Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Union, Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Thursday, June 10, 2010

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT:   Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Jessica Schwalenberg, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regent Stan Davis

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PRESIDENT’S GREETING

President Pruitt began the meeting by welcoming the Board of Regents’ newest member, student Regent Jessica Schwalenberg.  Jessica is replacing Kevin Opgenorth as the nontraditional student on the Board.  Jessica has just completed her Associate’s Degree with Honors at UW-Waukesha, and she plans to attend UW-Milwaukee in the fall to continue her coursework for her psychology major.  Jessica held several leadership positions on the Waukesha campus, including student ambassador, orientation leader, pre-college mentor, and tutor.  She also served as President of the Ecology Club and Secretary for the UW-Waukesha chapter of Phi Theta Kappa.

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UW-MILWAUKEE PRESENTATION:  PROGRESS, PERCEPTIONS AND PRESIDENTS: TAKING THE INITIATIVE AT UW-MILWAUKEE

President Pruitt then introduced Chancellor Carlos Santiago, to make a presentation about UW-Milwaukee, the host campus for the Board meeting.  The Chancellor began by saying that he would talk about progress during his six years at UW-Milwaukee; would invite representatives of market-research firm Lipman Hearne to discuss the perspectives of campus constituent groups; and then would invite two former Board of Regents Presidents to speak about their perspectives on higher education.

Progress

Research expenditures are an important measure of progress, the Chancellor said.  Significant progress has been made; by the end of the fiscal year, it is expected that the campus will surpass $60 million in research expenditures. 

Enrollment has grown at a rapid rate since 2000, with 6,502 additional students, or a 27 percent growth in students, without additional land or space.  Enrollment growth is at the forefront at UW-Milwaukee.

Online learning at UW-Milwaukee is the fastest-growing segment of the university’s pedagogy.  For example, a full general education curriculum is now online. 

Diversity is part of UW-Milwaukee’s access mission.  The percentage of students of color has increased.  The Chancellor’s goal is no less than 20 percent students of color in the freshman class; the university is currently at 18 percent, even while the size of the class has remained relatively constant.

Retention rates have improved from 69 to 73 percent.  More work is needed on retention and graduation rates, but gains have already been realized.

The doctoral program array has increased from 19 programs to 29.  The number of doctoral students graduating from UW-Milwaukee has doubled.  Doctoral growth has been significant compared to other research universities.

As the campus has become more of a residential campus, a need for more student spaces has been realized.  Citing recent residential-building growth, Chancellor Santiago said that residential facilities are hugely important for increasing retention, graduation, and involvement of students into the university.

The Chancellor also highlighted upcoming capital projects which will allow for expanded initiatives, such as the School of Freshwater Sciences, Kenwood Integrated Research Building, Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital campus, and the Neeskay Research Vessel replacement.  He expressed appreciation for the Regents’ role in supporting the six-part, $240 million UW–Milwaukee Initiative.

In sum, Chancellor Santiago said that the university, with the support of faculty, staff, and students, has made significant progress toward making UW-Milwaukee a premier research university.

Perceptions

Tom Luljak, Vice Chancellor for Public Relations, then reported on a rigorous market analysis of the university’s standing in the community.  The research also served as a foundation for UW-Milwaukee’s “Something Great in Mind” branding campaign.  The campaign has showcased the fine work of faculty and student researchers.

Mr. Luljak introduced Donna Van de Water and Tom Abrahamson from the Lipman Hearne marketing firm.  Dr. Van de Water and Mr. Abrahamson reported on the results of recent market research.  Through focus groups with high school guidance counselors, parents of high-school-bound high school seniors, representatives from Milwaukee businesses and community leaders, findings indicated that awareness remained high.  Significant improvement was realized in public and campus perceptions of UWM in such areas as the quality of faculty research and undergraduate education, the diversity of the university, and the university’s contributions to the community.

In further remarks, Mr. Abrahamson discussed prospective students’ concerns and selection criteria.  Among other things, he noted that a climate of respect and inclusion was ranked highly as a value, along with money matters, among prospective UW-Milwaukee students’ selection criteria.

Looking ahead to the next ten years, numbers of traditional students are not expected to grow; therefore, many institutions are looking to broader geographic recruitment, adult students, online students, and graduate students to increase enrollments.  UW-Milwaukee is well positioned to serve these latter groups, Mr. Abrahamson said.

Vice Chancellor Luljak described next steps to be taken with the financial support of the UWM Foundation, including:  (1) developing a marketing campaign; (2) focusing messaging on the results of academic research; (3) engaging alumni in communicating about the university; and (4) highlighting UW-Milwaukee’s involvement in the community.

Presidents

Chancellor Santiago then introduced two former Board of Regents presidents, Michael W. Grebe, who was Board president from1994-96 and is current president and CEO of the Bradley Foundation; and Sheldon B. Lubar, who was Board president from 1996-98 and is founder and chairman of Lubar and Company.  The UW-Milwaukee School of Business is named after Mr. Lubar.  Both are exceptional supporters of the university.

Mr. Grebe spoke from the perspective of the Milwaukee metropolitan area donor community.  The Bradley Foundation is the largest private foundation in the state and is celebrating its 25th anniversary.  The Foundation supports institutions which comprise a strong civil society, such as colleges and universities, including UW-Milwaukee.  For years most of the foundation’s support was focused on private institutions.  In a time of dwindling public resources, the foundation’s focus has changed; the foundation’s support for UW-Milwaukee has significantly increased.  Part of the reason for this is that UW-Milwaukee has become an increasingly important part of the community and a catalyst for economic development.  That opinion is shared broadly in the donor community, both foundations and individual donors.  The university has moved forward rapidly, thanks to strong leadership in the community.  Also, Chancellor Santiago and others from the university are very involved in the community.  In sum, Mr. Grebe said donors are happy to have the university in Milwaukee.

Mr. Lubar spoke next, first recalling his and Mr. Grebe’s retirement from the Board of Regents 12 years before.  Mr. Lubar spoke about the failure and serious problems of the Milwaukee Public School System.  For the state to succeed, its largest metropolitan area must succeed.  However, all is not lost, he said.  Milwaukee business is expecting to hire at a solid pace during the rest of the year, according to a recent survey. 

One of Milwaukee businesses’ most difficult problems is finding qualified employees.  As a banker and businessman in Milwaukee for more than 50 years, Mr. Lubar said that the path to success starts with education.  UW-Milwaukee is the largest institution in the southeastern part of the state; through its educational programs and development efforts, it is a logical venue for the citizens of the area to acquire advanced education – and it can impact the Milwaukee Public School (MPS) system.  More resources from the UW System are needed to be an engine for bringing the economy of the city and the state back.  More money, more faculty, and more programs will lead to more engineers, business school graduates, and productive citizens.  Milwaukee’s success will be the state’s success.  Mr. Lubar asked Board members to carry this message to the Governor, legislature, and university officials.

Regent Loftus commented on the impressive story about UW-Milwaukee and the great progress that has been made.  Regent Loftus asked for further explanation of the concentration on the freshman class.  Chancellor Santiago said that low retention and graduation rates were largely due to low retention rates among freshmen.  He has taken the position that students who are admitted should be given the tools to succeed.  More residence halls, more attention, and more remediation are helpful, as are relationships with the two-year colleges. 

Regent Falbo asked Chancellor Santiago to speak to Mr. Lubar’s challenge to the university to help improve K-12 education in Milwaukee.  The chancellor said that improvements in K-12 education are hugely important.  UWM has provided teachers, has its own charter schools, and is part of the solution to the K-12 issues; however, one institution alone cannot solve the problems, and partnerships are important.

Regent Danae Davis agreed with the chancellor’s assessment, but commented that UWM is going to need to be a bigger player.  She observed that the Milwaukee Partnership Academy has waned in its effectiveness.  Secondly, teacher preparation presents a big opportunity with respect to leadership of the College of Education.  Both are opportunities to “step up.”  Regent Davis also asked about enrollment growth at UWM, and how it can or should be sustained, and also about third-year attention.

In response, Chancellor Santiago said that the Milwaukee Partnership Academy has two layers:  (1) the Chancellor, Mayor, and other leaders; and (2) faculty and teachers interacting with MPS teachers.  The latter has worked well; but the higher-level discussion did not tackle the issue.  Eventually, the Chancellor suggested that the leadership group meet only when the group had business to conduct; it has not met in two years.

Regarding enrollment, the Chancellor said that the current growth rate cannot continue.  Increasing diversity was important; the university is increasingly a transfer campus; and graduate school enrollment has been rising, as well.  Now UWM is graduating 5,000 students each year.  He said if the university continues to grow and cannot sustain the growth with quality, then the university should not grow.  The Lipman Hearne study showed that students increasingly perceive the faculty as caring about them, which is a huge indicator of quality.

Regent Drew acknowledged Mr. Lubar’s comments and suggested that Chancellor Santiago and Dr. Thornton give a report next year on the collaboration between UWM and MPS.  The chancellor said that he had just recently met Dr. Thornton, and he would be happy to provide this report next year.

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APPROVAL OF UW SYSTEM 2010 ANNUAL OPERATING BUDGET

Thanking Chancellor Santiago for UW-Milwaukee’s presentation, President Pruitt said that he believes that the University of Wisconsin System is one of the best university systems in the country, and the governing Board is one of the best, as well. 

Timeline

To begin the discussion of the annual operating budget, President Pruitt reviewed the timeline for the integrated budget planning process.  The process began in February; in April the Board focused on the “More Graduates” goals; and in May Ellen Chaffee facilitated a brainstorming session on strategic financing.  President Pruitt then reviewed the day’s agenda, with its focus on the 2010-11 annual budget; components of the next biennial budget, including Research to Jobs; and action on the Board’s recommendation to the Higher Educational Aids Board (HEAB) for funding the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant (WHEG) financial aid program for the next two-year budget cycle.

Introduction

President Pruitt called upon President Reilly to begin the discussion of the 2010-11 annual operating budget, the budget for the second year of the state’s 2009-11 biennial budget.  President Reilly began by noting that the 2009-11 biennial budget was developed and approved in the middle of a pervasive financial downturn. Over the two-year period from July 2009 through June 2011 the UW System was required to cut about $161 million from its operating revenue, including $120.5 million from GPR; $17.6 million from other non-federal, non-gift program revenues; and $23.2 million from auxiliary reserves.  In addition, the state budget required all UW System faculty and academic staff members to take 16 days of unpaid furlough over two years.  Equal to more than a three-percent pay loss, this added $40 million in GPR and $16 million in program revenue cuts.  Total reductions were more than $255 million over two years, which meant that UW leaders had to find new ways to cut costs and increase efficiency, while preserving quality.

In recent years, tuition increases have been relatively modest and very predictable, President Reilly continued.  Annual increases at four-year campuses have been held to 5.5 percent, a smaller rate of growth than most of the UW’s peer colleges and universities.  Emphasizing predictability, President Reilly recommended that the board approve another 5.5 percent increase for resident undergraduate students and, for the fourth consecutive year, freeze tuition at UW Colleges.  As a result:

·      UW-Madison tuition would remain second lowest in the Big 10;

·      UW-Milwaukee tuition would rank 12th out of 15 peer universities;

·      average tuition at UW System’s 11 four-year comprehensive universities would rank 30th among tuition at 35 comparable regional universities; and

·      tuition at the UW Colleges would be nearly identical to tuition at Wisconsin Technical Colleges that offer comparable liberal arts transfer programs.

