Board of Regents

September 2009 Minutes - University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Whitewater, Wisconsin

UW-Whitewater

Held in the UW-Whitewater University Center

Room 275

September 10, 2009

10:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, David Walsh, and Aaron Wingad

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regents Anthony Evers and Betty Womack

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OPENING REMARKS

Introduction of UW-Parkside Chancellor Deborah Ford

President Reilly introduced and welcomed UW-Parkside Chancellor Deborah Ford, who had taken office in August.  She came to Wisconsin from her former position as Vice President for Student Affairs at the University of West Florida, where she had taught and published in the student affairs field. 

Campus Tour

Thanking the UW-Whitewater community for warmly welcoming the Regents and other meeting participants, Regent President Pruitt remarked that the campus tour that morning had been very interesting and impressive.  Much has changed, he observed, since the Board’s last visit in 2002.

Themes for the Meeting

Economic Development and Job Creation

Regent President Pruitt reported that agenda items relating to the theme of economic development and job creation included the report of the Research to Jobs Task Force and a request for approval of a new BBA degree in Entrepreneurship at UW-Whitewater, along with a tour of the new home of the university’s award-winning business education programs. 

Transparency and Openness

Regent President Pruitt pointed out that streaming audio and video were being provided to allow broader public access and transparency to the Board’s deliberations.  Later that morning, there would be discussion of the Human Resource Services project – a major undertaking that involved personal briefings for state leaders and extensive coverage by the news media. 

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PRESENTATION – UW-WHITEWATER: ON THE MOVE

Beginning his remarks, Chancellor Richard Telfer introduced State Representative Tom Lothian, of Williams Bay.

UW-Whitewater, the Chancellor stated, has been developing as a campus in a number of areas through both physical and programmatic transformations.  In presentations to the committees that afternoon, Provost Chris Clements would provide an overview of the campus academic plan and efforts related to the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative, the Equity Scorecard, and Inclusive Excellence.  Vice President Randy Marnocha would provide an update on the campus’ physical development; and Richard Van Schoonhoven would speak about streamlining facilities maintenance.  Finally, Ruth Swisher would give an update on preparedness for the H1N1 flu.  The next morning, the Regents would have a breakfast with UW-Whitewater students.

UW-Whitewater, he continued, has been on the move in making significant strides forward in key areas of the strategic plan: programs and learning, the educator-scholar community, diversity and global perspectives, regional engagement, and professional and personal integrity.  His presentation was organized around four adjectives that describe what has been accomplished: Engaged, relevant, hands-on, and entrepreneurial.

With regard to being engaged, he showed a video titled Proud to be Purple that followed new freshmen students during fall orientation, as they transitioned from high school or work to membership in the campus community. 

Students also are engaged through more than 170 organizations, involving them in service to the community, educational and social events, and professional development.  As examples of such engagement, he introduced William Dougan, the Irvin L. Young Professor of Entrepreneurship and advisor for the Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization, and Emily Kartheiser, president of the organization.

Ms. Kartheiser reported that the Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization was in its third year as a chapter and had 50 members, many of whom run their own businesses.  Having already won several national awards, the UW-Whitewater organization was the most decorated chapter in the nation last year. 

The chapter’s most popular program has been a business plan competition, which has attracted 135 new business ideas; and $20,000 in prizes have been awarded.  In the last two years, the winners have started their own businesses.  The chapter also sends representatives to high schools to explain the value of entrepreneurship to students.

Turning to the relevance of education at UW-Whitewater, Chancellor Telfer indicated that it is relevant to students themselves, to communities, and to the state and region.

In that regard, he introduced the following students and faculty involved in projects funded by a grant from the Merck Foundation:  Professors Catherine Chan, Elisabeth Harrahy, and Paul House and student researchers James Fietzer, Lucas Kuehn, Kyle Butzine, Jazmine Crafton, Thomas Zimmerman, and Danielle Anton.

Professor Harrahy reported that UW-Whitewater was one of 14 institutions to be awarded a Merck undergraduate research grant focused on pharmaceuticals and personal care products.  Noting that these items get into surface water when discarded, she indicated that wastewater treatment processes are not designed to deal with these products.  Concerns include toxicity and persistence in the water.

Mr. Fietzer added that caffeine was found to be toxic only at high concentrations.  On the other hand, triclocarban was found to be toxic at lower levels.  Mr. Butzine’s research studied effects on land plants, finding that ibuprofen negatively affects plant growth and that caffeine impacts growth at high concentrations. 

Ms. Anton indicated that chlorine was found to react with caffeine and triclocarbon in the wastewater treatment process.  She remarked that she and other students learned life-long skills in reading journals, developing research methods and presenting results.

In conclusion, Professor Harrahy said that toxicity of pharmaceuticals and personal care products has implications for bodies of water like the Milwaukee River, which receives discharge from multiple wastewater treatment plants.

Chancellor Telfer added that the project is part of UW-Whitewater’s involvement with the Milwaukee 7 Water Council and fits with the university’s emphasis on water management within the Science-Business major and its emphasis on undergraduate research. 

Part of being relevant, he continued, is preparing students for life beyond the university, including educating them for a global, international world.  He then showed a video of Professor Choton Basu who teaches students to think globally when making business decisions.

Stating that learning at UW-Whitewater is hands-on, the Chancellor indicated that students have numerous opportunities to participate in internships and other experiences that extend learning beyond the classroom and that many of the internships involve placements with companies and organizations throughout the region. 

In addition, the new Business and Economics building, Hyland Hall, includes a number of centers for outreach to the local, state, national, and international community.

The Wisconsin Center for Information Technology Services (Wi-CIT), for example, works with small business and non-profit organizations in the region to provide IT support and development to help them succeed.  He introduced Professors John Chenoweth and Paul Ambrose, co-directors of the center.

Indicating that the center has been involved in 30 IT projects, Professor Chenoweth said that students have worked on websites for a number of businesses and that, through the Small Business Development Center, Wi-CIT has reached out to more businesses to assist in getting websites up and running.

Initially funded through a Gear-Up grant, the center has since moved to a cost-recovery model.  Five students work there, each for 15-20 hours per week. 

Chancellor Telfer then introduced Jeff Bluhm, executive director of Lutherdale Ministries in Elkhorn, who expressed his appreciation for the prompt service he received to keep his website running when the previous host went out of business.  Students designed a new website, which was much better than the original, and continued to provide help as needed.  The cost to his organization was much lower than it would have been if a private company provided the service.

Nels Wiberg, proprietor of Babe’s Fiber Garden in Whitewater, related that, when he began his spinning wheel business, he designed his own website.  After moving to Whitewater, his business grew and he developed more products.  At that point he needed help to improve his website and called Wi-CIT in response to an ad for the program.  Students completely reorganized his website, which helped him greatly to expand his business.

Stating that hands-on experiences also occur in the classroom, the Chancellor showed a video of Professor Elena Bertozzi teaching students to design video games.  Noting that technology is a path to power, Professor Bertozzi pointed out that those comfortable with technology have mostly been men and that an important motivation in her teaching is to give all students the tools they need to become powerful.

Turning to the entrepreneurial aspect of education at UW-Whitewater, Chancellor Telfer noted that many graduates would work in the businesses that they create.  The Board was being asked to approve a major in Entrepreneurship to enable the university to be even more successful in preparing students to start their own businesses. 

