Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Thursday, February 4, 2010

11:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT:   Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, and Aaron Wingad

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents Mark Bradley, John Drew, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

- - -

PRESIDENT’S GREETING AND CONTEXT FOR REVIEW OF GROWTH AGENDA GOALS

President Pruitt welcomed Board members and others and began the meeting by describing the first agenda item, “Growth Agenda Planning.”  The Growth Agenda for Wisconsin has provided the framework for the university system’s strategic planning for the past several years.  This is the UW System’s plan to grow the entire state, improve Wisconsin’s competitive edge, and create a better future for our children and grandchildren.

People from around the state, President Pruitt continued, including business leaders, students, legislators, and taxpayers, have rallied around the Growth Agenda’s vision of a more educated citizenry, more well-paying jobs, and stronger local communities.  That long-term vision has not changed, but the economic situation of Wisconsin and the entire nation has.  In looking forward to economic recovery, it is a good time to revisit the Growth Agenda, to ensure that the university’s strategies are aligned with the state’s current and future needs.

President Pruitt stated that President Reilly would be sharing information about the process to be used over the next several months to develop a new set of Growth Agenda strategies.  First, however, President Pruitt provided some broader context by noting that: 

  • A record-high 178,000 students are enrolled at the UW System’s 26 campuses, approximately 65 percent of whom will graduate from a UW institution within six years, a rate that surpasses the national average.
  • The University of Wisconsin’s administrative costs remain among the lowest in the nation, and the Board has acted to preserve affordable access for all students by:  (1)  holding tuition increases to modest, predictable levels; (2) freezing UW Colleges tuition for three consecutive years; (3) adding a new grant this year for students who come from families at or below the median household income, holding them harmless from any tuition increase at all; and (4) working to preserve the quality and value of a UW degree, as evidenced by three UW System campuses recently being named among the “top 100 best values in public colleges” by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. 
  • About one year ago, President Barack Obama asked every American to commit themselves to at least one year or more of higher education, with a goal of regaining America’s worldwide leadership as the nation with the highest proportion of college graduates by the year 2020. 
  • Governor Doyle has been a champion of education, introducing the Wisconsin Covenant to put kids on the right path to college, advocating for higher education in tough times, advancing a 2007-09 state budget that provided more than $30 million in new support for the UW System’s Growth Agenda, providing UW System with targeted recruitment and retention funding in each of three biennial state budgets he has advanced; and tripling state financial aid since coming into office.

President Pruitt suggested that long before the next Governor takes office, joined by new and returning legislators from across the state, it is important to begin long-range planning efforts and the development of a 2011-13 biennial budget request.  Regents need to be part of that budget-making and goal-setting process from the beginning.  President Pruitt then introduced UW System President Reilly, who would review milestones in the process and provide a preview of the process ahead.

- - -

INTEGRATED GROWTH AGENDA BUDGET PLANNING

President Reilly indicated he would like to provide the Board with a sense for the steps to be taken on the Growth Agenda between February and August, when the Board will approve the 2011-13 biennial budget proposal. The focus is on strategies for recovery and renewal. 

Referring to a Growth Agenda diagram, President Reilly first described the UW System Growth Agenda framework, with its two core goals, more graduates and more jobs, and with foundational activity consisting of a competitive UW workforce, state support, and flexibility undergirding those two core goals.

Growth Agenda Goal of More Graduates

The first of the two core goals is more college graduates in Wisconsin.  President Reilly described recent trends and reasons that it is important to have more college graduates.  For example, more college-degreed people are needed for Wisconsin to be economically competitive.  In Wisconsin and across the nation, 25- to 34-year-olds are seriously under credentialed.  Populations of color are also under credentialed.  The achievement gap between students of color and white students is a longstanding problem that does not bode well for the future of the state and the country, given demographic trends.  Greater education equals greater wealth for individuals, states, and nations.  People without postsecondary education are not likely to be able to live very productive or comfortable lives in the future. 

On the other side of the coin, more highly educated people generally are healthier, more philanthropic, and more intellectually engaged in a democratic system of government.  Those leading and governing higher education are the “hope masters” for citizens of a global and knowledge economy. 

President Reilly said that he, Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin, chancellors, provosts, and others have had interesting conversations about the goal of more graduates.  The consultation will continue.  At the April meeting of the Board, President Reilly will return with exciting, specific new goals for more graduates.

Growth Agenda Goal of More Jobs 

With respect to the second core goal of “more jobs,” there is now incredible emphasis on job production.  The current “jobless recovery” is of concern.  The Governor, in his State of the State address, said that his attention will be almost completely on creating new jobs.  The President of the United States in his State of the Union address, as well as legislators commenting on this issue, have said essentially the same thing.

The university has a major role in this goal of more jobs.  Work continues on Research to Jobs task force recommendations:  (1) fostering and attracting human talent fueled by innovation; (2) focusing on the kind of jobs that leverage innovation and entrepreneurship; (3) attracting the research and development, along with the financial investment needed, to support the generation of new knowledge; and (4) creating an entrepreneurial culture throughout the state so that all citizens can contribute to and have a stake in the state’s better economic future. 

An implementation group, chaired by UW-Stout Chancellor Sorenson, is reviewing and prioritizing the Research to Jobs recommendations in relation to the Growth Agenda and the 2011-13 biennial budget.  In May or June, that group will come back with recommendations.

Creating new jobs involves more than creating new industries or creating new jobs through research, discovery, patents, and commercialization; it also involves helping traditional Wisconsin industries, such as agriculture, paper, and manufacturing, have the latest technology and techniques to be competitive. 

“More thriving, attractive communities” has been a third goal of the Growth Agenda, and community work continues.  If the System’s goals of more graduates and more jobs are met, communities around the state will greatly benefit.

Growth Agenda Foundational Activity

Underpinning the two goals that are the current focus, more graduates and more jobs, the foundational activity of having a competitive workforce is critical.  Faculty and staff will either deliver on the goals, or not.  Faculty and staff compensation, salary and benefits together, are behind compared to peers; as a result of furlough cuts to salaries and the foregone 2 percent pay increase, faculty and staff compensation is likely further behind.  President Reilly announced that he has assembled a Competitive Workforce Commission, which Board of Regents Vice President Spector has agreed to co-chair, along with Kathi Seifert, retired Executive Vice President from Kimberly Clark.  The group includes individuals from within and outside of the university system.  The group will take a finer-grained look at salary and compensation than has typically been done in the past, to identify salary gap problems, as well as areas where the System is competitive with its peers.  The goal is to come back to the Board in June with results from that Commission’s work.

President Reilly then commented on state support as a percentage of the university’s budget, which has declined in Wisconsin, as well as throughout the country.  However, state general purpose revenue (GPR) is still over $1 billion per year, or between 20 and 25 percent of the university’s budget, not including the major state investments the state makes in the capital budget.  Wisconsin cannot afford to not continue to press the state for support of this public institution, with its public purpose.

California’s governor announced that he would like to see that state spending more on higher education than on the prison system.  President Reilly said that if California can make that kind of statement, Wisconsin can, too.

He continued by saying that Wisconsin is grateful for the GPR the university does receive, but the university could put more of the state support toward core educational purposes if the university had the kinds of flexibilities needed to spend less of the state funding on the overhead associated with state bureaucratic processes.  The System is in serious conversations with the Governor’s Office about obtaining some of those flexibilities on the capital side and in some other areas.  In New York, the governor recently announced major, new flexibilities that he’s proposing for the State University of New York and the City University of New York Systems.  If New York can propose flexibility for its public universities, surely Wisconsin can do the same.

Plans for Future Board of Regents Meetings

President Reilly then presented an integrated plan for future Board meetings.  Following the February discussion of the planning process, the next meeting, in April 2010, will include a discussion of new goals for more graduates and higher levels of educational attainment.  An update on Research to Jobs may also be provided.

May’s one-day meeting will include the annual Accountability Report; an update on Research to Jobs; and a facilitated discussion about strategic financing of higher education, with a consultant from the Association of Governing Boards (AGB).

At the June meeting, the Board will need to act on the 2010-11 annual operating budget.  The results from the Competitive Workforce Commission also will be available.  Toward the end of June, a series of individual biennial-budget briefings will begin.     

A July meeting is not yet scheduled, but the Board has in the past found it useful to meet before the vote on the biennial budget in August.  If a July meeting is scheduled, there will be more flexibility to discuss Competitive University Workforce or Research to Jobs at a later date than currently anticipated.

After the Board’s August discussion of, and approval of, the 2011-13 biennial budget proposal, the proposal will be submitted to the state Department of Administration.  Other milestones include the primary election in September, general election in November, a new Governor taking office in January 2011, and introduction by the new Governor of his 2011-13 budget in February or March 2011.  The university, as well as others, will be advocating for the Regents’ budget during this time.

After the Governor introduces his budget, it goes into the legislative budget-making process, including action by the Joint Committee on Finance, approval by the full Assembly and Senate, conference committee reconciliation activities, and possibly gubernatorial vetoes.  After this, the Joint Committee on Employment Relations will take action on a pay plan proposal for UW System faculty and academic staff.  The new biennial budget takes effect July 1, 2011 or later.

By all accounts, President Reilly continued, this will be a very tough budget cycle because of the economic situation.  A strong argument for the value of the University of Wisconsin will be needed.

President Reilly then turned back to President Pruitt, to lead the discussion of the schedule President Reilly had proposed.  President Pruitt asked Regents for their reactions to the big-picture topics that President Reilly had discussed, as well as the mechanics, sequencing, or timing of the process.

