Board of Regents

October 2009 Minutes - University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

UW-Eau Claire

Held in the UW-Eau Claire Davies Center

Council Fire Room (252)

October 15, 2009

10:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

Present:   Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, and Aaron Wingad

Unable to attend:  Regents Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Tony Evers, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

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Introductory remarks

Thanks to UW-Eau Claire

On behalf of the Board, Regent President Pruitt expressed appreciation to all those who had put so much effort into preparing for these meetings.  The Regents looked forward to learning more about the campus and hearing directly from faculty, students, and staff. 

The Board’s last visit to UW-Eau Claire had been in October 2001 and, before that, in October 1995.

161st Anniversary of First Meeting of Board of Regents

Regent President Pruitt reported that, on October 7, 1848, the Board of Regents met for the first time in the library room of the State Capitol.  Led by Regent Eleazer Root, the board approved the university’s first admission requirements and educational curriculum, appointed John Lathrop as chancellor, and selected John Sterling as the first UW professor.

Meeting of Chancellors’ and President’s Assistants

Welcoming UW System assistants to the Chancellors and the President, who were meeting at UW-Eau Claire in conjunction with the board meeting, President Kevin Reilly thanked them for their competent and committed service and for the flair and discretion with which they perform their duties.

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UW-EAU CLAIRE PRESENTATION – Transforming our future

Regent President Pruitt introduced UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich to make a presentation showing how the campus has transformed in recent years and how it is serving as a catalyst for transformation across the region and the state.

Welcoming the members of the Board of Regents and other meeting participants, the Chancellor noted that UW-Eau Claire is home to 10,035 BluGold students.  In the past eight years, the university has produced 15,706 graduates and 10 Fulbright scholars; the Jazz Band has performed in China, and the BluGold Marching Band has played for the Pope.  Every year, UW-Eau Claire students have played a premier role in community service. 

Presenting a welcome on behalf of the students, Rebecca Kidnie, vocal performance major and catcher on the Division III championship women’s softball team, spoke of her passion, not only for opera and softball, but also for undergraduate research.  She sang an aria, titled “Ah, Love, but a Day.”

Chancellor Levin-Stankevich remarked that UW-Eau Claire students all benefit from the rich liberal education offered at the university and the opportunity to explore wide-ranging interests.  Long a leader in research, study-abroad, and focus on learning, the university has a vision for transforming the future, which is happening every day. 

Dr. Kate Wilson, campus sustainability fellow, noted that sustainability is one element of transforming the future. Stewardship, which means preserving what matters most, inspires the sustainability effort. 

Robyn Fennig, a senior economics major, described the 2008 carbon emissions inventory.   In September 2007, Chancellor Levin-Stankevich signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, which now has 655 signatories across the United States.  A carbon-neutral team was created and the inventory was conducted.  The next step would be to set a date for becoming carbon-neutral.

Isaac Borofka-Webb, also a senior economics major, described the study, which was modeled after a greenhouse gas emissions inventory at Middlebury College in Vermont.  Noting that quantification has been a challenge because of the complexity of the campus environment, he said that such items as heating, driving, lighting, and recycling were included. 

The team made a number of recommendations, which the university has begun to implement.  One of them was to identify a sustainability leader, which resulted in appointment of Dr. Wilson to that position.  Others included lighting and cooling system changes.

Another initiative, Ms. Fennig continued, is the “Clean Commute” effort to promote public transportation through an agreement with the city for free bus access and promotion of biking to campus, rather than driving.

She and Mr. Borofka-Webb were sustainability interns and helped to develop a carbon initiative inventory course.  After graduation, she planned to study urban planning at the graduate level.

Mr. Borofka-Webb indicated that the Climate Action Plan, with a timeline for carbon neutrality was being developed.  The next semester, he planned to study in Sweden, in the greenest city in Europe, and bring ideas back to UW-Eau Claire. 

Dr. Douglas Dunham, director of the Materials Science Center, explained that the mission of the center includes student/faculty research and outreach, both to K-12 schools and to the industrial sector. The purpose of K-12 outreach is to get students excited about careers in science while they are still in middle school.        

The center partnered with UW-Stout in the NanoSTEM initiative as part of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  Nano-science is integrated into the Materials Science major; and students are encouraged to follow careers in science through high impact activities, such as faculty/student research and internships. 

The industrial outreach effort involves bringing companies to the center and collaborating with them.   For example, if a company wants to test a new process, they can bring a sample to the center and get results right away, rather than sending it to a distant testing facility.

As to bringing companies to the area, Dr. Dunham cited the example of Resonant Microsystems, a new high tech firm in the Chippewa Valley.  The company, which moved to Wisconsin from California, employs three UW-Eau Claire interns and is projected to expand to 30 employees by the end of next year. 

Dr. Marcus McEllistrem, director of Materials Science Center academic programs, described a collaboration among engineers at Resonant Microsystems and faculty at UW-Eau Claire, Purdue University, Chippewa Valley Technical College and UW-Stout on a nanoswitch project, which has the goal of reducing power consumption of integrated circuits.  Resonant Microsystems has purchased a $350,000 instrument that will be housed at UW-Eau Claire.

Patrese Hoffman, a UW-Eau Claire senior physics major, described outreach to students from grade four to high school, which includes laboratory activities, demonstrations and presentations to show them that science is fun.  She added that she has had significant research experience as a student at the university and has worked for private sector companies, including Resonant Microsystems. 

Introducing a presentation on the Latin American Sustainability Education and Development (LA SED) program, Analisa De Grave, associate professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies, remarked that students’ lives have been changed by participating in the program’s project in Nicaragua.

Cory Ploessl, a senior Art-Ceramics major and president of LA SED, recalled that a group of students who had studied abroad in Nicaragua and worked in a community called El Fortin formed LA SED upon their return to Eau Claire. 

Meghan Sluga, a senior Spanish and Social Work major and secretary of LA SED, explained that one goal of the group’s projects is to build cultural understanding.  The first year, they built a greenhouse and planted fruit trees; the next year, the goal was education about parasites and nutrition; and the next project would be to build a bridge.  

Kristin Racchini, a senior Spanish major and vice-president of LA SED, said that the children of El Fortin could not afford the uniforms required for school, so LA SED raised money and gave them scholarships.  In 2008 LA SED won the New Student Organization of the Year Award.

Margaret McInnis, a junior Political Science major and treasurer of LA SED, observed that the project has empowered residents of El Fortin.  The planned bridge will help the children get to school; and, through education, they will learn how to support themselves and their community.  LA SED also planned to send three Nicaraguan women to a program on how to become independent – knowledge they can use to further empower the community.  The LA SED program participants, she said in conclusion, have had their lives changed by the work in El Fortin and have been inspired to do more community service in the future.

