Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Held in Reeve Union 227

UW-Oshkosh

Thursday, October 7, 2010

10:00 a.m.

PRESIDENTS’ GREETING.. 2

UW-OSHKOSH PRESENTATION: “UW-OSHKOSH’S ‘PRINCIPLES FOR PROGRESS AND PROSPERITY:’ A COMPACT TO BETTER EDUCATE MORE PEOPLE”. 3

UW-Oshkosh and the Compact. 3

Advocacy Strategy. 4

Controlling Costs. 4

UW SYSTEM’S PARTICIPATION IN THE NATIONAL ACCESS TO SUCCESS INITIATIVE. 6

Background.. 6

Alignment with Existing Initiatives. 7

Next Steps. 8

Regents’ Questions and Discussion.. 8


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Held in Reeve Union 227

UW-Oshkosh

Thursday, October 7, 2010

10:00 a.m.

– President Pruitt presiding –

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Jessica Schwalenberg, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents Stan Davis and John Drew

- - -

PRESIDENTS’ GREETING

President Pruitt greeted the Regents and other meeting attendees, welcoming them to UW-Oshkosh.  He thanked Chancellor Rick Wells and his team for their hard work in preparing for the Board’s visit.  President Pruitt also recognized the presence of state Representative Gordon Hintz.

President Pruitt turned to President Reilly to introduce some new UW System leaders, the first of whom was Michael Lovell, who had agreed to serve as Interim Chancellor at UW-Milwaukee during the search for a successor to Chancellor Carlos Santiago.  Dr. Lovell has been Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at UWM since 2008 and has developed a clear vision for the whole UW-Milwaukee campus and its role as an economic engine for southeastern Wisconsin.  

President Reilly also recognized Tomas Stafford, who was recently appointed as UW System’s new General Counsel, succeeding Pat Brady.  Mr. Stafford previously served as Interim Deputy General Counsel, having worked as a UW System attorney for ten years.  He has represented the university before the Wisconsin Equal Rights Division and the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, and worked with the Wisconsin Department of Justice to represent the university in state and federal court cases. 

In addition, President Reilly recognized the assistants to the chancellors from across the UW System, including his assistant, Rita Sears.  The assistants meet in person once each year for professional development.

- - -

 

UW-OSHKOSH PRESENTATION: “UW-OSHKOSH’S ‘PRINCIPLES FOR PROGRESS AND PROSPERITY:’ A COMPACT TO BETTER EDUCATE MORE PEOPLE

President Pruitt introduced Chancellor Wells, to speak about “UW-Oshkosh’s ‘Principles for Progress and Prosperity’:  A Compact to Better Educate More People.”  Chancellor Wells welcomed the Board of Regents, President Reilly, and UW campus colleagues to UW-Oshkosh, which he called one of the UW System’s twelve “Greater Wisconsin Universities,” one of those universities beyond Madison and Milwaukee, serving 110,000 UW students. 

UW-Oshkosh and the Compact

Chancellor Wells spoke about UW-Oshkosh’s ability to support the new compact proposed in summer 2010 by Regent President Pruitt and past Regent-President Jay Smith.  Chancellor Wells stressed UW-Oshkosh’s emphasis on high-impact educational practices and essential learning outcomes, which he said develops graduates who are talented, liberally educated, technically skilled, global citizens, and who are fully engaged as leaders and participants in civic, political, and social life.

Chancellor Wells focused his comments on UW-Oshkosh’s commitment to the proposed “Smith-Pruitt Compact,” saying that the compact seeks to forge the kind of relationship that Wisconsin’s public university needs to maintain with elected officials and the public at large.  The university must convince them that taxpayer funding of public higher education is a critical investment for a prosperous future, and not just a big expenditure, he said.  Known as “Principles for Progress and Prosperity,” this compact calls for three things from the UW System:  expanded access, increased productivity, and enhanced quality.  In exchange, the compact calls for three things from the State:  a greater and more stable share of state tax dollars for the UW System, including the resources and flexibility needed to make faculty and staff compensation competitive; greater management flexibility in purchasing, contracting, and construction; and prudent investments in need-based financial aid to preserve access for low- and moderate-income students.

Chancellor Wells said that in many ways, UW-Oshkosh is well positioned to uphold its end of the bargain.  Regarding expanded access, for example, UW-Oshkosh is Wisconsin’s third-largest and second-fastest growing university, with six consecutive record-breaking years of enrollment growth, including preliminary fall 2010 enrollment of 13,600 students.  He observed that in a time of economic uncertainty, it is a positive sign to see students investing in a progressive future.

UW-Oshkosh has also expanded access to high-demand programs, including new academic majors in athletic training, environmental studies, and environmental health and 13 new graduate certificate programs.  In addition, UW-Oshkosh has a long-term commitment to make a UW-Oshkosh degree affordable and accessible by securing funds for scholarships and paid internships; scholarship awards and paid internships help the university attract and retain a diverse student population, offset tuition costs for students in need, and encourage non-traditional students to complete their education.

With regard to increased productivity, the second component of the agreement, Chancellor Wells said that UW-Oshkosh has also established a good track record, setting new records for the number of degrees conferred in each of the past four years. UW-Oshkosh was the second school in the nation to implement a degree-completion initiative for “stop outs,” known as the Graduation Project, which has significantly increased the number of baccalaureate and associate-degrees holders.  

Regarding the third component of the compact, enhanced quality, Chancellor Wells said that UW-Oshkosh has adopted a set of student learning outcomes based upon the Essential Learning Outcomes of the American Association of Colleges and Universities.  With definitions and performance indicators for each outcome, students have a better understanding of what is expected of them.

Chancellor Wells said that UW-Oshkosh is working creatively and innovatively to improve quality through strategic financial planning.  For example, employment-based learning outcomes have been integrated into the Student Titan Employment Program (STEP), which improves the quality of on-campus employment while helping to make education more affordable for 200 students through a reallocation of $500,000 annually.  

Advocacy Strategy

Chancellor Wells said that a compelling case can be made for the Smith-Pruitt compact by building on the advocacy strategy that worked well in 2007-09.  The case for the 2007-09 Growth Agenda was about the university’s mission and meeting the needs of the people, the communities, and the students that the university serves.  The university is an excellent investment because of its alignment with the needs of the region and its ability to leverage resources through many partnerships and collaborations.  The chancellor stressed the importance of building on the good faith, respect and mutual understanding that the 2007-09 Growth Agenda advocacy strategy generated.

A similarly compelling strategy is needed for 2011-13, to promote the investment of a greater share of state tax dollars in public higher education.  Chancellor Wells said that the university must provide not only better educational quality, but better educational quality at a lower per-capita degree cost.