Regent Bartell, acknowledging that some details have not been worked out yet, asked President Reilly to describe the charge of the Competitive Workforce Commission, group composition, and assumptions the group might make about such issues as collective bargaining.  President Reilly responded that the basic charge is to look at faculty and academic staff compensation packages, peer comparisons, and recommendations for closing any gaps.  It will be a finer-grained analysis than has been done in the past.  The commission will include those from outside the university, who do not have a personal interest in the university’s compensation package and who will be able to offer a non-university perspective on what constitutes competitive compensation.  At President Reilly’s request, Senior Vice President Tom Anderes elaborated, saying that multiple types of peers would be examined, including state and regional.  Where the university is competitive, this will be stated. 

With respect to collective bargaining, President Reilly indicated that some university peers have collective bargaining, and some do not.  The UW does not yet know if it will have collective bargaining.

Regent Loftus expressed nervousness about introducing new peer comparisons (because peer groups have in the past been agreed to with the state), and President Reilly assured him this will not be the case.  Regent Loftus went on to say that some peers will have had reduced pay, due to furloughs or across-the-board cuts, and asked whether these things will be taken into account.  President Reilly indicated that these will be considered.

Vice President Spector commented that it will be important to ask what group members, as leaders in different capacities in Wisconsin, believe the university system should be in the state, and what role compensation plays in that.  The group should be aware of the past and the status quo, but not be limited by them.  It will be important to think about what our state wants education to be, how the University can be as effective as possible, and how the best people can be brought here to perpetuate the institution.  Whether the subject is collective bargaining or any other subject, Vice President Spector expressed confidence that the group and staff would use their best judgment in addressing these subjects.

Regent Falbo, who will also be a member of the Competitive Workforce Commission, commented that many of those on the Commission are dealing with the same issues that the university is. 

Vice President Spector noted that Regent Loftus’s experience as a legislator can help inform Commission members about obstacles to potential Commission recommendations.  Regent Loftus responded that there are two decades of decisions about the university’s peer groups.  Vice President Spector accepted this caution but said that the group should not rule out looking at what makes sense under current circumstances.  Following up on this remark, Regent Falbo said that drilling down within the comparisons may reveal more information that will be helpful than can be foreseen at this point.

President Pruitt underscored that the Commission is a first step, but the Board itself would be a central player in reviewing the Commission’s conclusions, as well as in making decisions about the recommendations.

 Regent Vásquez noted that other key players, in addition to the Regents, are legislators and the Governor.  He asked President Reilly how they will be kept informed and involved, since the Regents are limited by gubernatorial and legislative actions in such areas as staff salaries and benefits.  President Reilly responded that Jessica Tormey, one of System Administration’s legislative liaisons, is helping to staff the Commission; part of her role will be to keep the legislature well informed.  Also, former Senator Brian Rude has agreed to serve on the group; it is hoped that he will have contacts with his colleagues.  Regent Loftus also will be called upon to help with maintaining the right perspective.  In addition, the Commission meetings will be open meetings; deliberations will be in public.

Next, Regent Crain spoke in favor of a July Board meeting, saying that she hoped the date would be set soon.  She also requested a text of President Reilly’s earlier remarks about the Growth Agenda.

Regent Danae Davis, expressing her support for incorporating Growth Agenda goals into the Accountability Report, sought confirmation that inclusive excellence goals also will be reflected in this report.  President Reilly said that the Accountability Report already includes indicators related to diversity, and those will remain in the report and will be enhanced with results from the educational attainment planning. 

President Reilly reminded the Board that the UW System is one of the systems in the National Access to Success project, along with some other large systems.  The goal of that project is to halve the achievement gap between minority and majority students by 2015.  Data from this project also will be tracked. 

As to inclusive excellence, Senior Vice President Martin added that the Education Committee would be receiving a report and discussing strategies and progress in April or June.  In response to a follow-up question from Regent Davis, Senior Vice President Martin responded that the Accountability Report continues to be revised, as new leading indicators are identified.

Next, Regent Danae Davis asked about how the Growth Agenda goals will be integrated into the overall budget process.  In response, President Reilly used the goal of more graduates as an example, saying that in April some new numbers related to new graduates will be presented.   These goals will be achieved through a combination of more enrollment, higher retention and graduation rates, and new ways of delivering instruction.  The Board’s discussion in April will be about what aspects are to become part of the 2011-13 budget submission.

President Pruitt commented that the approach for this budget is to have the funding decisions follow the program decisions, so that when the budget proposal comes before the Board, it represents the continuation of a conversation, rather than the beginning of a conversation.  The discussion in May about strategic financing also will be important.  President Pruitt complimented President Reilly for laying out an overall plan for the Growth Agenda and budget planning process.  

- - -

The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 p.m.

 

Submitted by:

 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Friday, February 5, 2010

9:00 a.m.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF DECEMBER 10 and 11, 2009 MEETING.. 3

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 3

Report of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board.. 3

Recognition of UW-Whitewater Football Champions. 4

Regent and Other News. 4

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 6

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 8

New Directions for Teacher Education.. 9

UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools. 9

Academic Program Planning and Array. 10

Report of the Senior Vice President. 10

Consent Agenda.. 11

Program Authorization (Implementation) of B.S. in Environmental Health University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. 11

Program Authorization (Implementation) of B.S. in Cognitive Science University of Wisconsin-Stout 12

Wisconsin Partnership Program -- UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment 12

Charter School Contract with Veritas High School. 12

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract with Veritas High School 13

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE. 13

2009 Annual Financial Report and Auditor’s Opinion.. 13

2010 Operations Review and Audit Plan.. 14

Review and Approval of Revised Differential Tuition Policy. 14

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Commitment and Undergraduate Differential. 14

UW-La Crosse Academic Excellence Initiative. 14

UW-Stout Access to Learning.. 15

UW-Stout Customized Instruction.. 15

Annual Trust Funds Report. 15

UW System Strategic Plans for Major Information Technology Projects. 15

Update on Human Resources System (HRS) 16

Review of 2009-10 Source of Funds by UW System Institution.. 16

Consent Agenda.. 16

Review and Adjustment of the UW-La Crosse Academic Excellence Initiatives Differential Tuition. 16

Review of UW-Stout Access to Learning Differential Tuition Program.. 16

Review of UW-Stout Customized Instruction Differential Tuition Program.. 17

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Commitment and Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 17

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Commitment and Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 21

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE. 22

UW-Sheboygan - Authority to Release Approximately 27.6 Acres to Assist a Sheboygan County River Dredging Project and Accept the Return of the Land After Project Completion, UW Colleges. 23

UW-Richland - Authority to Amend the Lease Agreement to Include an Additional 1.4 Acre Parcel of Land and Improvements, UW Colleges. 23

Approval of the Design Report of the Residence Hall Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Oshkosh. 24

Approval of the Design Report of the Fisher and Wellers Halls Renovation Project and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater 24

Authority to Seek a Waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow for a Request for Proposal (RFP) Process and Construct the Hyland Hall Solar Photovoltaic System Project, UW-Whitewater 24

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System.. 24

Authority to Seek a Waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow Selection Through a Request for Proposal Process of a Construction Manager-at-Risk for the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Project, UW-Madison. 25

Authority to Adjust the Scope and Budget of the Sterling Hall Renovation Project to Construct a Plasma Dynamo Facility and to Seek a Waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., under Provisions of s. 13.48(19), Wis. Stats., to Allow Single-Prime Bidding, UW-Madison  25

PRESENTATION OF REGENT DIVERSITY AWARDS. 26

Individual Award:  Ms. Marion McDowell, UW-Milwaukee. 26

Team Award:  Multicultural Awareness Program Facilitation Team, UW-Colleges and UW-Extension.. 27

Institutional/Unit Award:  Summer Business Institute, UW-Whitewater. 28

CLOSED SESSION.. 30

Authorization to Appoint:  Dean, UW-Fond du Lac, University of Wisconsin Colleges. 30

Authority to Name the Health and Wellness Center the “Marcovich Wellness Center,” UW-Superior 30

Authority to Name the UW-Whitewater Track and Soccer Stadium the “Robert W.Fiskum Stadium,” UW-Whitewater 31

Authorization to Appoint:  Interim Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension  31

Consideration of Faculty Member Request for Review of a UW-Stout Personnel Decision (Recommendation of the Personnel Matters Review Committee) 31


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Friday, February 5, 2010

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, and Aaron Wingad

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents Mark Bradley and Betty Womack  

- - -

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF DECEMBER 10 and 11, 2009 MEETING

The minutes of the December 10 and 11, 2009 meeting stood approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Report of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

A written report was provided.

Recognition of UW-Whitewater Football Champions

President Pruitt introduced the seniors from the Division III national champion UW-Whitewater Warhawks football team, along with the coaching staff led by head coach Lance Leipold.  In December, the Warhawks claimed their second national title in three years with a 38-28 victory over Mount Union College in the 37th Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl. 

President Pruitt remarked that he watched that game; the Warhawks had the lead, lost it, and then took it back again, showing grit and tenacity.  The game was delayed by about five hours because 16 inches of snow fell in the Roanoke Valley.  It takes more than that to faze a Wisconsin football team.  With the victory, the Warhawks also snapped Mount Union College’s 29-game winning streak. 

Division III has a special place in our state and our country, President Pruitt continued.  These players did not go to UW-Whitewater with guaranteed full rides and entourages of sports agents following them.  They are, in the best sense, “student athletes.” 

On behalf of the Board, President Pruitt offered congratulations and introduced Warhawks Head Coach Lance Leipold. 