Under this proposal, tuition for nonresident undergraduate students and resident graduate students would increase by the same dollar amount as resident undergraduate students, which is consistent with previous actions of the Board.

Other costs for students, including segregated fees, meal plans, and room rates, have been held down, President Reilly indicated.  Chief business officers and their student affairs counterparts will be asked to work with System staff on a strategic approach to fee increases, with a goal of producing reasonable, predictable fee increases that mirror the approach to tuition. 

President Reilly reminded Board members of the context for the recommended tuition and fee rates.  For example, the System has avoided double-digit tuition increases or massive reductions in enrollments.  Also, for the second year in a row, students whose family income is at or below the state median income of $60,000 will be “held harmless” from tuition increases, if they have documented need.   

The state’s biennial budget preserved funding for the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant (WHEG-UW) program, and state funding for WHEG will increase by $3.3 million next year.  It is hoped that the federal government will also provide some additional aid.  The maximum award for Pell Grant recipients is scheduled to increase by $200, up to $5,550, and new eligibility rules mean that more UW students will qualify for Pell Grants next year.  However, Congress must act to address a significant funding shortfall in the program.

New private investments are also offering additional aid, President Reilly continued.  Nearly 2,000 UW students received $3.4 million in new need-based assistance from the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars, created by John and Tasha Morgridge during the 2008-09 academic year.  A second cohort of students in the 2009-10 academic year received $4.27 million in Fund for Wisconsin Scholars assistance, and a third cohort of students will enroll at UW schools this fall with aid from the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars.  President Reilly suggested that it is important to do a better job of explaining to students and their parents the “net price” of a college education.

Budget Considerations

President Reilly then turned to Associate Vice President Freda Harris to discuss an overview of the 2010-11 annual budget, including:  changes in the annual budget, tuition policies and practices, changes in auxiliary services, and tuition and fees.  

Beginning with overall budget changes, Ms. Harris noted that the university’s budget will increase by $839 million from 2009-10 to 2010-11, more than is typical, because all UW campuses are now required to participate in federal direct student loans, which adds $680 million to the budget.  These funds otherwise would have flowed through banks.  In other changes, General Purpose Revenue (GPR) funds are increasing by $39.5 million, a 3.5 percent increase; and tuition and fee amounts are increasing by $60 million, or a 5.7 percent increase.

Referring to slides, Ms. Harris said that the budget totals $2.2 billion, with $8.2 million added for the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery; $6.4 for Tuition Increase Grants for students with families with incomes of less than $60,000; $5 million for the recruitment and retention fund; and nearly $9 million related to utilities and debt service.  Also, some one-time funding is being taken from the budget. 

Not all potential costs are included in the budget.  For example, a required state lapse will be assigned later by the state Department of Administration.  Significant increases in health insurance and retirement costs could result in a budget shortfall.

With regard to tuition policies, the Board has directed that the quality, ability to pay, and access are to be balanced through tuition and financial aid; increases are to be moderate and predictable and made with regard to quality; and financial aid support should be maximized.  Also, it is assumed that general tuition revenues would be funded 65 percent through state funding and 35 percent through tuition.  Tuition increases are needed in 2010-11 to offset the $35 million ongoing general budget added to the 2009-11 biennial budget. 

In 2007-08, increases in tuition were 6.8 percent at most UW institutions and 7.3 percent at the UW Colleges.  Since then, 5.5 percent increases have been in place the last four years; UW Colleges have had a freeze on tuition for the last four years.

Compared to peers, UW-Madison’s tuition has been the second lowest, after tuition increases, among the Big Ten peers; UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee and the comprehensive institutions’ tuition are all below their peer averages.

Associate Vice President Harris described efforts to improve affordability, such as $3.3 million in WHEG funding; the tuition increase grant for families with under $60,000; an expected increase in the Pell Grant maximum by $200; financial aid included in UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee’s differential tuition; and increases in private institutional aid.

Regarding auxiliary services, fee increases average 5.7 percent.  Fee increases will be used for student initiatives, contracts with vendors, student services, new buildings, and facility maintenance.

Addressing segregated fees, Ms. Harris noted that segregated fees are used for such services as health services, recreational sports, athletics, and parking.  The lowest fees are at UW-Stout, highest at UW-Green Bay.

Room and board varies among campuses, ranging from $5,208 at UW-Platteville to $7,425 at UW-Madison, with an average of $5,849.  Increases average $218, or 3.8 percent.

Overall, the average cost increase for an undergraduate student who is living on campus, taking a meal plan, and not eligible to be held harmless from the increase is $631. This would be the case for about 25 percent of students.  Regent Bradley asked a follow-up question about the effect of the increases on students; Ms. Harris referred him to the consolidated tuition and fees table on page A-2 in the meeting materials.  About 38,000 students would receive either the WHEG award or a hold-harmless award; the Pell Grant would be available to students, as well.

Regent Drew asked about the 28 percent increase in the “other” portion of the budget.  Ms. Harris said that this is due to a requirement that the campuses provide federal direct student loans, which previously would have been handled through banks.  It does not provide new resources, but is reflected as an increase in the budget.  Following up on this, Regent Vásquez asked if administrative costs for managing the loans are covered; Ms. Harris said they are not.

Regent Loftus asked about the UW Colleges freeze and said that when tuition is frozen, there is a shift in resources that occurs to cover the Colleges’ cost.  Associate Vice President Harris said that about $8.00 of the tuition increase would be paid by students at other institutions.  Regent Loftus noted that the System seems to be directing students into the Colleges, even though data show a relatively low likelihood of success in terms of those students’ earning baccalaureate or associate degrees.  He also asked whether part of the reason for the freeze is to compete with the technical colleges.  Ms. Harris said that associate degrees are not necessarily the goal of students who attend the UW Colleges.  Also, some students move in and out of the Colleges.

Chancellor David Wilson, also responding to Regent Loftus’s question, commented that the most recent accountability data show that six years out, 84 percent of students who start at the UW Colleges have either an associate degree, have a bachelor’s degree, or are still enrolled in a college or university.  In addition, the UW Colleges have a slightly different role than other institutions and will work with students to get them to where they need to be to achieve success.

Regent Vásquez expressed concern about the UW Colleges tuition freeze and asked how long this can be sustained.  He asked what is being sacrificed at the Colleges; and if an increase is eventually introduced, will it be significantly higher in order to catch up for the years during the freeze.  President Reilly said that this has been a year-by-year decision; catch-up will not be needed because the cost has been subsidized; and as a System, a goal is to provide students and parents more choices, including the UW Colleges option.  Regarding graduation rates, President Reilly reiterated that it is important to look at how many are still enrolled after a period of years.

Regent Falbo recalled that the reason for freezing the UW Colleges tuition was to make the Colleges more competitive for the group of students that they serve.  Maybe at some point they should be unbundled from the comprehensives and research institutions to determine what tuition rates would be without subsidies.  It is probably time to look at this next time around, he suggested.

Regent Danae Davis asked about retirement costs and also about UW-Madison’s and UW-Eau Claire’s differential tuition, and how UW-La Crosse is different.  Ms. Harris said that the added retirement costs were not anticipated, and this increase was unusual.  The Tuition and Financial Aid Working Group study recommended that differentials include a financial aid component; this group’s work was done after UW-La Crosse had its differential tuition in place.  Also, financial aid was originally included as part of UW-La Crosse’s proposal during the biennial budget process, and the legislature was not supportive.

Regent Womack asked whether the unanticipated large cost increases in pay plan and fringe benefits will continue into the next biennium.  Ms. Harris said she would not anticipate this dramatic a change.  Regent Drew asked if anything in the health care reform legislation would help with our costs; Ms. Harris said that she did not anticipate this. 

At this point, President Pruitt asked for a motion to approve Resolution 9769, the 2010-11 annual operating budget.  Regent Crain made the motion, which was seconded by Regent Bradley.

Regent Wingad, saying tuition and operating budgets are among the most difficult decisions for student Regents, and noting that he is a first-generation college student who has had to fund his own education, said that he understands the financial burden of a tuition increase.  However, it is also important to find responsible ways to respond to state budget cuts.  The System can either charge more or do less.  The budget does speak to the importance of access through a hold-harmless provision and a tuition freeze at UW Colleges.  But more needs to be done to increase financial aid. 

To vote no to a tuition increase would mean eliminating faculty positions or reducing enrollments, Regent Wingad stated.  Therefore, it is important to strike a balance between raising tuition and making cuts at campuses.  It is a complicated decision.  By one calculation, not including furloughs, students will be covering approximately 57 percent of the hole that state cuts made; the rest will be coming from cuts at universities.  Over the two-year biennium students have covered about 45 percent of state cuts.  Regent Wingad said that he cannot vote 72 percent yes and the rest no.  He said he believes the budget does a reasonable job of spreading the burden of the poor financial situation among students, faculty, and programs.

Regent Schwalenberg, echoing some of Regent Wingad’s concerns, said that the budget vote is very difficult in a difficult time.  She said that anyone who cares about students’ needs knows that it is important to protect the quality of education; there is a balance between outpricing some students or maintaining the quality of education.  It also would be a serious loss to have students come to the university and not be able to serve them well.  Considering the efforts to keep the increase modest, and the hold-harmless provisions, it is evident that the cares of students are being considered.

Regent Drew, saying that he negotiates contracts for the United Auto Workers, noted that whatever wage increases those workers are getting are being offset by health care costs.  Thus, it is difficult to discuss a 5.5 percent budget increase.  Also, it is important to do more to get out the message about grants and aid.  However, overall, the budget represents a thoughtful balancing act of trying to maintain quality, affordability, and take care of UW employees.  He said he might have protested the budget at another time in his life, but he does not see an alternative at this time. 

Regent Wingad said that the budget is an opportunity to work with the legislature to try to stop the disinvestment from higher education in future years.

President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9769, which was approved on a unanimous voice vote.

2010-11 Annual Operating Budget (including Rates for Academic Tuition, Segregated Fees, Textbook Rental, Room and Board, and Apartments; Academic Tuition Refund Policy and Schedule; and Annual Distribution Adjustments)

Resolution 9769: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, theBoard of Regents approves the 2010-11 annual operating budget, including rates for academic tuition, segregated fees, textbook rental, room and board, and apartments; the tuition refund policy and schedule; and annual distribution adjustments as attached in the document 2010-11 Operating Budget and Fee Schedules, June, 2010. The 2010-11 amounts are:

GPR $1,179,337,184 21.1%

Academic Tuition $1,111,743,774 19.9%

Total GPR/Fees $2,291,080,958 41.0%

Other* $3,302,248,991 59.0%

Total $5,593,329,949 100.0%

*Includes auxiliaries, federal and private gifts, grants and contracts, other operating receipts, non-credit instruction, and trust funds.