The campus itself, he pointed out, has become more entrepreneurial as well.  In that regard, he cited the Whitewater University Technology Park, a joint venture of the university and the city of Whitewater that stemmed from a study by NorthStar Economics, which found that such an endeavor could be successful.

He then introduced Kevin Brunner, Whitewater city manager, and Bud Gayhart, director of the Center for Innovation and Business Development, which included the Wisconsin Innovation Service Center and the Small Business Development Center at UW-Whitewater.

Mr. Brunner announced that ground would be broken later in the month at the 130-acre park.  Using a $4.7 million federal grant, the Whitewater Innovation Center would be constructed for start-up businesses and would be the first LEED-certified building in the region. 

Mr. Gayhart predicted that the park would generate great economic impact as a hub of renewal for Racine, Kenosha, Walworth, and Rock Counties, as well as counties in northern Illinois. The federal Economic Development Administration investment in the region totaled $17 million.  Flexibility in design would allow space to be reconfigured to meet the needs of business, and global perspectives would be stressed to promote success. Students would have internships in the park and some would start businesses there.  Overall, he felt that the park would be a key element in economic recovery for the region.

Concluding the presentation, Chancellor Telfer said that, in being engaged, relevant, hands-on, and entrepreneurial, UW-Whitewater connects the campus to the community.  Students study curricula that are relevant to current and future workplaces and they use their learning in workplace situations that also benefit the communities that they serve.  In addition, the university itself has become more entrepreneurial and engaged in creating businesses and job opportunities.

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 a.m.

Submitted by:

Judith A. Temby, Secretary




 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Whitewater, Wisconsin

UW-Whitewater

Held in the UW-Whitewater University Center

Room 275

September 11, 2009

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

Approval of Minutes of July 9, 2009 Meeting.. 9

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 9

In Memory of September 11, 2001. 9

Thanks to UW-Whitewater.. 10

Governor Doyle’s Announcement.. 10

Senate Confirmation Hearings and Legislative Visits. 10

President Reilly to Accompany Governor Doyle on Trip to China.. 10

Report of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board.. 11

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 11

Introduction of Representative Steve Nass. 11

Grant for Whitewater Technology Park.. 11

Introduction of UW-Green Bay Provost Julia Wallace.. 11

Report of the Research to Jobs Task Force.. 11

Task Force on Internationalization and Economic Development.. 16

Introduction of Ken Lee, American Council on Education Fellow... 16

Preliminary Enrollment Information.. 17

WHEG Applications. 17

UW-Whitewater College of Business and Economics Online Programs Receive Honors  17

National Science Foundation Grant to UW-Manitowoc and UW-Stout.. 17

National Science Foundation Grant to UW-Oshkosh.. 18

UW Campuses Embrace Veterans as Students. 18

UW-Eau Claire Receives Grant to Transform Student Learning.. 18

UW-Superior Hosts Bio-Fuels and Energy Independence Symposium... 19

Honors for UW-Green Bay Women’s Basketball Team... 19

Gift to UW-River Falls. 19

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE.. 19

Thanks to Committee Members and Staff. 19

UW-Milwaukee Charter School Status Report.. 20

Contract Extension for School for Early Development and Achievement 20

Adequate Yearly Progress Status of UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools. 20

Program Authorization: UW-Madison Doctor of Nursing Practice.. 20

UW-Whitewater:  Presentation of Campus Academic Plan.. 21

Report of the Senior Vice President.. 21

Introductions. 21

Education Committee Priorities and Interests for 2009-10. 21

Consent Agenda.. 22

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension for the School of Early Development and Achievement 22

Program Authorization (Implementation) Doctor of Nursing Practice University of Wisconsin-Madison. 22

Revised Mission Statement UW-Stout 22

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Kinesiology University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. 22

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.B.A. in Entrepreneurship University of Wisconsin-Whitewater 23

Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Extension. 23

Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Madison. 23

The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health: The Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future – Acceptance of the Fifth Annual Report.. 23

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE.. 24

Review and Approval of Human Resource System Project Implementation.. 24

Review and Approval of Human Resource System Project Implementation. 25

Project Status Report for Major Information Technology Projects as Required by Wis. Stats. S.13.58(5)(b)(3) 26

UW-Whitewater Presentation: Streamlining Facilities Maintenance.. 26

Update on Financial Aid.. 27

Status of Wisconsin Higher Education Grant 27

Veterans Remissions. 27

Committee Business. 27

Report on Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (4th Quarter) 27

UW-Madison Contractual Agreements. 27

CDC Recommended Temporary Suspension on Use of Sick Leave Policy and Update on H1N1 Virus. 28

Report of the Senior Vice President.. 28

Consent Agenda.. 28

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Pfizer, Inc. 29

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Amgen, Ltd. 29

CDC Recommended Waiver of Certification of Medical Necessity Requirement For Faculty, Limited Appointees, and Academic Staff Use of Sick Leave. 29

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE.. 30

UW-Green Bay: Authority to Enter into Land Use Agreement for Construction of Student Housing 30

UW-Madison: Authority to Exercise Lease Purchase Option for 21 North Park Street 30

UW-Madison: Authority to Plan Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project.. 31

UW-Madison:  Authority to Adjust Budget of Physical Plant Shops and Office Building Project 31

UW-Madison:  Authority to Construct East Campus Utility Improvements, Phase 5 Project 31

UW-Madison: Authority to Lease Space for University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Fundus Reading Center 31

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects  32

Consent Agenda.. 32

Authority to Enter into a Land Use Agreement for the Construction of Student Housing,  UW-Green Bay. 32

Authority to Plan the Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project, UW-Madison. 32

Authority to Adjust the Budget of the Physical Plant Shops and Office Building Project 33

Authority to Construct the East Campus Utility Improvements, Phase 5 Project, UW-Madison. 33

Authority to Lease Space for the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Fundus Reading Center, UW-Madison. 33

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance And Repair Projects, UW-System.. 33

Authority to Exercise the Lease Purchase Option for 21 North Park Street, UW-Madison. 34

UW-Whitewater Presentation: Campus Master Plan Update.. 35

Report of the Associate Vice President.. 35

Building Commission Actions. 35

Project Delivery Method Legislation. 35

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS. 36

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Whitewater.. 36

UNFINISHED OR ADDITIONAL BUSINESS. 37

Election of Interim Assistant Secretary of the Board.. 37

CLOSED SESSION.. 38

Authority to Name the UW-Whitewater Baseball Stadium the “Jim Miller Baseball Stadium”, UW-Whitewater 38


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Whitewater, Wisconsin

UW-Whitewater

Held in the UW-Whitewater University Center

Room 275

September 11, 2009

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Jeffery Bartell, Mark Bradley, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, David Walsh, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regent José Vásquez

- - -

Approval of Minutes of July 9, 2009 Meeting

The minutes of the July 9, 2009 meeting stood approved as distributed.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

In Memory of September 11, 2001

Regent President Pruitt asked for a moment of silence in honor of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001, and in honor of the fire fighters, police, and military who saved so many lives then and since.

Thanks to UW-Whitewater

Expressing appreciation to Chancellor Telfer and UW-Whitewater for a rewarding visit, Regent President Pruitt referred to a professor’s statement during the chancellor’s presentation the previous day that students will change the world if they are given the necessary tools.  UW-Whitewater, Regent Pruitt said, is doing an excellent job of preparing students to meet the challenges of the future.