To describe a civil rights pilgrimage to the deep South, Associate Dean of Students Jodi Thesing-Ritter introduced Sarah Gonzalez, a senior Psychology major, who explained that the pilgrimage was a 10-day excursion beginning in Atlanta and proceeding to Birmingham, Montgomery, and Selma, Alabama; New Orleans; Little Rock’s Central High School; and ending at the Memphis, Tennessee site of Martin Luther King’s assassination.

A video on the pilgrimage showed the group tracing the journey made by civil rights marchers in Selma and speaking to a minister in Montgomery, who urged them to remember that citizens can act to bring about social change even when they are disenfranchised.  Throughout the journey, they were inspired by hearing from people who had participated in the civil rights movement.

Janna Caspersen, a junior Geography major, noted that she had gone on the pilgrimage and then worked as an intern on all of the succeeding ones.  She did research on the impact of the pilgrimage on participants’ attitudes and perspectives on racism, which she presented at a National Conference on Race and Ethnicity. 

In conclusion, Ms. Thesing-Ritter observed that the pilgrimage is an example of connected learning and that, upon return, participants have become change agents on campus and in the community.

In discussion following the presentations, Regent Loftus asked Chancellor Levin-Stankevich to expand on the university’s philosophy of international education.

Noting that one goal is to see oneself through the eyes of others, the Chancellor added that there also are multiple cultures in the United States and that all students should be exposed to such experiences.  The university was attempting to level costs so that all students could afford to participate. 

In response to a question by Regent Connolly-Keesler, students explained that, while they pay for many of the costs, some scholarships are available.  Mr. Ploessl added that returning students find that, although their “pocketbooks are lighter, their minds are fuller.” 

Regent Crain complimented Chancellor Levin-Stankevich and the other speakers for the richness of the presentations.

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THE UW SYSTEM’S PARTICIPATION IN GIVE STUDENTS A COMPASS: A TRI-STATE PARTNERSHIP FOR COLLEGE LEARNING, GENERAL EDUCATION, AND UNDERSERVED STUDENT ACCESS

In opening remarks, President Reilly explained that the Compass Project connects efforts to more successfully educate non-traditional students with re-thinking general education to reflect shared learning goals for the 21st century.

A collaborative grant project with the UW System, the California State University System and the Oregon University System, the project models ways in which state systems can become catalysts for change, in partnership with individual campuses. 

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin began the presentation by explaining that the Compass Project is a part of  the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative, a ten-year campaign sponsored by the American Association of Colleges and Universities that seeks to engage educational institutions and the public with questions about what really matters in college. 

Remarking that the Compass Project represents inclusive excellence in action, Dr. Martin said that its effort is to place diversity, equity and excellence at the heart of the higher education enterprise for the benefit of students and the workforce of the future. 

With funding from the Carnegie Corporation and the Lumina Foundation, the UW System and the Oregon and California State university systems have each designated three of their institutions as Compass campuses.  In Wisconsin, those institutions are UW-Eau Claire, UW-Oshkosh, and UW-Milwaukee, which were chosen because they are part of the Equity Scorecard Project and because all of them are in the process of revising their general education programs. 

With regard to general education reform, she cautioned that the work is challenging; that cohesive, outcome-based general education programs are difficult to design given the revenue model in existence and the way departments and majors are organized; and that faculty governance plays a critical role in the curricular revision required in this work.

High-impact practices, she explained, are intellectually engaging and effective educational practices that have been shown to deepen student learning and engagement and to raise levels of performance, retention and success for students.  While all students benefit from these practices, historically underserved students tend to benefit the most.

Examples of high-impact practices include learning communities, writing-intensive courses, global learning experiences and internships.  All UW campuses offer some such practices, which tend to be more resource intensive than other forms of learning.

Research on high-impact practices clearly shows the most dramatic benefits for students of color and students who begin college at a lower level of achievement.  It also shows that underserved students, who benefit most from high-impact practices, are least likely to have access to them.

High-impact practices, Dr. Martin stated, have the most potential to advance the UW System’s commitment to the Shared Learning Goals – the knowledge, skills, abilities and habits of mind with which all UW students should graduate in order to participate fully in the 21st century global society. 

Turning to campus presenters for examples of what is being done, Dr. Martin introduced Susan Turell, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs at UW-Eau Claire.

Dr. Turrell noted a growing consensus on a need for curricular reform, with a general education reform process that has started a shift from a course/credit basis to a focus on outcomes.  High-impact practices, such as honors courses and living-learning communities, will be used as a way to shrink the learning gap and achieve equitable outcomes. 

Data were analyzed for internships, student/faculty research, and study abroad experiences.  Findings were that:

  • For internships, there was no significant difference in completion among all groups;
  • For faculty/student research, significantly fewer first generation students participated;
  • For study abroad programs, significantly fewer students who were both low income and first generation took part in these experiences.

The finding that first generation status impedes access to high-impact programs is especially important for UW-Eau Claire since 45% of its students are first generation students.        

Next steps include development of interventions to remove barriers.                 

A description of the Compass project at UW-Oshkosh was presented by Carleen Vande Zande, assistant vice chancellor for curricular affairs and student academic achievement, who indicated that the project focuses on ensuring inclusive excellence through high-impact and best practices, including a first-year experience, writing-based inquiry study, study abroad, an honors program and undergraduate research.

The goals of the project are to:

  • Increase participation of students who are underserved – first generation, low income and students of color -- and transfer students in high-impact practices.
  • Assist student and academic support programs to meet needs of transfer students so that they can be successfully integrated into the university.

            Activities included:

  • Studying barriers to participation in high-impact practices;
  • Looking at advising and other services;
  • Studying the influence of high-impact practices on grade-point averages of students of color; and
  • Tying findings to general education reform.

Jeffrey Merrick, associate dean of humanities and communication and professor of history, presented a description of UW-Milwaukee’s Compass project, principles of which were:

  • General education reform based on outcomes that cross disciplinary lines;
  • Making excellence inclusive.

The goal of the project was defined as integration of LEAP essential learning outcomes into the undergraduate experience for all students, which fit well with UW-Milwaukee’s goals of research growth and access to success.  Access to success has the goal of closing achievement gaps and raising retention rates. 

Noting that UW-Milwaukee has had a task force on general education in place since 2005, Mr. Merrick said that high-impact practices are in place, focusing on freshman seminars, learning communities, undergraduate research, and capstone courses. 

