Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Thursday, August 19, 2010

10:00 a.m.

RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR GOVERNOR JIM DOYLE. 2

2011-13 BIENNIAL BUDGET. 5

State Support and Flexibilities. 5

New Initiatives. 6

2011-13 UW System Biennial Capital Budget. 7

2011-13 UW System Biennial Capital Budget Request 7

2011-13 UW System Biennial Operating Budget. 8

Operating Budget Discussion.. 9

2011-13 UW System Biennial Operating Budget Request 13

CLOSED SESSION.. 13


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Thursday, August 19, 2010

10:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Jessica Schwalenberg, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regent Anthony Evers.

- - -

RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR GOVERNOR JIM DOYLE

President Pruitt began the meeting by noting the presence of a special guest, Governor Jim Doyle.  President Pruitt remarked that in politics and in life there are easy fights and tough fights; his experience is that there is no shortage of elected officials willing to take on the easy fights.  For over 20 years in this state, Jim Doyle has taken on tough fights.  President Pruitt cited three examples.  First, in 2006, the Taxpayer Protection Amendment to the Constitution was proposed by some legislators.  This amendment would have harmed the University of Wisconsin System; the Board of Regents opposed it, and Gov. Doyle took on the tough fight to make sure that it did not pass in the legislature.  Second, Gov. Doyle took on the tough fight in support of domestic partner benefits for UW and state employees. Third, children of immigrants now have an opportunity to continue in the state’s university system, thanks to Gov. Doyle’s appreciation of the need for fairness and doing what is right. 

President Pruitt thanked the governor for his courage, and also for doing his best to protect the university financially, for his work on the Wisconsin Covenant and financial aid, and for his support of the Growth Agenda.

President Pruitt called upon Regent Walsh to present the resolution of appreciation for Governor Jim Doyle.  Noting that he was one of the governor’s first appointments to the Board, Regent Walsh said that he has observed the governor’s building of his legacy of support for higher education.  In 2003, the governor inherited the largest structural deficit in the state’s history, and economic conditions have not gotten easier.  However, the governor has looked out for the university financially; the University’s base budget has increased 10.6% percent over the last eight years. 

Also, Regent Walsh noted that the governor has delivered on improved access to the university, particularly in the area of financial aid; WHEG has increased by $163 million.  The Lawton and Advanced Opportunity programs have also increased.  The governor also created the Tuition Increase Grants program.  The governor has put in place the Wisconsin Covenant program, a challenge to eight graders to aspire to higher education.  Thanks to the governor’s leadership, philanthropists have also stepped forward.  In 2009, an all-time high number of students graduated from the UW System. 

In addition to access, higher education has been part of the governor’s economic agenda.  Significant investments have been made in facilities and research.  UW-Madison leads the way, as one of the top three universities in the country, in the amount of research grants.  The governor has also stood up for stem cell research. 

Regent Walsh said that the governor has sent a strong message about the importance of education, and access to high-quality educational institutions, for all residents of the state of Wisconsin.  Regent Walsh then presented the resolution of appreciation to Governor Jim Doyle:

Resolution of Appreciation, Governor Jim Doyle

Resolution 9800:        

WHEREAS, throughout his eight distinguished years as Governor of Wisconsin, James Doyle has demonstrated a deep commitment to advancing the potential, performance, and positive impact of the institutions of the University of Wisconsin System; and

WHEREAS, by his leadership and actions, Governor Doyle has done all within his power to help keep the UW System among the best, most accessible, and most affordable in the country, and

WHEREAS, from championing a much-needed program of building renovation and new construction on UW campuses, to providing necessary resources and improving access for all Wisconsinites and supporting the UW System’s Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, to leading and supporting the UW System’s initiatives in research and discovery as an engine for economic growth and improving the state’s quality of life, Governor Doyle has truly helped position the UW System for the 21st century’s jobs and economy; and

WHEREAS, the Wisconsin Covenant, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, and state financial aid – which has tripled during his tenure – are just three examples of his initiatives in support of higher education, and will benefit thousands of students and citizens for years to come; and

WHEREAS, from all corners of Wisconsin to around the world, including trade visits to China and Japan, Governor Doyle has promoted the University of Wisconsin System with vision and passion at every turn, helping to create opportunities for a great university system to become even greater – impacting more lives, forging valuable new partnerships, and advancing the mission and work of the Wisconsin Idea;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System highly commends Governor James Doyle for contributing significantly to the legacy of excellence of public higher education in Wisconsin, wishing him continued great success, good health, and much happiness in his future endeavors.

Governor Doyle said that he was deeply honored by the resolution.  He said that the Regents have provided great leadership and service for the university, and he thanked them and their predecessors for their work.  The governor also recognized the leadership of former UW System President Katharine Lyall and current President Kevin Reilly.  The governor thanked the chancellors and acknowledged the skill that it takes to effectively manage the campuses and move them ahead during such difficult economic times.

The Governor, referring to Regent Walsh’s remarks, said that it takes hard work and difficult decisions to educate more students than ever before, during the deepest recession since the Great Depression.  Noting the impending start of the new semester, the Governor Doyle described the pride that parents have in bringing their students to the University of Wisconsin System in the fall. 

The Governor noted the dramatic increase in the amount of financial aid available to students and stressed the importance of continuing on this course so that students can afford and have the opportunity to receive a quality education.  He also noted the rebuilding of many campuses in the state.  Citing $2 billion in projects at campuses around the state, the governor said that these buildings would be there for generations.  The governor also noted the commitment to research and important discoveries at UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, and the other UW campuses, as well.

Referring to the tough economic times, a mood of cynicism, and criticism of public institutions, the governor urged a continued focus on moving the System forward and providing opportunities to a world-class education.  

2011-13 BIENNIAL BUDGET

Before turning to the discussion of the UW System’s 2011-13 biennial budget request, President Pruitt turned to UW System President Reilly to introduce some UW colleagues.  President Reilly first introduced Chris Markwood, UW-Superior’s new interim chancellor.  Interim Chancellor Markwood joined UW-Superior as Provost, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty in 2006, and assumed the role of interim chancellor on August 1, 2010.   President Reilly also introduced UW-Superior’s new interim provost, Faith Hensrud.   Ms. Hensrud previously served the campus as Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Outreach.

New UW-Platteville Provost Mittie Nimocks taught at UW-Platteville as a professor of speech communication, later serving for eight years as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Education.  She was appointed recently as Platteville’s chief academic officer by Chancellor Dennis Shields.

Finally, President Reilly introduced UW System’s new Associate Vice President for Policy Analysis and Research, Heather Kim, who succeeds Sharon Wilhelm.  Associate Vice President Kim will continue to provide annual accountability reports and other data.  Ms. Kim has 20 years of experience in institutional and higher education research, most recently as Director of Institutional Research at Dartmouth College.

State Support and Flexibilities

Joining President Reilly in welcoming these colleagues, President Pruitt began the discussion of the biennial budget by saying that the law requires that UW System submit its budget request to the state in September, so that the Governor and his staff have time to incorporate the UW’s ideas into the larger state biennial budget, typically announced in February.  The Regents have already devoted considerable time and attention to helping refine the budget request. 

Today’s decisions on the budget request deserve to be put into a larger context, President Pruitt said.  Referring to the recent “barnstorming” tour, centered on the “Principles for Progress and Prosperity” that President Pruitt and former Regent President Jay Smith coauthored,  President Pruitt said that the broader context is one of long-term bipartisan discussion about the relative priority of higher education in the state’s budget.

President Pruitt said that it is not the university’s role to suggest how much to collect in taxes, or who should pay taxes; those decisions are left to others.  Rather, the conversation has been about how many cents of the dollars collected should be invested in higher education, and how to ensure a more stable funding base to enable campuses to effectively plan for the future.  In return, the university is prepared to deliver measurable performance against goals that have met with near universal acceptance. 

The UW’s General Purpose Revenue (GPR) allocation has declined over time relative to overall state spending, from about 14 cents of every tax dollar allocated to the UW System in the early 1980s, to fewer than 9 cents of every tax dollar today.  In addition, President Pruitt said that when he and President Reilly were interviewed by Wisconsin Eye, the reporter used data from the Legislative Fiscal Bureau to show that note that GPR support for the UW System grew by 14 percent between 1999 and 2010, while overall GPR spending grew by nearly 27 percent over the same time period.  President Pruitt noted that GPR allocated to the Department of Corrections, for example, grew during this period by 81 percent, illustrating the choices that are made about the relative priority of the UW in the state budget.

In discussing the Growth Agenda, the university has stressed the need for both more State support and the flexibility to adopt more efficient, contemporary business practices.  During the barnstorming tour, community leaders and editorial boards seem to understand the necessity for the university to be given more flexibility to do its work, President Pruitt said.  It is often said that the UW should behave more like a business; however, President Pruitt noted, it is difficult to imagine any business of the size and scope of the UW that would not have the ability to decide the number of dollars needed for personnel costs or the flexibility to distribute those dollars to address competitive compensation and retain that business’ best employees.   It is also difficult to imagine a business without the ability to generate revenue and then devote that revenue to producing a higher-quality product.