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2011-13 BIENNIAL BUDGET:  STRATEGIC FINANCING FOR THE GROWTH AGENDA

President Pruitt then shifted the conversation to the biennial budget.  The only action required at this meeting relates to Board’s recommendation for HEAB and the amount of financial aid UW students will need.  However, before addressing that action item, President Pruitt said that the Board will have a broader information-only discussion about the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  

At the May Board meeting, Ellen Chaffee from the Association of Governing Boards led the discussion about strategic financing – aligning financial decisions with academic goals and highest priorities.  Saying that the Growth Agenda goals focus on two main areas, more graduates and more jobs, with “foundational activity” related to our own competitive workforce, Regent President Pruitt turned to System President Reilly to discuss the action plan for the 2011-13 biennium.

Research to Jobs

To begin, President Reilly said he would focus on the “more jobs” component, and the UW’s efforts to stimulate economic growth through academic research and development.  He said that last year, he appointed a Research to Jobs Task Force to investigate ways that the UW System can better leverage research and development.  That Task Force, chaired by Carl Gulbrandsen from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, completed its work and issued a report in September. 

An implementation committee was convened to translate the recommendations into actionable measures and proposals.  President Reilly introduced UW-Stout Chancellor Chuck Sorensen, the chair of that committee, to present the group’s report.

Chancellor Sorenson thanked President Reilly for the opportunity to chair the committee and President Pruitt for the opportunity to speak.  He also thanked the chairs of the group’s three subcommittees, UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich, UW-La Crosse Provost Kathleen Enz-Finken, and Charles Hoslet of the UW-Madison Office of Corporate Relations, as well as those who provided support, Doug Mell, Kris Frederick, and Andy Richards.

Noting the nationwide effort by state universities to become more involved in applied research, Chancellor Sorenson said that the focus of the subcommittee on emerging technology centers was on finding the most effective way to help a region’s business and industry, rather than focusing on one strategy.  Chancellor Sorenson described principles, criteria for proposal review, and potential obstacles to developing emerging technology centers.  The subcommittee on entrepreneurship found examples of current efforts both within and outside of the UW System and explored those.  The third subcommittee was related to a discovery portal, which uses a database to allow industry to identify potential collaborators for sponsored research, consultants, or campus resources.  Recommended action steps include identifying a management team to lead the development of an expanded portal.

Although some work is already occurring, for most UW campuses, doing applied research requires a cultural change, Chancellor Sorenson said.  Regent Bradley, who served on the implementation committee, said that the cultural shift is part of the shift that will be occurring in higher education, because it is responsive to the needs of businesses and industry.  Higher education institutions in some other states started doing some of this work even earlier.  Regent Bradley expressed his enthusiasm for the recommendations of the work group.

Chancellor Levin-Stankevich affirmed that it is important to think about what will best benefit the state and to collaborate on projects.  Also, the group’s work recognized that the most successful model in systemwide initiatives has been a big idea driven at the system level, with an application of the idea that engages students, is responsive to local business needs, and creates jobs.   

Regent Loftus asked that access to capital be addressed when the Research to Jobs report is translated into a budget proposal.  President Reilly acknowledged the challenge of developing capital investment.

Regent Walsh, expressing support for the Research to Jobs effort, said that ideas, good science, managers, and capital are all necessary.  It is also important to seek legislative support; unfortunately these are difficult times in which to make such requests.  It takes money to be a resource for the future, and it is important to remind decision-makers of this fact.  Regent Loftus said that part of the state pension fund is designated for investing and suggested exploring this as a potential funding source.

Chancellor Wells mentioned the three economic summits being hosted in Appleton, La Crosse, and Milwaukee and suggested that UW institutions stay involved in these efforts.

Regent Bradley emphasized that the Research to Jobs effort is about start-ups, but is also about applying the UW’s expertise to help existing businesses.

Regent Bartell said that many of the implementation recommendations of the Research to Jobs report are relatively modest.  It is important to move forward on the recommendations to the extent possible.  President Reilly agreed with the importance of doing this.  He thanked Chancellor Sorenson and indicated that this conversation would be continued as part of biennial budget discussions.  He also noted other proposed initiatives that fit under the broad Growth Agenda goal of creating “more jobs” for Wisconsin:

  • At UW-Madison, a central tenet of the Madison Initiative is to add new faculty positions to eliminate course bottlenecks. When those new professors are hired, they also carry significant research responsibilities. Chancellor Martin and her team expect that these new faculty colleagues will attract more than $35 million in external grants.

To conduct that kind of high-level research and attract that external funding, they will need graduate assistants. While external grant funding will cover the direct costs of these graduate assistants, these grants cannot fund the tuition waivers that are also required to attract top-shelf grad students who can support cutting-edge research projects. A budget initiative focused on this need would seek funding to cover the cost of those tuition waivers for 225 new graduate assistants.

  • At UW-Milwaukee, there is an opportunity to fund Phase II of a three-biennia Research Initiative.  Phase I, included in the State’s 2007-09 budget, provided $9.6 million and 60 new faculty and academic staff positions to focus on research in areas of biomedical and health technologies, advanced manufacturing, and other science and engineering fields. The end goal is to strengthen economic development in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin by enhancing this university’s burgeoning research enterprise. 

The UW Library Research Commons initiative would increase access for students, faculty, and staff, to many core resources in a wide range of subject areas.  It would also support the expansion of existing electronic resources currently held by the UW-Madison Libraries to all UW faculty and students, thereby building the research capacity of the entire UW System.  The libraries have received no funding increases since 1999.  With an average inflation rate of 9 percent per year, significant cuts in research subscriptions have been necessary. 

More Graduates for Wisconsin

President Reilly continued, saying that it will be necessary to consider what level of funding will be needed to begin improving access, retention, and graduation rates, with a goal of increasing the annual number of graduates by 30 percent.  Eventually, performance will be rewarded by shifting funds toward UW System institutions that achieve their strategic goals.  Funds from the 2011-13 biennium would be used at the outset to incentivize initial goals and strategies that UW institutions have developed.  President Reilly said that if the Board agrees with this approach, dollar amounts will be assigned to the initiatives. 

In addition to reaching out to a broader group of students, using distance education, improving transfer options, the System will use ideas generated at the May Board meeting to help shape the 2011-13 budget proposal. 

President Reilly invited reactions to the broad budget-related ideas that were presented and the dilemma that faces the System:  addressing current obligations, promoting new ideas, and finding ways to grow the economy while the state and nation are climbing out of a deep recession.  Regent Loftus asked about performance funding, to which President Reilly responded that the 2011-13 budget will be based on conversations about how institutions will meet their more-graduates goals.  Regent Crain expressed concern about salaries throughout the system, and their relationship to quality.  Regent Womack asked about an item related to enhancing the library system in the previous biennium, and President Reilly said that the item did not get funded last time.

Regent Walsh said that access, financial aid, a reasonably-paid faculty and staff are all important; the challenge is to raise the level of constructive dialog around the state related to these issues.  He encouraged Regents and Chancellors to raise these issues in the context of the gubernatorial campaign.

Regent Spector, acknowledging the balancing of competing interests, commended President Reilly and his staff for opening up the process to different perspectives.  This is helpful for assisting the Board in making good decisions in a time of scarce resources.

Financial Aid

President Reilly then introduced a discussion of financial aid and the need to look forward to the 2011-13 biennial budget and to think now about how much aid will be needed. The Higher Education Aids Board (HEAB) needs the UW System’s recommendation related to the UW’s Wisconsin Higher Education Grant (WHEG-UW) so that it can develop the HEAB 2011-13 budget request.

President Reilly called upon Associate Vice President Freda Harris to discuss the financial aid request. Ms. Harris stated that more students are applying and are eligible for aid.  WHEG is the primary state need-based grant program; it provides financial aid grants.  Eligibility is based on federal needs-analysis criteria.  Although funding for WHEG has increased significantly, in 2009-10, about 7,400 of the 33,000 students eligible for WHEG funding did not receive it; those students received the Tuition Increase Grant.

State statutes require the WHEG budget to increase by the same percentage as tuition.  This provides additional funding, but students lose purchasing power using a percentage-increase basis, rather than a hold-harmless basis; their grants are expected to increase by less than half of the estimated tuition increase.  Therefore, the proposal is for WHEG recipients to be held harmless from tuition increases and for funding to be added to cover more students.  The cost of the proposal is about $43 million over the next biennium.  In comparison, funding all wait-listed students would cost $64 million, and using the percentage-basis would cost about $10 million.

Ms. Harris also provided information and recommendations related to the Tuition Increase Grant, the Lawton Undergraduate Minority Retention Grant Program, and the Advanced Opportunity Program for graduate students.  However, action would be needed only on WHEG at the time of the present meeting.

Regent Wingad asked about prior discussion of options, such as providing more awards at a lower amount.  Regent Bartell, a member of HEAB, said he raised this question; HEAB then created a task force, which will complete its work soon.  The UW System has developed a formula for focusing aid on higher-need students, with the aid spread equally over the entire population.  In response to a follow-up question from Regent Wingad, Associate Vice President Harris said that the recommended increase in WHEG would both increase the population and the amount of awards.

Regent Spector asked about the effect of hold-harmless provisions and about what other public universities have done in this area.  Ms. Harris said that some institutions have programs that fully cover eligible students’ tuition under some type of grant.  This approach is not typically found in a System.  It is too soon to measure the impact of the Tuition Increase Grant.

Regent Falbo asked for some additional numbers, which were provided and included the WHEG base of $55 million for 2009-10 and $58.3 million for 2010-11. The amount increases by $13.9 million in 2011-12.   

Regent Spector asked about the possibility of requesting the most funding available, since this financial aid item is in HEAB’s budget.  Ms. Harris responded that this would be reasonable in theory, but the amount impacts decisions about funding provided to the UW.  Regent Danae Davis, noting that the hold-harmless request was not successful last time, suggested that this may be another reason for tempering the request.

President Pruitt called for a motion for approval of Resolution 9770.  The motion was made by Regent Danae Davis and seconded by Regent Bartell.  President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9770, which was approved on a unanimous voice vote.

Financial Aid – 2011-13 WHEG Funding Recommendation

Resolution 9770:

WHEREAS, the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant program for University of Wisconsin students (WHEG-UW) is the primary state need-based financial aid program to assist low-income students in accessing and attaining a college education; and,

WHEREAS, increasing the number of Wisconsin residents with college degrees will help to secure the state’s future civic and economic vitality; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents is greatly concerned that individuals from lower and middle-income backgrounds are facing a future with fewer opportunities and greater economic uncertainty; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents has made it a priority to increase opportunities for low- and middle-income students to participate in public higher education in Wisconsin; and,

WHEREAS, fiscal pressures, including increased unemployment, have reduced family incomes and greatly increased the demand for financial aid, especially in need-based programs such as WHEG-UW; and,

WHEREAS, Wisconsin ranks below the peer average in state grant awards per full time equivalent (FTE) undergraduate students and many students have increasingly relied on loans and personal debt to finance their college education; and,

WHEREAS, funding for WHEG-UW did not increase in 2009-10 and increased by $3.3 million for 2010-11; and,

WHEREAS, the combination of flat funding and increased demand for WHEG-UW resulted in an estimated 7,400 eligible students not receiving a grant and an aggregate funding shortfall exceeding $17.8 million in 2009-10; and,

WHEREAS, additional funding that increases each student’s WHEG-UW award to match the change in tuition will help assure that students are not priced out of college due to increases in tuition and will assist families and students with their financial planning for higher education; and,

WHEREAS, additional funding that increases the number of grants available through WHEG-UW will help to ensure that more students receive the financial aid for which they are eligible; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents has identified increased need-based financial aid as critical to securing Wisconsin’s civic and economic future and the success of the Growth Agenda.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board requests that the statutory language of the WHEG-UW program be modified to provide that each student’s WHEG-UW award will increase by at least the same dollar amount as the dollar increase in undergraduate tuition, thereby granting a “dollar-for-dollar” hold harmless increase to eligible University of Wisconsin System students.