Controlling Costs

Chancellor Wells noted the challenges of increasing quality when there is a state budget deficit, but said that he believes quality can be increased.  Citing two recent articles in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “The Elephant in the Room:  Curricular Glut” and “Can Learning Be Improved When Budgets Are in the Red?,” the chancellor described efforts to simplify degree requirements and to consider fundamental questions about improving the quality of student learning and engagement.  At UW-Oshkosh, students are being asked to reach broad learning outcomes that will enable them to think for themselves and to work with others to solve problems in innovative ways.  The campus adopted the UW-Oshkosh Student Learning Outcomes in May 2008 and has undertaken other efforts to improve the quality of the educational experience.

Observing that both external and internal stakeholders have the same goals of more value and less debt, Chancellor Wells spoke about strategies for controlling the per-capita cost of a degree, such as reducing time to degree, curricular glut, requirement maze, and bureaucracy.  The quality/cost relationship can be enhanced in multiple ways:  (1) new funding, (2) reallocated funding, and (3) better use of time and controlling costs.  

With respect to new funding, the chancellor referred to the example of the Beach Monitoring project, funded through more than $3 million in local, state, and federal grants.  The project engages more than 100 student researchers in high-impact learning, addresses community health concerns, and helps protect the tourism economy.  A subsequent video presentation exemplifying the high-impact learning opportunities available to UW-Oshkosh students described students’ work collecting data to assess the overall health of many beaches across the state; the students’ work has resulted in the re-engineering of ten beaches in Door County and others around the state. 

The AirBoat Rescue project is an example of using private funding and reallocated university resources to develop a student-faculty project that produced a documentary film, a magazine, a CD, and a gallery exhibit.  The project was funded by a combination of private and reallocated university resources.  As further explained in the video, “AirBoat Rescue 1:  When the Ice Breaks,” was a cross-discipline (Journalism, Radio-TV-Film, Music, Art, Learning Technologies) student-faculty project.  Two students worked with Adjunct Instructor Grace Lim to tell the story of Norm and Joyce Lee and their family.  The Lees lost their son to a snowmobile accident on Lake Poygan in 1977; Norm Lee and two sons, Colin and Perry, operate an AirBoat and have been rescuing people off of Lake Poygan and surrounding lakes for more than three decades. 

A third way of enhancing the quality/cost relationship is through better use of time and controlling costs.  It is important to have fair, competitive compensation for the retention, recruitment, and development of faculty and staff, while also identifying ways to control degree costs and increase quality through reduced bureaucracy; more cost-efficient support services for faculty, staff and students; reduced time to degree; and streamlined curricula.

 Next, Chancellor Wells introduced several speakers:

·      Professor Gregory Kleinheinz spoke about the Environmental Health and Water Quality Outreach/Research Group; he described a collaborative project that brought UW expertise and resources to communities in need for water-quality testing and seasonal inspections of small businesses.  Marvi Verma, a biology major with a health-care emphasis, described her internship with the Research Group, and its benefits for her educational experience. 

·       Adam Kostrzek from Yahoo! spoke about a partnership with the university for students to provide services for the Yahoo! Global Technical Support Center.  Through the partnership, Yahoo! gains a source of talented, motivated employees.  Barb Koss, a UW-Oshkosh graduate, was one of the first students hired by Yahoo!, and she is now the Global Service Desk Supervisor.  She spoke of the critical-thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills students develop through this opportunity. 

·       Adjunct Instructor of Journalism Grace Lim further described the story of the Lee family and their heroism.  She introduced Trent Hilborn and Mark Mazur, Radio-TV-Film majors, who she said fearlessly filmed for many hours to produce a documentary of the Lees’ story, and who told the Board about the value of learning in the field how to make a documentary.  Ms. Lim also introduced others who participated in the production of the documentary, including musicians who composed original music for the film and who performed a piece for the Board. 

In closing, Chancellor Wells introduced Norm Lee and family members, who received a standing ovation from the Board and meeting attendees. 

- - -

UW SYSTEM’S PARTICIPATION IN THE NATIONAL ACCESS TO SUCCESS INITIATIVE

President Pruitt, thanking Chancellor Wells and the other presenters for the extraordinary opening to the Board meeting, introduced the discussion of the UW System’s participation in the national Access to Success initiative.  President Pruitt noted that this is an initiative in which the UW System is on the cutting edge of university systems across the country.  He expressed pride in the outstanding leadership of Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin, President Reilly, and the extraordinary chancellors and provosts across Wisconsin, who are leading the way.  President Pruitt then turned to President Reilly, who offered further background information.

Background

President Reilly began by saying that the UW System joined the national Access to Success initiative in 2009, while in the process of developing the More Graduates for Wisconsin initiative.  Under the leadership of the National Association of System Heads, Access to Success now includes some two dozen public higher education systems around the country.  The initiative has two interrelated goals:  to increase the number of college graduates in a state; and to ensure that those graduates are more broadly representative of the state’s high school graduates, particularly regarding race and income.  

Data clearly indicate that students of color and those from lower-income families do not enroll in college at the same rate as their more affluent, white peers; those who do go on to college also tend not to graduate at the same rate as their more affluent, white peers. This is not acceptable, President Reilly said.  The potential for positive change from Access to Success is enormous; the 24 higher-education systems involved in this initiative represent 378 two-year and four-year campuses, and more than three million students.  Collectively, these systems educate almost 40 percent of undergraduates attending four-year public colleges and universities, and almost 20 percent of all college undergraduates nationwide. 

The UW System’s involvement in Access to Success reflects a commitment to comprehensive and systemic transformation of the way students are educated.  It also positions the System to act as the catalyst for that transformation.  The Board of Regents has advocated for more focused, strategic, evidence-based efforts to eradicate the achievement gap between students of color and their white peers.  Access to Success represents such an effort, President Reilly said, introducing Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin to provide more specifics.

Alignment with Existing Initiatives

Senior Vice President Martin began her remarks by noting that Access to Success clearly aligns with the University of Wisconsin’s priorities, as reflected in the Growth Agenda, More Graduates, efforts to close the achievement gap, Inclusive Excellence, and other initiatives.  Dr. Martin reiterated the importance of the Access to Success initiative because of the large proportion of undergraduates enrolled in the participating institutions.  The initiative is a partnership of the Education Trust, which has championed closing the achievement gap in the PK-12 arena, and the National Association of System Heads.

The commitment the participating institutions have made includes:  cutting current achievement gaps in half by 2015 for college entry and completion; reflecting the economic and racial diversity of the state; improving overall student access and success, and reporting on progress publicly every year.  The focus is on under-represented minorities –African American, Latino, and Native American (as well as Southeast Asian, in Wisconsin), and on low-income students – students eligible for a federal Pell Grant.

Progress will be measured by:  (1) access (i.e., whether the system’s entering class reflects the socioeconomic and racial/ethnic profile of its state’s high school graduates); (2) success (i.e., how the success rates of low-income and underrepresented minority students compare with those of other students within the system; and (3) access plus success (i.e., whether the system’s graduates reflect the diversity of the state’s high school graduates).  The UW needs to make significant improvement in each of these areas.  Senior Vice President Martin said that Regents will be able to review progress in closing the achievement gap in the next accountability report in April.