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Governor Doyle’s Announcement

Referring to Governor Doyle’s announcement that he would not seek another term, Regent President Pruitt remarked that, despite very difficult fiscal challenges, the Governor remained committed to the UW System and to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, increasing financial aid, expanding the capital budget, and creating the Wisconsin Covenant.

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Senate Confirmation Hearings and Legislative Visits

Regent President Pruitt reported that he and Regent Wingad had appeared before the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Higher Education for their confirmation hearings. Topics of interest to committee members included credit transfer and the university’s contributions to growing the economy.

After the hearing, he and Regent Wingad visited several legislative offices, meeting with Senate Majority Leader Russ Decker; Assembly Speaker Mike Sheridan; Representative Kim Hixon, chair of the Assembly Colleges and Universities Committee; and Representative Steve Nass, ranking member of the committee. 

President Reilly has had regular meetings with both higher education committee chairs – Senator Kathleen Vinehout and Representative Kim Hixon.  A recent meeting included discussion of the state’s new provisions relating to collective bargaining rights for UW System faculty and staff.

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President Reilly to Accompany Governor Doyle on Trip to China

Regent President Pruitt announced that President Reilly had been asked to accompany Governor Doyle on an upcoming trip to China.  The President planned to meet with other university officials, as well as leaders in government and commerce. This would be a good opportunity, Regent Pruitt remarked, to build on the strong ties that UW institutions already have established with institutions in China.

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Report of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

A written report was provided.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Introduction of Representative Steve Nass

Chancellor Telfer welcomed Representative Steve Nass, who had come to observe the meeting.

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Grant for Whitewater Technology Park

Chancellor Telfer announced receipt of a $4.7 million grant for the Whitewater Technology Park from the federal Economic Development Administration.  It would help to fund the first building in the park, the Innovation Center.

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Introduction of UW-Green Bay Provost Julia Wallace

President Reilly introduced and welcomed Julia Wallace, who had recently taken office as UW-Green Bay provost.  She came to the UW System from Central Michigan University where she served as executive vice president and provost.  Prior to that, she was dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Northern Iowa. 

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Report of the Research to Jobs Task Force

In introductory remarks, President Reilly noted that the focus of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin is on growing numbers of graduates, growing jobs and growing communities.  The Research to Jobs Task Force, which he had established earlier in the year, was concerned with the second of those elements.

Recalling that long ago the university helped Wisconsin’s agricultural economy shift from wheat to dairy, he said that today the university must help the state transition to an economy in which almost all sectors and industries depend on knowledge and innovation.

While the UW System would continue to be a vital engine of economic growth, it must be done in partnership with the private sector in creating the wealth and opportunities that move the economy forward.

When he appointed the Research to Jobs Task Force in February, he had charged it with studying the UW research, patent, and commercialization process and with identifying ways in which the UW System could play a leading role in supporting industrial innovation, accelerating the growth of Wisconsin companies and fostering knowledge-based, high-paying jobs to sustain Wisconsin’s economy. 

The task force membership, he observed, was diverse and top-drawer, led by Carl Gulbrandsen, managing director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation.  The President then introduced several task force members who were attending the meeting:  John Neis, managing director of Venture Investors and chair of the task force’s Committee for Job Creation through Start-ups; UW-Stout Chancellor Chuck Sorensen, co-chair of the Committee for Growth of Mature Business; Tom Still, president of the Wisconsin Technology Council and chair of the Committee for Communication of the Critical Role of UW Research to the Public and Industry;  Maliyakal John, managing director of the WiSys Technology Foundation; and Kris Andrews, UW System assistant vice president for federal relations. 

Expressing his appreciation to the task force for efforts that would benefit the future of the state, he called upon Mr. Gulbrandsen to present the report.

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Beginning his presentation, Mr. Gulbrandsen indicated that the task force was large -- consisting of 25 members from across the state -- and diverse in the  experience of its members, including public sector, university, technology transfer, business, and legal expertise.  Thirteen of the task force members were chief executive officers.

The task force was charged with focusing on:

  • Job creation through start-ups or growth of mature businesses;

  • Job creation through increasing research within UW System schools;

  • Industry sponsored research as well as government sponsored research; and

  • Effective ways to communicate the role of UW research to the public and industry.

In that regard, he noted that the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) was established because of the work of UW professor Harry Steenbock as he addressed the problems of Wisconsin farmers.  It was created to serve the university, the state and its companies.  He predicted that the work of the task force also would increase jobs and help businesses to grow. 

It is important, he emphasized, to trumpet what UW campuses across the state do in that regard because there is much of which to be proud.

The task force charge required that recommendations be:

  • Practical and implementable in the near future;

  • Applicable to all UW institutions;

  • Quantifiable with benchmarks; and that

  • Roles of the UW, industry, and government be defined.

The first two requirements were met, and the last two remained to be completed.

The task force divided its work among three committees:  Start-ups, headed by John Neis, of Venture Investors; Growth of Mature Business, headed by David Ward, of NorthStar Economics and UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen; and Communications, headed by Tom Still, of the Wisconsin Technology Council.

Noting that the task force operated on a tight timeline, having met for the first time in March, 2009, he thanked Ms. Andrews and Mr. John for their efforts in moving the task force’s work forward.

Salient points of the task force’s work included:

  • Extensive discussions with business, education, and community leaders;

  • Review of nationally acclaimed model systems for job creation and business growth;

  • Identification of hurdles and potential solutions;

  • Special attention to cost effectiveness of recommendations; and

  • Recommendations with state-wide implications.

With regard to cost-effectiveness, Mr. Gulbrandsen indicated that, while task force members were particularly sensitive to cost issues in these difficult economic times, a small investment would be needed to implement the recommendations.

Key ideas that emerged from the work of the task force included:

  • Entrepreneurship is key.

    • It is important to get students excited about entrepreneurship

    • Leadership at UW System and campuses must lead the charge and promote the attitude that it is beneficial to be involved with business.

    • Emulate successful programs at UW-Madison and other campuses, such as housing students interested in entrepreneurship together and the UW-Madison “Boot Camp” in business for science students.

    • Remove hurdles for faculty to form start-ups by removing penalties and providing leaves for such work.

  • Connecting UW research to small and large company needs is vital.  In that regard, the task force recommended setting up emerging technology centers on campuses, with both industry and students involved.

  • Research should be promoted as an integral part of teaching in the comprehensive universities, recognizing that experiencing research enriches student learning.
In summary, Mr. Gulbrandsen said that:
  • 24 key ideas were identified for implementation or further study;

  • Recommendations include steps for the UW System and the public and private sectors; and

  • Most of the recommendations are low cost and high return.


Implementation steps include:
  • Creation of a standing committee to identify new ideas and encourage successes;

  • Regular reports to legislators and others to promote public understanding of what is being done; and

  • Leadership from the top down.

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Walsh inquired about obstacles to fulfilling the task force recommendations.

Mr. Gulbrandsen replied that one obstacle is lack of freedom for faculty take leave time to nurture start-up businesses and lack of rewards for success in entrepreneurship or business growth.  President Reilly added that framing of the issue and incentives could come from the system level and that campuses could follow with appropriate rule-making.