Coach Leipold, expressing appreciation for the welcome, recalled the Warhawks’ national championship in 2007, his first season as a head coach.  He and his staff are grateful to have had the opportunity to have that kind of success again, only two years later; they appreciate the hard work that led to this success, as well as the support from UW-Whitewater Chancellor Telfer; athletic director, Dr. Plinske; and the overall institution and community.  The coach also recognized the statewide conference and Commissioner Gary Karner and expressed appreciation for the team’s ability to compete on a national level in Division III athletics.  He expressed pride in the young men on the football team and the behavior that they modeled throughout their travels.  The mission of developing them as students and future leaders is as important as having a 15-0 season.  Coach Leipold thanked the Board for all that it does to allow UW-Whitewater to accomplish this mission.

Coach Leipold introduced team co-captain, Paul Wick, who had graduated the Thursday before the national championship.  He described his career as a finance major and football player at UW-Whitewater.  After an internship opportunity with Northwestern Mutual, he was offered a position as an investment specialist in Milwaukee.  He credited UW-Whitewater for preparing him well.  He thanked the Board for the opportunity students across the state have to succeed both academically and athletically.

 

Regent and Other News

President Pruitt resumed his remarks, reporting that the appointment of Regent José Vásquez was unanimously confirmed by the Wisconsin Senate last month.  Congratulating Regent Vásquez, President Pruitt noted that Governor Doyle originally appointed Regent Vásquez to the Board of Regents in February 2008.  His current term will continue until 2016.

In other Regent news, this past Sunday’s Wausau Daily Herald ran a story on “People of the Decade,” featuring the profiles of 50 people who have made a difference to life in Wausau and north central Wisconsin.  One of those named was Regent Mark Bradley.  In citing Regent Bradley’s work with the Board of Regents and his term as Board President, the article said, “(Bradley) oversaw a continuing expansion of participation in the UW System, something that improves residents’ lives and strengthens our state’s economy.  One of the key initiatives Bradley oversaw was a program that aligned higher education offerings with regional employment needs, assessing and responding to the ways that Wausau’s needs are different from Milwaukee’s.  There remain few state institutions that affect life here as much as the UW System, and this decade Bradley was a key contributor to that system’s work...”  President Pruitt extended congratulations to Regent Bradley.

President Pruitt next announced that the Board of Directors of TierOne Corporation, based in Lincoln, Nebraska, had recently named Regent Michael Falbo as its new Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, effective immediately.  TierOne Corporation is the parent company of TierOne Bank, a $3.1 billion federally chartered savings bank and the largest publicly-traded financial institution headquartered in the state of Nebraska.  

In making the announcement, the company's lead independent director Charles Hoskins said, “The recent challenges faced by the financial industry and TierOne will require a highly qualified, strong leader going forward and we believe that Mike is exactly the right person for this role.  His extensive experience, industry reputation and strong management skills will be key to taking us into the future.  The board believes this will be a win for our employees, our investors and our customers.  Mike’s broad public service background and civic commitment will also be an added benefit for our community and our market area.”  President Pruitt congratulated Regent Falbo.

President Pruitt said, further, that he was pleased to report that on Christmas Eve, Regent Kevin Opgenorth became engaged to be married to Kelly Jo Bratkowski.

President Pruitt next called attention to President Obama’s recently-proposed federal budget, which makes education the most prominent exception to the administration’s promise to freeze nondefense discretionary spending.  For the second year in a row, the President is asking Congress to make the Pell Grant an entitlement that receives an automatic budget allocation each year to meet the number of students who qualify.  He also proposed that the grant’s maximum per-student value increase each year by the rate of inflation plus one percentage point, bringing it from $5,550 in 2010, to $5,710 in 2011, to an estimated $6,900 in 2019.  That 2019 date is important because it dovetails with the President’s challenge to “once again have the highest proportion of college graduates of any nation in the world.”

President Pruitt then turned to UW System President Kevin Reilly, for his report.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Sharing good news from around the UW System, President Reilly began his remarks by noting that UW-Superior marked the start of the spring semester in January with the official opening of its new $22 million Yellowjacket Union.  The 90,000-square-foot facility features a soaring atrium, meeting rooms with balconies overlooking the main floor, fireplaces, lounges, and open dining areas that should make the Union an inviting place for students to gather.  The project, which began in spring 2008, was funded by student fees and gifts to the university.  The building will receive Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certification, highlighting the university’s commitment to environmental sustainability and energy-efficient operations.  Also, the Jim Dan Hill Library at UW-Superior recently received the award for Excellence in Architectural Design.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Erlenbach and UW-Superior.

Continuing his report, President Reilly noted that UW-Eau Claire reports that its first-year retention has reached the highest rate in the university’s history.  The fall 2008-09 freshman-to-sophomore rate was 84.4 percent, exceeding the previous high of 83 percent in 2004-05.  The 84.4 percent retention rate is well above the 71 percent national average at four-year public universities.  This kind of progress is extremely important if the UW System is to meet its goals of growing more graduates in coming years. 

As pointed out by Kris Anderson, UW-Eau Claire’s Executive Director of Enrollment Services and Director of Admissions, there is no data to confirm the reason for this year’s record high first-year retention rate.  However, she noted that research has shown that freshmen who feel connected to faculty, other students, and the campus are more likely to return in their sophomore year.  UW-Eau Claire, like many UW institutions, is making deliberate efforts to support first-year students by providing new freshmen with quality advising; strong residence life programs; extracurricular activities; and close contact with faculty, beginning in their first-year classes.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich and UW-Eau Claire.

President Reilly next acknowledged the accomplishments of two UW-Madison scientists who have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to receive five-year research grants through the federal American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.  Dr. Stanislav Boldyrev, an assistant professor of physics, and Dr. Daniel Fredrickson, an assistant professor of chemistry, were among only 69 scientists nationwide, out of a field of more than 1,750 applicants, to receive these grants as part of DOE’s new Early Career Research Program. 

President Reilly said that this new effort is designed to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during their crucial early career years.  Professor Boldyrev is working on a project titled “Scaling Laws in Magnetized Plasma Turbulence.”  Professor Fredrickson’s project is called “Chemical Frustration:  A Design for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases.”  Both professors are eligible for at least $150,000 per year to cover summer salary and research expenses.  The details are being worked out with the DOE.  President Reilly congratulated both professors and Chancellor Biddy Martin.

At UW-Stevens Point, chemistry professor Michael Zach has been awarded a $401,000 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation to further his research on targeting new ways to produce patterned nanowires that can be grown into circuits and components for manufacturing materials.  This is particularly noteworthy because these awards are rarely given to a regional master’s-granting university.  There is significant research potential and opportunity among the talented faculty and staff at the UW System’s comprehensive campuses.  President Reilly congratulated Dr. Zach and Interim Chancellor Nook. 

Continuing his report of good news in the System, President Reilly announced that three UW-Milwaukee researchers also have received Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards from the National Science Foundation in the past year.  Stefan Schnitzer, associate professor of biological sciences, received an $890,000 award to support his investigation into the mechanisms that control plant abundance and distribution in tropical forests.  Leslie Ying, assistant professor of electrical engineering, received a $400,000 award to support her work on improving magnetic resonance imaging techniques.  Also, Marius Schmidt, assistant professor of physics, received nearly $900,000 to support his work on imaging proteins as their atomic structure changes during biochemical reactions.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Carlos Santiago and his colleagues at UW-Milwaukee.

Next, President Reilly told the Board that Wisconsin’s two public doctoral research universities are joining forces in the first dual campus-wide program to promote collaborative research projects involving faculty at both universities.  UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin and UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago have officially launched the Intercampus Research Incentive Grants Program, which will award $300,000 in intercampus grants to support joint research and promote partnerships.  Grants will be available in the physical sciences, engineering, humanities, and the arts and social sciences.  The chancellors have both expressed hopes that successful partnerships will lay the groundwork for future federal and state grant proposals.

President Reilly said that he wanted to cite these early career awards for younger UW researchers, as well as the new collaborative research initiative between UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee, to emphasize how hard UW campuses work to attract talent from around the country that will help create a brighter future for people in Wisconsin and around the world.

UW-Platteville’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program has received a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, President Reilly continued.  The STEM Scholars Program is designed to increase the recruitment and retention of undergraduate students in the STEM disciplines through scholarships, structured networking opportunities, and support services.  Emphasis will be placed on recruiting and retaining underrepresented populations in these fields, including women, minorities, and persons with disabilities.  The STEM Scholars Program will be a five-year program, annually awarding eight to 12 renewable scholarships to students with declared STEM majors within the College of Engineering, Mathematics, and Science.  This project makes the point that the Growth Agenda includes efforts to target the growth in degrees in areas where Wisconsin and the nation need more expertise.

Wisconsin Public Television joined public and commercial broadcasters across the country in “Hope for Haiti Now,” a cross-sector solicitation of relief aid for victims of the Haiti earthquakes.  According to Malcolm Brett, the director of Broadcast and Media Innovations for UW-Extension, in an increasingly connected world, the definition of “boundaries of the university” regularly broadens, and the extraordinary devastation in Haiti affirms the station’s participation in the “global village.” 

President Reilly also noted that throughout the month of January, about 3,200 members of the 32nd Brigade of the Wisconsin Army National Guard returned home from serving in Iraq.  Many of them were demobilized at Fort McCoy, a process that takes about five days and, among other things, helps service members understand the benefits to which they are entitled, ranging from employment assistance, to health care, to the GI Bill. 