Some of the Access to Success initiatives in which the UW System is actively engaged include:  (1) delivery, a systematic process to deliver results; (2) the leading indicators project, which will help to identify measurable academic and enrollment patterns that will give students a good chance of reaching key milestones and earning a degree; (3) math course redesign, using small modules and computer-assisted, mastery-based learning; (4) strategic enrollment management to advance the equity agenda; and (5) a task force on Native American student success.

Next Steps

Summarizing the next steps to be taken, Senior Vice President Martin said that goals for cutting the achievement gap in half are imbedded in campuses’ More Graduates goals, and new indicators will be incorporated in future accountability reports.  Closing the gap in achievement for under-represented and low-income students is a major goal for the UW System; excellence and opportunities must be available for all students.  Access to Success confronts the biggest challenges to higher education, the country’s economic viability in the global economy, and the stratification by race and income of the nation’s educational institutions.

Regents’ Questions and Discussion

Reacting to Dr. Martin’s comments, Vice President Spector commented that taking on this major task will be very difficult without dramatic improvement in K-12 preparation.  Remediation is a second-best answer.  It is important to turn the attention of the UW education schools and UW experts’ attention to how the university can make a significant improvement in K-12 education.  Senior Vice President Martin mentioned, in response, that Wisconsin’s adoption of Common Core Standards will be helpful and will be discussed at the November Board meeting.

Regent Vásquez said that special projects sometimes are seen as outside the mainstream and may suffer from budget cuts.  He asked about the sustainability of the Access to Success project.  Senior Vice President Martin noted that the Access to Success goals are embedded in More Graduates goals, and that inclusive excellence is also being integrated into the way the university does business.  Therefore, these are core principles for the university, rather than a special project.  Also, an initiative such as the math project is a redesign of entry-level math courses in a way that will fundamentally change student success; this will lead to real change in the way business is done.

In response to a question from Regent Vásquez about the Education Trust and the university’s potential influence on pre-school-aged children, Dr. Martin noted that the Education Trust is working in the pre-K arena.  President Reilly added that work is going on in the UW System to ensure children are as prepared for school as possible.

Regent Loftus asked how the UW Colleges’ goals are included in the Access to Success project; Dr. Martin said that the two-year degree is part of the goals.  In response to a further question about the cost of the Access to Success project, Senior Vice President Martin noted that the Lumina Foundation and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation are supporting the work, with some staff time involved in addition.

Regent Crain said that the frequency of accountability reports is important.  Also important is more information about the specific gaps, including differentiation between rural and urban or male and female.  Regent Crain also noted that development from birth, and early childhood development, is critical.

Regent Evers responded that viewing the effort as a seamless one, from birth to 20, is imperative.  He also noted that the Education Trust is very involved in pre-K education; also, the Education Trust will be an aggressive monitoring entity.

Regent Danae Davis agreed with Senior Vice President Martin about the transformative possibilities of Access to Success.  She also commented on the goal of the System’s graduates reflecting the diversity of high school graduates; this would miss a huge population, she said.  Therefore, it is important to visualize how K-12 and college success fit together.  She asked how the Board can hold itself accountable for the accomplishments of this transformative initiative.  Senior Vice President Martin said that the issues the Board brings to the table promote accountability in the System.  President Reilly added that being part of the initiative along with other systems will also enhance data-based accountability.  Regent Davis asked if the System Administration would welcome feedback from the Board of Regents about areas to emphasize in closing the achievement gap; President Reilly responded in the affirmative. 

Regent Bartell asked about the data the Board can expect to receive in April.  Senior Vice President Martin provided a brief overview of aspects of the Accountability Report.  Chancellor Wells noted the importance of holding individual campuses accountable for improvement; it will also be important to assess and learn from the reasons for the improvement.

Regent Loftus said that the decision to place accountability for the UW Colleges at the two-year level is a change.  Senior Vice President Martin said that in the Access to Success project, tracking of gaps will occur at both the bachelor’s degree and associate’s degree level; for the Colleges, the two-year degree is the applicable measure in this particular project.  Overall, the work being done on More Graduates looks at how UW Colleges students transfer and where, as well as how well Colleges students do when they transfer. 

President Pruitt noted that Access to Success, as well as K-12 education, will be discussed at subsequent Board meetings and will help to continue the Board’s momentum on these subjects in the future. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:53 a.m.

 

Submitted by:

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Held in Reeve Union 227

UW-Oshkosh

Friday, October 8, 2010

9:00 a.m.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE August 19 & 20, 2010 MEETINGS. 3

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 3

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report. 3

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to the Board.. 4

Regent News. 4

In Memory of Regent Emeritus Barbara Thompson. 4

Preview of November Meeting. 4

DREAM Act Update. 5

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 5

NEW ERA and New North, Inc. Update. 5

NEW ERA.. 6

New North, Inc. 7

Additional Items that the President of the System may report or present to the Board.. 8

Nation’s First Commercial-Scale Dry Fermentation Anaerobic Biodigester At UW-Oshkosh. 8

Fall Course Registrations for Sustainable Management Degree Increased. 8

UW-Madison’s Center for Investigating Healthy Minds Receives Grant 9

UW-River Falls Opens New Hudson Center 9

Rothwell Student Center Dismantled at UW-Superior 9

UW-Milwaukee Research Foundation Announces Grants. 9

Prior Learning Assessment Programming Expanded. 10

UW-Stout Campus Goes Tobacco Free. 10

Growth Agenda Brochure Updated. 10

Election Day, November 2nd, 2010. 11

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE. 11

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business. 11

UW Sheboygan Lease, UW Colleges. 11

Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility Project 11

Porter Residence Hall Renovation Project 11

All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects. 12

Consent Agenda.. 12

Authority to Revise UW Sheboygan Lease, UW Colleges. 12

Approval of the Design Report of the Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility Project 12

and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison. 12

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System.. 13

Approval of the Design Report of the Porter Residence Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Allow for Single Prime Bidding and Construct the Project, UW-Platteville. 13

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE. 13

Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business. 13

Competitive University Workforce Recommendations Update. 13

Trust Funds 2010 Proxy Voting Season Results. 14

Status Update on UW System Human Resource System.. 14

UW Medical Foundation:  Notice of Intent to Establish Generations Fertility Care, Inc., a Not-for-Profit Corporate Joint Venture with UW Hospitals and Clinics. 14

UW-Oshkosh Contract for Financial Services Opportunities with UW Credit Union. 14

Endorsement of Continued Federal Funding for Stem Cell Research. 14

Report of the Senior Vice President 15

Consent Agenda.. 15

UW-Oshkosh Contract for Financial Services Opportunities with UW Credit  Union. 15

Endorsement of Continued Federal Funding for Stem Cell Research. 15

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 17

Education Committee Business. 17

Committee Priorities for 2010-11. 17

UW-Milwaukee:  Replication of Successful Charter Schools. 18

Presentation of Campus Academic Plans. 18

Presentation on the Role of Equity-Mindedness in Inclusive. 18

Report of the Senior Vice President 19

Consent Agenda.. 19

Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment and Reappointments. 19

Revised Mission Statement UW-Oshkosh. 19

Endorsement of the Principle of Replication for UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools. 19

ELECTION OF NEW ASSISTANT TRUST OFFICER OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS. 20

RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW OSHKOSH FOR HOSTING THE OCTOBER MEETING.. 20

Resolution of Appreciation: UW-Oshkosh. 20

CLOSED SESSION.. 22

Authority to Name the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility the “LaBahn Arena,” UW-Madison  22

Authority to Name the Pioneer Student Center Building “David J. and Lou Ann Markee Pioneer Student Center,” UW Platteville  22

Request for Salary Approval: Interim Chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 22


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Held in Reeve Union 227

UW-Oshkosh

Friday, October 8, 2010

9:00 a.m.