President Pruitt referred to two of the statutory changes in the budget request, expanding tuition authority to include educational quality initiatives and authorization to address competitive compensation needs across the UW System.  He said that these would be small but important steps that the state could take to provide chancellors and university leadership with a greater ability to recruit and retain top talent and give the Board of Regents greater flexibility to use tuition dollars to enhance education quality. 

New Initiatives

President Pruitt next turned to President Reilly to continue the biennial-budget conversation.  President Reilly said that last month’s special meeting provided a further opportunity to review the overall approach before today’s discussion and action, and that specific numbers have been assigned to the initiatives.  The focus of the proposed budget is on things the university can do to help the state emerge from the economic downturn stronger than before by producing more graduates and creating more jobs.  

To achieve these goals, new state investment is needed, with the new initiatives adding up to about $83 million, an amount that is about one-third of original proposals.  Increased management flexibility is also needed to make better use of existing resources.  The university is cognizant of the state’s fragile economic condition and the scarcity of public resources.  However, the university is an economic catalyst that can help move the state toward recovery and long-term prosperity.

Some familiar concepts underlie the budget proposal, such as continued emphasis on affordability and access, as evidenced by a request for more “hold harmless” funding to insulate families from tuition increases.  Concern about affordability for taxpayers, as well as students, is evident in the budget; the amount of funding requested for new enrollments is only 75 percent of the per-student costs used in previous budget calculations.  The Research to Jobs report has been narrowed down to the list of investments that would have the biggest and most immediate returns on investment. 

The university will continue to press forward on both the more-jobs and more-graduates fronts.  In total, the new initiatives represent a relatively modest increase of about a four-percent gain in state GPR.  This new funding will be used to leverage considerable federal and private dollars.  The UW-Madison initiative alone stands to bring in approximately $35 million in outside funds.

Along with the strong economic impact that follows UW graduates, now estimated at a $545 million increase to Wisconsin income with each graduating class, the Growth Agenda initiatives will yield a strong dividend for the entire state.  Legislative leaders from both parties have been receptive to this message. 

2011-13 UW System Biennial Capital Budget

President Reilly next called upon Senior Vice President Morgan to provide more detail on the budget request.  Senior Vice President Morgan first turned to Associate Vice President David Miller to present the capital budget. 

Mr. Miller presented a summary slide showing an all-funds picture, which showed that program revenue was slightly less than half of the amount last biennium.  This is because large new residence hall projects have been completed on almost all campuses to create a diversity of residence hall opportunities for students.  Traditional halls are still available for freshmen, and suite-style for upperclassmen.  New building has now largely been completed, and prospective projects will renovate and remodel traditional residence halls to make them more modern.

Referring to the Board materials, Associate Vice President Miller reviewed the detail underlying the recommendation in the resolution before the Board.  He also noted that some projects were not fully-developed enough to bring forward at this time; a December supplemental request is common.

Regent Bartell moved approval of Resolution 9801.  The motion was seconded by Regent Wingad and adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

2011-13 UW System Biennial Capital Budget Request

Resolution 9801:        

That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2011-13 Capital Budget request be submitted to the Department of Administration and the State Building Commission. The 2011-13 Capital Budget request includes the following:

1.     Enumeration of three projects at a cost of $54.0 million General Fund Supported Borrowing (GFSB) and $5.6 million Program Revenue Supported Borrowing (PRSB).

Note: 2011-13 General Fund Supported Borrowing also includes $22.5 million GFSB that was advance enumerated in the 2007-09 Capital Budget and $199.9 million GFSB that was advance enumerated in the 2009-11 Capital Budget, and those funds will become available on July 1, 2011, for five major projects.

2.     Enumeration of fourteen projects funded by non-GFSB sources ($175.6 million PRSB and $36.6 million Gift/Grant Funds).

3.     Enumeration of $83.6 million GFSB and $25 million PRSB for UW maintenance, repair, and renovation projects through the State Building Commission’s All Agency program.

4.     Authorization for the UW System President or designee to adjust individual project budgets as necessary in the development of the final 2011-13 Capital Budget recommendation with the Wisconsin Department of Administration.

2011-13 UW System Biennial Operating Budget

Senior Vice President Morgan then continued the discussion of the 2011-13 operating budget, with its proposed new investments.  First, however, he noted that the budget does not include cost to continue and program revenue requests.  This is because all data needed to set these portions of the budget are not yet available.  He said that cost to continue would include increases for financial aid programs, student technology fees, fringe benefit rates approved by the Department of Administration (DOA), negotiated classified salary increases, reinstatement of furlough savings, 2008-09 semi-automatic pay progressions, and other DOA-approved costs.  Regarding program revenue, authority will be needed for gift and trust funds, general operating funds, and auxiliaries.

Senior Vice President Morgan reiterated that legislators and the governor have responded favorably to the UW System’s initiatives focused on economic growth and development.  DOA budget instructions have allowed for zero percent increases, except for UW System instruction and research activities focused on economic growth. 

Next, Associate Vice President Freda Harris reviewed new initiatives tied to the more-graduates and more-jobs goals of the Growth Agenda, undergirded by a competitive university workforce, for a total request of $83.2 million.  More graduates will be accomplished by increasing retention and access, including increases in the precollege pipeline.  To improve affordability, increased funding for WHEG and the Tuition Increase Grant is proposed.  Ms. Harris also described research initiatives, as outlined in the Board materials, including Phase II of the Milwaukee Research Initiative, resources for graduate assistants at UW-Madison, increased digital resources for UW System libraries, three emerging technology centers, and development of the research infrastructure at UW institutions.

To support a competitive university workforce, Ms. Harris described the reinstatement of the 2 percent pay-plan increase that was provided to represented, but not to nonrepresented, employees.  Further discussion of the Competitive University Workforce Commission recommendations and of an unclassified pay-plan request will follow at a later date.

Associate Vice President Harris also described statutory language change recommendations, most of which are continuing requests from prior years.  Two new requests this year are to expand tuition authority to include educational quality, and to authorize the Board of Regents to address competitive compensation needs across the System. 

DOA requires agencies to submit performance measures.  The UW System’s measures are enrollments, second-year retention, graduation rates, and undergraduate degrees.  These reflect the work being done on the Growth Agenda and will be consistent with the annual Accountability Report.

Operating Budget Discussion

Regent Danae Davis moved adoption of Resolution 9802; the motion was seconded by Regent Vásquez.  Discussion followed.  Regent Danae Davis asked about precollege-program goals.  Senior Vice President Martin responded to the question, saying that the proposed initiative is for UW-Extension’s portion of the More Graduates initiative and focuses on college readiness in all counties of the state.  Regent Davis asked whether there should be alignment with existing precollege programs.  Senior Vice President Martin indicated that there is a need for alignment, and work toward this alignment is underway.  President Reilly also addressed precollege goals and the importance of ensuring the students involved in these programs eventually graduate. 

Regent Loftus asked about performance measures for the UW Colleges.  He cited statistics, saying for example, that the six-year graduation rate with a bachelor’s degree for UW Colleges students is below 30 percent.  President Reilly responded, saying that 80 percent of students are still actively involved, pursuing a degree, after six years.  This population takes the longest to earn a degree.  One of the UW Colleges’ goals relates to improving the extent to which students earn their associate’s degrees.  Senior Vice President Martin noted that the national Access to Success effort, in which UW System is participating, has a goal of cutting in half the achievement gap for under-represented and minority students by 2015.  Access and success goals are built into the more-graduates goals. 

Interim UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor Van Kekerix added that about one-third of UW Colleges students are part-time students, and about 45 percent are in the lower half of their class, so they may take longer to earn their degrees.  Of full-time new freshmen in 1999, 85 percent had completed their degrees by the end of the seventh year, and 92 percent had completed their degrees by the end of the eighth year.  A good deal of growth will come from people who are not in the top 50 percent of their class, and who may be geographically isolated.  The measures currently used do not account for this.  Provost Greg Lampe reinforced this, noting that the adult student population can also take a longer time to earn degrees.  It is a challenge and a source of pride to help students achieve their goals, he said.  Senior Vice President Martin also observed that ACT scores indicate that UW Colleges are serving a different population than institutions that are taking the top tier of students from high school, making the picture more complex. 

Regent Loftus reiterated that his question was about the performance measures for the Colleges.  President Reilly said that new and higher goals have been developed for the Colleges; these will continue to evolve and are part of the overall more-graduates strategy.

Regent Schwalenberg, stating that she is a graduate of UW-Waukesha, said that UW-Waukesha is the largest of the UW Colleges, is in a mixed urban/rural area, and has a good diversity level.  Having worked in the precollege programs and the multicultural and diversity area there, she said that there is room to strengthen these programs.  Offering students hope about the outlook for their future is important.  There is difficulty in recruiting traditional-age students, because many of them are looking for the typical college experience that might include residence-hall living, etc.  The Colleges are important for reaching nontraditional students; they offer a unique opportunity to interact with faculty and academic staff, similar to private institutions.  More academic-program or student-life initiatives may attract more multicultural students.  Regent Loftus commented that Regent Schwalenberg has a great value to offer the Board.          