Data is being used to analyze results, with connection to high-impact practices.  

Resuming her remarks, Senior Vice President Martin said that the Compass Project has the goal of making it possible for every student to participate in at least two high-impact activities during his or her undergraduate program – one in the first year, as part of general education, and one taken later, as part of the major.

She outlined the following activities at the system level:

  • The UW System will sponsor a professional development institute in 2010 to build capacity around the goals of the Compass Project;
  • A high-impact practice website is under construction to be used as a portal for sharing the good work going on at each UW institution;
  • Some Growth Agenda grant funding for 2010 -2011 will be used to support campus development of high-impact practices and making those practices more accessible; and
  • The next Accountability Report will contain information on campus offerings of high-impact practices, which will allow measurement of progress over time in deeper student learning and retention.

In conclusion, Dr. Martin reiterated that the Compass Project is about leveling the playing field and redefining excellence to include diversity and equity.  Through this effort the UW System and its partners would continue working to “help America’s extraordinarily diverse students reap the full benefits of their studies in college – benefits that are economic, civic, and personal.”

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Crain remarked that the Compass Project is both exciting and important.  She asked it if is known why high-impact practices are less available to students who would benefit the most from them.

Noting that more information in that regard is expected from ongoing studies, Dr. Martin expected that some disparity resulted from lack of knowledge about high-impact practices on the part of some students, such as those who are first-generation students, and lack of time on the part of working students to participate in them.  One of the challenges to be faced, she said, is to design the experiences in such a way that they are more readily accessible to these and other students.

Regent Vásquez inquired about student involvement in sharing their insights about the results of high-impact practices. 

In reply, Ms. Vande Zande said that UW-Oshkosh uses interviews, focus groups, and debriefings in their qualitative research to obtain student perspectives; and Mr. Merrick added that UW-Milwaukee’s freshman seminar incorporates a student evaluation at the end of the semester, while other high-impact practices are developing other forms of feedback.

Concluding the discussion, President Reilly observed that continuous improvement, such as that taking place through the Compass Project, is at the core of what the university does to ensure that more students are well educated.

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The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 p.m.

Submitted by:

Judith A. Temby

 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

UW-Eau Claire

Held in the UW-Eau Claire Davies Center

Council Fire Room (252)

October 16, 2009

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

Approval of Minutes of September 10 and 11, 2009 Meetings. 12

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 12

Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report.. 12

Meetings with Wisconsin Congressional Delegation.. 13

Meetings with Inside Higher Ed Editorial Board.. 13

Educational Attainment to Meet Goals of Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.. 13

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 14

Presentation by Michael McPherson, President of the Spencer Foundation and Co-Author of Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America’s Public Universities. 14

Positive Enrollment Numbers. 18

Grant for UW-Eau Claire Autism Program... 18

UW-Parkside Exceeds Scholarship Goal and Receives $1.6 Million Federal Grant   18

UW-Madison Entrepreneurship Programs Ranked among Best in Nation.. 18

UW Colleges and UW-Extension Receive Diversity Award.. 19

UW-Milwaukee Chosen to Participate in Solar Decathlon Project.. 19

UW-Oshkosh to Celebrate First New Academic Building Since 1971. 19

UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen to Receive Distinguished Alumni Award   20

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE.. 20

UW-Eau Claire Presentation: Recent Capital Projects. 20

UW-Stout Presentation: Campus Master Plan.. 21

UW Colleges:  Authority to Enter into a Land Use Agreement with the Wildlife in Need Center to Construct a Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic and Accept the Facility as a Gift-in-Kind   21

UW-Platteville:  Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land at 840 South Chestnut Street to Support the Chestnut Street Realignment and Bridge Replacement Project.. 21

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of Design Report of the North Campus Chiller project and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Project.. 21

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Hansen Residence Hall Renovation Project.. 22

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects  22

Consent Agenda.. 22

REVISED

Authority to Enter into a Ground Lease Agreement with the Wildlife In Need Center to Allow for Construction of a Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic and Grant an Easement,UW Colleges. 22

REVISED

Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land at 840 South Chestnut Street to Support the Chestnut Street Realignment and Bridge Replacement Project, UW-Platteville. 23

Approval of the Design Report of the North Campus Chiller Project and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Project, UW Stevens Point 23

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Hansen Residence Hall Renovation Project, UW Stevens Point 23

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System.. 24

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE.. 24

2009 Report on Remedial Education in the UW System... 24

UW-Eau Claire: Presentation of Campus Academic Plan: Transforming Our Future   25

UW-Superior: Presentation of Campus Academic Plan.. 25

Report of the Senior Vice President.. 26

Selected Education Committee Priorities and Interests for 2009-10. 26

Consent Agenda.. 26

Revised Mission Statement UW-La Crosse. 26

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A. in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  26

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Applied Social Science University of Wisconsin-Stout 27

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE.. 27

UW-Eau Claire Presentation:  Transforming Our Future, The Blugold Commitment   27

Status Update on UW System Human Resources System... 27

Trust Funds. 28

Managing Endowments: Implications of New Legal, Accounting and Reporting Frameworks. 28

2009 Proxy Voting Season Results. 28

Acceptance of New Bequests over $50,000. 28

Review of Food Service Contract Language Regarding Contractor Employee Transitions  28

Committee Business. 29

Approval of UW-Madison Contract for Merchandising Rights and Facility Rental with Gold Country, Inc. 29

Consent Agenda.. 30

UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of Bequests. 30

UW-Madison Contract for Merchandising Rights and Facility Rental With Gold Country, Inc. 30

Introductions. 30

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS. 31

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Eau Claire.. 31

Resolution of Appreciation UW-Eau Claire. 31

ELECTION OF SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS. 33


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

UW-Eau Claire

Held in the UW-Eau Claire Davies Center

Council Fire Room (252)

October 16, 2009

9:00 a.m.

- President Pruitt presiding -

Present:   Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, José Vásquez, and Aaron Wingad

Unable to attend:  Regents Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John Drew, Tony Evers, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

- - -

Approval of Minutes of September 10 and 11, 2009 Meetings

There being no additions or corrections, the minutes of the September 10 and 11, 2009 meetings of the Board of Regents stood approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

A written report was provided.

Meetings with Wisconsin Congressional Delegation

Regent President Pruitt reported that he, President Kevin Reilly, and Assistant Vice President Kris Andrews planned to meet later in the month with Wisconsin’s congressional delegation. 

