s leadership, participation in the Multicultural Mentoring Program has grown from 17 students when it was launched in 2005, to 50 students in 2009.

Regent Wingad said that the success of this program goes beyond the increased number of student and mentor participants, to the outcomes of the mentoring relationships, more confident, prepared, and connected students.  Mentors also want to stay involved with the program because of its success, impact on students, and benefits to business. 

Dr. Spearman is also the Multicultural Program Coordinator and a Senior Academic Advisor in the Lubar School of Business, with a caseload of about 750 undergraduates; and he supervises the Multicultural Tutoring Center, which offers academic assistance in courses critical for admission to the business major. In each of the last three years, the Center served close to 60 students, 80 percent of whom were subsequently admitted to the major.  Regent Wingad presented the individual Diversity Award to Dr. Spearman. 

Dr. Spearman was greeted with a standing ovation.  He expressed his appreciation for the honor of receiving the Diversity Award.  Although the award is an individual award, he expressed his appreciation to current and former deans, business leaders, professors and others who have helped him to lead the way.  He also thanked his wife and sons. 

The purpose of the Multicultural Mentoring Program is to create connections between the Lubar School of Business, multicultural business students, and the Milwaukee business community.  The program has established partnerships with major corporations, such as Manpower, Miller Coors, Harley Davidson, and Baird.  Twenty-one of 29 graduating seniors landed jobs, and11 of 25 returning students landed internships through the program.  Naming students who have achieved success through the program, he said that the quality of relationships reflect the true success of the program.  On behalf of these students and the many other lives affected by the program, Dr. Spearman expressed his sincere thanks.

Team Award:  Admissions Counselors-Community Liaisons from UW-Oshkosh

Regent Manydeeds presented the 2011 Board of Regents Diversity Award in the team category to the community liaison counselors in the Admissions Office at UW-Oshkosh.  He said that about ten years ago, UW-Oshkosh launched a program aimed at increasing the representation of students of color on campus. It was fairly quickly recognized that in order to fully commit to these unique student groups, there needed to be individuals who are immersed in the culture, who speak the language, and who would be trusted and respected in each of the communities.

The result is UW-Oshkosh’s small but dedicated team of four full-time and one part-time staff members specifically targeting the recruitment and enrollment of students from the African-American, Hispanic and Latino, Hmong/Asian, and Native American populations.  In the last year, this group has made more than 100 high school visits; participated in 24 diversity college fairs and parent programs; and sent out personalized mailings to nearly 3,100 prospective students of color; also, more than 1,500 students of color coming to UW-Oshkosh on organized visits.

These staff members act as recruiters, and also serve as conduits between various ethnic communities and the university.  They carry memberships and active roles in organizations like the Hmong-American Interagency Partnership, and the United Migrant Opportunity Services (UMOS).  As a result, from 2001 to 2010, there has been a 313 percent increase in the number of applications received from students of color at UW-Oshkosh, a 272 percent increase in the number of students of color admitted; and a 238 percent increase in the number of students of color enrolled. In 2010, more than 11 percent of first-year students at UW-Oshkosh identified themselves as students of color.

Each community liaison counselor shares in the responsibility to help new students engage and connect on campus once they arrive.  They refer and direct students to the various TRIO program services, for example, and introduce new students to academic support services, academic advising, and career counseling.  Regent Manydeeds said that the liaisons take the time to provide individualized attention and assistance.  Citing the group’s contributions to a more diverse, open and compassionate campus climate, Regent Manydeeds presented the 2011 Regents Diversity Award to the Admissions Counselors-Community Liaisons from UW-Oshkosh, and introduced Flora Stapel to accept the award on behalf of the team.

Flora Stapel and the team were greeted with a standing ovation.  She introduced Beverly Benston, Admissions Counselor/Milwaukee Outreach; Quincy La Grant, Admissions Counselor; Thomas Xiong, Admissions Counselor; and Roger Wescott, the team’s newest member.

Mr. La Grant spoke on behalf of the team, and began by expressing appreciation for the recognition.  He said that each team member is a UW-Oshkosh alumnus; they are committed to serving their communities, people of color, under-served and under-represented populations, and first-generation students.  Beginning with one admissions counselor, the team now has five members.  The team represents a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.  The team’s efforts are relationship-focused and varied, depending on the needs of students.  The team serves as a bridge to greater achievement and improved quality of life.  The relationships depend upon trust between students, families, the school, and the community.  In the last five years, enrollment of students of color at UW-Oshkosh has increased by 56 percent.  Programs and services also strive to close the achievement gap, once students are enrolled.  The team members are part of a special commitment to diversity.  Mr. La Grant closed by again expressing appreciation for the award.

Institution Award: UW-Milwaukee’s Southeast Asian American Student Services (SAASS)

Regent Danae Davis presented the Diversity Award in the institution/unit category to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for its Southeast Asian American Student Services program, represented at the meeting by the program’s coordinator, Dao Vang.  Sharing some of the history of the program, Regent Davis said that following the United States’ withdrawal from the Vietnam War, Southeast Asian refugees, Cambodians, Hmong, Laotians, and Vietnamese, began arriving in Wisconsin and in other parts of the U.S.  This refugee resettlement continued through the early 2000s.  These refugees were often among the poorest and least educated immigrants to come to Wisconsin, but with a strong desire to improve their life conditions, some began to enter the UW System to obtain post-secondary education.  They faced significant challenges.  Often, institutions did not possess the cultural knowledge, skill, or ability to serve students from Southeast Asia.  Many students felt alienated and dropped out.

Regent Davis said that in 1986, however, the Southeast Asian Student Academic Services program was established to serve these students at UW-Milwaukee.  In 2006, the program name was changed to Southeast Asian American Student Services to encompass the U.S.-born students of Southeast Asian backgrounds.  This program has produced significant results over the years by recognizing that the advising needs of students from refugee and immigrant backgrounds may go far beyond what courses to select or which major to choose.  It also demands cultural understanding, and the sensitivity to proactively respond to students’ unique situations.  