- - -

The meeting was adjourned at 12:47 p.m.

 

Submitted by:

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Union, Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Friday, June 11, 2010

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE MAY 6, 2010 MEETING.. 3

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 3

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report 3

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to the Board. 3

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 5

Report of the Competitive University Workforce Commission. 5

Additional Items that the President of the System may report or present to the Board. 8

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE.. 9

UW Colleges: Next Steps for BAAS Degree. 10

Status Report on Inclusive Excellence. 10

UW-Oshkosh First Reading of Revised Mission. 10

UW-Milwaukee Doctoral Program Authorizations. 10

UW System Policy for Making Textbooks More Affordable. 10

Report of the Senior Vice President 11

Consent Agenda. 11

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Forensic Investigation University of Wisconsin-Platteville  11

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.S. in Freshwater Sciences and Technology University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 11

Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. 11

Revised Mission Statement UW-Eau Claire. 12

Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate. 12

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  12

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Freshwater Sciences and Technology, 12

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 12

Approval of UW System Regent Policy on Making Textbooks More Affordable. 13

2010 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status. 13

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE.. 13

Consent Agenda. 15

Approval of the Design Report of the Gordon Commons Expansion Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Accept a Single Prime Contractor Bid and Construct the Project, UW-Madison. 15

Approval of the Design Report of the Lakeshore Residence Hall Development Project and Authority to Increase the Project Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Madison. 15

Authority to Request the Release of Building Trust Funds to Prepare Preliminary Plans and Design Reports for the Kenwood Integrated Research Complex – Phase I Project and the Freshwater Sciences Addition – Phase I Project, UW-Milwaukee. 16

Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land with Improvements Located at 608 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, UW-Oshkosh. 16

Approval of the Design Report of the George S. Fields South Fork Suites Addition Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-River Falls. 16

Approval of the Design Report of the Neale Residence Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Stevens Point 16

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System.. 17

Approval of the Design Report of the Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison. 17

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE.. 18

Legislative Audit of Wisconsin Partnership Program.. 18

Presentation by JP Morgan on Commercial Real Estate. 19

Request for Principal Expenditure. 19

HRS Status Update and Project Budget Approval 19

2011-13 Biennial Budget 19

Quarterly Gifts, Grants & Contracts. 20

Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19. 20

Consent Agenda. 20

Review and Approval of Human Resource System FY 11 Project Implementation Budget 20

Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19 Relating to Reinstatement Period for Sick Leave Benefits. 20

UW System Trust Funds Request for Principal Expenditure Benninger Request 20

2010 ACADEMIC STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS. 21

Individual Awards. 21

Dr. Lynn Freeman, Director of Academic Advising, UW- Oshkosh. 21

Dale Braun, Campus Planner - Integrated Planning, UW-River Falls. 22

Department Award. 23

McNair Scholars Program, UW-River Falls. 23

RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION.. 24

Resolution of Appreciation for Regent Kevin Opgenorth. 24

Resolution of Appreciation for UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor David Wilson  25

Resolution of Appreciation for UW-Milwaukee for hosting the June meeting. 27

Additional resolutions and departures. 29

APPROVAL OF THE 2011 MEETING SCHEDULE.. 29

APPROVAL OF BOARD OF REGENTS BYLAWS REVISIONS. 29

Amendment of Board of Regents Bylaws to Create Standing Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining. 30

ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS. 30

President of the Board. 30

Vice President of the Board. 30

Secretary of the Board, Assistant Secretary, Trust Officer, Assistant Trust Officers. 31

CLOSED SESSION.. 31

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Richland University of Wisconsin Colleges. 32

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Held in the Union, Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Friday, June 11, 2010

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT:   Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Jessica Schwalenberg, Michael Spector, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents Stan Davis and José Vásquez

- - -

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE MAY 6, 2010 MEETING

The minutes of the May 6, 2010 meeting stood approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

A written report was provided.

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to the Board

President Pruitt began the meeting by saying that the first part of the day’s conversation would revolve around how competitive the university is in attracting and retaining the quality workforce needed to deliver on Growth Agenda goals.  To continue to build support for the Growth Agenda, a “barnstorming tour” is being planned; the tour will involve a series of face-to-face meetings and presentations with editorial boards, media outlets, and other “opinion leaders” across the state.  As important as it is to talk and listen to elected officials, it is also important to engage the citizens of Wisconsin in the conversation.  Visits are already planned for Green Bay, La Crosse, Milwaukee, and Madison. 

President Pruitt thanked fellow Board members for their encouragement and urged their active participation, along with that of campus leaders, in “making the case” for the opportunities presented by the Growth Agenda.  The UW’s legislative team is also busy making visits to the Capitol and working to keep the lines of communication open.

With respect to some federal legislation, President Pruitt noted that many Board members accepted his and Regent Spector’s invitation to join Regent José Vásquez and President Reilly in signing a letter to Senators Charles Schumer, Lindsey Graham, Dick Durbin and Richard Lugar in support of the DREAM Act, also known as the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act.  Regent José Vásquez was not present at the meeting, but asked President Pruitt to read a statement on his behalf.

Statement of Regent José Vásquez

“I am sorry that I am not able to be present and to share with you personally my thoughts concerning the DREAM ACT.  It just so happens that today two of the organizations that I head are having their board directors’ meetings.

Over fifty years ago my parents made a decision that permanently changed the course of my family’s future. They decided to move to the United States from Mexico. Fortunately for me and my brothers and sisters our move to this country was done legally.  This is the only point that separates me from the thousands of young people that the DREAM ACT is poised to help.

Like the thousands of these young men and women my coming to this country was not by my choice, my parents did not ask me if I wanted to come to the US.  My parents made the decision because in their mind and heart they wanted to give my family a new future full of hope and opportunities for a better life.

Because I was less than ten years old, I quickly came to see and accept San Antonio and the United States as my home land.  Mexico was, surely, the land of my parents but it was not my home land.  I was home.  While we still have a fondness for our parent’s homeland it is a love and loyalty that is akin to that, which Irish Americans, Italian Americans, German American and many others have for the homeland of their parents or ancestors.

For the vast majority of the young men and women who will benefit from the DREAM ACT, especially, those that were brought here at a young age their love and loyalty for the USA is as strong and deep as it is for anyone that was born here.  Their desire is to live in the U.S., to build their future here, to serve and to help build the future of this country.

The DREAM ACT is not about the parents that made a life altering decision for their children. It is about this country looking into the souls and hearts of thousands of young men and women and recognizing that they are not aliens in a foreign country but, rather, individuals for whom this is their country. Individuals that because of others’ decisions, compassionate as those decision were, are now not able to fully live the American life.

The DREAM ACT is also about the United States of America which embraces the intelligence, creativity, skills and talents of all its populace.  The richness of this country was not solely built by native born citizens. It is built by individuals living here regardless of where they were born, whether they are citizens or not. It does not matter if you are white or black or Latino or what your race or ethnicity is. The only thing that matters is the desire to build a future and in turn benefit this country. That is what has made this country strong. The DREAM ACT will allow these young men and women to build their future here and make significant contributions to this country.

Who knows, one of them may become Regent President or System President of the University of Wisconsin System.

I thank my Regent colleagues for taking the brave step to endorse passage of the DREAM ACT.”

President Pruitt then turned to UW System President Reilly to present his report. 

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Report of the Competitive University Workforce Commission

Referring to the foundational activity of the Growth Agenda, President Reilly reminded Board members that in February of 2010 he appointed the Competitive University Workforce Commission, with a charge “to measure current compensation and benefit levels of System employees against their counterparts in institutions with which it most actively competes for talent, i.e., its peer institutions; and to make recommendations on how best to close any 2010 competitive gap in compensation and/or benefits, along with a timeline for doing so.”

The Commission met four times between February and May and examined extensive materials from both the higher education and business communities.  The Commission was co-chaired by Kathi Seifert, a retired executive with the Kimberly-Clark Corporation, and Regent Vice-President Mike Spector.  The Commission had 19 members overall, including representatives from the private sector, the UW System Board of Regents, former leaders of state government, and UW System faculty and staff. 

President Reilly urged Regents to examine the recommendations, as well as the membership of the committee, which included well-respected business leaders.  Business and civic leaders are recognizing that the state’s success is tied to the university’s success, and that the quality of the university’s work depends on the quality of its workforce.  President Reilly thanked all of the members of the Commission, as well as the UW System staff who supported their efforts.  President Reilly asked Commission Co-Chair, Regent Vice President, Spector to present the committee’s recommendations.

Vice President Spector expressed his thanks to Kathi Seifert, Jennifer Alexander, Christy Brown, Paul DeLuca, Debbie Durcan, Regent Mike Falbo, Larry Isaak, Sue Marks, Chancellor Rick Wells, Brian Ruud, Chancellor Biddy Martin, Arthur Zintek, and Steve Wildeck.  He expressed special thanks to Sr. Vice President Tom Anderes, as well as to Al Crist and other UW System staff members.

Early discussions focused on greater efficiencies in the use of personnel in the private sector, greater use of technology; greater alignment of mission and operations; and more emphasis on pay for performance, measured by metrics, where possible; and real accountability.  New approaches to solving problems, creativity, replication of what works, and customer service are other entrepreneurial strategies that are also emphasized in the private sector.  A major challenge is how to develop a culture in the university that synthesizes the best of academic freedom and shared governance with these private-sector characteristics.

Also, there is a need to give meaningful weight to fringe benefits, as well as salaries.  Fringe benefits are part of “total compensation,” although salaries are extremely important.

The Commission’s findings are in the report.  The most important is that using average-salary concepts, except for associate and assistant professors at UW-Madison, faculty and academic staff and limited appointees are significantly behind the median of peer institutions.  The report concluded that these deficiencies could have a damaging effect on the Growth Agenda.

Briefly mentioning some of the report’s recommendations, Vice President Spector said that the report concludes that the UW System generally has a competitive advantage with regard to health care and retirement benefits.  Moving to the median when salary and benefits are combined will help attract the kind of people that the university wants.  Vice President Spector mentioned some of the Commission’s recommendations:  The Commission recommended that the university obtain greater freedom to operate than it now has; that the state reinvest in the System to provide adequate compensation for university staff; that the Board consider a committee to focus on human capital; and that President Reilly appoint a committee to look at the possibility of tuition remission for university employees and their families.  The Commission also recommended that the System work with the legislature with the goal that by the end of three biennia, System salaries will catch up.

The Commission looked at a counterpart study from 1992, which had conclusions not unlike those of the current Commission’s report, including recommendations for more flexibility, decoupling from the state, and others.

