Board of Regents

June 2009 Minutes - University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Madison, Wisconsin

 

UW-Madison
Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall
Thursday, June 4, 2009
10:00 a.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

PRESENT:                               Regents Jeffery Bartell, Mark Bradley, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Mary Cuene, Danae Davis, John Drew, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Colleene Thomas, José Vásquez, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:          Regent Elizabeth Burmaster

 

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Introductions and Announcements
Welcome to Regent-Designate Aaron Wingad

Regent President Bradley welcomed Aaron Wingad, a junior at UW-Eau Claire, who had been appointed by Governor Doyle to succeed Colleene Thomas as a Student Regent member following the June meeting.  Majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, with a minor in Spanish, he plans to attend medical school after graduation in 2011.

Mr. Wingad has served as Director of Academic Affairs for the UW-Eau Claire student government and on numerous committees and boards.
Congratulations to Regent Charles Pruitt on Reappointment to the Board

Regent President Bradley congratulated Regent Vice President Pruitt on his reappointment by Governor Doyle to a new seven-year term on the Board.
Welcome to UW-River Falls Chancellor Dean Van Galen

President Kevin Reilly introduced new UW-River Falls Chancellor Dean Van Galen, who came to Wisconsin from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, where he served as Vice President of Advancement.  A native of Wisconsin, he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in chemistry from UW-Whitewater and a Ph.D in analytical chemistry from Kansas State University.  He did post-doctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley. 
Welcome to UW-Green Bay Chancellor Thomas Harden

President Reilly Introduced new UW-Green Bay Chancellor Thomas Harden, who came to Wisconsin from Clayton State University, in suburban Atlanta, where he served as president since 2000.  During his tenure, enrollment at Clayton State increased by 39 percent; and the university was ranked number one in the South for campus diversity by U.S. News & World Report in six out of the past seven years.  Chancellor Harden earned his Bachelor of Science degree in industrial education from Miami University, his Master of Science from the University of Dayton, and his Doctor of Education from the University of Cincinnati. 

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2009-11 UW SYSTEM BIENNIAL BUDGET DISCUSSION

As context for the biennial budget discussion, President Reilly recalled that, in August 2008, the Board approved a recommended budget for submission to Governor Doyle.  In the early stages of the economic downturn, the Board advanced a 2.5% pay plan recommendation for faculty and academic staff.

With economic indicators slipping further, the Governor in February introduced his biennial budget proposal, including a 5.2% reduction in GPR for the UW System.  In March, with revenue forecasts falling further still, the Joint Committee on Finance began its work on the budget.  In mid-May, the state announced that the difference between forecasted revenues and actual expenses for the coming biennium would grow by an additional $1.6 billion. 

The UW System, the President noted, faced major challenges from the outset of the budget process with the 5.2% reduction and additional reallocations and lapses from other funding sources.  As the process continued, state agencies that initially faced smaller cuts were asked to shoulder a bigger share of the financial burden. 

At that point, UW leaders reinforced the message that the university’s original budget reductions posed serious challenges to students and campuses and that further cuts would be very damaging.  In response, Governor Doyle did not recommend further base cuts to the UW, and legislators did not propose any either.

Nevertheless, the widening budget gap produced new challenges.  Based on the Governor’s recommendation, the Joint Committee on Finance added language to the budget bill giving him authority to furlough state and UW employees.  The Joint Committee on Employment Relations also rescinded a scheduled two percent pay plan increase for non-represented faculty and staff.

Noting that these compensation cutbacks are tough on the morale of faculty and staff, President Reilly emphasized that the UW has been adamant in support of competitive compensation for faculty and staff, the long-range plan being to bring UW salaries up to the compensation levels offered by peer universities.  While those plans had been delayed by the financial crisis, they would be advanced again as soon as possible.

Part of the commitment to faculty and staff has been to offer full benefits to the domestic partners of UW employees – a provision that is included in the budget bill advanced by Governor Doyle and the Joint Committee on Finance. 

Noting that the matter of employee furloughs is very complex, President Reilly indicated that the state, rather than the university, is in control of the ground rules for the furloughs, which amount to a three percent pay reduction.  The UW has been asking for flexibility to manage them in the least-damaging manner possible.