Working together with other relevant campus offices and community agencies, SAASS’s efforts have contributed to not only increased recruitment, but also increased retention and graduation rates during the last decade.  In the fall of 1990, there were 93 Southeast Asian students attending UW-Milwaukee.  By fall 2010, that number reached 725, a 633 percent change.  Currently, UW-Milwaukee has the largest Southeast Asian student population in the UW System.

This growth also contributes greatly to the diversity of the UW-Milwaukee student population.  This past fall, Southeast Asian students represented 2.5 percent of the total student population at UW-Milwaukee, and 12.3 percent of the students of color at UWM.  Regent Davis presented the Regents’ Diversity Award to UW-Milwaukee’s Southeast Asian American Student Services program, represented by its coordinator, Dao Vang.

Mr. Vang was greeted by a standing ovation.  He expressed his appreciation for the recognition of the work that the two staff at UW-Milwaukee do.  He said that he graduated from UW-La Crosse and did graduate studies at UW-Milwaukee; he is proud to be a graduate of the UW System.  The program does academic advising and recruitment.  By reaching out to Wisconsin Educational Opportunities Programs that serve low-income families and reaching out to college-bound students, the program has achieved success.  On a daily basis, the program helps ensure students are happy on campus, by making sure that the campus climate is friendly to them, helping address students’ financial-aid and advising needs, and other needs. 

Mr. Vang thanked Dr. Cheryl Ajirotutu, Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Climate, for her support of multicultural programs, and Dr. Chia Youyee Vang, Assistant Professor in the History Department, who nominated Mr. Vang’s program for the award.  In closing, he again expressed his appreciation to the Board of Regents and the Diversity Awards Committee.

Regent Vásquez noted that the awards committee recognized that there may be a need to revisit the directive that established the Diversity Awards Committee, with a possible recommendation to be more inclusive in the way that diversity is defined.  

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, PART II

Following the presentation of the Diversity Awards, President Pruitt congratulated all award winners.  He then resumed his President’s report.

Regent Policy Document Review Process

Returning to his President’s Report, President Pruitt addressed a subject that he said is an important one for the Board:  the Regent Policy Documents.  The 161 Regent Policy Documents, or “RPDs,” vary widely in both substance and style.  Over the past 40 years, the Board of Regents has adopted policies for many different reasons.  Some have been adopted in response to high-priority issues, such as textbook affordability or relationships with educational loan lenders.  Some policies are operational in nature.  Some adopt principles or endorse studies.  President Pruitt said that the reasons behind all of the policies were undoubtedly justified and compelling at the time. 

President Pruitt said that he believes the Board has a responsibility as a governing board to assess its policies periodically, and to evaluate whether they reflect the Board’s current objectives.  He commented on a policy the Board of Regents adopted in April 1973, entitled “Nondiscrimination in Oratorical Contests,” which denounces separate male and female oratorical contests held by the Interstate Oratorical Association.  Saying that the Interstate Oratorical Association voted to discontinue separate male and female contests in May 1973, the month after the Regent policy was adopted, President Pruitt noted that this policy was outmoded and did not need to be on the books anymore.

President Pruitt said that he had asked Board Secretary Jane Radue to lead a comprehensive effort to review and recommend updates and improvements to the Regent Policy Documents.  Joining Secretary Radue in this effort will be Jessica Lathrop, who joined the Board Office in mid-January.  The Board of Regents Office will work closely with the Offices of Academic Affairs, Finance, Capital Planning, and others to research the background and the current status of each policy.  Vice President Spector has a special interest in the relationship between the policy documents, the Board’s administrative rules, and state statutes; this will also be covered in the research.

President Pruitt noted the importance of the Committee Chairs in guiding the policy-review process, by developing a priority order for looking at the policies, and discussing the policies in their committees.  Describing the process for reviewing the policies, Regent Pruitt said that the review could be organized around a series of categories, such as:  (1) obsolete policies; (2) complex policies with significant shared-governance issues, some of which may be deferred until the policy-review process is better established; (3) policies reflecting high-priority issues for the Board, (4) policies that were adopted or changed very recently and that do not yet need review, and (5) “holes,” or areas in which new policies might be needed. 

Quoting from President Reilly’s recent letter to Governor Walker on flexibilities, President Pruitt said that one goal of the policy review is to eliminate or revise policies that the Board decides unnecessarily restrict the effective operation of campuses and to provide to UW campus CEOs the flexibility they need to manage. 

President Pruitt invited Board members to consider such questions as whether there should be a standard definition of what constitutes a Board policy, whether policies should have certain standard components, and how priorities for review should be set among the policies. 

In response to a question from Regent Crain about a timetable for the policy review, President Pruitt said that it is an important process to begin, and to continue for as long as it takes to complete it.  He suggested that a board of this sort should always be in a policy-review mode, to make sure that what stands as policy reflects current reality.  Regent Crain commented that this is a very good idea.  She asked if certain policies have proven to be problematic and need to be addressed more quickly.  President Pruitt responded that this would be one of the factors that could influence decisions about which policies to review before others.  Regent Wingad commented that he thinks the policy review is a great idea.  He said that he has some ideas for policies to review. 

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

President Pruitt turned to President Reilly for the report of the President of the System. 

Pre-Biennial Budget Visits with Business Leaders

President Reilly began his report by saying that along with the public appearances that Regent Pruitt mentioned, he also had the opportunity recently to visit UW-Parkside, speaking to the School of Business and Technology advisory board.  He said he carried the same message about the importance of higher education and the work campuses are doing to lead Wisconsin’s economic growth. 

It is very important for UW System institutions to maintain ties with local business leaders across the state.  One group the UW System has been working with over the past few years is the Wisconsin Higher Education Business Roundtable (WHEBR).  During the past week, the WHEBR Board of Directors released a formal resolution of support, encouraging Governor Walker and the State Legislature to provide UW campuses with greater administrative flexibilities.  WHEBR’s February 9th news release said, “The Roundtable is convinced that given the appropriate managerial flexibility, the UW could achieve new savings, enhance productivity, and help individual institutions and campuses manage resources in these challenging times.”