– President Pruitt presiding –

PRESENT:  Regents Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Jessica Schwalenberg, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, and Aaron Wingad

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, John Drew, Thomas Loftus, and Betty Womack

- - -

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE August 19 & 20, 2010 MEETINGS.

The minutes of the August 19 and 20, 2010 meetings stood approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

A written report was provided.  There were no questions or comments.

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to the Board

Regent News

President Pruitt noted that Regent Mark Bradley is featured on the cover of the September 28, 2010 edition of Marketplace magazine.  Reminding Board members that Regent Bradley was recently named as the fourth president of the Ruder Ware law firm, now in its 90th year of operation in Wausau, President Pruitt said that in the magazine article Regent Bradley talks about the firm, its history and its future, and the importance of dealing with clients as people.  He also shares his perspective as a second-term Regent, including thoughts about the UW System’s vital role in the state’s economy.

President Pruitt also stated that Regent David Walsh was honored at the Governor’s residence for his work with the UW Eye Research Institute in Madison.  David is stepping down as the institute’s Chairman of the Board after a three-year term; and in recognition of his service, the David G. Walsh Retinal Research Fellowship is being created to support further research on retinal issues.  President Pruitt congratulated Regent Walsh on behalf of the Board.

In Memory of Regent Emeritus Barbara Thompson

President Pruitt recognized the passing of former Regent Barbara Thompson, who recently passed away in Florida at the age of 85.  President Pruitt expressed the Board’s condolences to the family, friends, and colleagues of Dr. Thompson.  She was the first woman to serve as Wisconsin’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, serving two terms from 1973 to 1981.

Regent Evers, who knew Ms. Thompson well, as both a friend and as a boss early in his career, remembered her as an outstanding educator who served two terms as Superintendent with dignity; she was an inspiration to Regent Evers.  He recalled that as one of her achievements, she removed life-long teacher licensing; instead, teachers had to continually improve and engage in continuing education.  Dr. Thompson and her husband, Glen, spent their lives in public education.  Their son, Jim, established the Barbara and Glen Thompson Graduate Award Fund at UW-Madison; the fund provides a scholarship for one Ph.D. candidate each year.

Preview of November Meeting

Looking ahead to the Board’s November Board meeting in Madison, President Pruitt said that the meeting will be a one-day “deep dive,” discussion-only session.  One topic on the agenda will be the much-discussed, but widely misunderstood, phenomena known as “brain gain” and “brain drain.”

President Pruitt said that reports of recent research have included pessimistic forecasts regarding the “brain drain.”  One study, funded by the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute and conducted by Ken Goldstein of UW-Madison, found that 62 percent of those surveyed believe that the best and the brightest are leaving Wisconsin to work elsewhere.  President Pruitt said that as he and President Reilly have travelled the state arguing for the importance of More Graduates, the Growth Agenda, and Principles for Progress and Prosperity, one of the most frequently asked questions is about why the state should invest more in the public university if most new graduates leave the state.  This is a fair question, one to which policy makers, opinion leaders, and citizens deserve a complete and correct answer.  Quoting one of his academic mentors, the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan, President Pruitt said, “You are entitled to your opinions, but you are not entitled to your facts.”  At the November meeting the Board will hear more about the facts about “brain drain.” 

Also in November, President Pruitt said that the Board will look more closely at the PK-16 pipeline, and how public schools, UW institutions, and other educational partners work together.  The UW System staff is already working with Regent Evers and others in the K-12 system to prepare for a productive discussion.

President Pruitt noted that an invitation had been extended to both gubernatorial candidates, inviting the winner to address the Board at the November meeting, two days after the election.

DREAM Act Update

Following up on the status of the federal DREAM Act, President Pruitt said that in the closing days of the congressional session in September, supporters in the United States Senate fell short in their efforts to pass the DREAM Act.  The DREAM Act would provide currently illegal immigrant students who graduate from U.S. high schools, entered the country before the age of 16 and have been in the U.S. for five years, the opportunity to earn conditional permanent residency if they complete two years of military service with an honorable discharge, or complete at least two years of college in pursuit of a bachelor’s or graduate degree.

President Pruitt expressed pride that many on the Board and President Reilly, led by Regent Vásquez, signed a letter to Congress in June in support of the DREAM Act.  Quoting Dr. Martin Luther King, President Pruitt said, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”  President Pruitt expressed hope that those young people in Wisconsin who await passage of the DREAM Act will keep the faith and realize that the arc is bending their way and will arrive someday soon.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

NEW ERA and New North, Inc. Update

President Pruitt then turned to President Reilly, who began his report by noting that UW-Oshkosh is engaged in many important educational partnerships and regional collaborations.  These joint efforts support the System’s educational mission and, in the finest traditions of The Wisconsin Idea, help connect people with valuable university resources and expertise.  

President Reilly introduced a presentation that would highlight two regional collaborations, New North and NEW ERA.     New North, Inc. is a consortium of leaders representing businesses, economic development corporations, chambers of commerce, civic groups, non-profit organizations, and educational institutions from 18 counties in Northeast Wisconsin. Chancellor Wells and other colleagues are part of that effort, working to promote job growth, economic viability, and a high quality of life.  At a regional Economic Summit in 2000, people identified collaboration as a top priority among educational institutions within the region, calling on colleges and universities to “reduce barriers that limit access.”  This was the genesis of the Northeast Wisconsin Educational Resource Alliance, or NEW ERA.  President Reilly called upon Chancellor Wells to update the Board on both regional efforts. 

NEW ERA

Chancellor Wells introduced Dr. Susan May, President of Fox Valley Technical College, who expressed appreciation for the opportunity to provide an update on the NEW ERA organization.  Dr. May said that NEW ERA is a collaborative effort of 13 public higher education institutions in northeast Wisconsin; it has existed for almost a decade and has taken on many challenges, initiatives, and opportunities during that time.   

Dr. May shared accomplishments of NEW ERA:

· coordinating educational program offerings so that the offerings work effectively for residents of northeastern Wisconsin; 

· working together to address the increase in demand for educational services in the region; developing a degree-completion option, available through UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh, for technical college graduates;

· bringing technology and engineering technology programming to the region, in collaboration with UW-Platteville and UW-Stout;

· creating the faculty dialog group, which meets monthly to discuss the missions and goals of the participating institutions;

· creating a regional library card; and

· sponsoring a legislative breakfast annually, to focus on higher education and higher education collaboration. 