Following up on Vice President Spector’s remarks, Associate Vice President Al Crist noted that he met with faculty and staff groups during the course of the Commission meetings.  One challenge is separating the current environment from the long-term challenge of retaining and attracting the workforce the university needs.  In response to a question from Regent Crain, Associate Vice President Crist noted that benefits are not as easily compared as are salaries.  Vice President Spector commented that the benefits may make a difference, depending on the age cohort involved.

Regent Loftus asked about peer groups; the Big Ten was not on the list of standard peer groups.  Chancellor Martin commented a lot of the Big Ten institutions are in the group that is considered UW-Madison’s peers.  She also brought to the Commission information about universities with which UW-Madison competes for faculty.  Vice President Crist noted that comparative data were available for the Big Ten, particularly for comparing flexibilities. 

Regent Danae Davis asked why the Commission decided to not re-examine the list of peer institutions.  Vice President Spector said that the Commission concluded the list of peers seemed reasonable, even though it dates back 26 years.  Regent Falbo commented that the Commission was not qualified to establish peer groups.  Regent Danae Davis observed that there are many reasons to look at the peer groups.  Vice President Spector pointed out that among the items the Commission recommended was that President Reilly review the appropriateness of the institutional peer groups.

Regent Evers asked about the terminology, “adjusted salary.”  Associate Vice President Crist said that this is adjusted for cost of living.  Provost DeLuca commented that salary is what counts; retaining or recruiting faculty based on cost of living does not commonly occur.

Chancellor Wells remarked that the university should be decoupled from the state, because state employees are in a local market, while universities are competing in a national market.    

Regent Loftus offered a comment on legacy tuition, and Vice President Spector replied that the Commission thought legacy tuition should be examined and understood.

President Reilly said that he would be taking a hard look at the Commission report and discussing it with the Chancellors and Provosts.  He said that the findings and recommendations of the Competitive University Workforce Commission will play a large role in what is presented to the State for the university’s pay plan.  He has also received advice from his Compensation Advisory Committee.

In December, President Reilly said, he will make his pay plan recommendation to the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee; following approval by the Committee and the full Board, a 2011-13 pay plan recommendation will be forwarded to the Office of State Employment Relations (OSER) Director.  Then, after May 2011, the OSER Director will submit her recommendation to the Joint Committee on Employee Relations (JCOER).  Finally, after the 2011-13 State Budget is approved, JCOER will approve a pay plan for 2011-13.

Chancellor Martin expressed a strong sense of urgency regarding compensation and said that it is important to mount an educational campaign regarding the magnet for talent that the university represents.  Waiting until December would be problematic. The Regents could be systematic advocates for adequate compensation.  If there is no pay plan or rescission of the two percent pay plan, and if furloughs continue, great faculty will be lost, Chancellor Martin said.  Cost of living is not a good competitive tool; displaying data without taking into account cost of living would help present a more realistic picture.  Regents Loftus and Danae Davis offered comments supportive of Chancellor Martin’s remarks.

Additional Items that the President of the System may report or present to the Board

Turning to other news, President Reilly announced that the WiSys Technology Foundation and the UW-Madison Office of Corporate Relations will be collaborating to advance entrepreneurship education at UW System campuses.  To become entrepreneurs themselves, students need both education and exposure to the principles and practices of entrepreneurship.   As part of this new collaborative effort, UW-Madison’s Office of Corporate Relations (OCR) will support the development of entrepreneurship courses by WiSys.  

These efforts will be underwritten by a five-year grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation of Kansas City.  The first phase of the educational program, which will be delivered as a Web-based course, is expected to be completed by early 2011.  The grant also will allow WiSys and OCR to organize a Kauffman Entrepreneurship Workshop as part of the Wisconsin Science and Technology Symposium, an annual scientific conference to showcase technology breakthroughs at the comprehensive campuses.  The next symposium is scheduled for July 22-23 at UW-Green Bay.  President Reilly expressed thanks to Charlie Hoslet and Doug Bradley of OCR, and Maliyakal John from WiSys, for their efforts. 

New appointment to UW System

President Reilly also announced that Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs Tom Anderes is leaving the UW to take another position and that Michael Morgan, the current Secretary of the state Department of Administration, has agreed to join the UW System as Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs, effective July 6, 2010.  With more than 20 years of public sector background, Michael has served as Secretary of Wisconsin’s Department of Administration since 2007, after four years leading Wisconsin’s Department of Revenue.  His previous experience includes leading business and real estate development for the City of Milwaukee, and spearheading program-related investment efforts at the Helen Bader Foundation.

As the System’s chief operating officer, Mr. Morgan will provide leadership for finance, budgeting, information technology, facilities planning, human resources, legal affairs, and other areas.  He will also collaborate closely with chief business officers at all UW System institutions to develop goals and budget strategies.  He will serve as a senior advisor both to President Reilly and the Board of Regents on administrative policies and practices.  Mr. Morgan has agreed to a three-year appointment in part to shepherd the Human Resource System project to a successful conclusion.  He will also be involved with the biennial budget. 

Mr. Morgan earned his baccalaureate and law degrees from UW-Madison.  His wife, Diana, and their two daughters are also UW-Madison alumni.  He is passionately committed to the value the university brings to the lives of Wisconsin citizens, and to the wider positive impacts it has on the nation and world.

President Reilly also announced that Vice President Debbie Durcan has agreed to step in as Interim Senior Vice President during the short hiatus between Tom Anderes’ leaving and Michael Morgan’s arrival.

President Pruitt praised the appointment of Mr. Morgan and congratulated President Reilly on making this hire.  Regents Smith, Bradley, and Danae Davis also highly praised the appointment. 

President Reilly deferred most of his “good news” report, saying he would send it to Regents.  He briefly mentioned that UW-Superior has renamed its Health and Wellness Center the Marcovich Wellness Center, in honor of Regent Emeritus Toby Marcovich, a noted attorney in Superior, long-time university supporter, and president of the Board of Regents from 2003 to 2005.  During his seven-year term on the Board, Regent Marcovich was instrumental in gaining state approval and support for construction of the building that now bears his name.  When it opened in 2003, it was the university's first new building in 30 years.  The naming ceremony in mid-April was attended by more than 200 family members and friends of Toby and his wife, Sharon. 

President Reilly also reported that a student at UW-Barron County, 19-year-old freshman Romaine Robert Quinn, was recently elected as the new mayor of Rice Lake.  Romaine spent months campaigning against the incumbent mayor and won by a 53-percent-to-47-percent margin.  His campaign focused on balancing the budget and working on sidewalk policy. 

President Reilly concluded his report after reading a brief poem by Keats.

- - -

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education Committee.

UW Colleges: Next Steps for BAAS Degree

Regent Crain said that since many Regents were present during the discussion of the UW Colleges BAAS degree, rather than providing a summary, she would focus on next steps.  Some reservations and pointed questions were expressed during the discussion.  The committee decided to not ask for any modifications of the proposal, because it would come back to the committee.  There was an understanding that the bar was raised high before this degree proposal could be brought forward to the Board.  There was an extended process of development, submission, review, revision, and re-submission. 

The support demonstrated by Chancellors Gow and Sorensen was appreciated, as was the strong recommendation from President Reilly and Senior Vice President Martin.  Regent Crain said that the committee would look forward to a second reading, when UW System and the UW Colleges determine that the time is right.

Status Report on Inclusive Excellence

The committee heard a presentation from Associate Vice President Vicki Washington, who provided an overview of the framework throughout the UW System related to Inclusive Excellence; presenters from UW-La Crosse and UW-Oshkosh were excellent.  Regent Crain reported that faculty member Bob Hoar said, “Diversity used to be somebody else’s job; Inclusive Excellence means it’s everyone’s job!”  Committee members asked that more data analysis be done at the campus level and also that Inclusive Excellence come back to the committee regularly as a topic for discussion.

UW-Oshkosh First Reading of Revised Mission

UW-Oshkosh presented a revised mission for a first reading before the Committee.  It is shorter, more focused, and well-anchored within the vision, values, and learning outcomes of the institution.  The Education Committee expressed its support for the revised statement and looks forward to the second reading later this year, following a public hearing.

UW-Milwaukee Doctoral Program Authorizations

The committee was happy to welcome Interim Provost Johannes Britz, and the committee heard two excellent presentations on new UW-Milwaukee programs:  a Ph.D. program in Sociology and a Ph.D. program in Freshwater Sciences and Technology.  The committee unanimously approved both programs. 

UW System Policy for Making Textbooks More Affordable

Senior Vice President Martin presented to the committee for its consideration a proposed Regent policy on improving textbook affordability.  The policy is based on the Interim Guidelines approved by the Board a year ago.  The policy was heavily discussed among various constituent groups.  The policy takes into consideration:  (1) the UW System’s shared governance structure; (2) the primary role of the faculty and instructional academic staff in selecting textbooks as an integral component of curriculum development; and (3) market forces that involve textbook publishers and bookstores. 

The timing for bringing this policy to the Board coincides with new federal regulations that go into effect in July.  Given the attention the federal government and some state legislatures are paying to the topic, Dr. Martin encouraged Regents to continue their focus on this issue.  Pending final approval, the policy will go into effect on July 1.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Senior Vice President Martin’s Report covered the 2010 Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status, which was accepted by the committee.  Dr. Martin’s report also covered guiding principles for monitoring low-degree-producing programs.  These principles were developed at the request of the committee in February, after hearing about the 2009 Program Realignment Initiative.  The principles now become part of ACIS-1, the UW System’s operational statement of the Regent Policy on Academic Planning and Program Review.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9771, 9772, 9773, 9774, 9775, 9776, 9777, 9778, and 9779, which were approved by the committee. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote, after which Regent Crain expressed appreciation to UW System staff for their work for this and all Board meetings.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Forensic Investigation University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Resolution 9771:  That, upon recommendation of the Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Interim Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Forensic Investigation.

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.S. in Freshwater Sciences and Technology University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9772: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the M.S. in Freshwater Sciences and Technology.

Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Resolution 9773: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the amendments to Chapters 3 and 51 of the UW-Green Bay Faculty Personnel Rules.

Revised Mission Statement UW-Eau Claire

Resolution 9774:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire’s revised mission statement.

Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

Resolution 9775:   That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents accepts the proffer of $3,733,818 made by the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Music.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9776:   That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Ph.D. in Sociology.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Freshwater Sciences and Technology,

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9777:    That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Ph.D. in Freshwater Sciences and Technology.

Approval of UW System Regent Policy on Making Textbooks More Affordable

Resolution 9778:   That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the UW System Regent Policy on Making Textbooks More Affordable.

2010 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status

Resolution 9779:    That, upon recommendation of the respective Chancellors and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2010 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Other Changes of Status be approved.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE

Regent Pruitt then called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  Regent Bartell said that the meeting began with a presentation by UW-Milwaukee on its completed campus Master Plan.  Vice Chancellor Christy Brown and Bob Greenstreet, Dean of the School of Architecture and chair of the Master Plan coordinating committee, described the plan.

Resolution 9780 requests authority to construct the Gordon Commons Expansion project and seek a waiver allowing a single prime contractor bid and construct the project. This $34-million project will construct a new food service facility on the site of the former Ogg Hall.  After the project is constructed the existing Gordon Commons will be demolished, and that site will become a large open lawn area with a landscaped perimeter and terraces.  The need for a single prime contractor results from the critical timing issues inherent in the project, as Gordon Commons must continue to serve meals to thousands of students during the construction.