The resolution approved by the Roundtable Board encourages the Governor and members of the Legislature to support UW System’s proposals that would:  (1) allow UW to manage education-related building projects more efficiently; (2) let UW participate in higher-education purchasing consortia; (3) expand the UW’s ability to address both access and educational quality when setting tuition, while preserving an affordable “net price” for students with documented need; and (4) let the UW use existing resources wisely to address competitive compensation challenges, recognizing that UW competes for talent in a global market.

Budget Flexibilities Needed by UW Campuses

President Reilly made note of a letter he sent to Governor Walker about flexibilities, along with a report which said that a flexible UW is a strong UW.  He mentioned a recent chancellors’ meeting, at which chancellors expressed interest in clearly defining what statutory and policy changes would be needed to provide campuses greater management flexibility.  The report describes needed flexibilities in budgeting, tuition and pricing, capital planning and construction, human resources management, and purchasing and procurement.

President Reilly asked three chancellors to talk about what increased flexibilities would mean on their campuses.  UW-River Falls Chancellor Dean Van Galen spoke first, saying that campuses are called upon to be agile, entrepreneurial, and responsive to regional needs.  The GPR block grant concept is absolutely key for giving campuses more flexibility for serving students.  He said that he was struck by the length and inefficiency of the recent process for leasing space for the UW-River Falls Hudson Center to serve adult students in degree completion.  The campus wanted to lease three classrooms close to I-94; having toured several facilities, the campus identified appropriate space.  However, the Department of Administration’s process for leasing space is protracted; a form must be completed in detail, reviewed by DOA, reviewed by UW System, and reviewed by DOA budget staff and space planners, taking a number of weeks.  A DOA staffer had to travel to Hudson to tour the space himself; he agreed with the UW-River Falls conclusion.  Then the contract underwent legal review.  The process started in mid-April, and it took until the last week in August to complete the lease.  Classes began several days later; fortunately, the contractor was willing to build out the space prior to a lease being signed. 

Chancellor Van Galen said that everyone involved did their job well, but the process for trying to do something supportive of higher education in Wisconsin that was somewhat “out of the box” was too lengthy and involved costs in time and opportunity.  If the lease rate had been a few dollars higher, the Governor would have had to sign the lease for three classrooms.

UW-Whitewater Chancellor Dick Telfer spoke next, providing several examples:  (1) referring to Hyland Hall, which took ten years to build, he said that the university received a grant with the city of Whitewater to build the Whitewater Innovation Service Center in the Whitewater Technology Park -- the Innovation project took 30 months, total, because it was done apart from the state process; (2) a project related to the undergraduate research program was the remodeling in 2006 of the campus’s science building, but because the research program is successful, the building is now full -- it may be 2035 before a new science building can be built, but the campus has the students now; (3) the campus needs new faculty to teach in the sciences, and by working with the System, the campus has devised ways to hire these faculty through a different fund --  but it has taken time to make this happen, and the usual process does not allow for efficient hiring, because of position control; and  (4) related to energy, savings from efficient solar power go to the state, and cannot be retained by the university -- with block grant funding, the campus could use the saved funds to change lights and implement other energy-saving projects. 

In sum, Chancellor Telfer said that the campus continuously confronts inefficient processes in the state system.  The UW System could more effectively and efficiently manage the types of projects he described.

UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells, referring to more management flexibilities, said that the concept is actually more leadership flexibility and ability.  This is not only about chancellors, but about leadership behavior throughout the campus.  One example of providing public good, given more freedom to lead, is the following:  a procurement staff person noticed that the cost of 100-percent recycled paper had gone down 25 percent, by cutting down on the amount purchased and using 100-percent recyclable paper, 2,100 trees were saved.  Over-regulating people saps people of creativity and the opportunity to innovate, Chancellor Wells said.  Therefore, the most important flexibility is in the human-resource management area; people should be respected and allowed to do their jobs. 

Chancellor Wells continued, saying that the System is the most highly-regarded system of higher education in the nation.  Part of this is attributable to the collaborative relationships among the institutions.  Also, the System has the lowest administrative overhead in the country.  Given greater administrative flexibility, the system could be even better.  Leadership flexibilities need to be provided to every campus, when they are ready to take these on.  It is important to keep the System together and keep building on the distinctiveness of the System.  Mutual admiration, respect, and working together enable the campuses to get things done.

President Reilly said that the System would work hard during the legislative session to achieve greater flexibilities for all campuses at the level that each of them can handle.  Regent Smith asked about the timing of the flexibility request related to the budget, as well as the New Badger Partnership proposed by UW-Madison.  President Reilly said that it is hoped that the Governor’s budget would address flexibilities for UW-Madison and for all of the other campuses.

Regent Loftus posed a question about whether the System and Board were asking the Governor and the legislature for a statutory change that would provide the System with the authority to issue revenue bonds.  Associate Vice President Miller addressed the question, saying that under the UW Hospitals public-authority model, the hospital itself issues revenue bonds that are backed by the operational revenue of the hospital.  Mr. Miller said that 60 to 65 percent of the UW’s current bonds, issued as state general obligation bonds, function as revenue bonds.  The only source of the debt service is operational revenue, such as from a residence hall.  Currently DOA adds general purpose revenue (GPR) to the UW’s base budget to pay debt service on the general obligation bonds.  Under the new block-grant model, revenue bonds would be issued by the Board of Regents, and GPR would come to the UW institutions, who would determine how much of their GPR support they could allocate toward debt.  These would be revenue bonds, issued by the Board of Regents, and part of the repayment would come from the base budget.  The university would have its own bond rating.

Regent Loftus asked whether the Regents would want the authority to issue revenue bonds.  Associate Vice President Miller said that this is the model under which other universities operate.  Also, the state currently does not provide revenue for the UW’s revenue bonds.

Regent Danae Davis said that the current articulation of the need for flexibilities is excellent; she said that she is hopeful that the System and the Board will succeed after all of the years of asking for flexibilities.  It should be possible to reallocate to save money.  She said that she is hopeful.