In response to a question by Regent Bartell, Mr. Gulbrandsen said that the costliest recommendation would be creation of emerging technology centers, which would cost several million dollars, some of which might come from the federal government and industry.

Regent President Pruitt inquired about the context and history of the recommendation on leave policy.

As an example, Mr. Gulbrandsen recalled that UW-Madison faculty who took a leave for business purposes lost benefits as a result and some ultimately left the university.  At other schools, leaves of three to five years are allowed, not necessarily for the faculty member to serve as CEO, but to provide the inspiration and knowledge needed by a new business.  Faculty, he said, should not be penalized for having great ideas.

Regent Bradley inquired about ownership of discoveries made in technology centers. 

Replying that ownership would depend on the agreement that was in effect, Mr. Gulbrandsen explained that the university usually owns rights to a discovery developed on campus.  In that case, there generally is an agreement giving a company the right to use it.  Once it is in the marketplace, royalties flow to the university.  It also is possible for a university and private sector partner to obtain joint grants from the federal government, in which case discoveries can be jointly shared.

Referring to a recommendation that the UW do a better job of communicating the importance of research to constituent groups, Regent Bartell asked what the Board of Regents could do to help reach that goal.

In reply, Mr. Still urged attention both to communication needs and to the tools that could be employed.  With fewer central sources of information, it is harder to reach the broad public, requiring the use of many different tools.  Industry needs must be identified and addressed by the technology centers.

Agreeing that the matter is complicated, Mr. Gulbrandsen suggested that Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce and other trade associations might do more to funnel needs of industry to the university.  A means developed at UW-Madison involved creation of the web-based Discovery Portal, a directory of faculty and their areas of expertise that can be navigated with a search engine.  Expanding such a portal to the entire UW System, he thought, would be an effective means of reaching businesses.

UW Colleges and UW Extension Chancellor David Wilson noted that Small Business Development Centers have aided creation of 4,000 jobs and $50 million in profits in recent years.  He asked if they could serve as a start for what was being recommended. 

Mr. Gulbrandsen replied that the task force was aware of the value of those centers and was broadly considering all kinds of partnerships with industry, citizens, the media and others. 

Regent Davis inquired about what would happen if there were a mismatch between ideas and opportunities for commercialization.

Mr. Neiss replied that it is important to have a critical mass on both sides and that it will be necessary to screen what is on the portal and make connections to meet needs.

Expressing appreciation for an excellent report, Regent Walsh inquired as to next steps in moving the report’s recommendations forward.

President Reilly pointed out that academic research and development is an important industry in its own right, amounting to over $ 1 billion per year, $840.7 million of which has emanated from UW-Madison, one of the nation’s leading research universities. 

Great pride can be taken in UW-Madison’s nation-leading role, as well as in UW-Milwaukee’s growing strength, he remarked.  In fiscal year 2007, research spending at UW-Milwaukee totaled about $40 million and is expected to climb to more than $55 million in fiscal year 2010.  The campus is developing a strong base in key disciplines like engineering and life sciences – fields that will help the region reach its potential as a 21st century metropolitan economy.

Growing research and development support, he continued, also would help the comprehensive universities become stronger economic engines for their regions, as well as better prepare students with higher levels of curiosity and critical thinking skills that would serve them well in the high-tech job market. 

Turning to entrepreneurism, the President remarked that entrepreneurs are a major source of innovation and prosperity.  Not confined to the sciences or business schools, entrepreneurism should be encouraged in other disciplines as well.  Through a grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, UW-Madison was creating new entrepreneurship initiatives in the context of the Wisconsin Idea; and the UW System held its first Entrepreneurship Summit in April 2009 at UW-Stevens Point.

As to next steps, President Reilly commended Mr. Gulbrandsen and the task force for their willingness to form a standing committee to continue the momentum and indicated that they would work together to form such a group to serve as a conduit to the Regents, Chancellors and the President.  Initiatives were already under way for some of the recommendations, and others could be started quickly.  Still others would require consultation within the UW and with outside partners. 

Regent Davis asked if the board would receive periodic reports on how the action steps were proceeding, and President Reilly replied in the affirmative.

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Task Force on Internationalization and Economic Development

Noting that companies of all sizes are competing internationally for customers, capital and talent, President Reilly announced formation of a new UW System Task Force on Internationalization and Economic Development to examine how expertise throughout the UW System can be used to help attract international investment and promote growth in international markets.

The task force would be co-chaired by David J. Ward, former interim chancellor of UW-Green Bay and president and founder of NorthStar Economics, and Gilles Bousquet, dean of the Division of International Studies at UW-Madison. 

Referring to his upcoming trip to China, President Reilly remarked that the UW’s growing number of relationships in that area could be better used to promote economic growth for Wisconsin.

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Introduction of Ken Lee, American Council on Education Fellow

President Reilly introduced Ken Lee, who had come to the UW System on an American Council on Education fellowship – an intensive year-long program designed to ensure quality in the next generation of higher education leadership. 

Dr. Lee had 20 years of experience as a department chair, center director, and fund raiser at Ohio State University, having helped to raise private gifts and public support for a new food science building.  Before that, he served on the faculty at UW-Madison, where he helped to plan an addition to Babcock Hall and participated in running the Center for Dairy Research.

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Preliminary Enrollment Information

It was reported by President Reilly that many UW institutions were posting record-setting student numbers for the fall semester.  UW-Green Bay reported a freshman class of 1,056 students – the most ever; and UW-La Crosse reported enrolling about 8,700 students – more than any year in the past two decades.  At the two-year campuses, UW-Rock County reported enrolling 1,130 students – the highest number in 40 years.  Overall, preliminary reports showed the number of new freshmen up by almost 900 from last year, and the number of students transferring into the UW System up by more than 300.

Referring to these figures as very promising, President Reilly observed that they promote the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin goal of getting more Wisconsin residents into and through the higher education pipeline.

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WHEG Applications

Reporting that Wisconsin Higher Education Grant applications for the UW were up 11% compared to last year and that actual awards were up nearly 18%, President Reilly said that he sent a letter to the Governor and key legislators expressing concern about shortfalls in need-based aid.  Representative Cory Mason recently proposed a bill that would grant financial aid to more than 20,000 low-income students who had applied for financial aid to attend Wisconsin’s UW campuses, technical colleges, and private colleges but had been wait-listed because grant funding was depleted.

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UW-Whitewater College of Business and Economics Online Programs Receive Honors

President Reilly commended UW-Whitewater’s College of Business and Economics for being named, for the second straight year, “a best school for online business education” by the readers of the Corporate Report Wisconsin magazine.  The online BBA and MBA programs were recognized for innovative use of technology, including streaming video, audio, professor-led online discussions, and online exams.

The MBA program also won the 2009 Excellence in Online Education Award from European CEO magazine, which cited the program’s innovation, originality and market leadership.

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National Science Foundation Grant to UW-Manitowoc and UW-Stout

President Reilly congratulated UW-Stout and UW-Manitowoc on being awarded a National Science foundation grant of nearly $1 million to increase the number of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates in Wisconsin – a goal that aligned well with the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin. 

UW-Manitowoc professors Rebecca Abler and Richard Hein and UW-Stout professors Kitrina Carlson and Michael Pickart led the project, called “Opening the Portals of Discovery.”  The grant would support collaborative research, mentorship, and instructional programs to encourage students to begin studying more STEM courses in high school, continuing at UW-Manitowoc for two years, and finishing their degrees at UW-Stout.