Among the topics to be discussed would be the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act, which would provide for annual increases in the maximum Pell Grant over the next 10 years.  The bill also would provide new federal funding opportunities for community colleges nation-wide; and the UW System wanted to ensure that the UW Colleges would be well-positioned to compete for those funds.

The meetings also would present an opportunity to share information about the Research to Jobs Task Force Report, presented to the Board in September, and about efforts under way to improve the process through which UW research translates into commercialized technology and new jobs.

Meetings with Inside Higher Ed Editorial Board

Regent President Pruitt reported that, while in Washington D.C., he and President Reilly also would meet with the editorial board of Inside Higher Ed – a national online source of news and opinion in higher education, which recently published an opinion column by President Reilly.

Educational Attainment to Meet Goals of Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

Regent President Pruitt observed that there is no issue before the Board “that will help to determine America’s leadership in the world and Wisconsin’s leadership in America more than the issue of educational attainment . . . an integral part of the strategy for meeting the long term goals of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.”

Over the last forty years, he recalled, there has been a flattening of educational attainment in the United States.  While the percentage of those earning a bachelor’s degree has changed hardly at all, the time to degree has increased markedly.  In 1975, the U.S. was tied for second place with Finland in the proportion of college-age students who earned degrees in the natural science and engineering fields; today the U.S. has dropped to 17th.

Referring to the book, Conscience of a Liberal, by Paul Krugman, Regent Pruitt noted figures from the National Center for Education Statistics that showed high-scoring students from low-income families are less likely to finish college than low-scoring students from high-income families.  Mobility is highest in the Scandinavian countries and lower in the U.S. than in Canada or France.   

President Obama has called for the United States by 2020 “to once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world”, which is recognized as a necessary step to remain competitive in the global knowledge economy. 

In closing, Regent President Pruitt cited the importance of the conversation begun by the guest speaker at this meeting, Dr. Michael McPherson, and his colleagues in their book titled Crossing the Finish Line, and he thanked Dr. McPherson for sharing his insights with the Board.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Presentation by Michael McPherson, President of the Spencer Foundation and Co-Author of Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America’s Public Universities

Introducing Dr. McPherson, President Reilly referred to an article in the New York Times, in which he addressed the question of how much a college education really matters.  In that regard, he said: “College can’t guarantee anybody a good life . . . but it sure ups the odds substantially.”

Dr. McPherson is the fifth president of the Spencer Foundation, which grants funds to support research that contributes to the understanding and improvement of education.   Before joining the foundation in 2003, he served as president of Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, for seven years. 

A nationally known economist with expertise on the connection between education and economics, Dr. McPherson was for 22 years a professor of economics, chairman of the Economics Department and dean of faculty at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts.  He holds a B.A. in mathematics, an M.A. in economics, and a Ph.D. in economics, all from the University of Chicago.

In Crossing the Finish Line, Dr. McPherson and his colleagues examined the effects of variables, including parental education, family income, race and gender, high school grades, test scores, financial aid, and characteristics of universities, on retention and graduation rates in public universities. 

Noting the relevance of this topic to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, President Reilly said that the book brings a large amount of data and analysis to bear on the challenge of increasing the percentage of college educated people in the population. 

Beginning his remarks, Dr. McPherson noted that public higher education is where most of the students are found.  Data on 200,000 students were analyzed from a group of universities that included UW-Madison.

While there had been a steady climb in educational attainment since the late 1800’s in the United States, it had reached a plateau in the 1970’s and remained there as other nations forged ahead.  Noting a dramatic inequality in degree attainment by socioeconomic status, he referred to data showing that only 9% of students in the bottom income quartile, with neither parent graduating from college, attained a bachelor’s degree, while at the other end of the spectrum, 68% of those students in the top income quartile, with at least one parent graduating from college, achieved a bachelor’s degree. 

With regard to dropout rates, he indicated that students of low socioeconomic status were more likely to withdraw from college throughout their college careers, and those of high socioeconomic status were least likely to drop out. 

Another finding was that students of lower income tend not to apply to stronger institutions and to aim lower than they could in terms of potential eligibility.  Students who are under-matched in this way are disadvantaged because the odds of graduating are much better at more selective institutions.  In that regard, he remarked that students need better advice in high school and that universities could do more to help them understand the opportunities available to them.

With respect to college success, Dr. McPherson said that grade point averages have proved to be much better predictors of success in college than test scores – a finding that holds true consistently across more and less selective institutions.  The lesson, he said, is that colleges should focus more strongly on high school success in making admission decisions.  While some fear the variability of grading standards, he said that grade point averages remain better predictors of success even with such differences taken into account.  Test scores, on the other hand, are more likely to indicate how good the high school is, rather than how likely the student is to be successful.

Noting that community colleges have many missions, only one of which is transfer to a four-year university, he displayed a graph that showed a significant graduation advantage for students who began their educations at four-year institutions.

Another finding, Dr. McPherson continued, was that low-income students have a much lower chance of obtaining a degree than higher-income students, even when controlling for test scores and grades.  In that regard, he observed that low-income students sometimes have family-related challenges and that some cannot attend universities where they would have the greatest chances of success or do not know how to identify their options. 

Pointing out that the financial aid system is very complicated and a major factor in creating “under-matches” between students and institutions, he predicted that simplifying the system would make a big difference for low-income students.  In that regard, he noted that some states have low tuition and low financial aid, while others have high tuition and high aid.

Looking at the net price of tuition when financial aid was taken into account, it was found that the higher the net price, the lower the graduation rate for students in the bottom income quartile.  In the top income quartile, no relationship was found between net price and graduation. 

The authors concluded, therefore, that low tuition is important, as are decisions about which students should receive financial aid.  Financial aid should be delivered by formulas that are easy to understand, and there should be discretionary funding to help students through periods of financial hardship, so they do not drop out of school.

In conclusion, Dr. McPherson remarked that the public seems to understand that the future depends on doing a better job of educating students at all levels.  Unfortunately, this realization faces the reality of a battered economy that is not likely to recover soon, creating an especially tough set of challenges. While it is important to continue to make the case for more resources, other ways must be found to meet those challenges, underscoring the importance of the work of public colleges and universities. 

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Smith asked Dr. McPherson to discuss the issue of time to degree and solutions to moving students forward more quickly.

Noting that being in college has a great deal of appeal, Dr. McPherson suggested that a strong cultural expectation that students finish earlier would help the situation.  In addition, financial pressures to work too many hours can slow students’ progress, as can borrowing too little.  In that regard, he said many students should borrow more, recognizing that they will have greater earning power once they have a bachelor’s degree.  Finally, he noted that students often change their minds about majors and that better counseling and advice could make a positive difference, especially for first-generation students.