It was known at this point that the number of furlough days would be commensurate with employees’ full- or part-time status, so that faculty and staff on nine-month contracts would take fewer furlough days.  It also was known that employees with fifty percent appointment would continue to qualify for benefits, because state law provides that eligibility is based upon the appointment, not on hours worked; and half-time employees would retain their half-time appointments, even with the furloughs.

Turning to the Capital Budget, President Reilly reported that the Joint Committee on Finance advanced the UW System’s budget, funding high-priority academic buildings, residence halls, building repairs, and other projects.  The Capital Budget now included 36 major UW projects – up from 34 in the budget passed by the State Building Commission.  This is the first time in recent years, he pointed out, that there has been an increase in the Capital Budget by the Joint Committee on Finance. 

All of these projects, the President stated, will have a strongly positive impact on the university’s ability to educate students and conduct world-class research, along with boosting the state’s ability to compete in the knowledge economy.  The construction projects are expected to create 16,000 new jobs. 

The UW would continue to advocate for new flexibilities in the building process, as endorsed by the Board, to make more efficient and effective use of public and private dollars.

President Reilly reported that earlier in the week he had written to all 41,000 UW System employees about the status of the budget process.  His message concluded by saying:  “Even as we recognize the national and international causes and effects of this punishing recession, I know that furloughs and rescinded pay increases are bitter pills to swallow.  I have no easy words of wisdom to alleviate the anxiety and resentment that are natural human reactions in such situations.  Nonetheless, we will get through this downturn and on to recovery.  If we in the University can keep our energies focused on our vital work and our eyes on the horizon, we will speed the state’s passage through these tough times and reposition it for a robust recovery.”

In the meantime, however, he pointed out that it will be necessary to manage $161 million in reductions and $84 million in give-backs, for a total of $255 million, which will make the next several years very difficult. 

  1. For faculty, the cuts mean more students in their classes and less contact with each student.
  2. For students, the cuts mean fewer appointments with career counselors and longer lines at the registrar’s office.
  3. The cuts also will mean more vacant positions and higher workloads for the faculty and staff who remain.
  4. For students, the cuts will mean fewer class choices and bigger class sizes.  For some, it will mean a longer time required to complete their degrees.
  5. Faculty and staff will have fewer opportunities to keep current in their academic disciplines and strengthen their teaching and research skills.
  6. For students, the cuts mean fewer resources and opportunities for out-of-classroom learning experiences.
  7. There will be consolidation and elimination of some degree programs over the next two years.
  8. It will not be possible to move as quickly as desired to satisfy all the demands for more mental health counselors, emergency planners, police officers and related resources.  These remain high priorities, however, and the UW will try hard to protect existing resources in these areas, from front-line personnel to more administrative support for campus security.

            While there will be many tough choices ahead, there are other measures university leaders hoped not to take, such as:

  1. Double-digit tuition increases
  2. One-size-fits-all enrollment caps
  3. One-size-fits-all enrollment cuts
  4. Massive displacement of students from their degree programs
  5. Cancellation of teaching days
  6. Loss of major competitive research dollars for lack of adequate grant-writing staff and time
  7. Thinning the faculty and instructional staff ranks to the point at which remaining over-stretched classroom teachers cannot come close to meeting reasonable expectations of their students
  8. Abandoning the plan to hold harmless from tuition increases students with need up to the median family income.

If the budget does not change for the worse through the rest of the process, President Reilly stated, everything possible will be done to avoid these worst-case scenarios.  He hoped to recommend to the Board at its July 9th meeting a reasonable, single-digit tuition increase as part of the annual budget for 2009-10.

Between now and then, he said, the budget process should be completed, with the Assembly taking up the budget as early as the next week and concluding its debate in a couple of days.  The Senate then would take up the budget bill.  If there are differences between the two legislative houses, a conference committee would be formed to find a compromise.  The full houses would vote on the compromise, which then would go to the Governor for signature and vetoes. 

President Reilly then called upon Senior Vice President Tom Anderes to provide an overview of the Joint Committee on Finance’s actions on the university’s budget.

Mr. Anderes began his remarks by indicating that the Joint Committee on Finance accepted the Governor’s recommended $120 million reduction in GPR, consisting of $20 million in a one percent reduction and $100 million in a targeted general reduction.  The general reduction of $100 million would be split 50/50 in each year of the biennium, with a $15.5 million lapse in 2010-11 in order to meet requirements of the Fiscal Stabilization Fund.  The one percent across-the-board reduction exempted tuition, federal funds, trust funds, gifts/grant funds for program revenue-funded units.  Auxiliary service balances were reduced by $23.5 million, less than the Governor’s proposed $25 million. 