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National Science Foundation Grant to UW-Oshkosh

It was reported by President Reilly that the National Science Foundation had awarded nearly $900,000 to UW-Oshkosh for its project, “Alternative Careers in Teaching for STEM Professionals.”  Under the direction of Dr. Michael Beeth of UW-Oshkosh and Drs. Dubear Kroening and Tammy Ladwig of UW-Fox Valley, the grant would provide $10,000 stipends to 75 individuals enrolling in the Alternative Careers in Teaching program as it expands into areas served by UW-Waukesha, UW-Baraboo/Sauk County and UW-Richland.

The President congratulated all those involved in that effort.

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UW Campuses Embrace Veterans as Students

President Reilly reported that G.I. Jobs magazine had recently announced a list of military-friendly schools, based on a survey of more than 7,000 institutions nation-wide.  The list honored the top 15% of colleges, universities and other schools that have done the most to embrace veterans as students.  He commended nine UW institutions for making that list – UW-Eau Claire, Green Bay, Madison, Parkside, Platteville, River Falls, Stevens Point, Stout, and Whitewater.

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UW-Eau Claire Receives Grant to Transform Student Learning

President Reilly congratulated UW-Eau Claire and Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich on receiving a nationally competitive grant of nearly $1.75 million to support its goal of transforming student learning.  The university was one of just 57 institutions nation-wide to receive a grant this year through the Strengthening Institutions program of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Postsecondary Education. 

The grant would support a five-year project to create and implement a more integrated general education program designed to more deeply engage first and second year students; enrich their global and multicultural experiences; and implement an advising system to help students in more intentionally planning their college careers.

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UW-Superior Hosts Bio-Fuels and Energy Independence Symposium

Chancellor Julius Erlenbach and his team at UW-Superior were commended by President Reilly for hosting the first Bio-Fuels and Energy Independence Symposium.  Organized by American Science and Technology, based in Chicago, the symposium brought together researchers, engineers, educators, and industrial professionals from around the Midwest to present their latest ideas and development activities in bio-fuel conversion and production.  The keynote address was delivered by Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Barbara Lawton. 

The symposium, the President remarked, demonstrated the Wisconsin Idea in action, as the UW brought its potent resources to bear on society’s major issues.  In the area of bio-fuels, leading work was being conducted across the UW System.

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Honors for UW-Green Bay Women’s Basketball Team

Reporting that the UW-Green Bay women’s basketball team was the only Division I NCAA women’s basketball team in the state to be among the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association Academic Top 25 Team Honor Roll for the 2008-09 season, President Reilly commended them for posting a team grade-point average of 3.317, to place 23rd among Division I programs.  The team also was one of just seven teams in the nation to rank in the top 25 academically and also advance to the 2009 NCAA tournament. 

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Gift to UW-River Falls

President Reilly announced that Willis H. Miller, a well-known newspaperman, historian and philanthropist, had left UW-River Falls a gift of more than one million dollars – the largest gift in the school’s 135-year history.  Mr. Miller’s relationship with the university began in 1939 when he took a summer class there. 

The money would be used to establish endowed scholarships, giving preference to students from the Hudson area, which was the late Mr. Miller’s home.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Regent Crain, chair, presented the committee’s report.

Thanks to Committee Members and Staff

Stating that she was honored to chair the committee and to work with her follow committee members, Regent Crain thanked Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin, Committee Secretary Rebecca Karoff and the other staff members who assist the committee in its work.

UW-Milwaukee Charter School Status Report

Contract Extension for School for Early Development and Achievement

Bob Kattman, director of the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools, described the School for Early Development and Achievement, which is unusual in that it serves students in three-year-old kindergarten through second grade, 30-40% of whom are special education students with a variety of disabilities. 

The committee was informed that all fiscal and contractual requirements are being met and that the school now has a strong principal in place after having suffered from weak leadership and turnover for a number of years. The office believed that there is reason for confidence that the situation would continue to improve.

However, a better assessment plan is needed, and the office is working with the school to develop such a plan.  For those reasons, a three-year extension of the contract was sought, instead of the full five years. 

The committee approved the contract extension for the requested three years in a resolution to be included in the consent agenda.

Adequate Yearly Progress Status of UW-Milwaukee Charter Schools

Mr. Kattman provided an update on several other charter schools, including the School of Inland Seas, for which renewal of the charter was not judged to be appropriate at this time. 

Over the summer, the Regents received information on annual yearly progress of two UW-Milwaukee charter schools and the one charter school authorized by UW-Parkside.  There are remaining concerns about one of these schools, and further information will be provided later. 

UW-Milwaukee Provost Rita Cheng and Dr. Kattman shared with the committee some research projects being conducted by UW-Milwaukee faculty and graduate students on the university’s charter schools.

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Program Authorization: UW-Madison Doctor of Nursing Practice

Regent Crain recalled that, over the past two years, the Regents have received a strong foundation towards understanding the changing practice requirements for the nursing profession.  Since December 2008, the Board had reviewed the Report of the Nursing Education Task Force and approved DNP degree programs at UW-Milwaukee, UW-Eau Claire, and UW-Oshkosh.

The committee heard about the UW-Madison DNP program from Chancellor Biddy Martin and School of Nursing Dean Katharyn May.  Like other programs already approved, the UW-Madison DNP was developed in response to changing practice requirements and to workforce supply and demand issues, both statewide and nationally. 

The UW-Madison DNP would offer both a post-master’s, part-time DNP for nurses already practicing and a post-baccalaureate DNP, which would be a three-year, full-time program.  The program would focus on adult/gerontology, pediatric, and psychiatric/mental health nursing.

Dean May detailed the school’s work to recruit and retain diverse students and faculty, to integrate multicultural content across the curriculum, and to improve the school’s climate.  She also emphasized the strong collaborations that exist among the UW System’s DNP programs, both formal and informal.

The committee approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Whitewater:  Presentation of Campus Academic Plan

UW-Whitewater Provost Chris Clements presented the campus academic plan, which includes a strong sense of institutional identity through:

  • The university’s focus on accessibility, hands-on and high-impact learning, and relevance;

  • Its select mission to serve students with disabilities;

  • Its growth in areas of greatest concern to southeastern Wisconsin, such as water research;

  • Its strength in business education, including the new degree in entrepreneurship and development of the Whitewater research park;

  • Its cultural programming in the performance arts, utilized by the entire region; and

  • Academic program development in some key areas, including international business, urban education, and sustainability.

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Report of the Senior Vice President

Introductions

Senior Vice President Martin introduced newly installed provosts at six UW institutions and American Council on Education Fellow Ken Lee.

Education Committee Priorities and Interests for 2009-10

The committee discussed a list of priorities and heard reactions from a number of provosts.  It was agreed that the chair and vice-chair of the committee would work with staff to further prioritize and communicate with committee members.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved adoption by the board as consent agenda items the following resolutions, which were approved unanimously by the committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Danae Davis and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension for the School of Early Development and Achievement

  Resolution 9668: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with the School of Early Development and Achievement, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the School of Early Development and Achievement or SEDA.

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Program Authorization (Implementation) Doctor of Nursing Practice University of Wisconsin-Madison

  Resolution 9669: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Doctor of Nursing Practice.