In response to a question by Regent Womack, he said that the most important question in admissions is giving adequate weight to high school grades, since a high grade point average identifies those applicants most likely to succeed in college.

Regent Loftus asked if Dr. McPherson had made presentations to any high school systems, to which he replied that he had spoken with individuals involved high schools and interventions in Chicago were being discussed.

Noting that the UW System has strategies to enhance transfers from two-year institutions, Regent Loftus asked for further comment on starting at two-year, rather than four-year institutions.

In reply, Dr. McPherson suggested that community colleges could benefit from more focus on their transfer mission.  As an example of one strategy, he cited Gates Foundation work on mathematics remediation, teaching selected items needed for college, rather than broader math. While transfer can work well, he indicated that it is not effective in many states.

UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor David Wilson noted that the UW Colleges have no peers nationally.  He predicted that a study in Wisconsin would show high performance by students who begin at the colleges and transfer to a four-year university. The UW Colleges mission is focused on transfer and faculty have degrees from some of the best institutions in the country.

Dr. McPherson urged that such a study be done and disseminated to other states, noting that people are searching hard for a model that works.

UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich noted that his university was looking at a proposal to improve graduation rates, time to degree, and affordability.  Private universities have much higher four-year graduation rates, due to a combination of culture and pricing.

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joseph Gow said that students at his campus work up to 30 hours a week and that some do it to earn disposable income.  It also was noted that some students stay an extra year in order to obtain better grades.

Dr. McPherson suggested that students be sent the message in a more compelling way that taking more than four years to graduate takes valuable time from advancing their careers.  He would think twice, however, about raising the price of a fifth year.

President Reilly added that UW-Madison nonresident students graduate more quickly than resident students.

Regent Drew asked about UW System admission policy on grade point averages versus test scores.

In reply, Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin indicated that, while the Board’s admission policy requires either the ACT or SAT, there are no cut-off scores.  Instead, the entire application is considered and grade points are heavily weighted. 

Regent Bartell asked if tuition price was studied in relation to net price, and Dr. McPherson replied in the negative.

In response to a further question by Regent Bartell, Dr. McPherson noted that universities distribute half of their financial aid without consideration of ability to pay, and urged that that practice be changed.

Cautioning that careful analysis of grade point averages is needed, Regent Crain pointed out that they can be affected by such factors as difficulty of classes and whether students may have gotten off to a bad start. 

Remarking that borrowing for education is a sensible thing to do, Dr. McPherson noted that the federal loan system offers assurance about protections if financial difficulties strike. Some students, however, are afraid to incur that much debt, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Noting that the Wisconsin Technical College System was not created to be a community college system, Regent Vásquez urged that it remain true to its mission and not become an institution focused on transfer. Instead, the mission of the UW Colleges in that regard should be enhanced.

He asked how prepared public universities are to address the coming change in demographics that will increase the proportion of students of color.

Dr. McPherson replied that the greatest challenge in that regard is the rapidly growing Latino population, many of whom are disadvantaged first-generation students, with language differences, who may not be well-prepared for college.              

Regent Evers asked what can be done to better advise low-income students who tend to under-reach when choosing a college, and Dr. McPherson replied that the most credible advice comes from peers who made the choice to go to a more challenging institution.

President Reilly thanked Dr. McPherson and the Board for a very thoughtful discussion that would continue to resonate in the future.

Positive Enrollment Numbers

President Reilly reported that, despite the difficult economy, enrollments at UW institutions have increased and appeared to be on track to break another record, with a total headcount enrollment of about 178,000 across the 26 campuses.  That would be an all-time high and an increase of about 3,000 over 2008. 

Grant for UW-Eau Claire Autism Program

It was announced by President Reilly that a UW-Eau Claire program that provides behavior intervention services to young children diagnosed with autism will expand, due to receipt of a $263,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Expansion of the program is considered necessary to better serve a greater number of children in western Wisconsin and to provide more opportunities for university students to engage in supervised clinical work.  In 2000, UW-Eau Claire’s Psychology Department established an undergraduate emphasis in behavior analysis – the only undergraduate program of its kind in the UW System, which enrolls 15-20 students each semester. 

The President congratulated Chancellor Levin-Stankevich and the Campus Autism Program for their involvement in this important work.

UW-Parkside Exceeds Scholarship Goal and Receives $1.6 Million Federal Grant

President Reilly reported that UW-Parkside had exceeded the “40 for 40” Scholarship Drive goal of 40 new scholarships during the university’s 40th anniversary.  To date, 102 new scholarships had been created and more than $400,000 had been raised. 

The university also received a five-year $1.6 Title III grant from the U.S. Department of Education to fund the university’s student success initiatives.

The President congratulated Chancellor Deborah Ford and UW-Parkside for these achievements.

UW-Madison Entrepreneurship Programs Ranked among Best in Nation

It was reported by President Reilly that entrepreneurship programs at the Wisconsin School of Business ranked among the best in the nation, according to a survey

conducted by the Princeton Review and Entrepreneur Magazine. The Weinert Center for entrepreneurship ranked 11th on a list of the top 25 entrepreneurial graduate programs in the country, up from 13th last year.  The undergraduate entrepreneurship program ranked 16th among the top 25 undergraduate programs in the country.

Congratulating Chancellor Biddy Martin and Business School Dean Michael Knetter, the President noted that this was the first year that both graduate and undergraduate programs made the top 25 and that enhancing entrepreneurship education is an Action Step goal of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.

UW Colleges and UW-Extension Receive Diversity Award

President Reilly commended the UW Colleges and UW-Extension and Chancellor David Wilson upon their receipt of the 10th annual Ann Lydecker Educational Diversity Award, given by the State Council on Affirmative Action and the Office of State Employment Relations in memory of former UW-River Falls Chancellor Ann Lydecker.

The Colleges and Extension received the award for diversity training as part of their Multicultural Awareness Program.  The award is presented to state agencies or UW campuses for “their strong commitment to the recruitment, retention, and promotion of a diverse, classified workforce as measured by the creation of programs, initiatives, and practices.” 

The Multicultural Awareness Program is a voluntary two-day workshop, in which more than one-third of UW Colleges and UW-Extension’s 3,000 classified employees have already participated. 

UW-Milwaukee Chosen to Participate in Solar Decathlon Project

It was reported by President Reilly that UW-Milwaukee was chosen to contribute to the Solar Decathlon – a global contest in which students compete to design, build, and operate the most efficient solar-powered house. UW-Milwaukee was chosen by the U.S. Department of Energy as one of 20 student teams from an international pool to participate in this year’s event. 