The committee’s action supported the Board’s tuition hold harmless initiative and included $15 million for the recruitment/retention fund, as well as various research initiatives and domestic partner benefits.  The hold harmless initiative ensures that students will receive a grant to cover a tuition increase if their annual family income is $60,000 or less and they qualify for need-based aid.  The committee reduced financial aid on the assumption that the increase in the federal Pell grant would provide funding to support the hold harmless program. 

With regard to Wisconsin Higher Education Grant funding, the Governor recommended removal of a statutory maximum amount to allow larger grants to be given to the most needy students.  The Joint Committee on Finance recommended no increase in 2009-10 and a 6.1% increase in 2011.  Funding for tuition hold harmless benefits would be reduced moving forward into the 2011-13 biennium, as would the number of eligible students.

The June 2009 two percent pay plan increase was rescinded and furloughs would be imposed on employees.  There would be no pay plan increase in fiscal years 2010 and 2011; and all employees would take furloughs up to eight days in each year of the biennium.   The furloughs would be prorated for part-time employees and those on academic year contracts. 

Overall, Mr. Anderes indicated that the capital budget is strong.  Additions were the UW-Eau Claire Education Building, with funding available after July 1, 2011 -- $44.5 million total project cost ($44 million in general fund supported borrowing and $500,000 in building trust funds); and the UW-Madison Nursing Facility, enumerated in 2010-11 at $47.4 million total project cost ($28.1 general fund supported borrowing, $5.5 million program revenue supported borrowing, and $13.8 million gifts/grants)

In that regard, Mr. Anderes pointed out that funding for the nursing facility would be added funding – not reallocated from other projects.  Because this would have been a high priority in the following biennium, funding at that time would be freed up for use on other projects.

 

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Vásquez asked if the furloughs would apply to all employees, including those paid by federal and other non-state funding sources; and Mr. Anderes replied in the affirmative.

In response to a question by Regent Bartell as to the rationale for furloughing employees not paid with state funds, Mr. Anderes indicated that the state might consider it a matter of equity.  Noting that rules for furloughs were not the university’s decision, President Reilly added that it would be difficult to unravel sources of funding in the case of employees paid with a combination of funding sources.  He also pointed out that non-state funds saved from furloughs would be retained in their programs and not given to the state to reduce the budget deficit. 

With regard to elimination of the salary increase, Regent Falbo asked if that would mean that the UW would fall further behind peer universities; and President Reilly replied that such measures were being taken elsewhere – some even more drastic, including pay cuts, enrollment cuts and furloughs.

Regent Falbo inquired about funding for veterans’ tuition remissions, to which Mr. Anderes responded that the Joint Committee on Finance supported first use of federal funding and a state stipend to cover remaining costs.  Associate Vice President Freda Harris added that $18 million is provided in the budget for use after federal funds are exhausted. 

Regent Davis inquired about the decision by the Joint Committee on Finance not to accept the Governor’s proposal to remove the maximum from the WHEG grant; and Mr. Anderes replied that increased Pell grant awards would make up most of the difference.  The Governor had proposed $12 million; and, while the committee put that amount in the budget, $6 million of it is in one-time auxiliary monies.  Ms. Harris explained that funding in the second year would be increased to $6.4 million GPR and $1.9 million in auxiliary funds.  Because of the need to contain costs going forward to the amount funded by GPR, it was provided that, in 2011-13, only those receiving hold-harmless grants could continue and new recipients would not be added.

In response to a question by Regent Walsh, Mr. Anderes said that decisions about furloughs are made by the Governor’s Office and the Office of State Employment Relations and that it had been decided that all employees, regardless of funding source, will take furloughs.  Associate Vice President Al Crist added that, under the Fair Labor Standards Act, overtime issues might be raised for some employees; and the Attorney General’s office was being consulted on collective bargaining contract issues.

UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin pointed out that the two percent increase that represented employees would receive would have to be covered by the campuses through additional base cuts of layoffs.  This would amount to millions of dollars at UW-Madison.

UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells cautioned against connecting layoffs to lack of contract re-opening.  He felt that the best way to handle the matter was simply to add another budget cut to be taken in the most prudent manner possible.

General Counsel Pat Brady added that there had been discussion with the Office of State Employment Relations and others to minimize legal risks. 

Regent Crain asked what assistance was being given to campuses to deal with the confusion and frustration resulting from these cuts and uncertainties. 

President Reilly replied that he and the chancellors have been keeping  employees informed and that employee assistance programs would be called upon to help with the problems that they encounter.

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joe Gow expressed agreement with the importance of good communication, especially since so much still is unknown.  Expressing the hope to have flexibility to use furloughs in a way that makes most sense for the university, he noted that they will be complex to track and that more cutting will need to be done.

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago indicated that it is important to allow schools and colleges as much flexibility as possible and noted the mismatch between budget cuts, on the one hand, and on the other approval of new schools, although not funded, and purchasing land, although with private funds.

President Reilly added that the situation is made worse by the UW System’s outmoded human resources system, which requires manual entering of data.

In response to a question by Regent Loftus as to how cuts would be determined, President Reilly said that the goal would be to keep up the momentum of the Growth Agenda and to keep doors open to the greatest extent possible to help Wisconsin going forward. 

Indicating that UW-Madison also is concerned about impacts on research, Chancellor Martin explained that furloughs of federally funded faculty and staff hurts the state because less research will be done and the university’s competitiveness with other campuses will be impaired. 

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UW SYSTEM ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT

In introductory remarks, President Reilly observed that the Accountability Report provides perspective on why the cuts facing the university are so difficult to handle.  In that regard, data on efficiencies already in place show that administrative spending per student is well below the national average; and that students’ paths to graduation have been made more efficient by reducing average credits taken to earn a bachelor’s degree, which lowers tuition costs for students and opens up class seats for others.

Noting that the report represents a new direction, he recalled that the UW System began accountability reporting 15 years ago – the first statewide system of higher education to publish an annual accountability report focused on consistent measures of access, degree completion, professional preparation, and stewardship of resources.  While each year’s report has included updates, this year marks only the second major revision of the annual report format.

The revised report has a new organization and expanded emphasis, reflecting the UW System’s strategic framework and the goals of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  The new title, Investing in Wisconsin’s Future conveys how the university’s strategic priorities are aimed to benefit the people of Wisconsin.  Building on broad awareness of the Growth Agenda, the new report allows people to better see how progress is being made toward goals they support.

In addition, the report’s new design is easier to navigate and includes a wealth of additional information.  In its electronic form, the links allow readers to move directly to an in-depth report or website.

As in the past, the report focused on a manageable number of accountability indicators, each of which captures a key aspect of the UW System’s performance.  Each indicator has a measureable goal, typically a national benchmark or numerical target; and progress on each goal is clearly shown.

In addition to the traditional indicators of access, enrollments, retention, graduation, and resource management, the report measures the UW’s impact on communities through civic participation, community outreach and engagement, and as an engine driving the state’s economy.

The economic impact information, the President pointed out, makes the point that, in a severe recession, the UW is one of the few sure ways to revitalize the economy and move the state forward for the future.  As to value to dollar invested, the report shows that the 2007-08 graduating class will make an annual contribution of $507 million to Wisconsin earnings – a $9 million increase from the previous year.

The UW System’s 2007-08 budget of $4.5 billion generates a $10 billion annual contribution to the Wisconsin economy – a return of ten times the $1 billion annual state investment in the UW System. 

 

President Reilly then called on Interim Associate Vice President Sharon Wilhelm for a presentation on the report.

Referring to the UW System’s long history of accountability reporting, Ms. Wilhelm noted that the first report was published in 1994 and was continued until 2001, when it underwent a major revision.  This second phase of accountability reporting, entitled Achieving Excellence, emphasized service to students.

The current report represents a third phase, with the primary objective to align the report with the seven core strategies of the Strategic Framework, while also examining strengths and weaknesses of past reports.  The manageable number of indicators was found to be a strength, while there was room for improvement in making navigation of the report easier.

The report consists of seven sections, one for each of the core strategies of the Strategic Framework:  Prepare Students; More Graduates; Well-Paying Jobs; Stronger Communities; Resources; Operational Excellence; and Collaborations.  Twenty accountability indicators were spread among those seven strategies. 