Current initiatives include both programming and institutional practices in sustainability and engineering.  A regional economic assistance center proposal is being developed.  In addition, NEW ERA is looking to become a 501(c)(3) organization and to hire an executive director.

The next to speak was James Perry, Campus Executive Officer and Dean of UW-Fox Valley.  Dean Perry was the most recent past president of NEW ERA.  He spoke further of the NEW ERA accomplishments.  Campus executives meet quarterly for wide-ranging, honest discussions, to find ways to reduce competition and increase collaboration.  One effort is to bring together a resource list for northeastern Wisconsin.  A collaboration to recruit the new market of adult learners is also a recent focus.  Dean Perry said that State Senator Mike Ellis has praised the unique efforts of NEW ERA. 

Chancellor Thomas Harden spoke next, saying that the most important accomplishment of NEW ERA is open dialog.  The dialog of the faculty groups had resolved many competition-related issues.  All of the collaborating institutions share the same goal of educating more people in northeastern Wisconsin.

New North, Inc.

Next to speak was Jerry Murphy, Executive Director of New North, Inc.  Welcoming Regents and President Reilly to the region, Mr. Murphy said that all of New North’s work is designed around a marketing outcome; education is deeply woven into all initiatives.  He then introduced Tim Weyenberg, CEO and President of Foth, who began by saying that he speaks from the perspective of a businessman, rather than an educator.  Business operators in the region view the UW System as a supplier of human resources.  His company employs 350 scientists and engineers. 

Mr. Weyenberg said that the New North mission is to harness and promote the regions’ resources, talents and creativity to sustain and grow the regional economy.  The mission is accomplished with broad-based collaboration among all of the regions’ resources, including NEW ERA, with effective marketing and a focus on new capital investment and quality jobs.  The region includes 18 counties in northeastern Wisconsin, 400 municipalities, 1.2 million people, and an emphasis on manufacturing; agriculture; the health care industry; and the finance, insurance, and real estate industries. 

Mr. Murphy said that the New North’s internal resources are a small; he and Mr. Weyenberg represent 50 percent of the organization’s manpower.  The New North has a talented intern from UW-Oshkosh, with internships from other institutions, as well.  Professional services are engaged part time.  About 350 active collaborations are the cornerstone of New North’s efforts. 

New North’s six strategic initiatives are built around talent, business development, and branding, Mr. Murphy continued.  Mr. Murphy described in detail the work being done in various areas, including that of an educational task group, which examined development benchmarks for children, from the cradle and beyond; assumed that all people will earn at least associate’s degrees; and emphasized education for the regional economy.  Entrepreneurship, including development of a New North entrepreneurial index, is another focus.  Re-purposing and sustainability initiatives were also addressed, as was marketing.

In closing, Mr. Murphy said that a great deal is going on in the New North, due to the magic of collaboration. Mr. Murphy issued an invitation to attend the New North’s annual summit, hosted this year by UW-Oshkosh, on December 3, 2010.  

Regent Crain expressed appreciation for the efforts of New North and NEW ERA; she has participated in some of them, and she said that the work of the groups is making a tremendous difference in the region.

Regent Evers, referring to himself as part of the educational pipeline, mentioned the development of internationally-benchmarked Common Core Standards and other efforts to improve the pipeline.  He asked that NEW ERA do everything it can to collaborate among higher education partners, but also to enhance opportunities for high school students to have access to rigorous curricula.  Chancellor Wells added that PK-12 representatives are on the committees of New North.

Regent Danae Davis asked about collaborative efforts with the College of Menominee Nation.  Dr. Day responded that the College is a full partner with other institutions.  For example, Fox Valley Technical College has a programmatic collaboration with the College, which has been very active in the faculty dialog group and other efforts.  Chancellor Wells offered additional examples of collaboration specifically with UW-Oshkosh.  Chancellor Harden described further efforts to promote relationships between the College of Menominee Nation and UW-Green Bay. 

President Reilly complimented the pairing of the NEW ERA educational alliance with New North and suggested that this collaboration should serve as a model for other parts of the state.  Mr. Murphy reinforced the importance of the connection between education and economic development. Mr. Perry recognized Chancellor Wells for his vision, saying that NEW ERA is the result of his vision.

Additional Items that the President of the System may report or present to the Board

Nation’s First Commercial-Scale Dry Fermentation Anaerobic Bio-digester At UW-Oshkosh

Continuing his report, President Reilly noted that in September UW-Oshkosh celebrated the official groundbreaking for the nation’s first commercial-scale dry fermentation anaerobic bio-digester, which will turn 8,000 tons of organic bio-waste, provided each year by the campus and community sources, into heat and electricity.  The renewable energy facility is projected to produce up to 10 percent of the university’s needs.  The project is a collaborative effort with the Foundation, which purchased the land.  Additional support comes from a $233,000 grant from Wisconsin Focus on Energy, and a $500,000 grant from the federal government.  The project propels the university further in its goal to become energy independent, and, at the same time, opens up invaluable opportunities for student-faculty research.  UW-Oshkosh is ranked among the “greenest” universities in the country, according to the Princeton Review’s Guide to 286 Green Colleges and Sierra Magazine’s Cool Schools list.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Wells and the UW-Oshkosh campus.  

Fall Course Registrations for Sustainable Management Degree Increased

President Reilly reported that that UW-Extension’s fall course registrations for the UW online degree in Sustainable Management are up 66 percent over the fall semester of the year before.  Currently, 104 students are enrolled, and 97 percent of these are adult returning students. Seventy percent of registrations are from within the state, and the others are from ten states and Germany and China.  The online Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Management is offered through four UW campuses:  UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior.  In response to the growing demand, the four campuses also recently launched online certificates in Sustainable Management, and an online master’s degree in areas of sustainability is under development.

UW-Madison’s Center for Investigating Healthy Minds Receives Grant

The Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, located in the Waisman Center at UW-Madison, has received a $50,000 grant from the Dalai Lama’s personal trust to support research on healthy qualities of the mind, such as kindness and compassion.  The Center uses state-of-the-art neuroscientific and biological tools to probe alterations in the brain and body during the expression of such positive qualities. According to Richard Davidson, the Center’s director and a professor of psychology and psychiatry at UW-Madison, this was a completely unexpected but very welcome gift.  The Dalai Lama has a longstanding interest in Davidson's work on the neuroscience of emotion and has visited UW-Madison on several occasions.  President Reilly wished Chancellor Martin and her colleagues the best on this ground-breaking work.