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Revised Mission Statement UW-Stout

  Resolution 9670: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the University of Wisconsin-Stout’s revised mission statement.

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Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Kinesiology University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

  Resolution 9671: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Kinesiology.

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Program Authorization (Implementation) B.B.A. in Entrepreneurship University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

  Resolution 9672: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.B.A. in Entrepreneurship.

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Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Extension

  Resolution 9673: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the amendments to the UW-Extension Faculty Personnel Rules.

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Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Madison

  Resolution 9674: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the amendments to the UW-Madison Faculty Personnel Rules.

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The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health: The Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future – Acceptance of the Fifth Annual Report

At a joint meeting of the Education Committee and the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Dean Golden, of the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, provided an overview of the Wisconsin Partnership Program’s annual report.

Highlights included:

  • Development and approval by the Board of Regents of a new five-year plan in December 2008;

  • Strong evaluation practices of the Wisconsin Partnership programs in place and yielding important outcomes; and the

  • Hiring of Pat Remington as the first Associate Dean for Public Health.

A matter of concern was a significant decline in the program’s endowment, by about $100 million in the last two years.  Although the endowment was gaining as the stock market began to recover, there had been impacts on the ability to make grants, so that some approved programs could not be funded.

The program’s largest project was the Healthy Birth Outcomes Initiative, which attempts to reduce infant deaths and birth outcome disparities for African American women and children in Wisconsin.  Ten million dollars has been committed to this program over the next five years; and many community partners are involved in Beloit, Kenosha, Milwaukee, and Racine.

Dean Golden also addressed other program areas and the Legislative Audit Bureau’s financial audit of the Wisconsin Partnership Program. 

He termed the program an incredible gift and a 21st century realization of the Wisconsin Idea.  Overall, the committees agreed that it is an impressive commitment to addressing the state’s most pressing public health needs and to fiscal stewardship.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

Regent Smith, chair, presented the committee’s report.

Review and Approval of Human Resource System Project Implementation

The committee, with all Regents invited, heard an in-depth presentation on the project the preceding day by President Reilly, Senior Vice President Tom Anderes, and the chief executive officer of Huron Consulting Group. 

After considerable discussion by the entire Board, the committee amended the resolution approving the implementation plan of the multi-year project and approving the project budget for 2009-10, subject to negotiation of amendments to the existing Huron contract satisfactory to the Regent and System Presidents.  In addition, the Board will annually review the project implementation plan; and the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee will receive regular reports on the status of the project and the performance of Huron Consulting’s contractual obligations, beginning in October 2009 and continuing at every regularly scheduled two-day Board meeting until implementation is complete.

At the Board meeting, Senior Vice President Anderes outlined proposed amendments to the contract:

  • The UW System will identify key Huron personnel.

  • Huron will appropriately incentivize key personnel to remain with Huron and on the UW project.

  • The UW will be promptly notified of any departures of key Huron personnel.

  • Huron will promptly replace departed key personnel, subject to UW approval.

  • Huron will fund a two-to four-week transition period for new key personnel.

  • Huron will pay liquidated damages in the event key positions remain unfilled.

  • The UW System will have the right to offer to hire key personnel in the event of material financial duress of Huron in circumstances that prevent their providing professional services.

It was expected that these amendments could be completed in a few days.

Regent Smith asked if other amendments could be added, and Mr. Anderes replied in the affirmative.  He indicated that one question related to retaining funds in a reserve until the project is completed or having a surety bond.  Currently, the university pays the company as it performs, so usually there would not be a reserve or bond.  However, given the issue of financial capacity, they would discuss a financial reserve.  The contract already included a 60-day termination policy and the ability to have damages for any lack of performance.

Adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Smith and seconded by Regent Bartell:

Review and Approval of Human Resource System Project Implementation

  Resolution 9675: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approve:  (a) the System Administration’s Project Implementation Plan for the HRS Project and (b) the FY 2010 implementation budget for that project, in each case subject to the negotiation of amendments to the existing HRS system contract with Huron Consulting satisfactory to the Regent President and the System President.  It is understood that the Board of Regents will annually review the Project Implementation Plan and that its Business, Finance, and Audit Committee will receive regular reports on the status of the project and the performance of Huron Consulting’s contractual obligations, beginning in October 2009, and continuing at every regularly-scheduled two-day Board meeting until implementation is complete.

Regent Loftus asked if it would be realistic to think that the UW could hire Huron personnel if the company were dissolved. 

Mr. Anderes noted that the amount paid by the university was not what was paid to the staff, since part of it went to the company.  The university would offer salary and benefits. 

In response to a further question by Regent Loftus, Regent Bartell said that liquidated damages means established damages; and Regent Spector added that the amount would be mutually agreed upon as sensible.

Regent Bartell added that, if the company were dissolved, the personnel assigned to the UW project most likely would remain together and either go to a new firm or start their own company; and the UW could re-hire them.

While he understood the risks of not going forward with the project, Regent Opgenorth commented that committing to it also presents a risk that might put campuses and students in jeopardy.

Regent Loftus asked how many staff were considered key personnel, and Mr. Anderes said the number would be four or five, constituting the core leadership of the project.

The question was put on the Resolution 9675, and it was adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Womack, Wingad, Walsh, Spector, Smith, Pruitt, Falbo, Evers, Drew, Stan Davis, Danae Davis, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Bradley, and Bartell (15) voting in favor of the resolution; and Regents Opgenorth and Loftus (2) voting in opposition.

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Project Status Report for Major Information Technology Projects as Required by Wis. Stats. S.13.58(5)(b)(3)

Associate Vice President Ed Meachen presented the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee with progress reports on the six major IT projects currently under way in the UW System.  Those projects included student information systems at UW-Eau Claire, UW-La Crosse, and UW-Stout; the Human Resource Project planning; the Identity and Access Management project; and the Legacy Budget System.

All major projects were on target with respect to schedule, scope and budget. 

The report is required by state statute and is to be provided to the Legislature’s Joint Committee on Information Policy and Technology by March 1st and September 1st of each year.

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UW-Whitewater Presentation: Streamlining Facilities Maintenance

The committee heard a presentation by Richard Van Schoon Hoven, information services automation specialist at UW-Whitewater, who described value stream mapping of the maintenance work order process. 

System-wide and campus-specific lean projects are under way at all UW institutions in connection with the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin action step to improve operational excellence and efficiency.

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Update on Financial Aid

Status of Wisconsin Higher Education Grant

Associate Vice President Freda Harris provided the committee with an update on this fall’s Wisconsin Higher Education Grant awards and challenges.  There has been  significant growth in the number of students wait-listed for a WHEG award.

  Veterans Remissions

Jan Sheppard, senior academic planner, gave a presentation to the committee about changes in the laws regarding veterans’ remissions.

In discussion at the Board meeting, Regent Crain inquired about confusion that exists regarding levels of benefits and whether veterans are receiving less now than previously.

Senior Vice President Martin replied that they generally should receive more but that there is some confusion regarding the relation of state and federal benefits.  The university would continue to work with the Department of Veterans Affairs on these matters.

Regent Smith added that there are supplemental payments to make up any difference. 

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Committee Business

Report on Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (4th Quarter)

Vice President Debbie Durcan reported that total gifts, grants, and contracts for the period were $1.4 billion, an increase of $231.5 million from the comparable period in the previous fiscal year, and that federal awards increased $102.7 million, while nonfederal awards increased $128.8 million. 