Jan Sheppard in the UW System Office of Academic Affairs coordinated volunteers from UW institutions to be present and answer questions about education opportunities in Wisconsin.  Interested veterans were also given a “welcome back” brochure with contact information for all of the UW institutions.  More than 60 veterans from the demobilization requested follow-up contact.  A college degree will open doors for these new veterans as they look for civilian job opportunities in a tough job market.  Their presence on campus will also diversify the UW institutions’ student bodies and enrich students’ educational experience.  President Reilly expressed his thanks to Jan Sheppard and colleagues across the System for their efforts.

Finally, President Reilly called Regents’ attention to two green and white, pocket-sized brochures in their folders, companion pieces to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin brochure published about a year ago.  “A Leader in Accountability” succinctly describes how the UW System is efficient and accountable, using the most current confirmed statistics, and “A Quality, 21st-Century Education for Every UW System Student” explains the five shared learning goals representing the university’s commitment to student preparation.  These publications can be a valuable resource in communicating the message of the Growth Agenda to the university’s stakeholders.

Recognizing that February is the month of Valentine’s Day, President Reilly read Molly Bloom’s monologue from the closing of James Joyce’s Ulysses, and then turned back to President Pruitt, who called upon Regent Crain for the report of the Education Committee.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Regent Crain began the report of the Education Committee by encouraging Board members to read the minutes of the Education Committee for a full report of the committee’s discussion, which she said was thoughtful and productive.

New Directions for Teacher Education

The committee heard about teacher education, one of the priority areas identified by the Education Committee last fall.  Presenters were:  Debbie Mahaffey, Assistant Superintendent at DPI; Francine Tompkins, Director of the UW System PK-16 Initiatives; Beth Giles, Director of the Institute for Urban Education; and Katy Heyning, Dean of the College of Education at UW-Whitewater.  Teacher education involves many challenges, and much good work is occurring throughout the System. 

Regent Crain highlighted two of the initiatives on which the committee focused:  (1) the Institute for Urban Education with its mission of advancing the preparation of urban educators, is only a couple of years old, but has had some impressive outcomes, such as the 81 percent of graduates who go on to begin their teaching careers in Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) or other urban areas; and (2) UW-Whitewater’s College of Education, which is undergoing a restructuring.  The Dean of the College of Education was motivated by the President’s Council on Diversity, in particular Regent Davis, to address the lack of diversity in the College’s student populations and the faculty’s cultural competence; the Future Teacher Program is the result.  Exciting changes and infrastructure are being implemented to bring in and support more students of color in the program, as well as to enhance the cultural competence of faculty, staff, and students.  The Education Committee was very pleased with all of the information presented.

Regent Crain said that committee members expressed high expectations that efforts to close the achievement gap be redoubled, and that these projects be scaled up to reach more UW education students and the children they will teach in the classroom.  The committee supports the work that has been done and intends to focus further attention on these important efforts.

UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools

Regent Crain next discussed UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools, saying that the Education Committee was asked to approve a new charter school at UW-Milwaukee, the Veritas High School.  This is currently an MPS charter school, which is seeking a new charter with UW-Milwaukee upon the completion of its charter with MPS in June.  This will be the third charter school the Board has authorized that is overseen by Seeds of Health, Inc., a very effective organization.  The committee welcomed several people affiliated with the school, including Marcia Spector, Executive Director of Seeds of Health, and Sherry Tolkan, the principal of Veritas.  After a great deal of discussion, support for the proposal was unanimous. 

The committee also entered into a discussion of a national charter school movement, called “replication.”  Dr. Bob Kattman, Director of the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools, explained replication as the practice of a school management organization opening another school using the identical model already in place for an existing school managed by the organization.  The result is not a new or separate charter school contract but, rather, the replicated school is offered through an amendment to the original charter.

Besides providing more Milwaukee students the opportunity to enroll at successful schools, Dr. Kattman said that replication would result in documentation, or blueprints, for ingredients -- leadership, finances, school culture, necessary staffing -- necessary to replicate high-performing schools.  The committee had a long and intense discussion, as it has had previously about charter school issues.

Regent Evers was helpful in describing how replication fits in with the improvement of all schools and the goals for the success of Wisconsin children.  The committee reviewed proposed guidelines developed by UW-Milwaukee and expressed their support for replication, as long as it is done carefully and deliberately.  The committee expressed support for a policy on replication that is being developed and will come back to the Board this spring.

Academic Program Planning and Array

Regent Crain urged Board members to review two reports which were presented to the Education Committee by Associate Vice President Stephen Kolison.  The first was the annual report on Academic Program Planning and Review, which provides a good overview of the roles and responsibilities of the major players who determine the UW System’s overall program array, the institutions, System Administration, and the Regents.  The report also provides a summary of major activity taking place in program entitlements, authorizations, implementations, and joint reviews.

The second report, the UW System 2009 Program Realignment Initiative, was the result of a working group charged by Senior Vice President Martin to review the System’s undergraduate program array in a broader context, precipitated by the state’s fiscal environment.  The report offers an assessment of the viability and productivity of degree programs in terms of enrollment and completion.  Fine-grained analysis was done, and each UW institution received information on each major’s share of total undergraduate degree production on a per-institution basis over the last ten years.  The report also identified those majors that have produced few degrees.  The working group was not seeking to determine some optimum number; rather, the information is meant to be used by the campuses as they consider their overall program array and potential realignment in future years. 

The committee heard from the provosts that the information in the report is already encouraging such discussions on their campuses.  The working group also developed guidelines for program closures or discontinuations, as well as program suspensions.  These guidelines are designed to encourage coordination among institutions and to ensure that the System maintains capacity to offer programs needed by Wisconsin citizens.  Regent Crain noted that the committee was impressed with the utility of this report, especially in this budget climate.

Report of the Senior Vice President 

Senior Vice President Martin’s report followed up on the December discussion of the “Tuition Discount” initiative announced by President Reilly.  One of the primary ways mentioned for holding costs down was to encourage and motivate students to complete their baccalaureate degrees in four years.  Since December, Senior Vice President Martin has been working with the provosts to identify those degrees at UW institutions which are already designed for four-year completion.  Many, if not most, degree programs offered in the UW System are designed to be completed in four years; the exceptions are degree programs that require more than 120 credits for graduation.  While this is good news, it is clear that better messaging and advising can be done at the institutional level to help more students finish in four years.

In the next few months, Senior Vice President Martin’s office will work with the institutions to assemble materials and information already in existence that provide students with clear information.  The longer-term goal, announced by President Reilly in December, is to mount a campaign through the UW HELP Program that will provide students an online, user-friendly matrix or template that lists for them those degree programs that can be completed in four years.  There will always be students who elect or need to take more time, but this will make the pathway to a four-year degree more evident and accessible.

Regent Crain continued by saying that Senior Vice President Martin reported on the UW Colleges’ work on a proposal for a Bachelor’s of Applied Arts and Sciences.  She has granted an entitlement for the UW Colleges to plan a pilot program on six campuses, in collaboration with partnering comprehensive campuses.  The entitlement was granted following extensive input from the System’s provosts and chancellors, which resulted in a significantly revised proposal from what was originally proposed by the Colleges.

Senior Vice President Martin informed the committee that there remains much work to be done by the Colleges as they develop the request for authorization for the degree, with the specific issues to be addressed outlined explicitly in the entitlement letter.  The comprehensive institutions continue to have reservations about the proposed BAAS degree.  However, the committee heard from both UW Colleges Chancellor Wilson and Provost Lampe about the excitement of their faculty, potential adult students, place-bound students, and employers who will be served by the degree.  It is possible that this degree will come forward to the Regents sometime in the near future.  Consideration of this proposed degree would require a change in the mission statement for the UW Colleges.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9720, 9721, 9722 and 9723 which were approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Vásquez.  Resolution 9723 was removed from the consent agenda at the request of Vice President Spector. 

Resolutions 9720, 9721 and 9722 then were adopted on a unanimous voice vote:

Program Authorization (Implementation) of B.S. in Environmental Health University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Resolution 9720:                           That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Environmental Health.

Program Authorization (Implementation) of B.S. in Cognitive Science University of Wisconsin-Stout

Resolution 9721:                     That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Cognitive Science.

Wisconsin Partnership Program -- UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment

Resolution 9722:                     That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents approves the appointment of Katherine Marks to fill an unexpired term on the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Program beginning February 8, 2010, through October 31, 2010.

Charter School Contract with Veritas High School

Regent Drew spoke against adoption of Resolution 9723.  He said that he does not believe the university should be in the K-12 business.  By all accounts Veritas is a good school, with good people doing good things for good reasons.  It is troubling that a good-performing school would be removed from MPS.  Taking students away from MPS also affects revenue to MPS.  Also, the proportion of special needs students at Veritas is lower than at other MPS high schools.  This action would accelerate the trend of leaving MPS with a high concentration of low income and special needs students, which skews the results for MPS. 

Regent Davis disagreed, saying that school officials would like all three of their campuses to be under the same charter, from an accountability standpoint.  Also, Marcia Spector has indicated that Veritas has been successful despite MPS, Regent Davis said.  It is regrettable that there is flight from MPS, but this is partly because charter schools are an option for students and parents.  Regarding special needs students, the contract for Veritas requires that the school increase the percentage of special needs students.  The school has only 250 students, so the impact on MPS is not large.

Regent Vásquez then stated his understanding, which is that UW-Milwaukee is not actively recruiting charter schools from other authorizing entities.  Charter schools’ interest in UW-Milwaukee speaks to their desire to be associated with UW-Milwaukee; excellence seeks excellence.

Regent Crain remarked that the Board’s discussion is related to the challenge in public education in urban areas.  The Education Committee has struggled with these issues.  Within the committee, there was no question about the quality of the school, and committee members have respect for UW-Milwaukee and the way its charter schools are governed.