UW-River Falls Opens New Hudson Center

Chancellor Van Galen and his UW-River Falls colleagues officially opened the doors of their new Hudson Center last month.  The facility focuses on undergraduate courses for non-traditional and working adults seeking to complete a baccalaureate degree, as well as others interested in enrolling in select graduate or certificate programs.  Educational offerings at the Hudson Center include a business administration bachelor's degree completion program, an MBA program, and two master’s programs in secondary education.  The Center is a fine example of working to meet More Graduates for Wisconsin goals by making higher education more accessible for non-traditional students.

Rothwell Student Center Dismantled at UW-Superior

President Reilly said that when UW-Superior dismantled its old Rothwell Student Center last summer, after the completion of the university’s new Yellowjacket Union, the goal set by the state of Wisconsin was to recycle at least 50 percent of its materials.  Approximately 81 percent of the building’s materials have been recycled.  Tom Fennessey, director of facilities management at UW-Superior, reports that this amounts to 320 truckloads of materials that did not go into local landfills.  

UW-Milwaukee Research Foundation Announces Grants

The UW-Milwaukee Research Foundation has announced $475,000 in Catalyst Grants to fund eight research projects on a range of topics, from testing new drug therapies for cancer to developing innovative materials for energy, President Reilly continued.  These grants are made possible by support from the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation and the Richard and Ethel Herzfeld Foundation.  In line with the UW’s Research to Jobs focus, the Catalyst Grant Program is designed to provide seed funding for promising research projects at the UWM, particularly projects that have strong potential for commercialization and impact on the local economy.  Projects are selected based on their scientific excellence as judged by outside experts, as well as their commercial potential, including the potential for partnerships, intellectual property agreements, and start-up companies.  President Reilly congratulated Interim Chancellor Lovell and his colleagues at UW-Milwaukee.

Prior Learning Assessment Programming Expanded

 

President Reilly reported that the UW System is expanding its Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) programming, with the support of an $800,000, four-year grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education.  PLA, which is already used in different forms across the UW System, measures the learning a student may have attained outside the classroom through corporate training, work experience, military service, civic activity, and independent study.  By providing college credit for demonstrated learning gained in such experiences, UW System hopes to enroll more adult students, including returning veterans and those who previously attended a UW institution but departed prior to completing a degree.  The expanded initiative also will focus on the transferability of PLA credits across campuses.  At least nine UW System institutions will eventually pilot the new standards.  Faculty members will lead the development of core academic principles and guidelines underpinning the PLA process, to ensure that the highest academic standards are maintained.  This initiative offers a significant opportunity for more Wisconsin residents to get on a pathway toward a college degree, by recognizing the value of their previous learning experiences.   

UW-Stout Campus Goes Tobacco Free

President Reilly related that when UW-Stout announced that as of September 1, 2010, the campus was going tobacco free, the news spread far and wide.  UW-Stout’s tobacco-free initiative makes it the first comprehensive institution in the UW System to prohibit smoking and the use of all other tobacco products on campus.  Chancellor Chuck Sorenson gives students much of the credit for making this happen, saying that in April 2009, students overwhelmingly supported banning smoking from campus, and a year later, they voted again to extend that ban to all tobacco products.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Sorenson and the UW-Stout campus. 

Growth Agenda Brochure Updated

President Reilly called Regents’ attention to a new Growth Agenda brochure.  The brochure includes updated figures, as well as information about the More Graduates and Research to Jobs initiatives.

Election Day, November 2nd, 2010

In closing his remarks, President Reilly said that faculty colleagues from across the UW System agreed on a common set of five “Shared Learning Goals,” one of which is to prepare each UW graduate with a sense of “individual, social and environmental responsibility, including civic knowledge and engagement.”  President Reilly encouraged students to be active, engaged, inquisitive citizens by voting on November 2nd

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Manydeeds, in Regent Bartell’s absence, to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee. 

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business

Regent Manydeeds began his report by stating that the Capital Planning and Budget Committee met jointly with the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee to hear a presentation describing the partnership between the University and the UW-Oshkosh Foundation and an update of the Campus Master Plan.

UW Sheboygan Lease, UW Colleges

Regent Manydeeds said that Resolution 9824, brought by UW Colleges, requests authority to revise the UW-Sheboygan campus lease between the Board of Regents and Sheboygan County to reflect the current operating arrangement, land boundaries, and the recent co-location of the Sheboygan County Cooperative Extension within campus buildings.

Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility Project

Resolution 9825, brought by UW-Madison, requests authority to construct the $27.8 Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility project.  The project will construct a three-level addition to the Kohl Center that will provide a permanent home for the men’s and women’s hockey and swimming programs. 

Porter Residence Hall Renovation Project

Resolution 9826, brought by UW-Platteville, requests authority to construct the $4.8 million Porter Residence Hall Renovation project and to seek a waiver to allow for single prime bidding.  This project is the first in a series of residence-hall renovation projects at the Platteville campus that will upgrade interior surfaces and infrastructure and provide improvements to bring them up to today’s standards.  The waiver of the standard building process is necessary to provide a single source of project responsibility to ensure that renovations are completed during the summer break before students return to campus in the fall.

All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

Resolution 9827 requests authority to construct 12 all-agency maintenance and repair projects at eight UW System institutions, totaling $20 million, including $12 million of program revenue.  Three of the largest projects implement energy conservation opportunities in eight buildings at UW-Eau Claire, one building at UW-Milwaukee and ten buildings at UW-Platteville.  The debt service for these projects will be paid from the annual energy cost savings from the fuel and utilities appropriation.

Consent Agenda

Regent Manydeeds moved adoption of Resolutions 9824, 9825, 9826 and 9827, which were passed unanimously by the committee.  Regent Vásquez seconded the motion.  Regent Stan Davis requested that Resolution 9826 be removed from the consent agenda so that he could abstain from voting. 

Resolutions 9824, 9825, and 9827 then were adopted on a unanimous voice vote:

Authority to Revise UW Sheboygan Lease, UW Colleges

Resolution 9824:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to revise the lease for the UW-Sheboygan campus between the UW System Board of Regents and Sheboygan County to reflect the current operating arrangement, land boundaries, and the recent co-location of Sheboygan County Cooperative Extension within campus buildings.

Approval of the Design Report of the Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility Project

and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9825:                    

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility project be approved and authority be granted to (a) substitute $9,000,000 existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing for $9,000,000 previously enumerated gift funds, and (b) construct the project at a total estimated project cost of $27,787,000 ($18,787,000 Gift Funds and $9,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing).

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9827:        

That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $19,709,900 ($5,944,500 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $12,284,200 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $1,481,200 Program Revenue-Cash).

Approval of the Design Report of the Porter Residence Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Allow for Single Prime Bidding and Construct the Project, UW-Platteville

President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9826, which was approved on a voice vote, with Regent Stan Davis abstaining.  The resolution is as follows:

Resolution 9826:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Porter Residence Hall Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to: (1) seek a waiver of Wis. Stats s.16.855 under the provisions of s.13.48 (19) to allow single prime bidding and (2) construct the project for a total cost of $4,776,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Regent Manydeeds closed his report by saying that Associate Vice President Miller reported to the committee that the Building Commission approved $162 million for projects at its September meeting.  The funding breakdown for those projects is $74 million General Fund Supported Borrowing, $21 million program revenue, and $67 million gift funds.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.

Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business

Competitive University Workforce Recommendations Update

Regent Smith reported that Al Crist, UW System Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Workforce Diversity, provided the committee with an update on the UW System’s response to the recommendations of the Competitive University Workforce Commission.  Donna Dahlvang, academic staff representative from UW-Superior, and Randy Olson, faculty representative from UW-Stevens Point, gave their perspectives on the key recommendations for the UW employees they each represent.  While all of the recommendations are important, the Committee concluded it will be most important to focus on the University’s top priority of competitive salaries.

Trust Funds 2010 Proxy Voting Season Results

Regent Smith said that UW System Trust Funds actively responds to issues involving discrimination, the environment, and substantial social injury by proxy voting of shareholder proposals, as addressed in Regent policies.  Senior Portfolio Analyst Tom Reinders, reported that the 2010 proxy season saw the filing of 370 proposals related to social issues, with nearly half of them coming to votes. 

Status Update on UW System Human Resource System

Michael Morgan, Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs, provided the standard update on the current status of the UW System Human Resource System project, Regent Smith noted.  Mr. Morgan noted that the project overall remains on time and within budget.

UW Medical Foundation:  Notice of Intent to Establish Generations Fertility Care, Inc., a Not-for-Profit Corporate Joint Venture with UW Hospitals and Clinics

Claudia Sanders, General Counsel for the UW Medical Foundation, presented background information describing an upcoming joint venture between the UW Medical Foundation, UW Hospitals and Clinics Authority, and Meriter Hospital.  Regent Smith reported that no action was required; this item was presented to the Committee to meet a 60-day notice requirement outlined in the Board’s agreement with the UWMF. 

UW-Oshkosh Contract for Financial Services Opportunities with UW Credit Union

Regent Smith reported that the committee was asked to approve a ten-year contract for financial services opportunities between UW-Oshkosh and the UW Credit Union.  UW-Oshkosh provided an overview of the process used and how the campus followed the guidelines established by the Board of Regents.  Three students also spoke about the benefits of the contract to students.  Operations Review and Audit Director Julie Gordon was asked to provide an update on campuses that have also renewed contracts since the Board’s 2007 direction; all five used a competitive process, made the debit card optional, provided students information on other financial institutions in the area, and involved students whenever there was revenue generated.

Endorsement of Continued Federal Funding for Stem Cell Research

Regent Smith continued his report, saying that Business, Finance, and Audit Committee member, Regent Walsh, indicated that due to the importance of research funding, in particular stem cell funding, to the overall funding and reputation of the UW-Madison, it was important for the Board to signal its concurrence with the decision to join the amicus brief recently filed in federal court.  The resolution was modified slightly by the committee and approved by the committee.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Regent Smith said that Senior Vice President Morgan outlined the 2011-13 cost-to-continue item in the UW System’s biennial budget.  Mr. Morgan indicated that if furloughs had not been included, the amount would have been very close to the 2009-11 level ($70 million).  Mr. Morgan also reported on possible committee priorities for the year, including how campuses involve students in setting segregated fees, for-profit higher education risks and opportunities, and the roles and obligations of trustees with respect to Division I athletics.  Responding to a question from Regent Stan Davis, about whether these items would be full-Board discussions, President Pruitt suggested that committees can be the incubators of ideas, followed by consideration of the ideas by the full Board.

Consent Agenda

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith then moved adoption of Resolutions 9828 and 9829.  The motion was seconded by Regent Walsh and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote. 

UW-Oshkosh Contract for Financial Services Opportunities with UW Credit  Union

Resolution 9828:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves a contract with the UW Credit Union to provide financial services opportunities (including ATM, Campus Space Lease, and ID-Debit Card services) to the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh effective January 1, 2011 for a period of ten years.

REVISED

Endorsement of Continued Federal Funding for Stem Cell Research

Resolution 9829:        

WHEREAS, human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research holds great promise for biomedical science and the ability to treat debilitating disease, discover new medicines and uncover the fundamental processes that lead to disease; and

WHEREAS, hESCs have the capability to differentiate into any of approximately 200 different types of cells in the human body, which distinguishes them from adult stem cells capable of differentiating into only some different cell types; and

WHEREAS, induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSC) – adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed – are not substitutes for hESCs; and

WHEREAS, the University of Wisconsin-Madison is a world leader in stem cell research and regenerative medicine; and

WHEREAS, UW-Madison receives approximately $7 million per year in federal grant money for stem cell research, which supports the work of dozens of researchers, as well as many assistants and graduate students; and

WHEREAS, an action has been filed for declaratory judgment and an injunction to prevent the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from funding hESC research which action is being vigorously defended by the U.S. Department of Justice, with support from the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research; and

WHEREAS, a U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issued a preliminary injunction, barring all federal funding for hESC research on the basis that funding of hESC research violates the Dickey-Wicker Amendment; and

WHEREAS, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia indefinitely stayed that injunction while it considers the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) appeal of the preliminary injunction on behalf of NIH; and

WHEREAS, the loss of NIH funding for hESC research will have a devastating impact on hESC researchers, whose ongoing research projects will be permanently impaired wasting millions of tax payer dollars; and

WHEREAS, the loss of NIH funding for hESC research will prevent patients from receiving the best treatments science can provide; and

WHEREAS, the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research (CAMR), of which UW-Madison is a member, filed an Amicus Brief in support of the DOJ’s emergency motion to stay the preliminary injunction pending appeal; and

WHEREAS, it is expected that CAMR will continue to work in support of a court finding that NIH funding can continue for hESC research;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby acknowledges the great importance of human embryonic stem cell research to biomedical science, to patients and their families, and to the University of Wisconsin-Madison and supports efforts of the U.S. Department of Justice and the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research to ensure that the National Institutes of Health can continue to fund human embryonic stem cell research.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education Committee. 

Education Committee Business

Committee Priorities for 2010-11

Regent Crain said that, with the input of Senior Vice President Martin and the provosts, the Education Committee settled on a set of topics for 2010-11.  These topics represent components of the committee’s core goal of more graduates, and fall within the broad and interconnected areas of access, PK-16 collaborations, retention, and student success.  There was significant committee and provost interest in pursuing urban education and teacher education, in particular.  In addition, it has already been determined by Regent leadership that the November “deep-dive” policy discussion will focus on the new Common Core Standards for K-12.

With respect to urban education, the committee proposed this be a topic for the one-day Board meeting in March.  The intention is to pursue Urban Education broadly construed to include urban environments throughout the state, in addition to Milwaukee.  The policy discussion would include one or more aspects of teacher preparation for urban schools.  The committee believes the array of challenges and opportunities related to the broad topic of PK-16 needs to be a priority not only for the Education Committee but for the Board in its entirety.