UW-Madison Contractual Agreements

The committee approved contractual agreements with Pfizer, Inc. and Amgen, Inc. for inclusion in the consent agenda.

CDC Recommended Temporary Suspension on Use of Sick Leave Policy and Update on H1N1 Virus

Vice President Durcan reported to the committee that much planning and preparation was occurring at all UW institutions with respect to the H1N1 virus.  Chancellors and health center directors have been issuing guidelines for faculty, staff, and students; and websites have been populated with influenza information.

Nationally, there have been large outbreaks on college campuses.  UW-Madison University Health Services Director Dr. Sarah Van Orman reported that her campus had about 200 contacts the preceding week and that over 90% of them were for flu.  This is much earlier than flu typically occurs.  Most cases have been mild and could be controlled through self-isolation, fluids, and rest.  Dr. Van Orman indicated that the campus did not expect to cancel any large events, a decision which would change only if the severity of the illness increased and would not be based on the number of cases.

UW-Whitewater Health Services Director Ruth Swisher reported on activities under way on that campus. 

All campuses have key people monitoring the level of illness and have plans in place to respond. 

The National Centers for Disease Control identified one of the barriers to self-isolation by employees as sick leave policies that require a medical excuse.  The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda a resolution that temporarily would suspend the requirement of written certification from a health care provider of the medical necessity for use of sick leave for absences of more than five consecutive full working days in the case of flu-like illness.

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Report of the Senior Vice President

Senior Vice President Anderes reported on recent articles about new textbook rental opportunities for students. In addition, he noted that UW-Oshkosh was applying for a grant to fund collaboration of faculty to select common books for teaching and delivery online.

He also reported that UW System institutions have been awarded $44 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through August 15th, and he provided an update on the recently released Legislative Audit Bureau statewide audit of procurement cards.

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Consent Agenda

Regent Smith moved adoption by the Board of the following resolutions as consent agenda items. The motion was seconded by Regent Wingad and adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Pfizer, Inc.

  Resolution 9676: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contractual Data Analysis Research Agreement (CP-690,550) between the University of Wisconsin–Madison and Pfizer, Inc. from the effective date through January 31, 2013.

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UW-Madison Contractual Agreement with Amgen, Ltd.

  Resolution 9677: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contractual Data Analysis Research Agreement (AMG785 20060326) between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Amgen, Ltd. Effective from date of approval through July 15, 2012.

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CDC Recommended Waiver of Certification of Medical Necessity Requirement For Faculty, Limited Appointees, and Academic Staff Use of Sick Leave

  Resolution 9678: WHEREAS, the Board of Regents on October 7, 2005 adopted Resolution #9086 setting forth that UW institutions shall require written certification from a health care provider of the medical necessity for use of sick leave for absences of more than 5 consecutive full working days, except where the use of sick leave is authorized in advance, pursuant to the Wisconsin or Federal Family and Medical Leave Acts, and

WHEREAS, the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control, in its guidance for responses to influenza for institutions of higher education during 2009-2010 academic year, recommended:  “Do not require a doctor’s note for students, faculty, or staff to validate their illness or to return to work, as doctor’s offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and may not be able to provide such documentation in a timely way.”

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the UW System, the Board of Regents adopts the following policy:

Paragraph one of Resolution #9086 is suspended for the 2009-2010 academic year for those with the flu or flu-like symptoms.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

Regent Bartell, chair, presented the committee’s report.

UW-Green Bay: Authority to Enter into Land Use Agreement for Construction of Student Housing

The request would authorize two additional corporation-owned residence halls on Regent-owned land at UW-Green Bay.  The corporation would be able to finance and construct the housing at lower cost and avoid university debt, and the university would have the right to purchase them.  Housing rates would be increased for a year to cover the cost.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Madison: Authority to Exercise Lease Purchase Option for 21 North Park Street

In 2004, the university entered into lease arrangements to construct a residence hall, a parking ramp, and an office building, and to relocate UW Fleet Services.  The lease agreement provided purchase options for the various components of the project; and the residence hall, parking ramp, and fleet facility were purchased in 2006.

The next available purchase opportunity for the office building would be in 2010 at $38.5 million.  UW-Madison requested authority to negotiate an early option this month that would save the campus approximately $3.7 million in lease costs compared to the July 2010 purchase option.  The university hoped to save financing costs by substituting internal campus funding for at least half of the program revenue bonding, which would be the usual source for funding this type of purchase.

After discussion, the committee decided that the advantages of approving the request outweighed the disadvantages and passed a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Madison: Authority to Plan Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project

The committee was informed that the university and state would seek release of $24.5 million program revenue supported borrowing to complete the planning to design report stage and to purchase equipment.  The facility would have a new bio-fuel boiler and was included in the capital budget at a total cost of about $250 million.

A resolution granting the requested authority was approved for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Madison:  Authority to Adjust Budget of Physical Plant Shops and Office Building Project

The purpose of this project was to relocate some physical plant facilities from the Charter Street Heating Plant site, due to work being done on that project. 

When the project was initially approved, the Department of Administration did not include the $900,000 design and administration cost in the project estimate.  In addition, the university was requesting an additional $500,000 to provide space needed beyond what had been provided.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Madison:  Authority to Construct East Campus Utility Improvements, Phase 5 Project

Authority was requested to construct a $3.8 million project to provide core utilities in the Library Mall from State Street to Langdon Street.  Phase 4 of the project provided service to east campus facilities and the north side of Bascom Hill.

A resolution granting the requested authority was approved for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Madison: Authority to Lease Space for University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Fundus Reading Center

The request would provide research and office space in an off-campus location and would be entirely grant-funded.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda

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UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

Authority was requested to construct seven all agency projects, including infrastructure maintenance at UW-Eau Claire, UW-Madison, and UW-Milwaukee, an elevator installation at UW-Whitewater, and a significant remodeling project for the Maintenance and Material building and the Military Science building at UW-Stevens Point.

A resolution granting the requested authority was approved by the committee for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell moved adoption of the following resolutions as consent agenda items, and the motion was seconded by Regent Drew.  Resolution 9680 was removed from the consent agenda at the request of Regent Opgenorth

Resolutions 9679 and 9681-9685 then were adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Authority to Enter into a Land Use Agreement for the Construction of Student Housing,  UW-Green Bay

  Resolution 9679: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Green Bay Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to permit University Village Housing, Inc. (Village) to construct two additional student residence halls on the UW-Green Bay campus, under terms of a land use agreement with the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents.

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Authority to Plan the Charter Street Heating Plant Rebuild Project, UW-Madison

  Resolution 9681: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to pre-purchase equipment and complete the Design Report for the Charter Street Heating Plant (CSHP) Rebuild project for an estimated total cost of $24,500,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

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Authority to Adjust the Budget of the Physical Plant Shops and Office Building Project

  Resolution 9682: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to increase the budget of the Physical Plant Shops/Office Building project by $1,400,000 ($900,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $500,000 Agency Cash) for a revised project cost of $6,000,000 ($5,500,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $500,000 Agency Cash).

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Authority to Construct the East Campus Utility Improvements, Phase 5 Project, UW-Madison

  Resolution 9683: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct the East Campus Utility Improvements, Phase 5 project at an estimated total project cost of $3,855,000 ($3,045,450 General Fund Supported Borrowing and $809,550 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing).