Regent Vásquez, noting that he was raised in San Antonio and is Mexican, said that the conversation is full of complexities.  He thought that the Wisconsin Technical College System would promote rapid movement of students into college to earn bachelor’s degrees; however, he has come to realize that this will take time and effort.  Each group must be examined specifically.  He has read articles about Texas that said that the community college system in Texas was doing a poor job of ensuring students would transfer and graduate.  Hispanic or Mexican-American students lamented the commuter aspect; they have to go home, and the influences on them, such as unemployed parents, are not necessarily supportive of their returning to school.  Also, for younger students, there is a desire to have a traditional on-campus experience.  Maybe it is important to get them into comprehensive institutions as soon as possible, to help motivate them to stay in school.  Quick, cookie-cutter approaches do not exist.  UW-Extension can be helpful, but will not necessarily be the premier solution for helping students move through college.  It is important to acknowledge that change will take time.

Regent Drew said that he was pleased with the proposed reinstatement of the rescission of the 2 percent pay-plan.  He asked about peer comparisons.  Vice President Spector, who was co-chair of the Competitive University Workforce Commission, noted that, for other than a couple of categories, the UW was behind in compensation, as measured without benefits.  Associate Vice President Harris referred Regents to the materials for further details on the comparative data.  

Regent Crain suggested that some of the discussion about the Colleges and other issues should be continued within committees.  Regarding compensation, it is important to talk about being competitive as a state; the UW must prepare graduates at quality institutions.

Regent Bartell asked about the objective of adding 5,900 students in the next biennium and the dollar amount associated with this.  With state support per student already $2,300 below the national average, he expressed concern about a projection of 75 percent of the equivalent of 2008-09 state support per student.  He also asked if this is something that will continue.  President Reilly noted that the traditional cost per student is calculated based on a student out of high school whose education extends over four to six years.  However, it is expected that some new enrollments will be nontraditional students, and credits will be earned through prior learning or from other campuses.  Associate Vice President Freda Harris added that the university will have to change the way services are delivered to students as new enrollments are added; it is hoped that more online programs, collaboration between institutions, transfer opportunities, and credit for prior learning will lead to lower costs.

UW-Madison Chancellor Martin countered these statements, saying that cost per student will not go down, and returning adult students do not necessarily cost less to educate.  The approach being discussed seems inconsistent with requesting differential tuition to cover the costs of educating undergraduate students.  President Reilly reiterated that there is reason to believe that working adults, returning students, and nontraditional students may cost less to educate, without reducing quality.

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Gow commented that appropriate faculty and staff compensation and restoring the 2-percent pay plan must be a high priority.  Compensation continues to fall behind, and it becomes more difficult to motivate faculty and staff.  He offered his help at the legislature.

Regent Falbo said that Chancellor Martin and President Reilly were describing two different populations, that it will not be cheaper to educate traditional students, but that some efficiencies will be gained in educating nontraditional students.  He then went on to say that the goals for the next biennium are not on track to reach 80,000.  Senior Vice President Martin said that the next biennium is part of a ramp-up period, and slower progress will be seen at the beginning.

Regent Wingad asked about the split between GPR and fees for the new initiatives.  Associate Vice President Harris said that 65 percent is assumed to be provided by the state, and 35 percent by tuition.  Therefore, new enrollments use this split.  Research, however, is traditionally 100 percent funded by the state.  Regent Wingad asked about the possibility of asking for a greater proportion of state support.  Senior Vice President Morgan, noting that only about one-third of requested initiatives were reflected in the budget, said that the requested investments are seen as appropriately balanced.  Some legislative leaders are concerned about whether the request is too high, but the university concluded that this is the right request to make.  President Reilly commented that the answer to the question about the right balance is not clear.  He noted that the 65/35 split is the traditional request, and changing this may be seen as unrealistic.

Chancellor Wells remarked that it is important to consider how to create more, better-prepared graduates at lower per-capita cost.  It is important to address the compensation issue, but closing graduation/retention gaps is important, too.

Regent Danae Davis said that it would be helpful to have a visual of the trajectory of the 80,000 new graduates, including the new 5,900, showing which campuses are responsible for what growth, including the two-year campuses.  This will help Regents participate in the university’s reaching the goals, by allowing the Regents to absorb the visual depiction and then track progress.  Senior Vice President Martin, expressing some hesitation about whether this can be reflected in one visual, said that her office would try.  Goals also will be reflected in the Accountability Report.  She offered a reminder that new investment from the state will be needed over time to meet the goals.  Regent Davis said that the investment required should be depicted, as well.  President Pruitt added that it would be worth Regents’ time to continue these conversations in committees, as Regent Crain had suggested. 

Regent Loftus, returning to the 75-percent new-enrollment per-student cost projection, asked how this would affect the amount of funding institutions or the System would receive.  Associate Vice President Harris clarified that this is not a cut; institutions would retain their current base levels of funding.  The 75-percent projection relates to the cost of new enrollments and finding ways to reduce the cost of serving those students; the new-enrollment goals vary by campus, so resources will be affected by individual campuses’ level of participation in the new enrollments.  However, each student will still have state resources plus tuition resources.

Chancellor Wells commented that without receiving the management flexibilities requested in the budget, it will be difficult to reduce costs.  Chancellor Martin said that the funding requests should be conditional on gaining increased flexibilities.  Also, base budgets need to be kept up where they were, including the furlough savings.  Significant challenges exist for educating undergraduate students – getting into the courses they need, the majors they want, and getting the quality education that the UW needs to offer Wisconsin students.  Institutions are stretched to the limit; they want to be able to do what is right for the state, but the new initiatives must be viewed as conditional on the increased flexibilities.

Regent Vásquez said that future budgets would be successful if there is a demonstration that growth in the cost of education is significantly controlled.  In light of the economy and other factors, it seems unlikely that the cost of education will be reduced.  However, the increase in costs should be monitored and controlled. 

Regent Falbo said that the current budget request is a culmination of the goals that the Regents have effectively endorsed approved over the course of past discussions. 

Before calling for a vote on the motion to approve the operating budget request, President Pruitt commented that the need for increased management flexibilities, if not an explicit condition of the budget goals, is implicit.  President Reilly noted that this message has been communicated during conversations with legislative leaders.  President Pruitt then called for a vote on the motion, which was carried on a unanimous voice vote.     

2011-13 UW System Biennial Operating Budget Request

Resolution 9802:        

That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the submission of its 2011-13 Biennial Operating Budget request, totaling an ongoing increase of $83.6 million in GPR/Fees for the Growth Agenda, along with recommended Statutory Language Changes and approved Performance Measures.  The Board delegates authority to the UW System President to submit the Cost to Continue and Program Revenue requests and seek an extension to the statutorily required September 15, 2010 submission date, if needed.  The Cost to Continue and Program Revenue request amounts will be provided to the Board of Regents in October.

- - -

CLOSED SESSION

The full Board of Regents reconvened after the afternoon committee meetings, at which time the following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded by Regent Wingad, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Schwalenberg, Smith, Spector, Vásquez, Walsh, Wingad, and Womack voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9803:        

That the Board of Regents move into closed session to discuss the report of the Committee on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

The following resolution was passed during closed session:

Resolution 9804:        

That the UW System Board of Regents authorize the Board President to send in final form the draft letter that the Board discussed, after making whatever revisions the Board President deems appropriate.

The meeting was adjourned at approximately 4:30 p.m.