Regent Evers, acknowledging Regent Drew’s earlier comments, stated that he is focused on getting MPS into a position in which it can retain schools such as Veritas, rather than having them leave the system.  Expressing his support for the proposal at hand, Regent Evers said that the issue is bigger than one school and involves working together to make MPS strong enough so that changes such as this do not occur.  In response to a question from Regent Falbo, Regent Evers said that Veritas students are counted as MPS students.

Vice President Spector explained that he is abstaining from voting on the Veritas resolution because his sister is the executive director of the organization.  President Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolution 9723, which was adopted on a voice vote, with Regent Drew voting in opposition and Vice President Spector abstaining.  The resolution is as follows:

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract with Veritas High School

Resolution 9723:                     That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the charter school contract with the Seeds of Health, Inc., establishing a charter school known as the Veritas High School, effective July 1, 2010.

Asked if she had anything further to report from the Education Committee, Regent Crain expressed appreciation for Regents’ participation, and also for the guidance provided by Senior Vice President Martin; Associate Vice President Kolison; and Rebecca Karoff, Special Assistant to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Business, Finance, and Audit Committee Chair Brent Smith to present that committee’s report.  Regent Smith first reported that the committee had held its annual trust funds forum prior to the full Board meeting, with no speakers presenting.

2009 Annual Financial Report and Auditor’s Opinion 

Glen Nelson, Associate Vice President for Financial Administration, presented summary information from the UW System Annual Financial Report.  The report includes an unqualified audit opinion from the Legislative Audit Bureau, along with all standard higher education financial statements.  State Auditor Janice Mueller presented the auditor’s opinion, and Audit Director Carolyn Stittleburg highlighted the required auditor communications.  The committee was satisfied with UW System Administration’s responses to items the auditors noted.

2010 Operations Review and Audit Plan

Regent Smith said that Director Julie Gordon presented the proposed 2010 Review and Audit Plan of the UW System Office of Operations Review and Audit for Regent review and consideration.  The Plan includes several major reviews and is in Regents’ packets. 

Review and Approval of Revised Differential Tuition Policy

Senior Vice President Tom Anderes presented information on a revised differential tuition Board policy and proposed System guidelines for differential tuition initiatives. There was considerable discussion about what should be included in Board policy and what should be left to prescribed System guidance, Regent Smith reported.  The committee concluded that the Chair and Vice Chair would work with Senior Vice President Anderes and General Counsel Brady to address the committee’s concerns and present a revised policy at the April meeting.

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Commitment and Undergraduate Differential

Regent Smith stated that UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich presented information about an expanded differential tuition program for the institution, known as the Blugold Commitment.  The institution’s existing $163 per year differential was first approved by the Board in 1996.  The proposed increase would add $300 to the institution’s differential rate in each of the next four years, ultimately resulting in a $1,200 increase to undergraduate tuition rates.  The Blugold Commitment seeks to invest heavily in high impact learning practices, advising and student portfolios, and teaching and learning enhancements.  In addition, up to 40 percent of revenues generated would be available for financial assistance to those students with demonstrated need.  Funds raised by the UWEC Foundation may be used to lower the 40 percent allocation to financial aid.  Outcomes of the Blugold Commitment would be reviewed every five years.

Regent Smith said that Student Senate leaders spoke about their involvement in and support for the process, and three students spoke in opposition to the proposal.  Regent Emeritus JoAnn Brandes and UW-Eau Claire alumnus Terry Schadeberg addressed the committee in support of the Blugold Commitment.  After considerable discussion, there was an apparent desire to know more about the details of the expenditure plan.  The committee unanimously approved revised Resolution 9723, including a requirement for an expenditure plan to come back to the Board in May 2010.

UW-La Crosse Academic Excellence Initiative 

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joe Gow, along with representatives of the UW-La Crosse Student Association, addressed the committee, Regent Smith said, presenting information about the continuation of and annual adjustments to the existing UW-La Crosse Academic Excellence Initiative.  Students explained the components and planned uses for the differential.  The committee asked questions to understand the financial plan and the future increases.  In essence, the students’ preference was to have a smaller increase in year two, with 6 percent increases thereafter, rather than a larger increase in year two, followed by a 3 percent annual increase thereafter.  The new plan will combine the two existing differentials into one.  After questions regarding the need for the proposed increases, the committee approved Resolution 9722.

UW-Stout Access to Learning

UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen presented information about UW-Stout’s Access to Learning differential tuition.  This differential, which was established in 1999, adds 5 percent to resident undergraduate and graduate tuition rates and currently amounts to $9.48 per credit for undergraduates, and $15.26 per credit for graduate students.  The chancellor explained that this funding supports a broad array of active learning programs that promote critical and creative thinking abilities.  Students spoke about the benefits of this program and their support to continue it.  The committee approved Resolution 9723.

UW-Stout Customized Instruction

Chancellor Sorensen then presented the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee with information about UW-Stout’s Customized Instruction Program. This program was also established in 1999, and allows UW-Stout the flexibility to charge market rates for customized programs, certificates, and courses developed to meet market needs.  Chancellor Sorensen explained that these customized instruction programs are typically offered in an alternative delivery format.  The committee questioned how pricing was set and who the peers were for those programs, subsequently approving Resolution 9724.

Annual Trust Funds Report

Trust Funds Director Doug Hoerr presented highlights of the Annual Trust Funds Report.  The trust funds are comprised of gifts and bequests made directly to a UW institution.  As of June 30, 2009, the funds held net assets totaling $375 million, down from $430.3 million at the end of the prior fiscal year. 

UW System Strategic Plans for Major Information Technology Projects

Ed Meachen, Associate Vice President for Learning and Information Technology, reported to the committee on: (1) the Student Information System at UW-Eau Claire; (2) the Identity and Access Management Project; and (3) the Legacy Budget Project.  All three projects are on schedule and on budget. 

Update on Human Resources System (HRS)

The committee heard from Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs Tom Anderes about the status of the UW System Human Resources System project.  He reported that due to staff shortages, the Technical Development area is slightly behind schedule, but the other key areas are on schedule.  Expenditures are at or below budgeted amounts.

Review of 2009-10 Source of Funds by UW System Institution

Lynn Paulson, Assistant Vice President for Budget and Planning, presented an overview of key schedules in the UW System Annual Budget document.  He also presented members of the committee with a compact disc that contains all four volumes of the UW System annual budget.

Consent Agenda

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith moved adoption of Resolutions 9724, as revised; 9725, 9726, and 9727, which were approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Connolly-Keesler.  Resolution 9724 was removed from the consent agenda at the request of Regent Loftus. 

Resolutions 9725, 9726, and 9727 then were adopted on a unanimous voice vote:

Review and Adjustment of the UW-La Crosse Academic Excellence Initiatives Differential Tuition

Resolution 9725:                     That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves continuation of and annual adjustments to the existing UW-La Crosse Academic Excellence Initiatives undergraduate differential tuition.  Beginning in Fall 2010, the differential tuition rate will increase from $30.36 per semester to $60 per semester ($120 per year).  The rate will increase by 10%, to $66 per semester ($132 per year), in 2011-2012 and will then be adjusted by six percent annually through Fall 2014.

Review of UW-Stout Access to Learning Differential Tuition Program

Resolution 9726:                     That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the continuation of the Access to Learning differential tuition program at UW-Stout.

Review of UW-Stout Customized Instruction Differential Tuition Program

Resolution 9727:                     That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the continuation of the Customized Instruction differential tuition program at UW-Stout.

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Commitment and Undergraduate Differential Tuition

President Pruitt recognized Regent Loftus, who explained that he would be making a motion to delay consideration of Resolution 9724, as revised, until the May meeting.  He provided several reasons.  First, a tuition increase of this size during current economic times has a serious impact, and the full impact of the student union fees will occur this year at UW-Eau Claire.  Second, Board members are politicians, with most appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate, and with Regent Evers elected in a statewide election; therefore, Board members have an obligation to seek compromise and consensus.  Based on the discussion at Thursday’s Business, Finance, and Audit Committee meeting, there seems to be lurking a potential for consensus, or at least more support than there is now. 

Since UW-Eau Claire has been asked to return in May anyway, Regent Loftus suggested that a decision about the resolution be delayed and that UW-Eau Claire administrators return with a lower tuition increase, a more concrete commitment from the foundation on financial aid, and more student support.  The campus is already divided; if the resolution is passed, the opponents will become losers, rather than opponents; and even the opponents want a differential tuition proposal of some kind.  Moving this to the May meeting does not send it back to the campus; it keeps it here, but allows UW-Eau Claire to return with modifications, providing a chance for consensus. 

Regent Loftus moved that this item be taken up at the May meeting; he requested a roll call vote on the motion.  The motion was seconded by Regent Opgenorth.  Speaking in support of the motion, Regent Opgenorth commended the chancellor and Student Senate for the proposal that they brought forth.  He said that the proposal goes a long way toward preserving UW-Eau Claire’s quality and excellence.  However, the proposal has room to be strengthened.  He said that he has spoken with many well-informed UW-Eau Claire students, who should be allowed to work out their issues on their campus.

Regent Vásquez observed that there seems already to have been extensive discussion at the campus level; also the responsible and recognized shared governance bodies, both faculty and students, have been engaged in the discussion.  The chancellor, as a result of this discussion, has moved this proposal forward.  Regent Vásquez suggested that the Board should respect this process.  Also, Regent Vásquez posed the question of whether there is a commitment on the Board to make a decision when the issue comes back to the Board in May.  If the faculty, a group not tied to shared governance, or parents step forward to say they have not been heard, further delays could occur.