Each team received $100,000 to build an 800-square foot house powered entirely by solar energy.  UW-Milwaukee’s “Meltwater House”, designed to maximize rainwater collection, had been erected on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., where it would be judged on criteria such as architecture, engineering and market viability. 

UW-Oshkosh to Celebrate First New Academic Building Since 1971

President Reilly reported that UW-Oshkosh would soon hold a groundbreaking ceremony for the $48 million academic building, which would house offices of the College of Business, along with departments and programs of the College of Letters and Science. 

It has been estimated that the project would generate more than 2,000 jobs, including those in construction-related fields, over the next three years, providing a big boost to the regional economy. 

UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen to Receive Distinguished Alumni Award

President Reilly congratulated UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen, who was being honored with a Distinguished Alumni Award at Illinois State University, where he received his Master of Science degree.      

REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

Regent Bartell, chair, presented the committee’s report.

UW-Eau Claire Presentation: Recent Capital Projects

An update on recent capital projects was presented to the committee by Mike Rindo, special assistant to the Chancellor, who described the natural assets and challenges of the Chippewa River, the “hill” and Putnam Park, as he outlined elements of a master planning project for the campus.  In that regard, it was noted that the campus has 29 significant buildings, with an average age of 39 years. The newest academic building is 29 years old. 

UW-Eau Claire would be moving forward with a new student union in the next year and a major new academic building in 2011.   A new child care center also would be constructed.    

Beth Helwig, vice chancellor for student affairs and dean of students, discussed the new student union and issues involving the historic oak tree.  The design and placement of the building would be re-examined, working with students, with completion is planned for 2012.

Eau Claire City Manager Mike Huggins described campus-community partnerships, such as the Hobbs Ice Arena, which have resulted in impressive savings and efficiencies.

UW-Stout Presentation: Campus Master Plan

Diane Moen, vice chancellor for administrative services, discussed the master plan and challenges being faced, including a split campus, lack of public transportation, and the need to expand student services.

UW Colleges:  Authority to Enter into a Land Use Agreement with the Wildlife in Need Center to Construct a Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic and Accept the Facility as a Gift-in-Kind

The committee was informed that the wildlife rehabilitation clinic would be built at the UW-Waukesha Sherman Field Station at an estimated cost of $700,000 in gift funds raised by Wildlife in Need.  About 200 students and faculty would be involved in research at the facility.

A resolution granting the requested authority was approved by the committee for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Platteville:  Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land at 840 South Chestnut Street to Support the Chestnut Street Realignment and Bridge Replacement Project

The request was to purchase a small parcel of land on South Chestnut Street in Platteville to complete access to campus from Highway 151, at a total cost of $125,000, of which $39,000 would come from gift funds.  The project also would convey land along Chestnut Street that is needed to support a Grant County project that would replace a deteriorated bridge and develop a new street and a round-about to create a new campus entrance.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of Design Report of the North Campus Chiller Project and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Project

The request was for authority to increase the project budget and construct the chiller project for a total cost of $8,680,100, including an increase of $955,100, composed of a mix of program revenue supported borrowing, program revenue cash, and general fund supported borrowing, a portion of which would be reallocated from the Waste Management Laboratory project, for which bids came in under budget.

The project would construct a new north campus chiller plant that would house two new chillers to serve twelve student residence halls, the dining center, the recreation center, and future general purpose revenue supported buildings on the north part of the campus.

The residence hall portion of the project would be financed through room rental rates, which would increase by $89 per year, while rates in buildings with air conditioning would increase by an additional $97 per year. The student center’s portion of the project would result in a board rate increase of $15.68 per year (0.7%) and a segregated fee increase of $3.32 per year (0.6%), subject to approval by the Segregated University Fee Allocation Committee.

The committee passed a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Hansen Residence Hall Renovation Project

The committee was informed that the project would renovate the third building of a four building residence halls renovation project that was enumerated in the 2007-09 Capital Budget.  The project would include an upgrade of the residence hall heating system, an increase in electrical capacity, replacement of windows and lighting, and installation of an elevator.

A resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority was passed by the committee for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority to construct a utility repair project for UW-Madison and a budget increase for a project at UW-Oshkosh for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell moved adoption by the Board of the following resolutions as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent Drew and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

Authority to Enter into a Ground Lease Agreement with the Wildlife In Need Center to Allow for Construction of a Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic and Grant an Easement,UW Colleges

Resolution 9689: That, upon the recommendation of the UW Colleges Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to: (1) enter into a ground lease between the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents and the Wildlife in Need Center to allow for construction of a wildlife rehabilitation clinic facility at the UW-Waukesha Sherman Field Station on Board of Regents land at an estimated cost of $700,000 Gift Funds; and (2) grant an easement for shared roadway and turnaround access.

Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land at 840 South Chestnut Street to Support the Chestnut Street Realignment and Bridge Replacement Project, UW-Platteville

Resolution 9690: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-  Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to (1) purchase a property of approximately 1.26 acres, located at 840 South Chestnut Street, Platteville, Wisconsin, for a total cost of $125,000 ($86,000 Program Revenue-Cash and $39,000 Gift Funds) and (2) convey land along Chestnut Street that is necessary to construct the Grant County Chestnut Street Realignment and Bridge Replacement project to the city of Platteville and grant the necessary rights-of-way.

Approval of the Design Report of the North Campus Chiller Project and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Project, UW Stevens Point

Resolution 9691: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report for the North Campus Chiller project be approved and authority be granted to increase the budget by $955,100 ($615,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $114,050 General Fund Supported Borrowing Utilities Repair & Renovation, $69,900 Program Revenue-Cash, and $156,150 General Fund Supported Borrowing (reallocated from the Waste Management Lab project) and construct the project at a total cost of $8,680,100 ($1,270,200 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $7,340,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, and $69,900 Program Revenue-Cash).

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Hansen Residence Hall Renovation Project, UW Stevens Point

Resolution 9692: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct the Hansen Residence Hall Renovation project for a total cost of $4,986,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9693: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $4,267,000 ($3,255,800 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $883,700 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $127,500 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing).

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Regent Crain, chair, presented the committee’s report.

2009 Report on Remedial Education in the UW System

The committee received the 2009 Report on Remedial Education, which is presented to the Board every three years.