 

Submitted by:

 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Friday, August 20, 2010

9:00 a.m.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE JUNE 10 AND 11, 2010 AND JULY 23, 2010 MEETINGS. 3

2010 REGENTS TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS. 3

Individual Awards. 4

Professor of Mathematics Dr. Jennifer Earles Szydlik, UW-Oshkosh. 4

Professor of Physics & Astronomy Dr. Paul Thomas, UW-Eau Claire. 5

Department Award.. 6

UW-Platteville Department of Biology. 6

RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION.. 7

UW-System General Counsel Pat Brady. 7

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago.. 9

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 12

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report. 12

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to the Board.. 12

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 12

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 14

Joint Meeting of Education Committee and Business, Finance, and Audit Committee. 15

Education Committee Business. 16

UW-Milwaukee Ph.D. in Linguistics. 16

UW-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Expansion. 16

Report of the Senior Vice President 17

Consent Agenda.. 17

Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment 17

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.A. in Linguistics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 17

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 18

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Expansion Milwaukee College Preparatory School 18

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE. 18

Business Finance, and Audit Committee Business. 18

Amendment to Regent Policy Document 6-4 to Address Interim Appointments of Chancellors, Senior Vice Presidents and Vice Presidents. 18

WiSys Technology Foundation, Inc. 18

Operations Review and Audit Status Update. 19

Human Resource System Project Update. 19

Project Status Report for Major Information Technology (IT) Projects. 19

UW-Madison Contractual Agreements. 19

Quarterly Report of Gifts, Grants and Contracts (4th Quarter) 19

Consent Agenda.. 20

Amendment to Regent Policy Document 6-4, “Search and Screen Procedures for Chancellors, Senior Vice Presidents and Vice Presidents”. 20

Amendment to Agreement Between WiSys Technology Foundation, Inc., and the Board of Regents. 20

Allocation of Funding for the WiSCAP Program.. 20

Sponsorship Agreement Between UW-Madison and adidas America, Inc. 20

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pfizer, Inc. 21

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE. 21

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business. 21

Wisconsin Energy Institute Phase I 21

Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Center Tower. 21

Belleville Family Medicine Clinic. 22

Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital Campus. 22

UW-Oshkosh Residence Hall Project 22

UW-Stout Memorial Student Center Renovation. 22

UW-Superior Rothwell Student Center. 22

Consent Agenda.. 23

Approval of the Design Report of the Wisconsin Energy Institute – Phase I Project and Authority to Adjust the Scope and Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Madison. 23

Approval of the Design Report of the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Center Tower Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison. 23

Authority to Enter into a Lease Agreement for Facilities on Behalf of the Belleville Wisconsin Family Medicine Clinic, UW-Madison  24

Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land of Approximately 11 Acres and Buildings Adjoining the Campus, UW-Milwaukee  24

Authority to Adjust the Scope and Budget of the New Residence Hall Project, UW-Oshkosh. 24

Approval of the Design Report of the Memorial Student Center Renovation Project and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Stout 24

Authority to Adjust the Budget of the Rothwell Student Center Project, UW-Superior. 25

CLOSED SESSION.. 25


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Madison, Wisconsin

Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall

UW-Madison

Friday, August 20, 2010

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt, Jessica Schwalenberg, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents John Drew, Anthony Evers, and David Walsh.

- - -

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE JUNE 10 AND 11, 2010 AND JULY 23, 2010 MEETINGS

The minutes of the June 10 and 11, 2010 and July 23, 2010 meetings stood approved as distributed.

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2010 REGENTS TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

President Pruitt greeted meeting attendees.  Noting the visitors in the gallery, President Pruitt extended a warm welcome to the winners of the 2010 Regents Teaching Excellence Awards, as well as their families, friends, and colleagues.  These award winners do the work that the Board is here to support, and it is the Board’s privilege to formally recognize their dedication and success.  President Pruitt turned to Regent Danae Davis, chair of the Regents Teaching Excellence Awards Committee, to introduce the awards.

Regent Davis began by extending her welcome to the award recipients.  The Regents Teaching Excellence Awards recognize and honor some of the UW System’s most outstanding teachers, departments, and programs.  Regent Davis explained that three award recipients were being honored:  two professors and one academic department. 

Choosing the winners was not an easy task, she said, thanking her fellow Regents, Regents Bartell, Drew, Vásquez, and Womack, for their thoughtful participation in the selection process.  The selection committee was impressed by the extraordinarily talented and dedicated nominees.  This year’s winners are shining examples of the ability of excellent teachers to change students’ lives.  While each of them goes about their work in unique ways, they also share several characteristics: a distinct philosophy of teaching and learning, a willingness to adapt and innovate in order to meet the needs of students, a passion for their discipline, and a commitment to constant self-examination and improvement. 

Regent Davis called upon Regent Bartell to present the first award.

Individual Awards

 

Professor of Mathematics Dr. Jennifer Earles Szydlik, UW-Oshkosh

Regent Bartell presented the first award to Dr. Jennifer Szydlik, Professor of Mathematics at UW-Oshkosh.  He quoted Professor Szydlik as saying, “When we study the patterns and symmetry in artwork, we do mathematics.  When we work on a puzzle that requires logical thinking, we do mathematics.  When we solve a problem that allows us to quantify, generalize, organize, and find patterns, we do mathematics.  It is as natural for us to create and love mathematics as it is for us to create and love art, music, or literature.”  Her students absorb this passion. 

The award recognizes Dr. Szydlik’s outstanding work as a teacher and author of mathematics education for over 15 years at UW-Oshkosh.  She has also received Distinguished Teaching awards from UW-Oshkosh in 2004 and from the Wisconsin section of the Mathematical Association of America in 2009.

Professor Szydlik is nationally known for her research and publications on mathematics education, most notably a McGraw-Hill Company series of textbooks for prospective elementary and middle-grades teachers, co-authored with a variety of colleagues.  However, students say that her teaching goes beyond math, to help them acquire skills for living, learning, and reasoning.

Regent Bartell then introduced Professor Szydlik.  She began by saying that recipients were asked to talk about teaching excellence; she said she was delighted to do so, with the caveat that while she aspires to excellent teaching, she often falls short of it in practice.

She said she once heard the university classroom referred to as a “contact zone,” a place where students and teachers wrestle with ideas.  This metaphor conveys the fact that learning is often uncomfortable, and that for every moment of insight there are many moments of confusion, frustration, or or even anger.  She said she likes the metaphor of full-contact teaching, because nothing that makes a difference gets learned gently.  Excellent teaching means asking tough questions and taking risks.

Saying that she would like to demonstrate some full-contact teaching, Professor Szydlik related a story:  She said that for Mother’s Day she received a lovely clay turtle that her nine-year-old son had made.  The turtle was wrapped in the Wisconsin State Journal, dated March 14, 2010, in a page that happened to include a listing of the highest-paid employees in the UW System.

She said she learned from this article that five of the top ten employees are effective coaches or the athletic director, and four are talented and hard-working administrators. The lowest-paid employee on the list, an assistant football coach, makes approximately five times as much as a certain full-professor at UW-Oshkosh, she said. Only one of the top paid employees was a faculty member, and there was a separate listing for the top ten highest paid professors. They were described as prolific researchers.

Dr. Szydlik said that while she values both great research and great administration, she noticed that “teaching” was mentioned just once in the article, when it was noted that one of the listed professors was “also a popular teacher.”

Teaching is valued and supported in the UW System.  However, this article did not convey that impression.  Ms. Szydlik said that she worries about the incentives, in the form of compensation, promotion, and prestige, that nudge faculty toward research.  She wondered how the System might change that, because teaching is such important work.

Professor Szydlik then accepted the Regent’s Award for Teaching Excellence as a significant step in the support of teaching, thanked Board members for their support of teaching, and expressed her appreciation for the honor.  She closed her remarks by asking Regents to consider, in the spirit of full-contact teaching, the question of why on the list of the most highly paid and most highly valued employees in the UW System are there no professors known, first and foremost, for their teaching. 

Professor of Physics & Astronomy Dr. Paul Thomas, UW-Eau Claire

Regent Womack introduced the next individual Teaching Excellence Award recipient, Dr. Paul Thomas, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at UW-Eau Claire.  A native of Australia, Professor Thomas has been part of UW-Eau Claire for two decades.  In that time, he has earned a major following on campus among students and colleagues.  He consistently earns high praise from students, even as they acknowledge him to be a demanding and challenging teacher. 

Professor Thomas is an ardent advocate of the liberal arts tradition, and encourages students to see that the sciences are intrinsically a part of an education that includes subjects like music, English, and history.  He has been actively engaged in developing interdisciplinary courses with colleagues in other departments.  He firmly believes that the only way to learn science is by doing science, and that students have to be truly engaged in the subject matter if they are going to intellectually benefit from the experience. 

Professor Thomas also takes his science into the community; he organized the popular “Ask a Scientist” seminar series, a free monthly outreach program featuring short presentations by scientists at a local coffee shop in Eau Claire.  He also offers planetarium shows on campus.   In addition to his outstanding teaching portfolio, Dr. Thomas is a nationally recognized researcher in physics and astronomy. 

Regent Womack then presented the award to Professor Thomas, who said that it was a great honor to receive the award.  He said that the fundamental part of his career, and his service to the state of Wisconsin, is to take his students on an intellectual journey, a voyage of exploration with Galileo, Kepler, Newton and Einstein.  He quoted Einstein, saying: "One thing I have learned in a long life:  that all our science, measured against reality, is primitive and childlike -- and yet it is the most precious thing we have."  Dr. Thomas said that his career stands for this principle. 

He continued, saying that humility is important, and explaining that exploration is important because astronomers cannot account for 96 percent of the supposedly-known universe.  He expressed pride in experiences that have allowed him to watch the intellectual growth of students in his classes and lab.

Professor Thomas said that all of human knowledge is linked.  The liberal arts model in the United States is founded on this principle.  He praised the faculty of UW-Eau Claire who exemplify this philosophy in their teaching.  He said that the main thread of his teaching development at UW-Eau Claire has been his continued development of interdisciplinary courses with his colleagues in various departments.  Citing collaborations in planetary science with colleagues in Geology, trans-human society with colleagues in English, computational science projects with colleagues in Mathematics, for example, he said he is strongly committed to collaborative teaching and has had the most productive career experiences in such courses.  He thanked the leadership at UW-Eau Claire for the opportunity to break out of the conventional departmental structure with innovative teaching possibilities.