For each indicator, a chart or table provides quick reference to data illustrating progress to the accountability goal, and bulleted text provides brief background on the indicator and interpretation of the data. Accompanying each indicator is a “more to explore” box with related information on the context within which the UW System operates, additional data of interest, or examples of ways the university strives to achieve progress.  Many of these items reference related publications, with a link on the web version of the report to allow the reader to quickly access the publications and explore an issue in much greater depth.

Aligning the accountability report with the Strategic Framework resulted in five new accountability indicators:

  1. A new Degrees Conferred indicator appears under the core strategy of More Graduates.
  2. The core strategy of Well-Paying Jobs includes a new indicator of Degrees in High-Need and Leading-Edge Fields, including degrees conferred in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and health professions, reflecting the UW System’s efforts to provide qualified graduates for the kinds of jobs that are projected to experience above-average growth in Wisconsin.
  3. Under the strategy of Stronger Communities, a new indicator is Community Outreach and Engagement, which seeks to measure the impact of UW outreach programs and related activities in Wisconsin communities.
  4. A new indicator of Wisconsin Partnerships is under development to help measure progress on the strategy of increasing Collaborations.  A system-wide task force has begun to look at ways to more systematically define and collect data on Wisconsin Partnerships for future accountability reports.

The report contains a status grid summarizing the seven core strategies, the twenty associated indicators and the UW System’s progress on each indicator, marked by one of the following:

  1. A plus sign indicates that the goal was achieved.
  2. A minus sign indicates that the goal was not achieved.
  3. A combination plus and minus sign indicates mixed results.

 

The status grid shows that the UW System met its goals on ten indicators, had mixed results on seven, and has yet to achieve its goal on two indicators.  The Wisconsin Partnerships is listed as being incomplete until the task force completes its work.  Therefore, of the 20 indicators, the UW System met or partially met its goals on 17 of them.

Ms. Wilhelm identified the following good news included in the report:

  1. The UW System continues to provide educational experiences that prepare students for future careers and for civic participation both in their communities and in the global society.
  2. The UW System does well on its goals related to producing more graduates.  It continues to provide access to 33 percent of Wisconsin high school graduates; retention and graduation rates are above national averages; and both enrollments and degrees conferred have increased.
  3. The UW System has increased its amount of external research funding, leading to the development of new technologies and industries and also creating well-paying jobs in Wisconsin.
  4. The UW System continues its operational excellence with administrative costs well below national and state averages.  Average credits taken to earn a bachelor’s degree remain at low levels, providing savings for students in time and tuition.

            She then identified the following challenges that remain:

  1. While there has been overall progress on goals related to producing more graduates, rates of access, retention, and graduation for most students of color remain below those of white students, although enrollments of students of color have increased in both absolute and percentage terms. 
  2. As to resources, the UW System’s total revenue increased three percent from the previous fiscal year, below the target and the average annual increase over the last decade of five percent.  Revenues from gifts, grants, and contracts – which account for over one-fourth of total revenues – increased only one percent.

 

Turning to the institutional accountability reports, she noted that these reports supplement the system-wide report.  In addition to four common measures, each institution provides additional measures that reflect its specific mission and strategic plans.  In the next several months a revision of the institutional reports would be under taken to better align them with the Strategic Framework and enhance their usefulness as a management tool.

Ms. Wilhelm concluded her remarks with an update on the UW System’s continued participation in the Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA) – the national initiative to increase accountability of public institutions of higher education.  All four-year UW campuses now provide consistent and comparable information on the characteristics of each institution and its students on their web-based VSA College Portrait, and a national website lists VSA participants.      

 

Thanking Ms. Wilhelm for the presentation and her excellent work in linking the accountability report to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, President Reilly indicated that the report would be distributed widely – to UW institutions, the Legislature and Governor, and to groups statewide,  including regional economic development entities, chambers of commerce, the Wisconsin Higher Education Business Roundtable, Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce, the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce, Competitive Wisconsin and others.

In conclusion, the President emphasized that the purpose is to let all of Wisconsin know that the UW System is transparent and accountable, that it has a strategic plan with specific performance measures, and that the university is always seeking continuous improvement.

 

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Davis commended the excellent work done in aligning the report with the strategies of the Growth Agenda.  Suggesting that the report be returned to the Board after there had been time to study it more thoroughly, she said that she would like to see an analysis of why goals for retention and graduation of students of color had not been achieved in order to better inform efforts at improving success in this area.