Regent Manydeeds said that he has been hearing about the New Badger Partnership, but he said he is not certain what it means for the System.  He said that there is fear in the northern region of the state that the New Badger Partnership could mean a return to the 1970s, that students from northern Wisconsin will not be able to attend UW-Madison, etc.  He said that he felt encouraged that the flexibilities document was prepared for all of the System, and that all of the chancellors were a part of preparing it.

President Martin turned to Chancellor Martin to respond to Regent Manydeeds’ expression of concern.  Chancellor Martin said that the New Badger Partnership has been articulated for more than a year.  The flexibilities being discussed are part of the Badger Partnership, which has been discussed openly around the state, on the Madison campus, and with the Board of Regents.  She said that it is no different than what has finally been advanced on behalf of the System as a whole, on the instigation of the chancellors.  She said that the proposal did not aim to treat Madison separately from the System, but this might happen, given the lateness of the proposal from the System; this will be up to the Governor.  Flexibility is very important; the System is in an emergency situation, and the house is burning.  She said that she hopes there will not be arguments about how to paint a building that is burning.  She said that if the Governor moves forward with flexibilities for UW-Madison, she hopes his plan will include flexibilities for the other campuses; however, the New Badger Partnership has been on the record for more than a year.

Chancellor Gow said that he was at a presentation on the Badger Partnership in La Crosse.  He said there is a wide range of flexibilities, and different campuses would be interested in different aspects.  All are interested in tuition responsibility.  The ability to do more with tuition is vitally important.  UW-La Crosse supports the New Badger Partnership.  UW-La Crosse is seeking the same kinds of things.  There has been an undercurrent that UW-Madison would be separate from the System.  He recalled an experience as a dean at Winona State; marketing research on the name of the university showed that the public said that the name should be “University of Minnesota at Winona,” which shows the power of the brand.  As a System, all institutions benefit from the great achievements of the flagship.  Hopefully, the Governor and others will give campuses the responsibility to “manage through” the challenges of reduced resources.  Raising money for scholarships will be particularly important.

Chancellor Wells said that the management/leadership flexibilities have been sought for many years.  UW-Madison has done an excellent job of articulating them, but they are not new.

UW System News

President Reilly thanked those who participated in the discussion of flexibilities and proceeded with a shortened President’s Report, in the interest of time.  First, he reminded Board members of a special event coming up, the “Civility in Everyday Life Workshop” at UW-Oshkosh on February 24 and 25.  He thanked Chancellor Wells and his team for their good work in coordinating the System conference.  The conference provides a forum for leadership teams from UW institutions to discuss the practical meaning of civility on campuses and in the wider society.

President Reilly also recognized a milestone in the career of UW-Stout Chancellor Charles W. Sorenson, who officially became the longest serving head of UW-Stout.  There have been only seven leaders of that institution, dating back to 1891.  The previous record-holder was Burton E. Nelson, who served from 1923 to 45.  During Chancellor Sorenson's time at UW-Stout, enrollment has grown 32 percent, to a record 9,339 in September 2010.  The number of academic majors has nearly doubled to 40.  He has overseen 11 major building and remodeling projects, including the new Jarvis Hall Science Wing and Millennium Hall.  He has led the effort to create a digital campus culture through the innovative e-Scholar laptop program, and he helped to establish the Stout Technology Park.  Under Chancellor Sorenson, the Board of Regents designated UW-Stout as “Wisconsin's Polytechnic University,” and in 2001, UW-Stout became the first recipient in higher education of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Sorenson and then closed his remarks with a brief Valentine’s Day poem.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance and Audit Committee. 

Business, Finance, and Audit Committee Business

 

Annual Public Forum on University Trust Funds

Regent Smith first reported that prior to the full Board meeting, the committee had held its annual investment forum, which allows for faculty, staff, students, and the general public to provide comments on the investments held by the University Trust Funds.  Although two people had registered to speak, no speakers appeared.

2010 Annual Financial Report and Auditor’s Opinion

Next, Regent Smith said that the committee heard a report from Associate Vice President for Financial Administration Julie Gordon, summarizing information from the UW System’s 2010 Annual Financial Report.  State Auditor Jan Mueller and Audit Director Carolyn Stittleburg also described the auditors’ communication regarding internal control concerns.  The committee asked that a follow-up be provided at the April Board of Regents meeting, which would include management’s response and changes in procedures due to LAB’s findings.

Review and Adjustment of Differential Tuition Proposal:  UW-River Falls Falcon Promise

Regent Smith reported that the committee next heard from UW-River Falls Chancellor Dean Van Galen, who summarized the benefits of the current UW-River Falls differential tuition and introduced the Falcon Promise Proposal.  The goal is to improve student retention and student success, the Chancellor stated; the differential would be phased in over three years.  The Falcon Promise would increase from $72 to $100 per year in 2011-12, to $130 per year in 2012-13, and to $160 per year in 2013-14, when it is fully implemented.  Past Student Senate President Leigh Monson informed the committee about students’ involvement in the process and changes made to the proposal resulting from the students’ input.  The committee approved this resolution.

Review and Adjustment of Differential Tuition Proposal:  UW-Superior Experience and UW-Superior Natural Sciences Differentials

UW-Superior Interim Chancellor Chris Markwood addressed the committee, describing a request for an increase to the UW-Superior Experience undergraduate differential tuition, effective in fall 2011.  The institution’s current differential would increase from $207 per year to $237 per year.

Interim Chancellor Markwood also asked for approval of a new undergraduate program differential tuition at UW-Superior. Beginning in fall 2011, the proposed differential would add a $12-per-credit charge to all courses in the Department of Natural Sciences.

The student consultation process for these differentials was presented to the committee by Student Government President Jessica Duffy and Joe Stinson, who represented graduate students.  Both the UW-Superior Experience and the UW-Superior Natural Sciences Differential resolutions were approved by the Committee.