Department Award

           

UW-Platteville Department of Biology

The third award, the 2010 Regents Teaching Excellence Award for a department or program, was presented by Regent Vásquez to Department of Biology Chair Dr. Jeffrey Huebschman.  The biology department currently has only about one dozen faculty and staff members, but it is accomplishing much.  In recent years, under the leadership of Dr. Wayne Weber and Dr. Huebschman, the department completely overhauled its curriculum, based on a comprehensive vision for the future, a long-term strategic plan, and student learning outcomes.  A guiding principle for the department is the belief that students of biology are not only expected to think and act like biologists, but to simply be scientists.

The number of students majoring in biology at UW-Platteville has more than doubled in the past 10 years.  At the same time, the department provides critical courses to support general education requirements in natural science and the needs of students in other majors.

UW-Platteville biology majors are regularly engaged in hands-on research projects and internships, and opportunities are available for study in regions as diverse as the tropics of Costa Rica, the American desert southwest, or the subarctic zone around Hudson Bay.  Students compliment the dedication, collaboration, and personal mentoring of the faculty.  The department has received more than 20 UW-Platteville and UW System awards for excellence in teaching and advising.

Regent Vásquez then presented the Regents Award for Teaching Excellence to Dr. Jeffrey Huebschman, who accepted the award on behalf of the UW-Platteville Department of Biology.  Dr. Huebschman expressed his gratitude and introduced members of the Biology Department, Dr. Wayne Weber and Dr. Beth Frieders, both senior faculty members.  Both have won many teaching and advising awards, and through their modeling of teaching excellence, they have set a high bar for the Department.  He also introduced former UW-Platteville student Korrin Schriver, who is now a teacher in Milwaukee, as well as Nikki Martinson, a current student, who is a participant in the Rural and Urban Scholars in Community Health Program.  Dr. Huebschman said that Dean Duane Ford has been a great advocate for the department. 

One of the first things that took place under the leadership of Dr. Weber, the previous biology department chair, was a revision of the departmental review process, along with a significant curriculum revision.  The department has now grown to 380 students majoring in biology; undergraduate research, scholarship of teaching and learning, and grants have also increased.

In closing, Dr. Huebschman said that as department chair, he regularly meets with prospective students.  He tells students they have fantastic choices for universities and colleges in Wisconsin.  He tells them that it is important to attend where they want to attend; but he also tells them that every day, as part of the biology department, he feels as though he has won the lottery.  The people in the department are what make the department successful; they all are motivated by their students’ success.  Dr. Huebschman again thanked the Board of Regents for the honor.

To end the awards ceremony, President Pruitt expressed appreciation for the creative, insightful, and inspired teaching that these award recipients represent, and that make the UW a beacon of excellence in higher education.

- - -

RESOLUTIONS OF APPRECIATION

 

UW-System General Counsel Pat Brady

President Pruitt introduced Regent Brent Smith to present a resolution of appreciation to General Counsel Pat Brady, who was retiring after 30 years of service.  Regent Smith, referring to an earlier retirement gathering for Ms. Brady, said that two themes that emerged were her loyalty and contributions to the UW System, and her unflappability in various situations.  The job of general counsel requires intellectual power and good judgment, as well as political savvy, due to the many audiences and clients that the General Counsel’s Office serves.  Regent Smith said that Ms. Brady would be sincerely missed in the General Counsel position and then read the Board’s resolution of appreciation.  

Resolution of Appreciation for Patricia A. Brady

Resolution 9805:        

WHEREAS, Patricia A. Brady, a proud alumna of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin Law School, has dedicated 30 years of service to the University of Wisconsin System, including the past eight years as the third General Counsel in the history of the UW System; and

WHEREAS, her position as the university’s chief legal advisor is the culmination of a productive and distinguished career, in which she served as Assistant Attorney General in North Carolina, representing the state’s Department of Public Instruction and the University of North Carolina, before joining the UW System in 1980 and “rising through the ranks,” being promoted to Deputy General Counsel in 1999, serving as Interim General Counsel on several occasions, and being promoted to General Counsel in 2002; and

WHEREAS, Pat has demonstrated a broad mastery of higher education law, providing quality representation of the UW System in tenure and employment cases; advising on issues pertaining to affirmative action and diversity, student affairs, and intellectual property – including promoting the value of the services of UW System’s WiSys Technology Foundation; and teaching higher education law at UW-Madison for nearly 10 years, giving numerous presentations on that subject within UW System and for national groups; and

WHEREAS, she has been instrumental in developing important university administrative rules and policies, including the UW System Sexual Harassment Policy, Code of Ethics for Unclassified Staff, Student Academic Misconduct Policy, and discriminatory harassment policies; and

WHEREAS, Pat provided in-house support in constitutional law cases, including the U.S. Supreme Court case Board of Regents v. Southworth, which established the university’s right to require the payment of student fees, so long as the fees are distributed in a viewpoint neutral manner; and

WHEREAS, under Pat’s leadership, the Office of General Counsel has continued to provide high-quality training and legal guidance, helping staff systemwide, at all levels, better understand current legal issues; and

WHEREAS, Pat has consistently offered thoughtful, judicious counsel throughout her service to the Board of Regents, System President and administrators, Chancellors, campus administrators, and other university colleagues, combining legal acumen with a wry wit, both of which will be greatly missed;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offers thanks and commendation to Patricia A. Brady for her many life achievements and for her service as University of Wisconsin System General Counsel, and wishes her a fulfilling retirement.

General Counsel Brady thanked the Board for the resolution.  She said that as she has prepared for retirement, she has reflected on her career and the colleagues with whom she has worked.  She said that the issues have always been complex and interesting, and the people smart and talented.  She said that it has been an honor to work for the UW System. 

Ms. Brady recognized the people with whom she has worked, including Board members; former President Lyall and current President Reilly; her System Administration and cabinet colleagues, including Rita Sears, Debbie Durcan, Freda Harris, and Al Crist; and the staff in the Office of General Counsel.  She praised her staff and said she feels she is leaving the System in good hands with them.  She also wished the Board and System the best in the future.

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago

President Pruitt next noted that the Board would also be saying farewell UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago, who will become CEO of the non-profit Hispanic College Fund in Washington, D.C.  The chancellor has served as UWM’s leader since July 2004, and he leaves an impressive legacy.  Chancellor Santiago has commented often that he was brought to UW-Milwaukee to transform UWM into a first-class, second research university for Wisconsin.  On behalf of the Board of Regents, President Pruitt thanked Chancellor Santiago for his outstanding service and wished him the best with the new challenges that lie ahead.  President Pruitt then turned to Regent Vásquez to present the Board’s resolution of appreciation.

Regent Vásquez expressed his pleasure at being the Regent to read the resolution.  He observed that the Milwaukee area presents both opportunities and challenges.  It takes unique, talented individuals to be successful maneuvering in the Milwaukee climate, with its unique politics, economics, and private sector.  He said that Chancellor Santiago has been very successful in navigating that environment.

Before reading the resolution, Regent Vásquez spoke in Spanish, in consideration of Chancellor Santiago’s new position with the Hispanic College Fund.  On behalf of Presidents Pruitt and Reilly and all of his Regent colleagues, he wished Chancellor Santiago good luck, much success, and many years of happiness in his new position.

Resolution of Appreciation for Chancellor Carlos Santiago

Resolution 9806:        

WHEREAS, Carlos E. Santiago has served with distinction for more than six years as the seventh Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, from 2004 to 2010, and has devoted 30 years to public higher education, the last ten as a senior leader for major research universities; and

WHEREAS, during his tenure, Chancellor Santiago spearheaded a renewed emphasis on UW-Milwaukee’s research mission while maintaining the university’s commitment to provide access for all students, positioning the campus in the upper echelon of urban research universities; and

WHEREAS, UW-Milwaukee experienced considerable growth under Chancellor Santiago’s watch, seeing both enrollment and degrees granted grow by 12 percent; enrollment of Wisconsin residents increase by 8 percent; and doctoral degrees granted increase by 114 percent, with the number of doctoral degrees available growing from 20 to 30; and

WHEREAS, under Chancellor Santiago’s leadership, two new academic schools, the School of Public Health and School of Freshwater Sciences, were approved – the first new academic schools at UW-Milwaukee since 1975; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Santiago oversaw the implementation of Access to Success, a campus-wide initiative designed to help students achieve greater success, resulting in overall retention rates increasing almost four percentage points from students’ first to second years, and for students of color, retention rates increasing nearly 10 percentage points; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Santiago advanced the $240-million UW-Milwaukee Initiative, approved by the state legislature and Governor Jim Doyle, and consisting of six main projects designed to expand the campus and its ability to serve the region and entire state in research and innovation initiatives, health services, and regional economic development; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Santiago led an unprecedented fundraising campaign, the Campaign for UW-Milwaukee, which ended 18 months early in January 2008 and raised $125 million – $25  million more than the target and over $100 million more than the largest previous campaign over two decades ago;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System offers its sincere gratitude to Chancellor Carlos Santiago for his service and dedication to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin, and wishes him continued success as the new chief executive officer for the Hispanic College Fund in Washington, D.C.