Associate Vice President Sharon Wilhelm shared a number of key findings, including:

  • It is a basic assumption that all students admitted to UW institutions have the potential to succeed.
  • The majority of students needing remediation complete their remedial requirements in the first year.
  • Students who complete their remedial requirement in the first year are more likely to succeed than students who do not complete their remedial requirement in the first year.
  • There are dramatic differences in second-year retention rates between students needing remediation who complete it and those who do not.
  • The report showed that remediation works.

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin described system-wide initiatives under way to address and alleviate the need for remediation, including:

  • Alignment of high school curricula to post-secondary demands through the American Diploma Project;
  • Many partnerships across educational sectors, including PK-12, Wisconsin Technical College System, and independent colleges and universities;
  • A new national initiative – Access to Success – which seeks to cut the achievement gap for underserved students in the next decade.

The committee heard from UW College Provost Greg Lampe, UW-Green Bay Provost Julia Wallace, and UW-Whitewater Provost Chris Clements about innovative work to help students successfully complete remediation.  Elements common to these programs include:

  • Experimentation with different formatting for remedial courses, in terms of sequencing of math topics, course compression, and self-paced mastery of modules;
  • Professional development for faculty teaching those developmental courses;
  • Summer bridge programs and more sustained advising of students needing remediation.

In committee discussion, it was noted that, while remediation works, it is frustrating to students not to receive credit for remedial courses, which costs them both time and money in their efforts to get into their major programs and earn their degrees.

Regent Evers mentioned that K-12 expectations may soon change, requiring four years of mathematics in high school.

UW-Eau Claire: Presentation of Campus Academic Plan: Transforming Our Future

Provost Patricia Kleine presented UW-Eau Claire’s academic plan.  Highlights included a strong sense of the university’s liberal arts mission and identity through:

  • Its centennial vision, which has a strong emphasis on inclusive excellence, global knowledge, exploratory studies, and outcomes-based experiential learning;
  • A recent quality improvement review of all of its programs, practices, and services;
  • Ongoing redesign of the liberal arts core, which will include increased offerings of high-impact practices;
  • Holistic advising of students; and
  • Recognition of a need to improve the four-year graduation rate.

UW-Superior: Presentation of Campus Academic Plan

Provost Chris Markwood presented the campus academic plan, which was developed by UW-Superior faculty, resulting in a strong sense of ownership.

To fulfill its mission as a public liberal arts college, the campus is focusing on five initiatives, which received funding in the last biennial budget:

  • A Center for Academic Service Learning;
  • A first-year experience;
  • Global awareness;
  • A senior experience; and
  • Writing across the curriculum. 

The campus is working towards meeting goals that have been developed for each of these initiatives.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Selected Education Committee Priorities and Interests for 2009-10

The committee reached consensus on five areas of focus for its 2009-10 meetings:

  • LEAP Wisconsin, the UW-System’s work on liberal education;
  • Inclusive excellence;
  • Teacher quality and the UW System’s teacher education programs;
  • The UW System’s evolving accountability reporting; and
  • The role of the comprehensive universities in implementing the recommendations of the Research to Jobs Task Force.

Consent Agenda

Regent Crain moved adoption, as consent agenda items, of the following resolutions, which had been approved unanimously by the Education Committee.  The motion was seconded by Regent Vásquez and carried unanimously.

Revised Mission Statement UW-La Crosse

Resolution 9694: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse’s revised mission statement.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A. in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9695: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.A. in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Applied Social Science University of Wisconsin-Stout

Resolution 9696: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Applied Social Science.

Concluding her report, Regent Crain expressed appreciation to the UW System provosts for joining the members of the Education Committee at the table, and participating in the meeting.  She expressed her intention of continuing this practice at future meetings. 

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

Regent Smith, chair, presented the committee’s report.

UW-Eau Claire Presentation:  Transforming Our Future, The Blugold Commitment

Chancellor Levin-Stankevich and student leaders presented information on the Blugold Commitment, the purpose of which would be to maintain and enhance the quality of the UW-Eau Claire degree by immersing high-impact practices into the curriculum in accordance with the strategic plan.

Student leaders spoke about the existing tuition differential and how the Blugold commitment would expand it beyond the current scope, while maintaining access and affordability.  They emphasized collaboration among students, faculty, and administrators in working on the proposal.

A UW-Eau Claire alumnus spoke about the value of his degree and the desire of alumni to preserve that value into the future.  The chancellor emphasized that alumni and donors have a role in committing to financial aid.

It was noted that a full discussion of differential tuition would take place at the Board’s December meeting.

Status Update on UW System Human Resources System

In accordance with the committee’s request for monthly briefings on the status of the Human Resources System (HRS) project, Senior Vice President Tom Anderes provided an update on a recent hearing of the Joint Committee on Information Policy and Technology, an update on Huron Consulting Group, a summary of key safeguards in the Huron contract, a first quarter budget versus actual report for fiscal year 2010, and a report on key deliverables in September and work activities for October to December 2009.

Trust Funds

Managing Endowments: Implications of New Legal, Accounting and Reporting Frameworks

UW System Trust Funds Director Doug Hoerr discussed key changes and implications of Wisconsin’s change from the guidance provided by the Uniform Management of Institutional Funds Act to the new guidance provided by the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act. 

2009 Proxy Voting Season Results

Portfolio Analyst Tom Reinders reported that the 2009 proxy season saw filing of 361 proposals related to social issues, with nearly half of them coming to votes. 

Acceptance of New Bequests over $50,000

The committee approved a resolution accepting seven bequests, with a total value of $665,000, for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Review of Food Service Contract Language Regarding Contractor Employee Transitions

Senior Vice President Anderes noted that a recent UW-Green Bay food service contract had prompted review of employee transitions of food service contractors. 

Julie Gordon, director of Operations Review and Audit, reported that it is not standard industry practice to contractually require a new food service vendor to retain all employees of a previous contractor.  The office reviewed contracts from 13 colleges and universities, interviewed three food service contractors, a national food service consultant, and representatives of the National Association of College Auxiliary Services. 

Senior Vice President Anderes commented that the university must strike an appropriate balance between the needs of the university and the needs of workers.  To encourage and facilitate retention of staff from one contractor to another, the UW System Office of Procurement would insert language into all future food service requests for proposals that would require vendors to:

  • Hold a meeting to introduce vendor representatives to employees of the current contractor;
  • Give assurances that all employees of the current contractor would have the opportunity to compete for positions with the new contractor; and
  • Review hiring criteria with those current contractor employees who are interested in pursuing employment with the new contractor.

The committee then discussed these and other options that could be considered.