Resolution 9781 also brought by UW-Madison, requests authority to increase the scope and budget and construct the Lakeshore Residence Hall Development project.  This $48 million project is the first of two phases that will improve housing and food service facilities located in the west lakeshore area of campus and will increase residence hall capacity to satisfy demand by students and parents for on-campus housing in that part of campus.  This building will provide housing for 412 students and a new food service facility that will replace an outdated one and meet the needs of approximately 3,200 students who live in the lakeshore area.  The project scope is being increased to extend an electrical distribution circuit to the site. 

Resolution 9782 requests approval of the UW-Madison Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project at a total cost of $245 million program revenue supported borrowing.  The project will demolish portions of the existing plant and construct several additions.  The following elements are included:  (1) plant boiler capacity will be increased by approximately 37 percent; (2) four coal boilers will be retired and one gas/oil boiler will be retained; (3) two new gas/oil boilers and one new biomass boiler will be installed; (4) biomass fuel handling and storage equipment will be installed; (5) plant electrical generation capacity will be increased by the installation of a new 20 megawatt steam turbine generator; and (6) rail facilities on the site and within the existing rail corridor east to West Washington Street will be upgraded and expanded.

This project is a result of the amended consent decree that requires the Department of Administration and the University of Wisconsin to conduct a comprehensive study to evaluate alternatives to bring the plant into compliance with the Clean Air Act and make necessary upgrades to other state-owned heating plants in Wisconsin. 

Independent of this study, and in conjunction with a directive from Governor Jim Doyle in 2007, coal at the plant will be phased out as a fuel source by the year 2012.  As an interim measure natural gas will be the sole fuel source.

Regent Bartell continued, saying that the program revenue supported borrowing ($245 million) will have an impact on student-derived revenue; however, the extent of the impact is uncertain at this time.  There is also uncertainty about the source and availability of biofuel.  This is a ground-breaking “green” project with a huge price tag.  A number of valid questions have been raised, but they cannot be answered with certainty at this point.

Resolution 9783, brought by UW-Milwaukee requests authority to request $4.3 million in state Building Trust Funds to begin design of two buildings, the Kenwood Integrated Research Complex and the Freshwater Sciences Initiative Research Building.  Both projects were enumerated by the legislature this spring as recommended by the Board of Regents.

Resolution 9784, brought by UW-Oshkosh requests authority to purchase the former Lincoln Elementary School to provide space for the Children’s Learning and Care Center and the Center for New Learning.  The property is easily accessed and adjacent to the southern edge of campus.

Resolution 9785, brought by UW-River Falls, requests approval of the George S. Fields South Fork Suites Addition Project.  The $19-million project will construct a new 240-bed building attached to the north end of the existing residence hall and a parking lot.  The four-story building will have eleven residential “clusters,” each containing 12 bedrooms, four bathrooms, a kitchenette, living room, and closets.  The project is being designed with the intent of obtaining U.S. Green Building Council LEED certification. 

Resolution 9786, brought by UW-Stevens Point, requests approval of the Neale Residence Hall Renovation Project.  This is the fourth of four projects enumerated together to renovate the residence halls in the South DeBot quadrant of the campus.

Resolution 9787 requests authority to construct four all agency maintenance and repair projects at three UW System institutions, totaling $12.7 million in program revenue.  This is the largest project which implements energy conservation opportunities in five high-rise academic buildings at UW-Milwaukee.  The debt service will be paid from the annual energy cost savings from the fuel and utilities appropriation, with a 16-year payback.

Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell reported that these eight resolutions were passed unanimously by the committee, and he moved adoption of Resolutions 9780, 9781, 9782, 9783, 9784, 9785, 9786 and 9787, and the motion was seconded.  Resolution 9782 was removed from the consent agenda at the request of Regent Falbo.  The other seven resolutions were approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote.

Approval of the Design Report of the Gordon Commons Expansion Project and Authority to Seek a Waiver to Accept a Single Prime Contractor Bid and Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9780:   That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Gordon Commons Phase I & II project be approved and authority be granted to (a) seek a waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under the provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to allow single prime bidding and (b) construct the project at an estimated cost of $34,124,000 ($33,056,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing [Housing], $1,000,000 Program Revenue-Cash [Housing], $39,700 Gift Funds and $28,300 Program Revenue-Cash [Transportation].

Approval of the Design Report of the Lakeshore Residence Hall Development Project and Authority to Increase the Project Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9781:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report for the Lakeshore Residence Hall Development project be approved and authority be granted to: (a) increase the project scope and budget by $530,000 ($419,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing and $111,000 Program Revenue-Cash) and (b) construct the project for a total project cost of $48,170,000 ($45,932,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing [Housing], $1,708,000 Program Revenue-Cash [Housing], $419,000 Existing General Fund Supported Borrowing, and $111,000 Program Revenue-Cash).

Authority to Request the Release of Building Trust Funds to Prepare Preliminary Plans and Design Reports for the Kenwood Integrated Research Complex – Phase I Project and the Freshwater Sciences Addition – Phase I Project, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9783:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek the release of $4,280,000 Building Trust Funds–Planning to plan the Kenwood Integrated Research Complex – Phase I project and the Freshwater Sciences Addition – Phase I project.

Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land with Improvements Located at 608 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 9784:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Oshkosh Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to expand the campus boundary and purchase a 2.41-acre parcel of land and improvements located at 608 Algoma Street in the city of Oshkosh at an acquisition cost of $1,480,000 General Fund Supported Bonding.

Approval of the Design Report of the George S. Fields South Fork Suites Addition Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-River Falls

Resolution 9785:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-River Falls Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct the South Fork Suites Addition project for an estimated total project cost of $18,935,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Approval of the Design Report of the Neale Residence Hall Renovation Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9786:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Neale Residence Hall Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project for a total cost of $4,986,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9787:   That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $12,690,100 ($11,591,300 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $1,098,800 Program Revenue-Cash).

Approval of the Design Report of the Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison

President Pruitt called upon Regent Falbo, who expressed hesitancy to proceed with the high-cost Charter Street project.  He said that he would like the opportunity to discuss all alternatives before proceeding, while still complying with the consent decree.  He said that he would like the opportunity to discuss a project that could be phased in as fuel sources are developed and understood.  Reducing the scope of the project would be prudent.

Regent Loftus said that he was recently invited to travel to Germany and examine their Green Tech system and principles.  He said that if demand is created, biomass fuel will become available.  The culture will be changed from coal to other resources available in the state.  Acknowledging the legitimacy of Regent Falbo’s concerns, Regent Loftus said that the project provides an opportunity to create a new industry in the state.

Regent Bartell also acknowledged Regent Falbo’s concerns and the uncertainties involved in the project.  Regent Bartell said that he has considered whether this is the right time and the right way to do this project.  Associate Vice President David Miller was asked to address questions about the process. 

Mr. Miller said that the consent decree required that the Charter Street heating plant be upgraded to comply with the Clean Air Act as though it were a fresh permit, based on work that had been done in the plant, without seeking a new permit. 

What the consent decree could have done, Mr. Miller continued, was to apply best-available control technology to the current, coal-fired, 55-year-old plant, which would have cost about $90 million.  Alternatives considered were:  (1) going to natural gas only, which is inexpensive on the capital side ($150-180 million), but the plant is then fuel-source dependant, and the price is unpredictable and volatile; or (2) using a plant with a boiler that can burn any solid fuel, and which would accommodate 70 percent gas and 30 percent biomass ($125 million).  It is believed that biomass will be a declining cost.

Regent Spector asked about the effect on student fees or tuition.  Mr. Miller explained that this would be a program revenue supported borrowing project.  For the CoGen facility at UW-Madison, auxiliary operations (parking, residence halls, etc.) cover 19 percent of the debt service.  That model could perhaps be applied here, but 5.3 percent program revenue share of the debt service would be sought in this case.

Regent Falbo remarked that the plant will be fuel-source dependant in any case, and 70 percent of the source will be gas no matter what.  Therefore, it will cost an extra $100-125 million to meet 30 percent of the need.  He asked about how a stepped process would compare.  Associate Vice President Miller said that technically, additional gas boilers could be purchased, to avoid purchasing the solid fuel boiler for an additional $20 million; but if the campus needed additional capacity, a solid fuel boiler could be added in the future.

Regent Spector asked whether this action sets a precedent for the other campuses.  Associate Vice President Miller said that the System is seeking to address each plant separately.

President Pruitt called for a vote on Resolution 9782, which was adopted on a voice vote, with Regent Falbo voting in opposition.

Approval of the Design Report of the Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison  

Resolution 9782:    That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Charter Street Heating Plant (CSHP) Rebuild project be approved and authority be granted to (a) request the release of the remaining $220,636,600 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing funding authorized for the project and (b) construct the project for an estimated total project cost of $245,136,600 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.

Legislative Audit of Wisconsin Partnership Program

Regent Smith reported that the Business, Finance and Audit Committee met jointly with the Education Committee to discuss a program review by the Legislative Audit Bureau of the Wisconsin Partnership Program.  State Auditor Jan Mueller addressed the committees regarding the first five-year program review of the Wisconsin Partnership Program.  The review was required by order of the State Commissioner of Insurance, and requires an evaluation of the program at both the UW School of Medicine and Public Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin.  Ms. Mueller reported that the Audit Bureau found that both schools generally complied with the requirements they established for awarding and monitoring their funding, and that most grantees met the objectives described in their proposals.  She also reviewed several recommendations for improvement identified through the LAB review.

Bob Golden, Dean of the School of Medicine and Public Health, also addressed the committee.  He reported that he is planning to meet with the Insurance Commissioner and the Wisconsin United for Health Foundation Board to respond to the suggestions made by LAB regarding clarification of the allocation of the funds for medical research and education, and of the definition of supplanting.  Dean Golden will return in August with his annual report.

Presentation by JP Morgan on Commercial Real Estate

Representatives of the J.P. Morgan Asset Management team addressed the committee and offered their perspectives on commercial real estate assets and the current state of the real estate market.  Overall market downturns in the recent past have engendered a reluctance to establish a position in this area.  However, given that valuations have moderated somewhat, the current time may be a more desirable entry point.  The pros and cons were discussed, and this conversation will be continued at future meetings.

Request for Principal Expenditure

Regent Smith reported that current Board policy requires that gifts with a value greater than $250,000 become Board-designated endowments.  Such designation restricts expenditures to income only.  The UW School of Medicine and Public Health is requesting that $274,845 of funds from the Norma Benninger Trust be applied toward the second phase of the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research.  Due to the strong connection between the necessary infrastructure and the research, the committee approved Resolution 9788.

HRS Status Update and Project Budget Approval

Ed Meachen, Associate Vice President for Learning and Information Technology, provided an update on the status of the UW System Human Resource System project through April 30, 2010.  He discussed the actual expenditures for FY 2010 and reviewed the FY 2011 expenditure plan for the HRS project.  He emphasized that project milestones are being met for both timing and cost.  The committee approved Resolution 9789.