Regent Vásquez inquired about how shared governance should be integrated into the Board’s decision-making responsibility.  He said the he believes the process has worked, the chancellor has solicited input and brought forward the best decision possible.

Regent Pruitt next acknowledged Regent Loftus, who clarified that his motion is not to send the differential tuition proposal back to the campus but, rather, to keep the decision with the Board and simply delaying the decision until May.  UW-Eau Claire already has to return to the Board in May to provide detail on planned expenditures.

Regent Connolly-Keesler noted that the economy was no better last spring, when the Board approved the UW-Madison differential tuition proposal.  There was not overwhelming student support at UW-Madison, but the Board did not put UW-Madison on hold and ask it to go back to develop greater consensus.  Both decisions are difficult.  Regent Connolly-Keesler said that she would have preferred to see a lower differential tuition amount; however, this is the amount that has been brought forward for consideration, and the Board should vote either for or against the proposal at the current meeting.

Regent Bartell noted that he received many emails and was contacted by students and parents about the UW-Eau Claire differential tuition proposal.  Having reviewed the proposal carefully, and being prepared to vote, he echoed Regent Vásquez’s concerns about possible continued delays.  On the other hand, Regent Bartell expressed concerns about the vehemence of some of the objections, and said that he would be interested to know what effect postponing the decision until May would have on the campus.

Responding to Regent Bartell’s question, Chancellor Levin-Stankevich said that financial aid notices are sent out in April; therefore, incoming and continuing students could not be given a clear picture of what their costs would be for next year.  Students could perhaps be given hypothetical information.  Alternatively, implementation could be delayed until January 2011 or fall 2011. 

Regent Pruitt next recognized Regent Danae Davis, who said that she supports the resolution and amendment as recommended by the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.  Additional information on planned expenditures will help to address concerns that have been raised.  It is unfair to require UW-Eau Claire to suffer the ambiguity and uncertainty of waiting to implement financial aid and other components of the proposal.  Regent Davis also said that it is exciting that students have been so engaged in discussing these issues. 

Regent Loftus, with the permission of Regent Opgenorth, who had seconded his motion, amended the motion to have the Board decide on the Eau Claire proposal in April, rather than in May.

Regent Smith then spoke in opposition to the motion, saying that he believes there was a commitment from the foundation at UW-Eau Claire to raise money.  Also, he recalled that the initial survey at UW-Madison was not supportive.  In addition, he was impressed by the UW-Eau Claire student government leaders who spoke in support of the proposal. 

Regent Wingad then told the Board that he was unconvinced that a delay would change any of the information before the Board; he said enough information is available to make a decision.

Following up on earlier comments about UW-Madison’s differential tuition proposal, Regent Opgenorth referred to a second UW-Madison survey, the results of which were favorable toward that campus’s proposal.  He said the survey seemed to be a very effective way to reach students, but UW-Eau Claire students have not had an opportunity in a survey to comment on the current UW-Eau Claire proposal.  Providing this opportunity would go a long way toward consensus and would show progress. 

Regent Drew said that he believes in consensus, but that delaying would not lead to consensus at UW-Eau Claire.  Instead, delaying prolongs the pain.  There are good reasons to be against a tuition increase, but since the chancellor and Student Senate have come forward, it is important to take action at the current meeting.

Regent Vásquez commented that the currently-proposed tuition amount is already a compromise number; it has been adjusted based on input.  In addition, he noted that while the initiative has centered around tuition, the Blugold Commitment goes beyond tuition.  He encouraged a vote, and a vote in support of the proposal.

Vice President Spector, also commenting on Regent Loftus’s motion, said that the motion was thoughtfully presented, but that he disagreed with the premise that the Regents were appointed to reach consensus; they were appointed to do what is best overall for the UW System.  This is a representative democracy, rather than a direct democracy.  Regents have a responsibility to listen, consider, and apply their life’s wisdom and judgment to their decision making.  The presentations at Thursday’s Business, Finance, and Audit Committee meeting, on all sides, were terrific, Vice President Spector said.  He said that the Regents should decide now because it is what is best for the school, and therefore for the people of the state.  Students and parents should have predictability.  Appropriate weight has been given to the student component of shared governance; and approval of the proposal is best for current and future UW-Eau Claire students.

Regent Bartell expressed his agreement with Vice President Spector’s remarks and said he would vote in favor of the Blugold Commitment, both because he believes it has been carefully vetted by the campus, and also because a delayed decision could cause uncertainty on campus.

Regent Opgenorth raised a question about the amendment made at Thursday’s Business, Finance, and Audit Committee meeting, to require UW-Eau Claire to return in May to present a detailed plan for expenditures.  He asked what would happen if the Board is not satisfied with the plan.  Regent Smith replied that the plan would be sent back for further work.  Regent Opgenorth sought and received confirmation that only the expenditure plan would be sent back, but that this is separate from the Board’s approving the dollar amount.

Regent Crain expressed her support for the resolution adopted by the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, saying that she thought the appropriate steps had been taken, and the Board should act.

President Pruitt, remarking on the process, observed that emotional, passionate issues have been involved, with many strong opinions communicated on both sides.  It has been suggested that the leaders are not listening but, on the contrary, the Board and the campus have listened.  There may not be agreement, but that should not be interpreted as not listening.  President Pruitt thanked and congratulated Board members and the campus for the strong example of listening that they have demonstrated.

President Pruitt turned to President Reilly, who added his thanks to the students, as well as to Chancellor Levin-Stankevich and his leadership team.  President Reilly pointed out that the UW-Eau Claire resolution would not have come to the Board without his support.  He would not have supported the proposal had it not lowered the tuition rate after the student survey, but it did lower the rate.  He would not have supported the proposal if it had placed UW-Eau Claire’s tuition in the top of its peer group; it does not do that but, rather, keeps it near the mid-point.  He continued, saying that he would not have supported the proposal if it had not included a strong financial aid component, but it does include such a component.  He would not have supported the proposal if the faculty and staff had opposed it; they support it.  Finally, he would not have supported the proposal if the campus had not gotten repeated votes from the elected student government leadership in favor of it.

President Reilly noted that he does have concerns about the lack of consensus, but this is partly why he supports the amendment to the resolution which requires an expenditure plan from UW-Eau Claire by May.  He said that he believes that if the Board postpones a decision, it will inflame the situation; however, passing the resolution and urging the parties to work together on an expenditure plan will help to build consensus on campus.  He expressed support for the resolution.

President Pruitt then recognized Regent Loftus, who withdrew his request for a roll call vote on the motion to delay the vote on the UW-Eau Claire proposal.  Regent Opgenorth, who had seconded the motion, agreed.  President Pruitt then called for a vote on the Loftus motion to postpone the vote on the Blugold Commitment until April.  The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Next, President Pruitt turned to the main motion and Regent Wingad, who said that this decision is one of the most difficult he has had to make as a member of the Board.  Regent Wingad said that if passed, the proposal will affect the bill he receives as a student at UW-Eau Claire and will augment his considerable student loan debt.  He said he takes the decision very seriously and has weighed every perspective carefully.

The Blugold commitment has created the most student involvement that he has ever seen, Regent Wingad continued.  There have been students in opposition at recent Student Senate meetings, as well as involved in a collaborative process with the administration.  Regent Wingad said that for two years he oversaw the differential tuition process for students at UW-Eau Claire.  During the past six months’ worth of meetings to shape this proposal, student leaders were treated as equal partners.

The student body and elected student leaders have many concerns, which they rightly should with any proposal of this scope, and he has taken them seriously, Regent Wingad said.  Student opinion has been a chief factor in his decision-making process.  In the end, he said he believed that the student body’s elected leaders went through an extensive process that ultimately took into consideration the opinion of the student body and made a tough, close decision to approve the Blugold Commitment.  If the students’ elected representatives had voted no, he said, he would not feel comfortable considering this proposal.

Though he has been listening to both sides and believes it is important to be responsive to students, Regent Wingad said that the largest concern expressed by both elected representatives and students at large is a lack of specificity in the proposal.  His amendment to the resolution in the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee attempted to address these concerns.  A shared student and faculty process must be followed before specifics are provided.  Regent Wingad said that he proposed that the structure of the Blugold Commitment be approved so that student-faculty committees can be created and in three months, at the May meeting, the specifics that are lacking can be presented for Board approval.  Students will get a better sense of how their tuition dollars will be used and will have a chance to be part of the process.

Regent Walsh commented that these are tough times which demand creative solutions.  The beauty of shared governance is the engagement.  Also commenting on the focus on financial aid as way to alleviate the burden on the student, Regent Walsh said that he would vote yes on the resolution. 

Regent Pruitt called for a vote on Resolution 9724, as revised.  Regent Opgenorth requested a roll call vote.  The resolution was adopted, with Regents Bartell, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Drew, Evers, Falbo, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Vásquez, Walsh, and Wingad voting in the affirmative and Regents Loftus and Opgenorth voting in the negative.  There were no abstentions.

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Commitment and Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Revised

Resolution 9724:                     That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the expansion of the UW-Eau Claire undergraduate differential tuition beginning in Fall 2010.  The differential tuition will be phased in over four years. For full-time resident and nonresident undergraduate students, the differential will increase from $163 per year to $463 per year in 2010-11; $763 per year in 2011-12; $1,063 per year in 2012-13; and $1,363 per year in 2013-14.  The differential will be prorated for part-time students.

Up to forty percent of the increase in Blugold Commitment revenues will be available to support financial aid based on Estimated Family Contribution and Pell Grant eligibility.  