Other topics the committee identified were:  pre-college and bridge programs; student success programs for populations of opportunity through high-impact practices; enhancing dual enrollment opportunities for high school students across Wisconsin; focusing on the unprecedented opportunity the UW System and the Department of Public Instruction have to follow closely the re-creation of the UW-Parkside school of education; and closing the achievement gap, which pertains to all of the other topics.

UW-Milwaukee:  Replication of Successful Charter Schools

Regent Crain noted that last February, the committee discussed the practice of charter school replication, expressing its support for moving forward with the development of a policy that would permit and guide the replication of successful UW-Milwaukee-authorized charter schools.  Following that meeting, staff from Senior Vice President Martin’s office worked with Regent Evers and members of his staff, Dr. Robert Kattman from the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools, and the Office of the General Counsel to articulate a policy.  The committee unanimously endorsed the replication policy.

Regent Crain noted that the policy is framed in accordance with the recommendations and best practices for charter schools established by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers, as advocated by both Regent Evers and Dr. Kattman.  Regent Crain also noted that only those schools with demonstrated academic and organizational success will be brought forward for replication, and only on a case-by-case basis, as amendments to existing charter school contracts.  The goal is to provide blueprints for highly successful charter schools that can be used by others, whether part of public school districts or not, and in Wisconsin as well as elsewhere around the country. 

Presentation of Campus Academic Plans

Regent Crain reported that the committee was presented with two campus academic plans.  The first was presented by Provost Julia Wallace of UW-Green Bay.  With new leadership in place, the campus is focused on the fulfillment of UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary mission through “continuity, collaboration, and connection.”  The committee next heard from UW-Oshkosh Provost Lane Earns, who described components of the institution-wide strategic planning undertaken by the University in the last few years, grounded in the institution’s liberal education reform efforts and a more intentional integration of Inclusive Excellence.  The committee was impressed with the comprehensive nature of this reform work.

Presentation on the Role of Equity-Mindedness in Inclusive

The committee heard a presentation on equity-mindedness from Vicki Washington, Associate Vice President for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.  Equity-mindedness is a critical component of Inclusive Excellence.  Equity refers not only to equal access, but also to equal outcomes among all racial, ethnic and other students groups in higher education institutions.  Inclusive Excellence reframes the discussion of unequal outcomes from an emphasis on student deficits (or deficiencies), to a matter of institutional responsibility.   Equity-mindedness, therefore, requires institutions to hold themselves accountable for unequal outcomes.  The committee heard that this is hard work that takes time and sustained and intentional consciousness-raising. 

Report of the Senior Vice President

Regent Crain reported that the Education Committee heard the report of Senior Vice President Martin, which included a feature of some of the Inclusive Excellence work being done at UW-Oshkosh.  The presentation reiterated the comprehensive nature and commitment of UW-Oshkosh’s impressive efforts to incorporate Inclusive Excellence into the fabric of the institution.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9830, 9831 and 9832, which were approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Danae Davis and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote.

Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment and Reappointments

Resolution 9830:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the appointment of Dr. Cynthia Haq to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, effective October 8, 2010 through October 31, 2014. Further, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents also approves the reappointments of Dr. Susan Goelzer, Ms. Katherine Marks, and Mr. Douglas Mormann to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, effective October 8, 2010 through October 31, 2014.

Revised Mission Statement UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 9831:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh’s revised mission statement.

Endorsement of the Principle of Replication for UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools

Resolution 9832:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents endorses the principle of replication for University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee charter schools under the Board’s authority that have demonstrated academic and organizational success. Replication is the practice of allowing a school management organization that holds a charter school contract, to open an additional school using the model of an existing school managed by the organization.  The Board of Regents will consider the replication of UW Milwaukee charter schools:  in accordance with the recommendations and best practices for charter school replication established by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers; on a case-by-case basis; as amendments to existing charter school contracts; and when recommended by the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools, the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor, and the UW System President.   As part of the recommendation to replicate a UW-Milwaukee charter school, the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools will include a description of efforts to involve Milwaukee Public Schools in the initial, or a subsequent, replication process.

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ELECTION OF NEW ASSISTANT TRUST OFFICER OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

Following the committee reports, President Pruitt stated that General Counsel Pat Brady’s retirement creates a vacancy in an assistant trust officer position and called for a nomination for assistant trust officer.  Regent Walsh nominated new General Counsel Tomas Stafford; the nomination was seconded by Vice President Spector, and the Board unanimously approved the nomination on a voice vote. 

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RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION TO UW OSHKOSH FOR HOSTING THE OCTOBER MEETING

President Pruitt called on Regent Evers to present the resolution of appreciation to UW-Oshkosh.

Resolution of Appreciation: UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 9833:        

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh is an agile, responsive, innovative university aligned with the needs of northeastern Wisconsin and beyond; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh, the second-fastest growing university in the state, has experienced historic enrollment growth, with four consecutive years of record-breaking graduating classes; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh is dedicated to granting an additional 8,000 degrees by the year 2025, building upon a 25-percent growth rate in degrees conferred over the past 10 years; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh has gained national recognition for ground-breaking innovations, including the Graduation Project, Student Titan Employment Program, and Accelerated Online Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program, as well as its sustainability efforts, such as becoming the first Fair Trade University in the United States and utilizing state-of-the-art renewable energy features throughout campus; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh has been recognized as a national model for developing and highlighting exemplary campus-wide liberal education and inclusivity programs; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh has nearly tripled the total assets of the UW-Oshkosh Foundation, characterized by raising more than $35 million for high-priority capital projects, student scholarships, and academic programs; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh will have completed by 2011 a decade long, $200-million transformation of campus facilities; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh has established a national reputation for the way it engages and partners with numerous individuals and organizations to better serve the region, including becoming proud founding members of NEW ERA and New North, Inc.;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks UW-Oshkosh for hosting the Board’s October 2010 meeting and commends Chancellor Richard Wells and the campus’s faculty, staff, and students for success in engaging people and ideas while building a regional model for collaboration in action.

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The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 a.m. and reconvened at 11:00 a.m.

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CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded by Regent Falbo, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bradley, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Evers, Falbo, Pruitt, Schwalenberg, Smith, Spector, Vásquez, Walsh and Wingad voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9834:        

That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider personal histories, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats., related to the naming of facilities at UW-Madison and UW Platteville; to consider salary for an interim UW-Milwaukee Chancellor, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to discuss collective bargaining activities at UW institutions, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

The following resolutions were passed during closed session:

Authority to Name the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility the “LaBahn Arena,” UW-Madison

Resolution 9835:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility the “LaBahn Arena.”

Authority to Name the Pioneer Student Center Building “David J. and Lou Ann Markee Pioneer Student Center,” UW Platteville

Resolution 9836:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the Pioneer Student Center building “David J. and Lou Ann Markee Pioneer Student Center.”

Request for Salary Approval: Interim Chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9837:        

That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, salary approval is requested for Michael Lovell as Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, effective October 8, 2010 at an annual base salary rate of $297,183.

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The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon.

Submitted by:

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board