2011-13 Biennial Budget

Associate Vice President Freda Harris presented information regarding the UW System’s anticipated cost-to-continue budget request for FY 2011-13.  She indicated that allowable items to be included in the request are prescribed by the State Department of Administration, and typically include changes in fringe benefit costs, utilities, salaries, debt service, and other items required to maintain the University’s current level of service.

Quarterly Gifts, Grants & Contracts

Vice President for Finance Debbie Durcan reported on the gifts, grants and contracts awarded to UW System institutions in the nine-month period July 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010.  Total gifts, grants, and contracts for the period were $1.258 billion, which is an increase of $180.2 million over the same period in the prior year.  The large increase in federal awards was primarily driven by substantially increased research funding opportunities associated with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19

Al Crist, Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Workforce Diversity, reviewed draft rules amending Chapter 19 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code to bring sick leave reinstatement rights of unclassified staff into alignment with classified staff, which is five years.  This is consistent with the recent change in the leave of absence policy to encourage entrepreneurial activities.  The committee approved Resolution 9790.

Consent Agenda

Regent Smith moved adoption of Resolutions 9788, 9789, and 9790.  The motion was seconded, and Resolution 9788 was removed from the consent agenda at the request of Regent Wingad.  Resolutions 9789 and 9790 were approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote. 

Review and Approval of Human Resource System FY 11 Project Implementation Budget

Resolution 9789:     That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the Human Resource System implementation budget for fiscal year 2011.

Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter 19 Relating to Reinstatement Period for Sick Leave Benefits

Resolution 9790:     That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Secretary of the Board of Regents and staff transmit the attached draft rules amending Chapter 19, Wisconsin Administrative Code, to the Legislative Council for review, pursuant to Chapter 227, Wisconsin Statutes.

UW System Trust Funds Request for Principal Expenditure Benninger Request

President Pruitt called upon Regent Wingad to speak to his concerns about the Benninger estate.  He said that he interprets a passage in the decedent’s will somewhat differently than others.  Regent Falbo indicated that he had followed up with Dean Golden and learned that the money was to be used for research, and it is now being put into bricks and mortar.  Without the bricks and mortar, there can be no research.  However, the gift was not restricted, and Regent Falbo therefore was comfortable with the intended use of the gift.

President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9788, which was adopted on a voice vote, with Regent Wingad voting in opposition. 

UW System Trust Funds Request for Principal Expenditure Benninger Bequest

Resolution 9788:     That, upon recommendation of the Dean of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, the Chancellor of UW-Madison, and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the principal of the bequest from the Norma Benninger Trust u/w/o Merlin C. Benninger is to be made available for spending.

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2010 ACADEMIC STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS

President Pruitt called upon Regent Drew, chair of the Board of Regents Academic Staff Excellence Awards Committee, who welcomed the winners of this year’s Academic Staff Excellence Awards.  Regent Drew said that the awards salute the hard work, dedication, and “out-of-the-box” thinking of talented academic staff members.  Although it was difficult to narrow the field, the Board is presenting awards to two individuals and one program, whose outstanding work helps to strengthen and invigorate UW institutions and the communities they serve. 

Regent Drew thanked fellow committee members, Regents Stan Davis, Kevin Opgenorth, Brent Smith, José Vásquez and Betty Womack, for their hard work.  He said that the committee was impressed by the talent, commitment, and achievements of all of the nominees.  Regent Drew asked Regent Smith to present the first award.

Individual Awards

Dr. Lynn Freeman, Director of Academic Advising, UW- Oshkosh

Regent Smith presented the first individual Board of Regents Academic Staff Excellence Award to Dr. Lynn Freeman of UW-Oshkosh, Director of Academic Advising at UW-Oshkosh since 2002.  He said that she was hired not only to “fix” advising, but also to transform it, and she has delivered.  When she first arrived on the scene, student-to-advisor ratios were 1,200 to one.  Advisors did not receive adequate training, and students often received “McDonald’s drive-through style” advising. 

After Dr. Freeman got involved, she established a comprehensive advisor training and professional development program on campus; created the Undergraduate Advising Resource Center, which offers comprehensive, developmental academic advising; and successfully secured the resources to hire five additional advisors, significantly reducing the advisor-to-student ratio, and increasing both the quality and quantity of advising available to students.  Overall, Dr. Freeman’s engagement with the university community has substantially altered the way that UW-Oshkosh advises, assists, and supports all students.  This kind of commitment is vitally important, Regent Smith noted, as he introduced Dr. Freeman.

Dr. Freeman thanked Regent Smith and the Board of Regents for the great honor.  She said that she represents others at UW-Oshkosh, including the Chancellor and Provost, with whom she said the accomplishments in advising would not have happened.  In advising, students are helped to explore and learn about themselves and set goals; advising affects retention, engagement, and student success.  The campus has made an amazing commitment to supporting the improvement of advising.  Expressing a desire for continued emphasis on advising, Dr. Freeman again thanked to Board for the honor.

Dale Braun, Campus Planner - Integrated Planning, UW-River Falls

Regent Emeritus Kevin Opgenorth presented the second individual Board of Regents Academic Staff Excellence Award to Mr. Dale Braun, the campus planner for UW-River Falls.  Regent Opgenorth said that Mr. Braun has served with distinction on the UW-River Falls campus for more than 20 years.  In that time, Mr. Braun has overseen the planning for a plethora of campus projects, including the University Center, South Fork Suites residence hall, Wyman Education Building, and the newly opened Dairy Learning Center.  His is respected within the campus community and throughout the state.  He is often called upon to serve as a consultant on planning projects, including the redesign of a state highway in River Falls, which runs through the middle of campus, or the formulation of a FEMA-approved pre-disaster mitigation plan for the university.

Regent Opgenorth said that Mr. Braun’s colleagues praise his ability to think creatively, to work effectively with others, and to see the long-term impact of decisions.  Saying that Mr. Braun has said that he considers himself as an educator first and a planner second, Regent Opgenorth introduced Mr. Braun to accept the award. 

Mr. Braun thanked Regent Opgenorth, Regent Drew, the selection committee, and the Board.  He congratulated Dr. Freeman and Ms. Lawrence-Porter, as well.  He said that UW-River Falls is exceptional, and he is a proud alumnus.  The campus emphasizes communication, resourcefulness, and broad application of learning.  He also expressed appreciation for the support of his parents, civic leaders for the past 30 years.

He affirmed that he believes that staff are educators first and experts within their areas second.  Staff have a strong ability to influence students.  Borrowing ideas from Parker Palmer, Mr. Braun said that by being a teacher, an individual actually learns more and is a more effective leader.  In addition, Mr. Braun said that universities are about people.  He thanked all of those who have had such an influence on him, including UW System Capital Planning and Budget staff, whom he named during his remarks.  They have shared their professional talents, as well as their kindness, patience, and support.  In closing, Mr. Braun again expressed his appreciation for the recognition.

Department Award

McNair Scholars Program, UW-River Falls

Regent Womack next presented the Academic Staff Award for Program Excellence, saying that there were many excellent program nominations to choose from, but the McNair Scholars Program at UW-River Falls particularly impressed the committee with its success in supporting students from low-income and first-generation backgrounds, or from groups that historically have been underrepresented in post-secondary and graduate education.

Regent Womack noted that the McNair Scholars Program is a federal TRIO program funded at 194 institutions across the United States and Puerto Rico by the U.S. Department of Education.  It is named to honor the African-American astronaut, Ronald E. McNair, who perished with the Challenger Mission in 1986.  The McNair Program’s mission is to prepare first-generation, low-income, and underrepresented students for Ph.D. programs.

At UW-River Falls, 12 to 15 new undergraduate McNair Scholars are selected each year for two years of intensive mentoring, specialized seminars, collaborative research, and a paid summer research internship, all of which better prepare them for graduate school.  The program involves the collaborative efforts of faculty, staff, and students across disciplines, and more importantly, across all colleges, working together to enhance and expand undergraduate research experiences, and to strategically prepare students for competitive admission to graduate programs.

The program at UW-River Falls has been successful at retaining and graduating its students, but it also has recently implemented an aggressive and innovative strategy to increase the number and quality of the admissions offers that its students receive.  These strategies have resulted in more UW-River Falls students being admitted to graduate programs at institutions like Princeton, University of Michigan, Michigan State, Penn State, Vanderbilt, Clemson, the University of California, and many others.

The activities of the McNair program impact the campus culture by promoting undergraduate research and scholarly endeavors, increasing the number of students who consider graduate degrees, and raising UW-River Fall’s national visibility and reputation for excellence.  Regent Womack presented the award to Ms. Njia Lawrence-Porter, Assistant Director of the McNair Scholars Program, to accept the award on behalf of the program. 

Ms. Lawrence-Porter thanked President Pruitt, Regent Drew, committee members, and the Board for the honor of receiving the award.  She said that the program is celebrating its tenth anniversary.  Acknowledging her family members in the audience, Ms. Lawrence-Porter said that she herself was a first-generation college student.  She also acknowledged the support of UW-River Falls faculty, staff, and administrators.  Expressing appreciation for the program’s current and past program directors, Ms. Lawrence-Porter spoke of her long-term commitment to the program and her pride in UW-River Falls.  She also spoke of the leadership of the Chancellor and the campus’s commitment to undergraduate research and scholarly activity.

In closing, Ms. Lawrence-Porter read testimonials from two students who expressed gratitude for the McNair Scholars Program and its life-changing possibilities, noted the planned uses for the monetary award, and again expressed her appreciation.

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RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION

Resolution of Appreciation for Regent Kevin Opgenorth

Saying that all good things much come to an end, President Pruitt asked Regent Loftus to present a resolution of appreciation to Regent Kevin Opgenorth, whose two years of service ended in May.  Regent Loftus noted Regent Opgenorth’s military service, his recent degree from UW-Platteville, and his engagement to be married.

Regent Loftus said that when the idea of a student Regent was being discussed in the legislature, questions arose about how a student Regent could contribute in only two years.  However, the rest of the Regents are the beneficiaries of Kevin’s and other student Regents’ service.  Kevin has also been very devoted to UW-Platteville.  He met with every candidate during the search process for a new UW-Platteville chancellor and when it came time to choose, his choice was based on personal knowledge of the candidates and what would be best for the students.

Congratulating Regent Opgenorth, Regent Loftus read the resolution of appreciation, which was approved by acclamation and accompanied by a standing ovation for Regent Opgenorth:

Resolution 9791: 

WHEREAS, Kevin Opgenorth has served for two years as a dedicated student representative on the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents and has been an active member of the UW-Platteville student government and campus community; and 

WHEREAS, in his role serving on the Capital Planning and Budget Committee, Kevin displayed his commitment to ensuring safe, functional, and up-to-date facilities, in which students and educators can carry out their best learning, teaching, and research; and

WHEREAS, through his participation on the selection committees for the Regents Diversity Awards and Academic Staff Excellence Awards, Kevin praised the virtues of recruiting and rewarding those educators who go the extra mile to ensure student success and expand equitable opportunities for students from all backgrounds; and

WHEREAS, Kevin served his country through three years of service in the United States army, including one year of deployment in Iraq, before returning to school to pursue his degree in business administration and economics; and
     

WHEREAS, Kevin offered a valuable student perspective as a member of the Committee on Student Discipline and Other Student Appeals, as well as the Chancellor Search Committee for UW-Platteville, his alma mater; and

WHEREAS, Kevin was responsive to the UW System student body through his strong and consistent advocacy for continued affordable tuition, increased financial aid, respect for the student role in shared governance, and academic quality;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System wholeheartedly thanks Regent Emeritus Kevin Opgenorth for his contributions and service to the students, faculty, and staff of the UW System and to the citizens of Wisconsin, and wishes him every success in the future.