The outcomes of the proposed differential will be presented to the Board of Regents for review after five years (2015-2016).

UW-Eau Claire will present a detailed plan for expenditures for approval by the Board of Regents in May 2010.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee.  Regent Bartell reported that the committee approved eight resolutions, presented to the Board as consent agenda items.

Resolution 9728 was brought by UW Colleges on behalf of UW-Sheboygan to request authority to temporarily release 28 acres of land from UW-Sheboygan’s lease back to Sheboygan County to assist in the completion of a Sheboygan County river dredging project.  The land will be returned to the lease when the project is finished.  The project budget includes funding for fully restoring environmentally clean land.

Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9729, also brought by UW Colleges, involves UW-Richland.  It was a request for authority to amend a lease agreement to include an additional 1.4-acre parcel of land and improvements.  The building on this property will be upgraded, and the Art Department and the Richland County UW Cooperative Extension will be relocated to that facility.

Resolution 9730 asks for authority to seek a Building Commission waiver to allow the selection of a construction manager-at-risk for the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research project at UW-Madison.  This project will construct the second tower of this research facility and will require a unique set of construction knowledge and resources to successfully plan and coordinate the project.  The resolution grants authority to request a waiver of a single prime contractor, but the project may not require a waiver if pending legislation passes this spring.

Resolution 9731, also brought by UW-Madison, requests approval to increase the scope and budget of the Sterling Hall Renovation project to construct a Plasma Dynamo Facility.  This cutting-edge equipment to experiment with plasma gas and magnetic fields is entirely funded by a National Science Foundation grant.  Regent Bartell explained that a waiver will allow for single-prime bidding for the increased project scope.

Resolution 9732 requests approval to construct the UW-Oshkosh Residence Hall project for a total cost of $31.5 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.  This project will demolish three residence halls and replace them with a 340-bed, five-story suite style structure that will house primarily sophomores and juniors.  The building is designed to include sustainable design principles that emphasize energy efficiency, long term durability, and ease of maintenance.  This building is expected to receive LEED silver certification.  This project is coming in under budget.

Resolution 9733 requests approval to construct the Fisher and Wellers Halls Renovation project and increase the project budget by about $2 million Program Revenue-Cash, for a total cost of $10.5 million.  This project will renovate the first two buildings of 12 student residence halls at UW-Whitewater that are in need of capital renewal.  Renovation work in both buildings will improve existing rooms, add fire sprinklers, and replace the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, as well as windows and exterior doors.  External elevator shafts will also be added, to make the buildings more accessible.  This project was in the 2009-11 capital budget. 

Resolution 9734, another UW-Whitewater project, seeks approval to construct the Hyland Hall Solar Photovoltaic System project for a total cost of $296,200 ($150,000 Grant Funds and $146,200 Institutional Funds).

This project will install a photovoltaic array on the roof of Hyland Hall and connect it to the building’s electrical distribution system, reducing energy consumption from the grid, Regent Bartell said.  An energy dashboard will be installed in a public campus location to display real-time energy usage to highlight the university’s sustainability efforts and raise the public’s awareness of energy conservation.

Resolution 9735 requests authority to construct eight maintenance and repair projects that address areas of utility upgrades, roof replacements, and lab remodeling.

Stating that these eight resolutions were passed unanimously by the committee, Regent Bartell moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9728, 9729, 9730, 9731, 9732, 9733, 9734, and 9735.  The motion was seconded by Regent Drew.  Regent Stan Drew requested that Resolutions 9730 and 9731 be removed from the consent agenda due to a client conflict of interest.

Resolutions 9728, 9729, 9732, 9733, 9734, and 9735 then were adopted on a unanimous voice vote:

UW-Sheboygan - Authority to Release Approximately 27.6 Acres to Assist a Sheboygan County River Dredging Project and Accept the Return of the Land After Project Completion, UW Colleges

Resolution 9728:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to temporarily release approximately 27.57 acres from UW-Sheboygan’s lease back to Sheboygan County, for the purpose of completing a Superfund cleanup project of the Sheboygan River.

UW-Richland - Authority to Amend the Lease Agreement to Include an Additional 1.4 Acre Parcel of Land and Improvements, UW Colleges

Resolution 9729:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to amend the lease agreement with Richland County to add approximately 1.44 acres and building improvements.

Approval of the Design Report of the Residence Hall Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 9732:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Oshkosh Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the UW-Oshkosh Residence Hall project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total estimated cost of $31,500,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Approval of the Design Report of the Fisher and Wellers Halls Renovation Project and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9733:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Fischer and Wellers Halls Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to (a) increase the budget by $1,921,000 Program Revenue-Cash and (b) construct the project at a total cost of $10,505,000 ($8,584,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $1,921,000 Program Revenue-Cash).

Authority to Seek a Waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow for a Request for Proposal (RFP) Process and Construct the Hyland Hall Solar Photovoltaic System Project, UW-Whitewater

Revised

Resolution 9734:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater  Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct a Hyland Hall Solar Photovoltaic System Project for a total cost of $296,200 ($150,000 Grant Funds and $146,200 Institutional Funds).

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9735:                     That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $2,746,000 ($209,200 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $364,500 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; $535,000 Gifts and Grants; and $1,637,300 Program Revenue-Cash).

Regent Pruitt then called for a vote on Resolutions 9730 and 9731, which were approved on a voice vote, with Regent Stan Davis abstaining:

Authority to Seek a Waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., to Allow Selection Through a Request for Proposal Process of a Construction Manager-at-Risk for the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9730:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to waive s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., under the provisions of s. 13.48(19), Wis. Stats., to allow selection, through a Request for Proposal (RFP) process, of a Construction Manager-at-Risk for construction of the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research (WIMR) project, at a estimated budget of $134,800,000 ($67,400,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing [advance enumerated for release July 2011] and $67,400,000 Gifts/Grant Funds).

Authority to Adjust the Scope and Budget of the Sterling Hall Renovation Project to Construct a Plasma Dynamo Facility and to Seek a Waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., under Provisions of s. 13.48(19), Wis. Stats., to Allow Single-Prime Bidding, UW-Madison

Resolution 9731:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to (a) increase the scope and budget of the Sterling Hall Renovation project by $1,246,000 Gift Funds and (b) seek a waiver of s. 16.855, Wis. Stats., under the provisions of s. 13.48(19), Wis. Stats., to allow single-prime bidding for the Plasma Dynamo Facility, for an estimated total cost of $18,872,500 ($16,500,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $1,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – All Agency UW Infrastructure, and $1,372,500 Gift Funds).

Continuing his report, Regent Bartell said that Associate Vice President Miller reported that the Building Commission approved approximately $46 million for projects for the university at its December and January meetings.  Regent Bartell said that Associate Vice President Miller also updated the committee on the status of project-delivery legislation and the legislation to enumerate projects for UW-Whitewater and UW-Milwaukee.  There is cautious optimism that long-sought flexibility in delivery methods will become law.  Associate Vice President Miller also provided the committee with a preview of committee business in the coming months.  The committee then adjourned into closed session to discuss the naming of several facilities.

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PRESENTATION OF REGENT DIVERSITY AWARDS

President Pruitt introduced the 2010 Diversity Awards and welcomed the special guests at the meeting, the award winners and their families, friends, and colleagues. Stating that Regent Vásquez chaired the selection committee for this award, President Pruitt underscored the importance of recognizing and honoring the kind of work being done on many UW campuses to make diversity a genuine condition, rather than a “buzzword.”  The awards are a significant part of the UW System’s ongoing commitment to ensuring that all UW institutions provide a welcoming, supportive community, where all students can grow and succeed.  President Pruitt said that the individuals and programs being honored are shining examples of that commitment, and their efforts lead others by example.

President Pruitt then invited Regent Vásquez to speak.  Regent Vásquez echoed President Pruitt’s welcome to award recipients.  He said that this is the second year that the Board of Regents has presented its Diversity Awards, which are meant to recognize the outstanding contributions to diversity and inclusion by individuals, teams, and programs at UW institutions.  The Board established the awards through a directive which called for the formal recognition of those who have successfully fostered greater access and success for historically underrepresented populations.  While the awards are relatively new, these are ideals that the UW System has pursued for more than twenty years. 

Diversity plans and programs are important to organizations.  However, without a human touch, plans are only words on a page.  Three award recipients are being honored, in the categories of Individual, Team, and Institution.  Although the recipients may have different approaches to their diversity work, their efforts share common characteristics, such as a genuine respect for human differences, a deep attentiveness to the learning process, and a keen responsiveness to students and their educational needs.

Regent Vásquez said that this year’s Selection Committee included Regents Danae Davis, Betty Womack, and Aaron Wingad.  He thanked these Regents for their efforts and said that Regents Davis, Wingad, and he would each present one of the awards. 

Individual Award:  Ms. Marion McDowell, UW-Milwaukee

Regent Vásquez began the awards presentation by introducing Marion McDowell, recipient of the 2010 Board of Regents Diversity Award in the Individual category.  Ms. McDowell is Administrative Program Manager in the UW-Milwaukee College of Health Sciences, where for over 30 years she has worked to help disadvantaged students pursue their dreams of one day working in the health care field as doctors, nurses, therapists, scientists, and medical researchers. 

Ms. McDowell’s tenure as an advocate for students began in 1978, when she was hired by UW-Milwaukee to direct its Health Careers Opportunity Program, a program aimed at helping students of color cultivate the requisite academic skills needed to successfully prepare them for careers in the health and allied health professions.  Ms. McDowell has played a pivotal role in creating numerous academic skill-building programs for students of color.  Among those programs are:  (1) the Diversity Health Sciences Academy, which introduces elementary and middle school students to the world of health care through hands-on experiences in math and science; (2) the Saturday Academy, an  extracurricular program for 11th and 12th graders, aimed at honing their math and science skills while also introducing them to healthcare facilities, lab settings, and the college classroom; and (3) the Health Careers Undergraduate Program, which helps prepare undergraduates of color for the academic rigors of graduate and professional schools.