Chancellor Santiago thanked Regent Vásquez and Board members.  He said that when he came to UW-Milwaukee six years ago, Board members told him he needed to convert UWM from a university that does research to a “research university.”  The Board has been supportive in those efforts.  Chancellor Santiago thanked Board members for their approval of additional Ph.D. programs at UW-Milwaukee.  The number of such programs has increased from 19 to 30. 

Chancellor Santiago also said that System Administration has been phenomenal.  He has worked closely with President Reilly over the years.  He praised Associate Vice President David Miller for his work on UW-Milwaukee’s capital projects.  The chancellor said that the governor’s legacy of access and research, mentioned the day before, was also UW-Milwaukee’s legacy, and he thanked the executive branch for its support.  He also praised his colleagues, the other UW System chancellors, for their leadership.

Chancellor Santiago said he was proud of UWM’s accomplishments, which could not have been achieved without the faculty, staff, and students of the university.  As of 2007, UW-Milwaukee was ranked 189th among the top 200 research universities in the 2009 Top American Research Universities Report, even though it had not been ranked until 2005, when it was ranked (#200) for the first time.  The goal should be to break into the top 100, joining UW-Madison in that group.

When Chancellor Santiago arrived at UWM, he set a goal of $100 million in funding for research.  The university this year will be at approximately $70 million of contract research, and the university will do great things for the city, state and region.

Reflecting on his academic career over the past 30 years, the chancellor said that he had followed a linear progression; for the first time he has decided to do something different.   He looks forward to building an organization that will provide opportunities for Latino students in this country and in Puerto Rico.  He said that if he receives even half of the support he has received in his position at UWM, the success of his future efforts will be assured. 

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

 

The Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

A written report was provided.  There were no questions or comments.

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to the Board

President Pruitt followed up on the barnstorming tour that he and Jay Smith had undertaken.  He quoted from the Oshkosh Northwestern, saying that he agreed with the newspaper’s editorial, which said that the debate about state investment in higher education is one that the state needs to have.  He thanked Chancellors Wells, Levin-Stankevich, Sorenson, and Van Galen for their participation in recent meetings with editorial boards.  The Communications and External Relations staff are looking for additional opportunities to continue the conversation.

Noting recent honors for two Regents, President Pruitt said that Regent José Vásquez’s organization, the Child Development Center of St. Joseph, was recently recognized for excellence in childhood education by the Department of Children and Families.  Also, last month, the Wisconsin Alumni Association honored ten UW-Madison alumni as “Badgers of the Year.”  One of those honored was Regent Mark Bradley, who earned both his bachelor’s and law degrees from UW-Madison.  

President Pruitt then turned to President Reilly to present his report. 

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

President Reilly shared some good news from around the UW System:

· The U.S. Department of Commerce recently announced $32.3 million in federal grants to expand high-capacity Internet access in five Wisconsin communities.  The application process for this grant was led by UW-Extension.  Altogether, the grants will bring high-capacity Internet access closer for 139,000 households and 9,000 businesses.  President Reilly congratulated colleagues, and especially Provost Christine Quinn, at UW-Extension.

· At UW-Eau Claire, this fall marks the launch of a new pilot program aimed at building a more coherent liberal education core.  The program focuses on themed course bundles, with the idea that students will address a “big question” by integrating perspectives from various disciplines.  This pilot program, which will be available to 140 first-year students this fall, is part of a multifaceted liberal education reform project at UW-Eau Claire, supported in part by a federal Title III grant of nearly $1.75 million received in October 2009.  Additional funding is provided as part of the Blugold Commitment initiatives.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich and his colleagues at UW-Eau Claire.

· UW-La Crosse students won five of the six best student-presentation awards at the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s 57th Annual Meeting recently in Salt Lake City.  Nuclear medicine technology major Michael Pawlak won the best student presentation overall and best student presentation in the instrumentation category at the event, which draws thousands of nuclear medicine technologists, physicians, health physicists, and students from across North America and the world.  President Reilly congratulated Michael and the other winners, as well as Chancellor Gow and UW-La Crosse.

· The Great Lakes Maritime Research Institute at UW-Superior has been awarded a $750,000 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to help reduce air emissions from the Edwin H. Gott, a 1,000-foot ore carrier serving the Great Lakes.  This Clean Diesel Initiative Grant will also leverage more than $14 million of private investment supporting employment in Wisconsin and Minnesota. The Great Lakes Maritime Research Institute has the mission of developing and improving a sustainable maritime commerce on the Great Lakes through applied research.  President Reilly congratulated Interim Chancellor Christopher Markwood and his UW-Superior colleagues.

· Recognizing UW System colleagues who are taking on new appointments, President Reilly noted that Dr. Christine Thomas, Dean of the College of Natural Resources at UW-Stevens Point, has been named by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack to serve on the new Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council.  Also, Dr. William Campbell, who has been the Director of Grants and Research at UW-River Falls for the past 20 years, has been elected to serve as president-elect for the Council on Undergraduate Research for the 2010-11 year. 

· Backed by a $1.2-million federal grant, UW-Milwaukee has launched a Center for Advanced Materials Manufacturing that will support the transfer of UWM research in bulk nanostructured materials to the manufacturing industry in Wisconsin and the nation.  Oshkosh Corporation, a major supplier of tactical wheeled vehicles for the U.S. Department of Defense, is a partner in the new center and will use the futuristic materials developed at the center to satisfy military needs.  Nanostructured metallic materials are embedded with atomic-scale particles that make them cheaper, lighter, and stronger than the original metal alloys. The new center is expected to collaborate with more than a dozen businesses from around the Midwest.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Santiago and his UW-Milwaukee colleagues.

· UW-Whitewater is taking the lead role in administering a $5.9 million federal Economic Development Administration grant to help stimulate economic growth in southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois.  The grant will help provide entrepreneurial support to businesses in six counties that were hit by the downturns in the automotive industry and also suffered as a result of the severe flooding in 2008.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Richard Telfer and his UW-Whitewater colleagues.

· The Joint Legislative Council has approved its committee member appointments for the 2010 Legislative Council Study Committees, and the UW System will be represented on 13 of the 16 committees, with 23 members from nine different UW System institutions.  These study committees are established during the Legislature's interim period in even-numbered years to examine major policy issues.  Quite often, the work of these committees leads to new legislation. 

· At UW-Green Bay it was recently announced that a $740,000 gift from Arjo Wiggins Appleton Ltd., will extend and expand a highly successful program in which local high school students monitor the water quality in area streams. The paper company’s gift is expected to fund the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program for three more years, through 2013.  It will also increase opportunities for participation by minority and low-income students.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Harden and UW-Green Bay.

· College Planning & Management Magazine has selected UW- Oshkosh’s Student Recreation and Wellness Center as the 2010 grand prize winner for outstanding design and architecture in education in the college and university category. The publication is the premier trade magazine for facilities design in education.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Wells and his UW-Oshkosh colleagues.

· The UW-Madison Police Department’s Badger Watch program has been honored as the nation’s 2010 Neighborhood Watch Program by the National Sheriffs’ Association.  Badger Watch, the university’s crime-prevention program, has grown to encompass more than 70 campus buildings and has more than 1,400 citizen volunteers.  President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Martin, UW-Madison Police Chief Susan Riseling, and the UW-Madison campus.

· Four UW-Stout students received highly-coveted positions this summer working for the Professional Golfers Association as interns, including working at the PGA Championship at the Whistling Straits golf course, north of Sheboygan.  This opportunity offered these students, who are among the approximately 200 students in UW-Stout’s golf enterprise management program, invaluable hands-on experience.

- - -

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education Committee.  Regent Crain provided a brief summary of the joint meeting of the Education Committee and the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee on the Wisconsin Partnership Program, and then she provided her regular report:

Joint Meeting of Education Committee and Business, Finance, and Audit Committee

Regent Crain said that the two committees welcomed Dean Robert Golden of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health to present the 2009 Annual Report of the Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future (“the Wisconsin Partnership Program”).  This was not an action item; Regents review the report annually, and approval is not required.

The annual report describes the activities leading to the awarding of grants by the Oversight and Advisory Committee (OAC) and by the Medical Education and Research Committee (MERC) for projects that advance population health in Wisconsin.  This was the first report under the new five-year plan, approved by the Board in 2008.  The new plan strongly emphasizes the expansion of community engagement and the reduction of health disparities.  In 2009, the Partnership Program increased its efforts on one strategic initiative:  tackling infant mortality among African-Americans.  It selected a new direction -- the prevention of obesity and the promotion of physical activity and good nutrition -- for increased attention moving forward.