Operations Review and Audit:  2011 Audit Plan and Student Involvement and Consultation in the Allocation of Segregated Fees

Before presenting the proposed 2011 Review and Audit Plan, Assistant Director Joshua Smith described to the committee how the UW System plan is established.  Then, the planning activities specific to UW-River Falls’ separate audit planning process were described by that campus’s internal auditor, Richard Stinson.

Based upon Regent Wingad’s earlier request, Assistant Director Smith also presented the results of a recent review of how students are involved and consulted with regard to the allocation of segregated fees.  Regent Wingad pointed out that the review document had been distributed to student leaders and concluded that the document served as a useful tool for defining the role of students on each campus.

UW System Information Technology Report:  UW System Strategic Plans and Status Reports for Major IT Projects

Ed Meachen, Associate Vice President for Learning and Information Technology, outlined the UW System IT Strategic Plan for the Committee.  He also reported on the status of three major projects currently in progress within the UW System.  State statutes mandate that this status report be presented to the Legislature’s Joint Committee on Information Policy and Technology by March 1 and September 1 of each year.

Report on Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (2nd Quarter)

Regent Smith said that ice President Debbie Durcan presented the 2nd Quarter Gifts, Grants, & Contracts Report, reporting that the total decreased by $36.5 million from the same period last year, to $855.5 million; federal and non-federal awards decreased by $6.8 and $29.7, respectively.

Update on Nonresident Tuition Programs and Reauthorization of the Return to Wisconsin Program

Regent Smith reported that Lynn Paulson, Assistant Vice President for Budget and Planning, presented the Committee with an update on the special tuition programs for non-resident students which were approved by the Board in response to an abrupt drop in non-resident students in the early to mid-2000s.  The three programs the committee heard about were the Tri-State Initiative, the Midwest Student Exchange Program, and the Return to Wisconsin Program.  The committee adopted a resolution that makes the Return to Wisconsin Program permanent, permitting other UW System institutions to participate if they choose.

Authorization to Recruit a Dean of the Law School and a Dean of the School of Business at UW-Madison at a Salary Above 75% of the UW System President’s Salary

The committee approved two resolutions from UW-Madison:  one granting authority to recruit a Dean of the Law School, and the other granting authority to recruit a Dean of the School of Business.  Both recruitments would be at a salary above 75% of the UW System President’s salary, which is why approval of the Board was sought.

Approval to Submit Rules to the Legislature:  Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19 Relating to the Reinstatement Period for Sick Leave Benefits

The committee also approved a resolution amending the UW Unclassified Sick Leave Reinstatement rules, after Deputy General Counsel Chris Ashley specified that the requested change would align the UW System’s rules for unclassified staff with those established by the State of Wisconsin for classified staff.

Status Update on the Human Resource System (HRS)

Regent Smith reported that Senior Vice President for Administration Michael Morgan updated the committee on the status of the UW System Human Resource System (HRS) project.  With the project’s launch anticipated in April of this year, Senior Vice President reviewed the detailed components and key dates of the readiness assessment, which will ensure that all aspects of the project are equipped for the launch.

Consent Agenda

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith then moved adoption of Resolutions 9862, 9863, 9864, 9865, 9866, 9867, and 9868.  The motion was seconded by Regent Wingad and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote. 

UW-River Falls Falcon Promise Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9862:          That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-River Falls and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the expansion of the UW-River Falls undergraduate differential tuition beginning in Fall 2011.  The increase to the differential will be phased in over three years. For full-time resident and nonresident undergraduate students, the differential will increase from $72 per year to $100 per year in 2011-12; $130 per year in 2012-13; and $160 per year in 2013-14.  The differential will be prorated for part-time students.

 

                                      The outcomes of the proposed differential will be presented to the Board of Regents for review in five years (2016).

 

UW-Superior Experience Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9863:          That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Superior and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the expansion of the UW-Superior undergraduate differential tuition beginning in Fall 2011. 

 

                                      The differential will increase from $103.50 per semester ($207.00 per year) to $118.50 per semester ($237.00 per year).  The differential tuition will include resident and nonresident undergraduate students.  The differential will be prorated for part-time students.

 

                                      The outcomes of the proposed differential will be presented to the Board of Regents for review in four years (2015).

 

UW-Superior Natural Sciences Differential Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9864:          That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Superior and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the implementation of a per-credit differential tuition on courses in the UW-Superior Department of Natural Sciences beginning in Fall 2011. 

 

                                      The differential will be $12.00 per credit and will be charged to resident and nonresident undergraduate students. The differential will apply regardless of the tuition plateau.

 

                                      The outcomes of the proposed differential will be presented to the Board of Regents for review in four years (2015).

 

Reauthorization of the Return to Wisconsin Tuition Program

 

Resolution 9865:          Whereas, the Board of Regents approved the Return to Wisconsin tuition program in November 2003 as a pilot program to offer discounted tuition to children of alumni who reside out of state; and

                                     

                                      Whereas, the Board of Regents approved a three year extension to the Return to Wisconsin pilot program in April 2007; and

 

                                      Whereas, the Return to Wisconsin tuition program:

 

                                      •         Provides a modest increase in funding to support Wisconsin  resident students without additional GPR appropriations;

                                      •         Attracts high quality undergraduate students without displacing Wisconsin resident students;

                                      •         Addresses “brain gain” interests by increasing the number of high quality students coming to Wisconsin for their  education and potentially staying for their careers;

                                      •         Increases the geographic diversity of the student body to enrich the educational experience of all; and

                                      •         Creates stronger ties with alumni, possibly resulting in greater future giving; and

 

                                      Whereas, the Return to Wisconsin pilot has been a success, enrolling 97 nonresident children and/or grandchildren of alumni in 2009-10 and 95 in 2010-11 at UW-Eau Claire, UW-Green Bay, UW-La Crosse, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Whitewater;

 

                                      Therefore, be it resolved that, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents makes the Return to Wisconsin tuition program permanent, and permits other UW System institutions to participate in the program if they so choose.