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin suggested that Regent committees could move forward in placing on their agendas portions of the report that they might wish to discuss further.

While he agreed that committees should follow up on various items, Regent Vásquez suggested that the full Board should be involved in discussions of some of the issues.

Regent Crain commended the presentation of the report as being very accessible.  She suggested that preparation for well-paying jobs should include reference to job satisfaction and contribution to the community. She also noted the need to understand where race, ethnicity and low income status interact and pointed out that, while reduction of credits is a worthy goal, it should be remembered that an important part of the college experience is to obtain as much education as possible.

Expressing agreement with the points that had been made, President Reilly noted that the current average of 133 credits to degree is still well above the usual requirement of 120, leaving space for enhancing education.

Regent Smith agreed that the report should be sent to legislators, noting that transfer of credits and collaboration were two matters often on their minds.

Regent President Bradley pointed out that the core strategy of Preparing Students includes graduating people with critical thinking skills who have the interest and ability to contribute to their communities and society.

Regent Davis emphasized the importance of analyzing the “why” of persistent issues like retention and graduation of students of color and hiring and retention of faculty and staff of color.

President Reilly noted that individual campus reports and discussions with chancellors address these issues, and Ms. Wilhelm indicated that Equity Scorecard results are being added to institutional reports.

Regent Pruitt noted that the ability to provide resident tuition for children of immigrants would increase numbers of students of color. 

UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells observed that high-impact activities in preparing more well-educated graduates include service learning and collaborative student/faculty research.  Because these efforts are labor-intensive, they are more difficult to sustain and enhance in a time of severe budget cuts.

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UPDATE:  CAMPUS SAFETY REPORT

In opening remarks, President Reilly pointed out that, overall, campuses are safe places, with incidents of violence being less frequent than in the wider society.  UW System crime statistics reflect these national trends. 

As background, he recalled that, after the Virginia Tech tragedy in early 2007, the UW System – along with colleges across the country – took another look at their practices and policies for keeping people safe on campus.  At that time, he appointed the President’s Commission on University Security, let by UW-Madison Police Chief Sue Riseling.

Around the same time, Governor Doyle appointed the Task Force on Campus Safety.  Both groups were charged with identifying ways in which campuses could prevent, intervene, respond, heal, and resume operations if confronted with the threat or actual incident of major violence on campus. 

Reports from both groups formed the basis of the UW System’s Report on Campus Safety, presented to the Board last June.  The report provided an overview of campus safety efforts and showed how UW institutions were responding to recommendations that emerged from the President’s Commission and the Governor’s Task Force.

This update showed that campuses have been working hard to ensure a safe and productive environment for the campus communities, even in these very tough economic times.

President Reilly called upon Associate Vice President Larry Rubin to begin the presentation.  Noting that the Report on Campus Safety included a set of system-wide and campus expectations, Mr. Rubin indicated that Julie Gordon, Director of the UW System Office of Operations Review and Audit would provide a summary of the results of a questionnaire sent to the campuses on how they addressed those expectations.

Reporting on the survey results, Ms. Gordon noted that actions varied based on campus demographics, needs, existing programs, and community and campus resources.

  1. UW institutions were expected to develop new or enhance existing safety and security awareness programs.  Progress made included revision of parent and student orientation sessions to include more health and safety topics.  Websites were updated to include similar information, and many institutions began providing self-defense classes.

Other initiatives included development of office protocols for dealing with disruptive individuals, creation or enhancement of SAFE walk programs, and purchase or development of instructional videos, which are shown online or as part of presentations to groups on campus.