Dean Golden highlighted some of the individual grants made by both the OAC and the MERC.  Since its inception, the program has awarded more than $90 million through 200 initiatives to faculty, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies.  Also, the program has resulted in significant leveraging of its grants, to bring in additional funding from other sources (especially federal).

As promised in June, when the Regents were presented with the Legislative Audit Bureau’s (LAB’s) review of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, the dean provided an update on the ways in which the program is responding to the audit findings.  The dean reminded the committees that, overall, LAB found that the School of Medicine and Public Health was in compliance with the Insurance Commissioner’s order.  

The LAB report did, however, make recommendations to the program and the Insurance Commissioner, and the Partnership Program is revising its conflict of interest policy and working with its grantees to ensure that they better meet their project outcomes.  He also explained that LAB’s manner of judging grants solely on whether or not they met their initial objectives was not necessarily the way research projects should be evaluated.  Nevertheless, a large majority of the Partnership’s grants were meeting their outcomes.

Regent Crain said that the dean expressed his appreciation for the responsibility with which the School of Medicine and Public Health has been entrusted.  She then responded to a question from Regent Womack, who asked about the criteria for evaluating grants.  Regent Crain asked Regent Danae Davis to comment.  Regent Davis said that she believes the Pearls for Teen Girls experience is typical, in that at the initial application stage, outcomes may be set forth; but flexibility is needed to recognize that the impact of the project may be even greater than the initial measures would show.

Education Committee Business

Regent Crain then continued her report by first expressing her appreciation for her reappointment as chair of the Education Committee.  Naming each member, she also expressed gratitude for the composition of the committee, which for the first time in several years will include a student-Regent member.

UW-Milwaukee Ph.D. in Linguistics

Regent Crain said that the Education Committee heard a presentation of the Ph.D. in Linguistics at UW-Milwaukee.  The linguistics department chair, Dr. Fred Eckman, defined linguistics as the search for understanding and explaining how human beings are able to talk.  The program’s primary focus will be on preparing graduates in applied linguistics for the workforce and for continuing on to doctoral study.  There is a growing demand for applied linguists.  The program is distinguished by faculty with national and international reputations and success in attracting extramural funding.

The committee also approved an M.A. degree in Linguistics as a part of its consent agenda.  Committee members felt both of these degrees would be good additions to UW-Milwaukee’s graduate program.

UW-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Expansion

Regent Crain said that the committee heard from Dr. Bob Kattman, Director of the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools.  He presented the requested contract expansion for the Milwaukee College Preparatory School.  The committee voted unanimously to approve the requested amendment to the charter school contract with the Milwaukee College Preparatory School, which allows the school to expand for two years to a second site, in order to accommodate the students who were displaced by the termination of the Academy of Learning and Leadership’s charter contract with the city of Milwaukee.

The Board will take up a replication policy later this fall.  This was not a replication, Regent Crain clarified. 

The contract was carefully reviewed by UW-Milwaukee and UW System General Counsel, and it came with the recommendation of UW-Milwaukee Provost Johannes Britz.

This has been a compressed and expedited process, Regent Crain explained.  The Milwaukee College Preparatory School has undertaken a number of activities in order to ensure that a quality second site will be up and running in time for the start of the school year.  All of these activities were done in a way that ensured that future staff, prospective students, and families all understood that the operation of the second site was contingent upon Board of Regents approval. 

The committee recognized that the situation before it constituted an extraordinary circumstance.  However, the Milwaukee College Preparatory School is UW-Milwaukee’s highest-performing charter school and is led by a highly-regarded principal, Rob Rauh, who appeared before the committee yesterday.

All Board members received a letter from Regent Evers, who could not be at meeting, expressing his support for the contract expansion, as well as some reservations.  Regent Evers’ letter raises a number of issues the committee would like to attend to in the future.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Regent Crain noted that in June, committee members requested brief presentations on Inclusive Excellence as it is being implemented at the institutions.  UW-Whitewater volunteered to be first, and the committee saw an inspiring video and heard from Provost Bev Kopper; Lauren Smith, Chair of the Department of Women’s Studies and Member of the Inclusive Excellence Committee; and Richard McGregory, Interim Director of Academic Support Services.

The committee discussed priority areas for the new academic year.  The committee agreed that a focus would be on the core strategic goal of “more graduates.”  Regent Crain invited other members of the Board to offer suggestions for priorities. 

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9807, 9808, 9809, and 9810, which were approved by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Danae Davis and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote.

Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Appointment

Resolution 9807:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the appointment of Dr. Patrick L. Remington to fill an unexpired term on the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, beginning August 20, 2010, through October 31, 2012.

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.A. in Linguistics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9808:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the M.A. in Linguistics.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9809:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Ph.D. in Linguistics.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Expansion Milwaukee College Preparatory School

Resolution 9810:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of

Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the amended charter school contract with the Milwaukee College Preparatory School to allow expansion to a second site located at 1530 W. Center Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.

Business Finance, and Audit Committee Business

Amendment to Regent Policy Document 6-4 to Address Interim Appointments of Chancellors, Senior Vice Presidents and Vice Presidents

Regent Smith reported that Board President Pruitt and Board Secretary Radue joined the committee to present proposed changes to Regent policy regarding search and screen activity for certain senior executive positions.  The additions to the Board policy put into writing what has been followed in practice, prescribe consultation with Board leadership, and add a limitation on the term of an interim appointment.  The Committee discussed the proposed changes and approved Resolution 9811, which would amend Regent policy to include a new section addressing interim appointments.

WiSys Technology Foundation, Inc.

Regent Smith reported that General Counsel Pat Brady indicated that the C.O.R.E. Jobs Act created the Wisconsin Small Company Advancement Program (WiSCAP), which included a $2 million appropriation to the Board of Regents and a provision that WiSys administer the program.  Changes to the Board’s agreement with WiSys would allow all but the inventor’s share of licensing revenue generated from WiSCAP-funded projects to be directed toward repaying the WiSCAP grant investment, in order to create a revolving fund.  The committee approved Resolution 9812, directing this change.

The committee also approved Resolution 9813, allocating the $2 million to WiSys from funds appropriated by the State as part of the C.O.R.E. Jobs Act in support of WiSCAP.

Operations Review and Audit Status Update

Regent Smith said that Operations Review and Audit Director Julie Gordon provided the committee with an update.  Current projects include:  Student Evaluation of Instruction, Prior Learning Assessment, Student Assistance (emergency loan) funds, Service Learning, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Implementation, NCAA Division III Athletic Departments, and the Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Pilot Project.

Human Resource System Project Update

Senior Vice President Morgan provided the committee with an update on the status of the UW System Human Resource System project through June 30, 2010.  He indicated Phase I of the project was completed in fiscal year 2010 and included development and modifications.  Phase II of the project includes system testing and integrated testing.  Early testing efforts are going well.  Senior Vice President Morgan also indicated that fiscal year 2010 ended with a $500,000 surplus.  Challenges remain in staffing, especially with the departure of a key Huron staff person.  A provision in the contract provided that when a key person departs, the position must be filled within ten days, and it has.  Mr. Morgan also spoke about his recent conversation with Huron CEO Jim Roth regarding the status of the SEC investigation and the overall fiscal health of the company, both of which were good.  The project remains on time and within budget.

Project Status Report for Major Information Technology (IT) Projects

Associate Vice President for Learning and Information Technology Ed Meachen presented the committee with progress reports on the four major IT projects currently underway within the UW System.  Those projects are:  the Student Information System at UW-Eau Claire, Identity and Access Management project, Legacy Budget System, and Human Resource System.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreements

The committee considered two separate contractual agreements from UW-Madison:  a five-year Athletic Apparel, Equipment, and Sponsorship Agreement between the institution and adidas America, and a six-year Data Research Analysis Agreement between the institution and Pfizer, Inc.  After discussion, the Committee approved Resolutions 9814 and 9815, supporting the execution of these agreements.

Quarterly Report of Gifts, Grants and Contracts (4th Quarter)

Vice President for Finance Durcan reported total gifts, grants, and contracts for the 2009-10 fiscal year were $1.621 billion, an increase of $212 million over the same period in the prior year.  Federal awards were up to about $300 million, driven by substantially increased research funding opportunities associated with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). 

Consent Agenda

On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith then moved adoption of Resolutions 9811, 9812, 9813, 9814, and 9815.  The motion was seconded by Regent Wingad and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote. 

Amendment to Regent Policy Document 6-4, “Search and Screen Procedures for Chancellors, Senior Vice Presidents and Vice Presidents”

Resolution 9811:        

That the Board of Regents adopt the attached amendments to Regent Policy Document 6-4, “Search and Screen Procedures for Chancellors, Senior Vice Presidents and Vice Presidents,” to incorporate procedures for interim appointments.

Amendment to Agreement Between WiSys Technology Foundation, Inc., and the Board of Regents

Resolution 9812:        

That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the attached amendment to the Agreement between WiSys Technology Foundation, Inc., and the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System be approved.