 

Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee (Dean of the Law School) at UW-Madison at a Salary above 75% of the UW System President’s Salary

Resolution 9866:          That, upon recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, UW-Madison be authorized to recruit for a Dean of the Law School at a salary that may exceed 75% of the UW System President’s current salary.

                                      Further, the Board of Regents authorizes the President of the University of Wisconsin System to approve the appointment and the salary for this position.

 

Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee (Dean of the School of Business) at UW-Madison at a Salary above 75% of the UW System President’s Salary

Resolution 9867:          That, upon recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, UW-Madison be authorized to recruit for a Dean of the School of Business at a salary that may exceed 75% of the UW System President’s current salary.

 

                                      Further, the Board of Regents authorizes the President of the University of Wisconsin System to approve the appointment and the salary for this position.

 

Approval to Submit Rules to the Legislature: Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19 Relating to Reinstatement Period for Sick Leave Benefits

Resolution 9868:          That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the proposed rule amending Chapter UWS 19, Wis. Admin. Code, is hereby approved, together with the “Report to the Legislature, Clearinghouse Rule 10-104,” and that the Secretary of the Board of Regents, pursuant to s. 227.19, Wis. Stats., notify the presiding officer of each house of the Legislature that the proposed rule is in final draft form, and cause a statement to appear in the Wisconsin Administrative Register that said proposed rule has been submitted to the presiding officer of each house of the Legislature.

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CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee. 

Joint Meeting with the Business, Finance & Audit Committee

Regent Bartell first reported that the Capital Planning and Budget Committee met jointly with the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee to hear the annual report on City and County Financial Support of the UW Colleges.  Local municipalities provided $9.4 million of financial support to UW Colleges in 2010.  Chancellor Ray Cross, Vice Chancellor Steve Wildeck, and UW-Rock County Dean and CEO Diane Pillard provided an overview of partnerships and accomplishments.  Dean Pillard commented that the county feels an investment interest in UW-Rock County.

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business

Authority to lease space for the UW-Madison Graduate School

Regent Bartell described Resolution 9869, brought by UW-Madison, which requests authority to lease space for the UW-Madison Graduate School that will provide a state-of-the-art facility in Blue Mounds for the quarantine and holding of nonhuman primates required for campus researchers.  Build-out costs will be $300,000; operating costs will be $625,000 per year, to be paid for by the Graduate School, primarily with federal funds. 

Expansion of University Research Park II

Regent Bartell reported on Resolution 9870, which requests approval to acquire 75 acres of land in the town of Middleton for the future expansion of University Research Park II.  This acquisition, at a cost of about $5.7 million, will provide an additional 16 sites for at least 1,000,000 square feet of buildings, 100 companies, and 2,500 employees.  Revenues from the Park will service the debt.

Gift of land from the University of Wisconsin Foundation

Next, Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9871 requests authority to accept a gift of six acres of land, appraised at about $350,000, from the University of Wisconsin Foundation.  The donors are and Lloyd and Bernice Durand, professors emeriti at UW-Madison.  This is a parcel of wooded property that is undeveloped and located adjacent to conservancy land owned by the Board of Regents and managed by the UW-Arboretum.  The gift will add a portion of a pond, shoreline, and upland oak woods to the conservancy.

Autopsy and Pathology Suite in the Wisconsin Institutions for Medical Research Building (WIMR)

Resolution 9872, brought by the UW Hospital and Clinics Authority, seeks approval to construct an Autopsy and Pathology Suite located in the Wisconsin Institutions for Medical Research (WIMR) building at a total cost of about $11 million.

The suite will be constructed in the planned “wedge” structure between towers two and three of the WIMR building.  This space will provide the UW Hospital and Clinics and the Department of Pathology with a facility to perform medical and pathology services when the VA Hospital terminates all their space leasing agreements within the next several years.

Federal Grant from the US Fish and Wildlife Agency

Regent Bartell described Resolution 9873, brought by UW-Green Bay, requesting authority to use funding provided by the UW Foundation and a federal grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife agency to purchase three parcels of land totaling about 62 acres for $335,000.  These parcels, consisting of wetlands, woodlands, and access acreage, will link existing conservation lands and create opportunities to study long-term effects on bird migrations, water quality, and evolving habitat communities.

Multi-Sport Facility Phase III Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9874 requests authority to adjust the budget and construct the Multi-Sport Facility – Phase III project at UW-Whitewater.  This project will provide a two-story structure located within the university’s Multi-Sport Facility to support the university’s softball program.  The structure will house a press box, a team locker and shower room, a coach’s office and locker room, and public restrooms.  The building will be used primarily during the university’s softball season, but will be used year-round for office functions, meetings, recruiting, and other related functions.  Regent Bartell said that the project will be partially funded through the use of a SUFAC-approved $5.22 annual increase to student segregated fees for a term of ten years.

Consent Agenda

Stating that these six resolutions were passed unanimously by the committee, Regent Bartell moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9869, 9870, 9871, 9872, 9873, and 9874.  Regent Manydeeds seconded the motion, and the resolutions were adopted on a unanimous voice vote:

Authority to Lease Space for the UW-Madison Graduate School, UW-Madison

Resolution 9869:          That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted for the Department of Administration to enter into a new lease agreement for 19,000 square feet of animal holding space on behalf of the UW-Madison Graduate School. 

 

Authority to Acquire 75 Acres of Land for the Future Expansion of University Research Park II, UW-Madison

Resolution 9870:          That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to acquire 75 acres of land in the Town of Middleton, Dane County for $5,650,000 Existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing plus closing costs and any necessary environmental abatement costs.

 

Authority to Accept a Gift of Six Acres of Land from the University of Wisconsin Foundation, UW-Madison

Resolution 9871:          That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority to accept a gift from the University of Wisconsin Foundation of approximately six acres of land located in the Town of Cross Plains, Dane County.  The appraised value of this gift is approximately $350,000.