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Authority to Lease Space for the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Fundus Reading Center, UW-Madison

  Resolution 9684: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted for the Department of Administration to execute a lease for 22,172 leasable feet of office space at 8010 Excelsior Drive, Madison, Wisconsin, on behalf of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health – Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science’s Fundus Reading Center.

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Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance And Repair Projects, UW-System

  Resolution 9685: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $19,637,800 ($5,157,700 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $4,381,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; $4,674,000 Gifts and Grants; and $5,425,100 Program Revenue Cash).

Authority to Exercise the Lease Purchase Option for 21 North Park Street, UW-Madison

Regent Opgenorth stated that he requested this item be removed from the consent agenda in order to make the point that he did not consider it to be appropriate to reach into the operating budget to pay for a capital expense.

Regent Bartell agreed that it was a matter of some concern.  The committee had decided to approve the request because of the financial benefit to the university in an unusual situation.

UW-Madison Vice Chancellor for Administration Darrell Bazzell recalled that the project had been submitted for inclusion in the capital budget but was not accepted because of the pressing nature of other projects, and he did not expect it to be enumerated in the near future.  If the property were not purchased now, the operating budget lease costs in excess of $3 million per year would continue and increase over time.

Regent Falbo remarked that it would be unusual to exercise an option to purchase when the market was depressed. 

Mr. Bazzell indicated that purchasing at this time would be the less costly alternative.  The impact on the operating budget would be over $3 million per year to lease the facility, but $19 million from a one-time revenue stream would be available to purchase the property.  No tuition money would be involved.

Regent Walsh agreed that purchasing at this time would be a wise financial decision.

Regent Opgenorth expressed concern about the matter on the basis of principle.  Once the precedent were set, he asked, what would keep others from using similar mechanisms.

Vice Chancellor Bazzell noted that, in this case, operating budget funds were already being used to pay for the lease.

Regent Opgenorth asked about the $500,000 from the operating budget being used in the physical plant/office building project, to which Mr. Bazzell replied that one-time funding was used for the project and that it would be recouped through efficiencies.  The project would cost more if done later.

President Reilly noted that the Board could deny future requests, if it wished.  He considered the use of operating budget funds in these two cases to be reasonable.

In response to a question by Regent Wingad, Mr. Bazzell explained that the $19 million would be composed of a one-time stream of revenue from the Medical Practice Plan, money from what otherwise would have been lease payments, and internal transfers to support ongoing costs.

The question was put on Resolution 9680; and it was adopted on a voice vote, with Regent Opegenorth voting in opposition. 

  Resolution 9680: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to amend the existing lease and exercise the purchase option for the building at 21 North Park Street located on university-owned property at a total cost of $38,546,000 ($19,273,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $19,273,000 Program Revenue).  The purchase was enumerated in the 2009-11 Capital Budget.

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UW-Whitewater Presentation: Campus Master Plan Update

The Committee heard a report by UW-Whitewater Vice Chancellor Randy Marnocha, along with faculty, staff and a student, on the university’s capital planning success and hopes for the future.

Important successes included: Technologically sophisticated Hyland Hall, recent upgrades of the Warhawk Stadium and Multi-Sports complex; and the LEED certified and handicap accessible residence hall currently under construction. 

For the future, Dean Mary Pinkerton envisioned one building to consolidate faculty and classes for the College of Letters and Sciences. 

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Report of the Associate Vice President

Building Commission Actions

Associate Vice President David Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $17 million for projects at its August meeting.

Project Delivery Method Legislation

The committee received an update from Mr. Miller on the Building Commission’s recommendation for project delivery method legislation.  The previous month, the commission supported drafting legislation recommended by Division of State Facilities Administrator David Helbach to allow agencies to use various project delivery methods on a project-by-project basis.  This would eliminate the current multiple-prime preference in the statutes and the requirement to seek statutory waivers for other methods, such as single prime contractor, and construction manager at risk.

If enacted, Regent Bartell said, this legislation would greatly improve the process and save costs.

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 ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Regent Walsh presented and moved the adoption of the following resolution, which was seconded by Regent Wingad and adopted on a unanimous voice vote, with an ovation of appreciation to Chancellor Telfer and UW-Whitewater.

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9686: WHEREAS, the members of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System are pleased to learn more about UW-Whitewater’s commitment to educational excellence on a regional, national, and global level, commending Chancellor Richard Telfer for cultivating a spirit of learning that is engaged, hands on, relevant, and entrepreneurial; and

WHEREAS, the Regents are impressed by the national acclaim UW-Whitewater faculty have garnered for their work,  including faculty member Alison Townsend for the Pushcart Prize in poetry; Fulbright Scholar and Linguistics Professor Susan Huss-Lederman, who is developing educational partnerships in Oaxaca, Mexico; Music Professor Robert Gehrenbeck for the Julius Herford Prize for outstanding choral research; and Marketing Professor Carol Scovotti for first-place honors from the American Marketing Association for her research on student organizations and their impact on entrepreneurial skills; and

WHEREAS, through its campus master plan process, UW-Whitewater is creating exciting, dynamic additions to the campus to foster student-centered learning and community engagement, as the Regents admired firsthand touring Timothy J. Hyland Hall, the new home for the College of Business and Economics, a jewel of a building that is both a model for sustainability and a state-of-the-art learning environment for UW-Whitewater’s premier business school and MBA on-campus and online program; and

WHEREAS, UW-Whitewater is expanding its regional impact by working with the city to develop the Whitewater University Technology Park, which will house the Innovation Center, an initiative designed to use campus research to foster new businesses and create jobs benefitting the community and region; and 

WHEREAS, the Regents admire the scholastic, civic, and athletic achievements of UW-Whitewater students, who conduct nationally recognized undergraduate research; volunteer by the thousands for service projects, raising nearly $100,000 in the 2008-09 academic year for charitable causes; and who continue to excel as student-athletes, winning numerous national championships and other honors, including the men’s renowned wheelchair basketball team which earned its eighth national title in 2009;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System extends its gratitude to the staff, faculty, and students of UW-Whitewater for supporting the mission of the UW System with true “proud to be purple” Warhawk spirit and graciously hosting this productive September 2009 meeting.

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UNFINISHED OR ADDITIONAL BUSINESS

Election of Interim Assistant Secretary of the Board

Regent Wingad nominated Ann Nottestad as interim assistant secretary of the Board, and the nomination was seconded by Regent Danae Davis. 

Ms. Nottestad was elected on a unanimous voice vote.

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The meeting was recessed at 11:45 a.m. and reconvened at 12:10 p.m.

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CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution, moved by Regent Spector and seconded by Regent Opgenorth, was adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, Drew, Evers, Falbo, Opgenorth, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Walsh, Wingad, and Womack (16) voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

  Resolution 9687: That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider personal history related to naming of a facility at UW-Whitewater after person, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(f), and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(g).

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The following resolution was adopted in closed session:

Authority to Name the UW-Whitewater Baseball Stadium the “Jim Miller Baseball Stadium”, UW-Whitewater

  Resolution 9688: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the UW-Whitewater baseball stadium the “Jim Miller Baseball Stadium.”

The meeting was adjourned at 12:40 p.m.

Submitted by:

Judith A. Temby, Secretary

G:regents/minutes/September 11, 2009.doc