Allocation of Funding for the WiSCAP Program

Resolution 9813:        

That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the allocation of $2,000,000 from the funds appropriated under ss. 20.285(1)(cd) and 36.52, Wis. Stats., to the WiSys Technology Foundation, Inc., for the purpose of making grants and otherwise providing support for the Wisconsin Small Company Advancement Program (WiSCAP).

Sponsorship Agreement Between UW-Madison and adidas America, Inc.

Resolution 9814:        

That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the Athletic Apparel, Equipment, and Sponsorship Agreement between UW-Madison and adidas America, Inc. which will provide, among other things, apparel, footwear, and equipment to the University of Wisconsin-Madison intercollegiate athletic teams, certain cash compensation, and licensing opportunities.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement With Pfizer, Inc

Resolution 9815:        

That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contractual agreement between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Pfizer, Inc.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE

President Pruitt called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee. 

Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business

Regent Bartell reported that seven resolutions were unanimously approved by the Capital Planning and Budget Committee and would be presented as consent agenda items.

Wisconsin Energy Institute Phase I

Resolution 9816, brought by UW-Madison, requests authority to increase the scope and budget of the Wisconsin Energy Institute Phase I Project and to construct the project.  The project will construct a five-story building on to house research labs and offices to support the Wisconsin Energy Institute.  The goal of the institute is to help the university meet the pressing need of creating renewable energy in a sustainable and economically viable manner by developing novel technologies to convert plant biomass into ethanol and other motor fuels.  Other forms of sustainable energy production also will be researched in this facility.  The facility will be designed to maximize compliance with the United States Green Building Council’s LEED Green Building Rating System.

Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Center Tower

Resolution 9817, also brought by UW-Madison, requests authority to construct the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research (WIMR) Center Tower project.  This $134.8-million project is funded with a 50/50 split of GPR and gift funding.  This project is the second phase of the larger WIMR project and will construct a seven-story research laboratory tower on a three-story base to address research-space deficiencies of the School of Medicine and Public Health.  The laboratories are designed to be flexible and easily adaptable to future changes in the dynamic environment of research.  This project will integrate sustainability practices and will be LEED® certified, as a requirement of the funding received from the National Institutes of Health. 

Belleville Family Medicine Clinic

Resolution 9818, brought by UW-Madison, requests authority to request a lease space for the Belleville Family Medicine Clinic.  The building will be built and owned by the Madison Family Medicine Residency Corporation, on land donated to the corporation.  The corporation is a non-profit entity comprising a partnership of UW School of Medicine and Public Health; UW Hospitals and Clinics; Dean Medical Center; Meriter Hospital; St. Mary’s; the UW Medical Foundation; and the cities of Madison, Belleville, and Verona.  The clinic has outgrown its present space, and the new larger facility will provide appropriate space and incorporate the latest in healthcare design, equipment, and other innovations.  UW School of Medicine residents will staff the clinic.

Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital Campus

Resolution 9819 requests approval of a request by UW-Milwaukee to purchase the Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital Campus, a site of approximately 11 acres and existing facilities, at a cost of $20.2 million ($5 million in existing general fund supported borrowing and $15 million program revenue supported borrowing).  This acquisition is identified as one of the key opportunity sites for the university, and it offers UWM the ability to add contiguous space to the landlocked Kenwood campus.  Vice Chancellor Christy Brown told the Capital Planning and Budget Committee that a campus committee will recommend guidelines to determine the best potential uses of this property.  Uses could include student services, health sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics.  Following the acquisition, it is likely that renovations of the buildings for campus use will be incremental and take place over many years. 

UW-Oshkosh Residence Hall Project

Resolution 9820, brought by UW-Oshkosh, requests authority to increase the scope and budget of the new residence hall project by $1.7 million in program revenue supported borrowing.  This is a total cost of $33.2 million for a 340-bed residential facility, primarily for sophomores and juniors. 

UW-Stout Memorial Student Center Renovation

Resolution 9821, brought by UW-Stout, requests authority to increase the budget of the Memorial Student Center Renovation project by $1 million in program revenue supported bonding and to construct the project.  This $19-million project will remodel space in the center to improve deteriorated infrastructure and reconfigure space to serve current functional needs of the students.  Students approved a segregated-fee increase for the project and have had extensive involvement in planning.

UW-Superior Rothwell Student Center

Resolution 9822, brought by UW-Superior, requests a $300,000 increase to the budget of the Rothwell Student Center project.  The bids received for the parking lot portion of this project were higher than original estimates for that part of the project.

Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell moved adoption of Resolutions 9816, 9817, 9818, 9819, 9820, 9821, and 9822, which were passed unanimously by the committee.  Regent Stan Davis seconded the motion. 

Before the Board voted, Vice President Spector commended all of those who have worked to make the Columbia St. Mary’s project a reality.  He congratulated UWM Chancellor Santiago, Vice Chancellor Christy Brown, and Senior Advisor to the Chancellor David Gilbert.  He also acknowledged the Columbia representatives, who did an excellent job of recognizing that the university is an important part of the community.  Vice President Spector also singled out Associate Vice President David Miller of UW System for his calmness, insights, and credibility with those involved in the project.  President Pruitt then thanked Regent Spector for his work, as well.  Regent Falbo added his thanks, commending all of those involved for their restraint and patience. 

After discussion, the Board approved the motion unanimously on a voice vote.

Approval of the Design Report of the Wisconsin Energy Institute – Phase I Project and Authority to Adjust the Scope and Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9816:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Wisconsin Energy Institute –Phase I project be approved and authority be granted to (a) increase the project scope and budget by $5,586,600 ($1,010,600 General Fund Supported Borrowing Utility Improvements and $4,576,000 Gift/Grant Funds) and (b) construct project at a total estimated budget of $55,586,600 ($50,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $1,010,600 existing General Fund Supported Borrowing – Utility Improvements, and $4,576,000 Gift/Grant Funds).

Approval of the Design Report of the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Center Tower Project and Authority to Construct the Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9817:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research Center Tower project at a total estimated project cost of $134,800,000 ($67,400,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing and $67,400,000 Gift/Grant Funds).

Authority to Enter into a Lease Agreement for Facilities on Behalf of the Belleville Wisconsin Family Medicine Clinic, UW-Madison

Resolution 9818:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek approval for the Department of Administration (DOA) to execute a lease for 21,000 GSF of clinic space for the UW-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health’s Department of Family Medicine (DFM) within the Village of Belleville, Wisconsin, for the Belleville Family Medicine Clinic.

Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land of Approximately 11 Acres and Buildings Adjoining the Campus, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9819:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to purchase the Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital Campus at a cost of $20,155,000 ($5,000,000 Existing General Fund Supported Borrowing, $15,155,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing).

Authority to Adjust the Scope and Budget of the New Residence Hall Project, UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 9820:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Oshkosh Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to increase the scope and budget of the New Residence Hall project by $1,707,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing for a total revised project cost of $33,207,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Approval of the Design Report of the Memorial Student Center Renovation Project and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Project, UW-Stout

Resolution 9821:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stout Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Memorial Student Center Renovation project be approved and authority be granted to (a) increase the project scope and budget by $1,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing – Facility Maintenance and Repair and (b) construct the project at an estimated total project cost of $19,000,000 ($18,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $1,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing – Facility Maintenance and Repair).

Authority to Adjust the Budget of the Rothwell Student Center Project, UW-Superior

Resolution 9822:        

That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Superior Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to increase the project budget of the Rothwell Student Center project by $300,000 Program Revenue-Cash for an estimated total project cost of $25,066,500 ($208,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing–Jim Dan Hill Library, $969,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing–New Academic Building, $16,885,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $2,892,500 Program Revenue-Cash, $112,000 Agency Funds–Non GPR, and $4,000,000 Gift and Grant Funds).

Closing his report, Regent Bartell said that Director of Facilities Planning Kate Sullivan had reported to the Capital Planning and Budget Committee that the Building Commission approved about $421 million for projects at its June and August meetings.  The funding breakdown for those projects is $23 million in general fund supported borrowing, $393 million in program revenue funds, and $5 million in gift funds.

Regent Bartell also reported that the building lease for the building on Regent Street that houses Capital Planning and Budget and other UW System staff has been renegotiated at very favorable terms for the university, with an option to purchase at the end of seven years.

Finally, Regent Bartell added his congratulations to Associate Vice President Miller, on both the lease renewal and all of the Milwaukee initiative achievements.  Mr. Miller has been instrumental in holding the initiative together during difficult political upheavals.  Regent Bartell also mentioned that Mr. Miller is beginning his studies at the UW Business School’s MBA program. 

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CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution was moved by Regent Spector, seconded, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Schwalenberg, Smith, Spector, Vásquez, Wingad, and Womack voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9823:        

That the Board of Regents move into closed session to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats., and to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by s. 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.

The meeting was adjourned at approximately 2:30 p.m.

 

Submitted by:

 

/s/ Jane S. Radue                          

Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board