 

Approval to Construct an Autopsy and Pathology Suite Located in the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Building, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics Authority Board

Resolution 9872:          That, upon the recommendation of the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics Authority Board, approval be granted to construct an Autopsy and Pathology suite, which will be located within the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research (WIMR) building on the UW-Madison campus, at a total cost of $11,000,000 Program Revenue - Operating Funds.

Authority to Purchase Three Parcels of Land Totaling 61.78 Acres, UW-Green Bay

Resolution 9873:          That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Green Bay Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to purchase three parcels of land totaling 61.78 acres located along and adjacent to County Road A and Point Comfort Lane in the Town of Scott, Brown County, Wisconsin, at an acquisition cost of $335,000.

 

Approval of the Design Report for the Multi-Sport Facility – Phase III Project and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9874:          That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report for the Multi-Sport Facility-Phase III project be approved and authority be granted to construct the softball building portion of the project for $650,000 by substituting $350,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing for gift funds for a total project cost of $650,000 ($350,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $60,000 Gift Funds, and $240,000 Program Revenue-Cash).

 

Before ending his report, Regent Bartell said that in addition to hearing from Associate Vice President Miller about the Building Commission’s approval of about $32 million in projects at its December meeting, the committee had a discussion about budgeting for capital projects.  It is well known that where a campus is able to put together gift funds for a project, the project moves up in priority.  The board scrutinizes projects that raise segregated fees.  It has occasionally been the case that gift funds are a large component of a project; but it has happened that that promised gift funds have not arrived.  This is troublesome.  The committee feels it needs to take a closer look at projects with significant gift-fund components, trying to anticipate whether the funds will still be there at the time a project occurs. 

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education Committee.  Regent Crain said that she appreciated the involvement of the provosts, the good preparation the administration provided for the meeting, and the participation of Bob Jokisch in Rebecca Karoff’s absence.

Education Committee Business

Charter School Authorizations and Renewals

The Committee took action on five charter schools, three of which were up for renewal, and two of which were authorizations of new schools.  Dr. Bob Kattman, Director of the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools, walked the committee through the four UW-Milwaukee charter schools.  The two renewals, for Seeds of Health Elementary, and the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park, were approved quickly.  The Seeds of Health Elementary serves a student population that is 90 percent Latino and 98 percent low income, while Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park serves a student population that is 99 percent African-American and 82 percent low income.  The committee unanimously approved five-year contract extensions for these two schools.

Dr. Kattman then put forward two new charter schools, which the committee also approved.  The Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights, was originally planned to be a replication of the Milwaukee College Prep-Metcalfe Park.  Instead, the campus, which is composed of two buildings, will separate students by gender.  While they believe that the research shows the success of single-gender schools, there is some difference of opinion on what the research shows in this regard.  The committee unanimously approved the contract for this school. 

Regent Crain said that the other new school, the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School, will be run by a for-profit organization, National Heritage Academy.  Dr. Kattman explained that the National Heritage Academy has a strong record of success nationally.  They have opened 68 schools in cities such as Detroit, Atlanta, and Brooklyn.  The committee approved the contract for this school, on a three-to-one vote, with Regent Evers opposed.  Discussion focused on issues such as the diversity of the teachers at these charter schools, the success of students when they move on to high school and college, and the number of applicants for these charter schools.  A request was also made to share further assessment data with the Education Committee in the future.

Regent Crain added her thanks to Dr. Bob Kattman, who is retiring at the end of the school year.  Dr. Kattman expects to introduce his replacement at the June Board meeting in Milwaukee.

Dr. Paul Haubrich, Director of the UW-Parkside Charter School Office, then brought forward the renewal of UW-Parkside’s one charter school, the 21st Century Preparatory School.  The school is making good progress, and the results for the school’s eighth-grade African-American students are especially impressive.  Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin noted that the initial authorization Board meeting was her first board meeting as Provost at UW-Parkside.  She commended the leadership of the Board, UW-Parkside, and the school for the improvements in test scores and overall strength of the school.  The committee approved a five-year contract extension for this school also.

Regent Crain expressed appreciation to the school representatives who took the time to attend the committee’s meetings.  She commented that there is remaining discussion to be had about the role and responsibility of the Board of Regents in approving charter schools.  This will continue to require attention.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Approval, Milwaukee Scholars Charter School

Regent Crain said that approval was unanimous on all except the resolution on the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School.  Regent Crain moved Resolution 9879, approving the charter school contract with the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School, Inc.  The motion was seconded by Regent Danae Davis. 

Regent Evers indicated that he had opposed the resolution the previous day because of his concern about the local board's ability to govern.  He suggested the board’s role was unclear and not defined well.  Regent Evers said that he believed the local board had not thoroughly thought through their role with the charter school. 

Regent Vásquez, another committee member, indicated that his questions about the governance relationship were addressed in the presentation the previous day.  He had some questions about the governance relationship between the 501(c)(3) organization and the board, but he felt assured that the board is ultimately responsible for the school.  Regent Vásquez expressed confidence that the UW-Milwaukee office will exercise adequate oversight in monitoring the charter.  He expressed support for granting the charter. 

In response to a question from Regent Wingad, Regent Danae Davis asked Marc Marotta, who represents the organization, to provide additional information.  Mr. Marotta pointed to a provision in the contract that says that the board, which is a strong board, can terminate National Heritage Academies at any time, at will, without cause.  Regent Evers replied that other charter schools make mid-course corrections and change personnel.  Regent Davis said that the operations would be similar to other related operations; this group is committed to improving the proficiency of students in a difficult area of the city of Milwaukee.  She did not agree that the proposed structure posed an undue risk in this instance.

Regent Vásquez, commenting that a previous charter is ending, said that the Board’s discussion makes it very clear that when organizations contract for the delivery of the charter, the Board is attentive to the structure of these arrangements.  Regent Falbo, based on his knowledge of the majority of the individuals on the board, reinforced that it is a strong board. 

President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9879, and it carried on a voice vote, with Regents Evers opposed and Regent Walsh abstaining:      

Resolution 9879:          That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the charter school contract with the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School, Inc., establishing a charter school known as the Milwaukee Scholars Charter School, effective July 1, 2011.