Regent Emeritus Opgenorth thanked Regent Loftus.  He also thanked Governor Doyle for giving a voice to the students of the System, his fiancée for her support, and his family for their support and for the important values and principles that they instilled in him.  He said that he was somewhat overwhelmed when first appointed, but he has learned a lot over the past two years; he expressed gratitude for the kindness and wisdom Regents shared with him.

As Regent Opgenorth said his good-byes to Regents, President Pruitt also expressed his pride in Regent Opgenorth’s service on the Board. 

Resolution of Appreciation for UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor David Wilson

President Pruitt, noting that Chancellor David Wilson will be leaving for Morgan State University, turned to Regent Danae Davis to offer a resolution of appreciation.  Regent Davis said that she chaired the search committee that made the fine selection of Chancellor Wilson to be the first chancellor of the combined UW Colleges and UW-Extension.  Regent Davis used the words “scholar” and “gentleman” to describe Chancellor Wilson and his dedication to quality education and his demeanor and presence. 

Chancellor Wilson has given to students, families, colleagues, the UW System, and many others, Regent Davis said.  He has given a spirit and passion for learning, as well as the courage of his convictions.  He has also received much in return; Morgan State University is getting one of the top academic leaders in the nation.

Regent Davis read the resolution of appreciation, which was approved by acclamation and accompanied by a standing ovation for Chancellor Wilson.

Resolution 9792:

WHEREAS, David Wilson has served with distinction as chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and the University of Wisconsin-Extension from 2006 to 2010, being the first chancellor to lead two UW institutions simultaneously; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Wilson oversaw the integration of the administrations of these two diverse, geographically dispersed institutions, uncovering efficiencies while preserving the institutions’ unique identities and raising awareness of and implementing their value as educational resources; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Wilson worked assiduously to maximize access to the resources and research of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges to all the state’s residents; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Wilson has helped fulfill the promise of the Wisconsin Idea by strengthening the relationship between Cooperative Extension offices and county boards, logging countless miles on state highways visiting all 72 County Extension offices, and three tribal nations, as well as all 26 UW campuses – not once but numerous times; and

WHEREAS, during his tenure, UW Colleges’ recruitment and retention of students of color increased and overall student enrollment reached an all-time high of 13,807; and

WHEREAS, under Chancellor Wilson’s leadership, the UW Colleges and UW-Extension Adult Student Initiative effectively reached out to Wisconsin’s adults to help them start, continue and attain college degrees, and UW-Extension’s collaborative bachelor of science in sustainable management is the first online degree of its kind in the United States, receiving a national award for best online program from the University Professional and Continuing Education Association, and garnering enrollment twice as high as expected; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Wilson created a dynamic strategic plan for both UW-Extension and UW Colleges, incorporating the priorities of Innovation, Diversity, Economic Development, Access, and Service and Engagement, as well as Stewardship and Support, which appropriately constitute the acronym IDEAS;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System offers its most sincere gratitude to Chancellor David Wilson for his service and dedication to the University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension, as well as the entire state of Wisconsin, and wishes him continued success as the next president of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Following Regent Davis’s presentation of the resolution, Regent Bradley invited Chancellor Wilson and UW-Marathon County Dean Sandra Smith to stand near a covered easel.  Regent Bradley spoke of the advocacy and support of Chancellor Wilson, which contributed to the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service, which will be housed in the UW Center for Civic Engagement, being built at UW-Marathon County.  Regent Bradley spoke of the students who would be sitting in the reading room in that building, to be named the David Wilson Reading Room. 

Thanks to the generosity of the Regents and many colleagues, students will see a plaque on the wall of the reading room, dedicating the room to Chancellor Wilson.  The plaque, which was uncovered during the meeting, is intended to provide future students with inspiration, as it relates the personal story of Chancellor Wilson, from his birth in rural Alabama to his development as a leader in higher education.

Chancellor Wilson expressed his sincere thanks and related a story of the first day he left home for college.  He said that having a reading room named after him, given his background and lack of education as a young child, is extraordinary.  He invited visits to Maryland, and said he would also look in on his colleagues in Wisconsin.

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Resolution of Appreciation for UW-Milwaukee for hosting the June meeting

President Pruitt called on Regent Falbo to present the resolution of appreciation for UW-Milwaukee’s hosting the June meeting. 

Resolution 9793:                    

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System appreciates the many perspectives featured in the presentation “Progress, Perceptions and Presidents: Taking the Initiative at UW-Milwaukee,” shared by Chancellor Santiago and Vice Chancellor Luljak; Donna Van De Water and Tom Abrahamson of marketing communications firm Lipman Hearne; and former Regent Presidents Michael W. Grebe and Sheldon B. Lubar; and

WHEREAS, the Regents offer their congratulations on the decision to locate the School of Freshwater Sciences and related academic and research facilities at two quality waterfront locations; and

WHEREAS, the Regents commend the vision of two UW System leaders, UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago and UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin, in creating the Intercampus Research Incentive Grants initiative to foster research projects and scholarship undertaken jointly by researchers at both institutions, and – just yesterday – learned that eight innovative and collaborative projects were named after being graciously funded by UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee donors; and

WHEREAS, the Regents are pleased to be part of an impressive “green campus” experience, having tasted the delicious foods and produce from Badgerland Wisconsin and several other local and state vendors; and

WHEREAS, the Regents are glad to know that the waste products of this meeting are also sustainable and being recycled by Growing Power, a local nonprofit organization turning the meeting’s food and product remnants into enriched soil, which will then be used on the green roof of Sandburg Hall, contributing to the growing cycle; and

WHEREAS, the Regents appreciate UW-Milwaukee’s hospitality and the opportunity to see firsthand the university’s new Daniel M. Soref Learning Commons—a state-of-the-art technology and flexible learning environment for students, housed in the Golda Meir Library—and applaud the numerous sustainable construction techniques incorporated into the renovation of this space;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System extends its gratitude to the staff, faculty, and students of UW-Milwaukee for supporting the mission of the UW System and graciously hosting this productive June 2010 meeting.

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Additional resolutions and departures

President Pruitt next expressed appreciation to Interim Chancellor Carol Sue Butts, who served as Interim Chancellor at UW-Platteville, and Interim Chancellor Mark Nook, who served as Interim Chancellor at UW-Stevens Point.  Each took over at a challenging and interesting time, and led their institutions with great energy and dedication.  Resolutions of appreciation for the two interim chancellors were approved by acclamation.

President Reilly then recognized the service of and bid farewell to two UW System administrators:  (1) Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs, Tom Anderes, who is beginning his new responsibilities as President of the University of Arizona System, reporting to its Board of Regents; and (2) Sharon Wilhelm, of UW System’s Office of Policy Analysis and Research, who is retiring after 33 years of service to UW System Administration.

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APPROVAL OF THE 2011 MEETING SCHEDULE

President Pruitt noted that a draft 2011 Board of Regents meeting schedule was in the Board packets and requested a motion to approve Resolution 9794, adopting the schedule.  Regent Bartell moved approval; the motion was seconded by Regent Smith, and adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Approval of 2011 Meeting Schedule

Resolution 9794:     That the Board of Regents adopt the attached draft regular-meeting schedule for 2011.

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APPROVAL OF BOARD OF REGENTS BYLAWS REVISIONS

President Pruitt stated that the University of Wisconsin Faculty and Academic Staff Labor Relations Act, which was enacted as part of the 2009-11 budget legislation, directs the Board of Regents to establish a collective bargaining capacity and to negotiate and administer collective bargaining agreements with faculty and academic staff unions.  Because matters relating to faculty and academic staff collective bargaining fall outside the scope of duties of the Board’s current committees, it is necessary to create a new standing committee to carry out the Board’s responsibilities under the new law.  The structure of the new committee and appointment procedure for its members are consistent with those of the Board’s other standing committees. 

Stating that approval of Resolution 9795 would create a standing Board of Regents Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining, President Pruitt requested a motion to approve Resolution 9795.  Regent Spector moved approval; the motion was seconded, and adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Amendment of Board of Regents Bylaws to Create Standing Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining

Resolution 9795:     That the Board of Regents adopt the attached amendments to Chapter III, Section 1.g. and Section 8 of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents, creating and describing the duties of a standing Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining.

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ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

President Pruitt noted that the Bylaws of the Board of Regents specify that officers of the Board are elected at the annual meeting, which is held in June, and hold their offices for one year, until their successors are elected.  If there is only one nominee for an office, the election is by voice vote.  If there is more than one nominee, the election is by ballot.  Terms of office begin immediately after the June meeting.

President of the Board

President Pruitt called for nominations for the office or President of the Board.  Regent Bradley nominated President Charles Pruitt for election to another term, praising his concern for students, faculty and staff; strong leadership; commitment to diversity; excellent relationship with the System President, accessibility; and decisiveness.  President Pruitt was unanimously re-elected on a voice vote and expressed his appreciation for the Board’s confidence and support, and for Regent Bradley’s kind words.

Vice President of the Board

President Pruitt called for nominations for the office of Vice President of the Board, recognizing Regent Drew, who nominated Vice President Michael Spector for re-election.  Regent Drew praised Vice President Spector’s service on K-12 issues, as well as his service on the Board of Regents, saying he has always been willing to take on tough assignments, such as Chapter 17and the Competitive University Workforce Commission.  He is an outstanding listener and is able to understand and synthesize ideas.  He is committed to giving back to the community.  Regent Crain seconded the nomination.  Vice President Spector was unanimously re-elected on a voice vote.

Secretary of the Board, Assistant Secretary, Trust Officer, Assistant Trust Officers

President Pruitt listed the incumbents for the positions of Secretary of the Board, Assistant Secretary, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers:

·      Jane Radue, Secretary;

·      Ann Nottestad, currently Interim Assistant Secretary, and recommended by Secretary Radue to be Assistant Secretary for the coming year;

·      Deborah Durcan, Trust Officer; and

·      Pat Brady and Doug Hoerr, Assistant Trust Officers.

President Pruitt requested a nomination to elect these officers.  The nominations were moved and seconded.  The incumbents were re-elected on a unanimous voice vote.

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The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. and reconvened at 12:45 p.m.

CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Danae Davis, Drew, Evers, Falbo, Loftus, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Schwalenberg, Spector, Walsh, Wingad, and Womack voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9796:     That the Board of Regents move into closed session to discuss collective bargaining activities at UW institutions, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to consider appointment of a UW-Richland executive officer and dean, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.; and to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by Wis. Stats. s. 19.85(1)(c).

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During the closed session, the Board adopted the following resolution: 

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Richland University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9797:     That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges/University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint Patrick Glenn Hagen as Dean at the University of Wisconsin-Richland, effective July 1, 2010 at an annual salary of $106,000.

The meeting was adjourned at approximately 3:10 p.m.

 

Submitted by:

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board