In discussion at the Board meeting, Regent Drew asserted that the university should do more to protect food service workers.  Noting that new vendors need experienced staff, he pointed out that, without safeguards, workers face risks such as lack of objective criteria for retention, gaps in insurance coverage, and lower wage levels.

Urging that vendors be required to assume the existing collective bargaining agreement, he asked the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee to re-examine the issue and find a better solution.

Regent Womack asked how many food service requests for proposals would be forthcoming in the next twelve months.

In reply, the Board was informed that UW-Whitewater planned to send out a request for proposals in the next two months.

Mr. Anderes explained that the new language would assure that current employees receive accurate information and that they would be at the front of the line for interviews.  At the same time, he said, it is important to maximize the ability of the contractor to provide the services that the university wants, including differences in amounts and types of services from what was provided under the existing contract.  Most current workers, he indicated, would get jobs with the new vendor

Regent Womack noted that, if assuming a collective bargaining contract were part of a request for proposals, contractors would be on notice to bid accordingly.

Mr. Anderes pointed out that if the university wanted to change services that were provided, the existing set of employees might not provide the right mix for the changed situation.

Regent Smith suggested that the matter be returned to the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee agenda for the December meeting and asked if  UW-Whitewater could wait that long to proceed. 

In reply, it was indicated that the new contract would need to be in place by late spring and that a request for proposals could be amended, if necessary.

Committee Business

Approval of UW-Madison Contract for Merchandising Rights and Facility Rental with Gold Country, Inc.

The committee unanimously approved extension of the contract with Gold Country, Inc. for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Consent Agenda

Regent Smith moved adoption by the Board of the following resolutions as consent agenda items. The motion was seconded by Regent Falbo and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of Bequests

Resolution 9697: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions and the President of the University of Wisconsin System , the bequests detailed on the attached list be accepted for the purposes designated by the donors, or where unrestricted by the donors, by the benefiting institution, and that the Trust Officer or Assistant Trust Officers be authorized to sign receipts and do all things necessary to effect the transfers for the benefit of the University of Wisconsin.

Let it be herewith further resolved, that the Board of Regents and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, and the Deans and Chairs of the benefiting Colleges and Departments, express their sincere thanks and appreciation to the donors and their families for their generosity and their devotion to the values and ideals represented by the University of Wisconsin System. These gifts will be used to sustain and further the quality and scholarship of the University and its students.

UW-Madison Contract for Merchandising Rights and Facility Rental With Gold Country, Inc.

Resolution 9698: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves an additional two-year contract extension with Gold Country, Inc. for space rental and merchandising rights for UW-Madison Athletics, through June 30, 2016.

Introductions

President Reilly introduced former UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Larry Schnack and Regent Emeritus Joanne Brandes, a UW-Eau Claire alumna, who were attending the meeting.

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Eau Claire

Presenting the Resolution 9678, Regent Wingad, a student at UW-Eau Claire, expressed his pride in having his fellow Regents visit the campus, noting that it was a highlight of his tenure on the Board.  The following resolution was adopted on a unanimous voice vote, with a standing ovation of appreciation to UW-Eau Claire and Chancellor Levin-Stankevich.

Resolution of Appreciation UW-Eau Claire

Resolution 9699

WHEREAS, the members of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System are pleased to learn more about UW-Eau Claire's well-deserved reputation for Excellence, as demonstrated through its presentations and performances; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire advances the educational, cultural, and economic well-being of the Chippewa Valley Region and State of Wisconsin through its nationally recognized academic programs, co-curricular activities, undergraduate research, and campus-community collaborations; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire ranks among the national leaders in the percent of students who study abroad, and among the master's level universities that produce the most U.S. Fulbright Fellows, preparing graduates to help Wisconsin compete in an increasingly global economy; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire is noted for its outstanding community service programs by being the only Wisconsin school, public or private, named to the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with Distinction every one of the three years since the honor roll was instituted; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire students engage in faculty-student undergraduate research collaborations that enable students to earn the highest academic honors including prestigious Goldwater and Rhodes scholarships; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire confers the second highest number of baccalaureate degrees in the UW System; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire is recognized in national publications, including US News and World Report, The Princeton Review, and Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine, as one of the preeminent public universities in the Upper Midwest and one of the best higher education values in the nation; and

WHEREAS, UW-Eau Claire faculty, staff, and students, under the leadership of Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich, have developed a strategic Centennial Plan, Transforming Our Future, with the vision to become one of the premier undergraduate learning communities in the Upper Midwest, noted for rigorous, integrated, globally infused, undergraduate liberal education, and distinctive, select graduate programs;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System extends its deep appreciation to the staff, faculty, and students of UW-Eau Claire for their efforts in supporting the mission of the UW System and generously hosting this productive October 2009 meeting.

Chancellor Levin-Stankevich expressed appreciation to those contributed to hosting the meetings, including:

  • Steering Team members: Debra Lang, Jason Anderson, Susie Johnson, Debi Levin-Stankevich, Kim O’Kelly, Lynn Peterson, Jan Sloan, Karen Stuber, and Susan Turell
  • Meeting support providers: Charles Farrell and University Centers staff; Mike Rindo and publications staff; Christian Wise and Sodexo staff; Don Schleicher and LTS technical team; Dr. Bob Knight and Christos Theo and the faculty and staff of Art and Music and Theater Arts; Dr. Randy Dickerson and the Blugold Marching Band; and student volunteer, especially Ambassadors, Student Philanthropy Group and Career Services
  • Presenters:  Vice Chancellors Patricia Kleine and Beth Hellwig; Mick Wick and Paula Collins of Academic Affairs; and the students, faculty, and staff who helped to present.

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The meeting was recessed at 11:30 a.m., and reconvened at 11:45 a.m., at which time the following resolution, moved by Regent Spector and seconded by Regent Wingad, was adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Womack, Wingad, Vásquez, Spector, Smith, Pruitt, Falbo, Evers, Drew, Crain, Bradley, and Bartell (12), voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions. 

Resolution 9700: That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider UW-Madison Honorary Degree nominations, as permitted by Wis. Stats. 19.85(1)(f), to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by Wis. Stats. 19.85(1)(g), and to consider a recommendation for secretary of the Board of Regents, as permitted by Wis. Stats. (19.85(1)(c).

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Upon conclusion of the closed session the Board reconvened in open session.

ELECTION OF SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

Jane S. Radue was nominated for the position of Secretary of the Board by Regent Falbo, and the nomination was seconded by Regent Wingad. 

There being no further nominations, Ms. Radue was elected on a unanimous voice vote.

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m.

Submitted by:

Judith A. Temby