Precollege Programs

Regent Crain reported that the committee heard a presentation on precollege programs, one of the priority areas identified for the year.  The presentation focused on precollege programs for multicultural and disadvantaged students.  Associate Vice President Vicki Washington delineated the different kinds of precollege programs for multicultural and disadvantaged students, reminding the committee that different programs serve different purposes, from summer camps designed to develop aspiration, to year-round programs intended to improve preparation and achievement in high school, to bridge programs designed to ease the transition from secondary to post-secondary education.  She described some of the professional development her office is providing to campus personnel responsible for precollege programming, especially related to program evaluation.  Of particular interest to the committee was the use of the Logic Model, a tool used to improve precollege program development, planning, implementation, and assessment.

The committee also heard from Ruby Paredes, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Climate, who discussed some of UW-Madison’s precollege programming, focusing in particular on the PEOPLE program.  The PEOPLE program has grown from 66 students when it began in 1999, to over 1,600 students today.  Barbara Stewart, Associate Dean for Campus Climate and Diversity, and Kate Oganowski, Program Coordinator of Precollege Programs, from UW-La Crosse, then described the overall organization of their campus’s work on a variety of precollege programs, as well as successes and challenges.  The use of college students as mentors in precollege programs has had a positive impact on retention of these students.

Both UW-Madison and UW-La Crosse increasingly view their precollege programming as an integral part of their Inclusive Excellence work.

Senior Vice President Martin noted the work that has been going on with assessment of UW precollege programs.  It is very important to know how many precollege students reach higher education.  UW System Administration has been building assessment expertise to work with campuses.

 Report of the Senior Vice President

Regent Crain said that as part of a regular feature of the Education Committee, UW-La Crosse Provost Kathleen Enz Finken described her campus’s Inclusive Excellence work.  Provost Enz Finken provided an overview of the set of comprehensive strategies and actions being undertaken to make Inclusive Excellence a guiding framework for the campus.  This is a multi-phase process, and UW-La Crosse has determined specific goals, actions to reach those goals, and measures by which to determine if they are being met appropriately.

Provost Enz Finken noted the importance of having Inclusive Excellence “in front of people” on a regular basis.  UW-La Crosse has also developed an online registry of what different units are doing and is doing student exit surveys and surveys of faculty and staff to determine employee satisfaction.  The committee was impressed with the presentation and asked about student involvement in the process.  Associate Dean Stewart noted that students are involved, and they hope to have more student involvement during the summer.

Sr. Vice President Martin’s report also included an update on a topic the committee had discussed previously:  the ways in which campuses are being more intentional in helping students complete their undergraduate degrees in four years. The committee heard from Duane Ford, Dean of the College of Business, Industry, Life Science and Agriculture at UW-Platteville.  He described what is being done there to make the four-year pathway clearer to students, primarily by making available more extensive web materials to students as they explore and choose majors.  He also shared with the committee four-year and six-year graduations rates for Platteville, which underscore the need to help students complete their undergraduate degrees more expeditiously.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved adoption of Resolutions 9875, 9876, 9877, 9878, and 9880, which were approved unanimously by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Bartell.  Regent Spector requested that Resolution 9876 be removed from the consent agenda.  The remaining resolutions were approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote.   

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.F.A. in Design, University of Wisconsin-Stout

Resolution 9875:          That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the M.F.A. in Design.

 

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension, Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park

Resolution 9877:          That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with the M. C. Preparatory School, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Metcalfe Park.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Approval, Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights

Resolution 9878:          That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the charter school contract with the M. C. Preparatory School, Inc., establishing a charter school known as the Milwaukee College Preparatory School-Lindsay Heights, effective July 1, 2011.

The University of Wisconsin-Parkside Charter School Contract Extension, 21st Century Preparatory School

Resolution 9880:          That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with Racine Charter One, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the 21st Century Preparatory School.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension, Seeds of Health Elementary School

            President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9876, which was approved on a voice vote, with Regent Spector abstaining.  The resolution is as follows:

Resolution 9876:          That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with the Seeds of Health, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the Seeds of Health Elementary School.

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ELECTION OF NEW ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

Regent Pruitt said that Jessica Lathrop in the Board of Regents Office will be working on the Regent policy review, as well as other research projects.  Since her official title is Assistant Secretary of the Board, he requested a nomination of Jessica Lathrop as Assistant Secretary.  Regent Smith made the motion, which was seconded by Regent Bartell and adopted on a voice vote. 

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The Board recessed at 12:10 p.m. and reconvened at 12:25 p.m.

CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded by Regent Falbo, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Evers, Falbo, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Vásquez, Walsh, Wingad and Womack voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9881:          That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider a UW-Stevens Point honorary degree nomination, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider a compensation adjustment for the UW-Madison head football coach, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to consider a compensation adjustment for a UW-Madison football offensive coordinator, as permitted by s. 1985(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to consider salary for an interim UW-Superior Chancellor, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to discuss collective bargaining activities at UW institutions, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to consider a student request for review of a UW-Madison decision, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

 

The following resolutions were approved during closed session:

Approval of Compensation Adjustment, Head Football Coach, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Resolution 9882:          That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the attached revised contract, including a compensation adjustment, between UW-Madison Head Football Coach Bret A. Beilema and the UW Board of Regents.

Approval of Compensation Adjustment, Assistant Football Coach - Offensive Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Resolution 9883:          That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the attached revised contract, including a compensation adjustment, between UW-Madison Assistant Football Coach – Offensive Coordinator Paul Chryst and the UW Board of Regents.

Authorization to Appoint: Interim Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Superior

Resolution 9884:          That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Julius Erlenbach be appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Superior, effective April 11, 2011 at a salary of $210,759.

Student Request for Review of a UW-Madison Decision

Resolution 9885:          That the Board of Regents adopts the attached Proposed Decision and Order as the Board’s final Decision and Order in the matter of a student request for review of a UW-Madison decision.

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The meeting was adjourned at approximately 2:00 p.m.

Submitted by:

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board