In the process of building these programs, Ms. McDowell has also played the critical role of fundraiser, securing millions of dollars in state and federal funds from agencies such as the Wisconsin’s Department of Public Instruction, the National Institutes of Health, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resource and Services Administration. 

She has proven herself to be an extraordinary collaborator as well, Regent Vásquez continued, forging strong relationships with important partners such as the city of Milwaukee Health Department, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Marquette University, and the Milwaukee Public School System.  With his best wishes, Regent Vásquez presented the individual award to Ms. McDowell. 

Expressing her thanks, Ms. McDowell said that she was deeply honored by the award and humbled by the recognition of her professional efforts.  She also expressed her gratitude to the UW-Milwaukee colleagues who nominated her for the award, Dr. Paula Ryner, Interim Associate Dean and Professor in the College of Health Sciences; Delois Snow, Interim Director of Pre-College Programs; and Donald Singleton, Director of the Upward Bound Program.  In addition, she expressed love and appreciation to her family and friends, who have supported her in her passion to help students. 

Creating a more diverse health care work force in America is a national concern, Ms. McDowell said, but progress is being made.  In 1978 there were only eight minority students identified to participate in Health Careers Opportunity Program.  By 2006, the annual target number for participation in structured programs was more than 500.  Each year, non-structured activities impacted at least one thousand additional students.  Graduates are now employed all over the world in both health- and non-health care professions, a testament to the importance of providing support services to under-represented students.  Ms. McDowell said that her goal is to continue to bring an inspiring strategic vision to the UW System’s diversity and inclusion efforts.  Ms. McDowell urged that the UW System continue to articulate a compelling case for diversity and the importance of addressing issues that affect students, staff, faculty, and the community. 

Team Award:  Multicultural Awareness Program Facilitation Team, UW-Colleges and UW-Extension

Regent Danae Davis presented the 2010 Board of Regents Diversity Award in the Team category to the Multicultural Awareness Program Facilitation Team at UW-Extension and UW Colleges.  The program, also known as MAP, is the cornerstone of a significant initiative of multicultural change.  Using a train-the-trainer model, MAP has held 38 two-day workshops so far.  These are open to all UW Colleges and UW-Extension employees across the state and focus on transforming the two institutions by facilitating a deeper understanding of cultural issues on personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural levels.  

Regent Davis said that what makes the team of facilitators so unique is the fact that the team consists of more than two dozen volunteers from UW-Extension and UW Colleges.  These individuals represent a broad cross-section of identities – race, ethnicity, culture, gender, age, sexual orientation and religion -- as well as different functions within the institution, including faculty, academic deans, researchers, administrative managers, and development specialists.  More than 900 faculty and staff members from both institutions have participated in MAP. 

Regent Davis said that the MAP model of wholesale change set this team apart.  She congratulated the Multicultural Awareness Program Facilitation Team, introducing Demetrius Brown, a 4-H and Youth Development faculty member, and Susan Fey, a video design manager for Wisconsin Public Television, to accept the award.

Mr. Brown thanked the Board of Regents and the awards committee.  He said that the MAP team has been educating UW Colleges and UW-Extension colleagues and others about multicultural education for five years.  He said that it has been a great experience and builds upon his past work helping students and faculty understand that those who have been marginalized need an opportunity to have doors opened for them.

Mr. Brown and his colleagues on the Multicultural Awareness Team have learned from their own cultural experiences, have shared those experiences with others, and have examined both their privileges and lack of privileges.  He acknowledged by name 24 members of two cohort groups involved with the project, and also expressed appreciation for the support of Chancellor Wilson.

Susan Fey then asked Chancellor Wilson if he would like to offer remarks.  Chancellor Wilson took the opportunity to thank the Board, as well as the multicultural trainers.  He said that he has not received even one complaint during his tenure as chancellor about mistreatment because of human differences.  He praised the cultural, institutional transformation that the team has led at UW Colleges and UW-Extension.

Ms. Fey said that the program took a decade to flower, before facilitators were selected.  Some very skilled “gardeners” were involved, including Associate Vice President Vicki Washington and President Reilly.  She noted that all 900 of those who attended the training sessions had volunteered to come.  The feedback has been positive, with many describing the training as life-changing.  She thanked the Board for recognizing the commitment required to make the program work. 

Institutional/Unit Award:  Summer Business Institute, UW-Whitewater

Regent Wingad presented the final award, in the Institution/Unit category, to UW-Whitewater for its Summer Business Institute program.  Although relatively new, this is an extraordinary initiative, he said, one that models responsiveness to student needs.

As background, Regent Wingad said that data compiled through UW System’s Equity Scorecard project revealed that at UW-Whitewater, students of color performed as well as their white peers in freshman and sophomore business courses, but by the third year of college, they tended to switch to other majors.  The Summer Business Institute originated two years ago as part of a cross-departmental initiative led by Freda Briscoe, Director of the Minority Business Program in the College of Business and Economics.  Ms. Briscoe and College administrators gathered faculty from accounting, economics, business education, and marketing, as well as staff from Academic Support Services, to begin a conversation about addressing this identified gap in retention.

The result was the Summer Business Institute, a one-week residential program for admitted students of color with a GPA of between 2.5 and 2.9.  As part of the Institute, students become connected with business faculty and administrators from UW-Whitewater’s College of Business and Economics, develop a vision of what a business career could be, work with mentors, establish a cohort of friends, and learn about life on campus. 

Early progress reports have been promising, Regent Wingad noted.  Between 2008 and 2009, the Summer Business Institute increased enrollment from 17 to 25 students. Summer Business Institute students had a 94 percent retention rate, compared to 85 percent retention among other students of color in the Minority Business Program.  The College of Business and Economics is committed to mentoring these students of color so that they may become active, involved members of the campus community and the business world; and their presence in business classes enriches the learning experiences for all students.  Regent Wingad presented the Regents’ Diversity Award to UW-Whitewater’s Summer Business Institute, represented by Ms. Briscoe, Director of the Minority Business Program.

Ms. Briscoe expressed appreciation for the award on behalf of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and the College of Business and Economics’ Summer Business Institute coordinating team.  She explained how the analysis of the Equity Scorecard data led UW-Whitewater staff to challenge the assumption that academic performance in gateway courses created roadblocks to college entry.  Rather, many students migrated to other majors in the university prior to taking the gateway courses.  As the College collaborated with staff in the Academic Support Services Unit, it was discovered that a lack of connection to the business school and its faculty over the initial two years of enrollment and perceived cultural differences were potential forces driving students away.

As a result, the Summer Business Institute was created.  Examples of Summer Business Institute programming include:  participation in a written and oral communication class that infuses marketing concepts into lectures and hands-on activities; an overview of the Concepts of Business class, in which students meet College faculty and staff and learn about business majors and requirements; sessions on personal finances and financial management; and a trip to Manpower’s Headquarters in Milwaukee.  Students have reported excitement about and satisfaction with the program. 

Ms. Briscoe said that Summer Business Institute is a process that is transforming the way administrators, faculty and staff perceive their roles in the success of students of color in the College of Business and Economics.  She acknowledged the coordinating team members at the meeting, including George Herrmann, Executive Vice President of the Americas at Manpower; Interim Dean Lois Smith; Han Ngo, Academic Advisor; and Kathy Mlinar, University Service Associate.  In closing, Ms. Briscoe again thanked the Board of Regents and the selection committee for this prestigious award. 

- - -

The meeting was recessed at 11:55 a.m. and reconvened at 12:05 p.m.

- - -

CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Drew, Evers, Falbo, Loftus, Opgenorth, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Vásquez, and Wingad voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9736:                     That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider appointment of a UW-Fond du Lac campus executive officer and dean, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats; to consider UW-Milwaukee and UW-River Falls honorary degree nominations, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider personal histories, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats., related to naming facilities at UW-Superior and UW-Whitewater; to consider salary approval for an interim chancellor for UW Colleges and UW-Extension, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to consider a faculty member request for review of a UW-Stout personnel decision, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

The following resolutions were adopted in closed session:

Authorization to Appoint:  Dean, UW-Fond du Lac, University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9737:                     That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint John Short as Dean at the University of Wisconsin- Fond du Lac, effective July 1, 2010 at an annual salary of $106,000.

Authority to Name the Health and Wellness Center the “Marcovich Wellness Center,” UW-Superior

Resolution 9738:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Superior Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the Health and Wellness Center the “Marcovich Wellness Center.”

Authority to Name the UW-Whitewater Track and Soccer Stadium the “Robert W.Fiskum Stadium,” UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9739:                     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the UW-Whitewater track and soccer stadium the “Robert W. Fiskum Stadium.”

Authorization to Appoint:  Interim Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension

Resolution 9740:                     That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Marvin Van Kekerix be appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension, effective July 1, 2010, at a base annual salary of $200,000.

Consideration of Faculty Member Request for Review of a UW-Stout Personnel Decision (Recommendation of the Personnel Matters Review Committee)

Resolution 9741:                     That the Board of Regents adopts the Proposed Decision and Order as the Board’s final Decision and Order in the matter of a request for Regent review of a UW-Stout decision on an employee grievance.

- - -

The meeting was adjourned at 1:10 p.m.

 

Submitted by:

 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board