  1. UW institutions were expected to form functioning multi-disciplinary review teams to anticipate, identify, and evaluate threats and other safety concerns.  All campuses have formed such review teams, although costs in time and resources can be significant.  At a minimum, the teams meet every two weeks, but on several campuses they meet weekly or even more frequently, to discuss individuals of concern and identify potential intervention plans to diffuse situations.
  2. It was expected that work groups would be formed to examine whether changes to existing regulations and policies or creation of new regulations were needed to promote campus safety.  In addition to System policies, described in the report, campus efforts also had been made, with some reporting revisions or clarifications to policies regarding assistance to those in distress and policies regarding mandated assessments for those exhibiting signs of suicide.
  3. UW institutions were expected to continue to make progress toward achieving an appropriate level of counseling and mental health services.  One national standard for the level of services needed is one counselor for every 1,500 students.  Two UW institutions meet that ratio, while all others have taken some steps to increase availability of counseling, which might involve hiring new staff, contracting for services, and/or expanding office hours.
  4. UW institutions were expected to have a plan for emergency communication to the campus community.  All institutions reported having such a plan and periodically testing it.  Notifications of possible threats are sent in multiple ways, including mass emails, reverse 911 capabilities, computer pop-up alerts, message boards, text messages, and enhanced public announcement systems.  Campuses often partner with local communities or counties to share the cost of such notifications systems or tap into their available technology.

 

In conclusion, Ms. Gordon indicated that safety procedures continue to be refined as campuses identify new needs, conduct table-top and functional exercises, conduct assessments after these exercises, and further develop their crisis response plans.  In many cases, campuses emphasize that funding continues to be an issue.

 

Petra Roter, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at UW-Oshkosh, then spoke about safety activities on that campus.  Indicating that the intention is to infuse safety into all aspects of the campus, she noted the following short and mid-term goals:

  1. Increased knowledge of risky behaviors and consequences
  2. Increased knowledge of community expectations, campus resources and the resources’ use
  3. Increased ability to identify risky situations and intervene

 

The following actions have been taken:

  1. Use of an expanded communication plan and methods
  2. Development of campus safety information, such as a campus safety website, posters on what to do in an emergency, and flip- charts posted in academic buildings and residence halls
  3. A text-alert system
  4. A campus-wide emergency notification system, which is in process
  5. Continued review of the Campus Safety Plan to ensure readiness for an emergency
  6. Development of collaborative relationships with the city and county in the areas of law enforcement, mental health providers, hospitals, and service agencies
  7. The Student at Risk Response Team, which was in place prior to the Virginia Tech tragedy and identified as a best practice by the Governor’s Task Force
  8. Training for over 500 faculty and staff on how to help a student in distress
  9. Safe ride program
  10. Office safety sessions and individualized office safety plans
  11. Doubling the number of community service officers to provide additional security presence and safe walks
  12. Addition of a part-time case worker for the Student at Risk Response Team
  13. Addition of a police officer
  14. Student safety programs with a focus on the first semester, using the UW-Oshkosh Safety Model (Red-Cup virtual house party and Take Back the Night)
  15. Campus safety infused in orientation for both students and parents
  16. Addition of safety phones and Blue Lights, updated and reviewed by periodic walks through campus
  17. Training of trainers and delivery of programs on Stop the Hate, for bias incidents, and Step Up, for bystanders.

 

As challenges and opportunities, Vice Chancellor Roter identified the following:

  1. The expense of ever-changing technology
  2. Making safety improvements in older buildings, which were not built to be locked down
  3. Finding ways to reach out and provide information about safety to the campus community
  4. Collaborating and developing relationships and resources off campus in areas such as mental health
  5. The expense and time needed for training to meet ever-changing safety risks and best practice protocols for responding to emergencies
  6. Time spent dealing with safety activities that cannot be spent on other duties.  Some staff experience burn-out
  7. Need for additional staff, such as police, counselors, case managers, Dean of Students Office staff, victim’s advocates, and risk managers
  8. Cost and availability of tools to do the job
  9. Funding,  especially given the deep  budget cuts that are taking place
  10. Developing a campus culture where a safe environment is everyone’s responsibility.

 

UW-Madison Police Chief Sue Riseling began her remarks about safety initiatives by thanking the Board for continuing to focus attention on these matters.

With regard to the university’s Multi-Disciplinary Review Team, she noted the challenge of dealing with disruptive people who are not members of the campus community, but still provide the potential for threats on campus. 

She reported that the university is about to embark on a radio interoperability project with Dane County, at a cost up to $1.7 million.  Grant applications will be made in an effort to keep the project going forward.

With regard to emergency communications, Chief Riseling noted the problem of ever-increasing expectations for various types of warnings.  In that regard, she cautioned that people who find themselves in a potential dangerous situtation should not wait to be warned because emergency communications, such as text messages and e-mails, take time to deliver.  Instead, people should use common sense and their natural instincts to get to a place of safety.

As to the university’s Response Plan, she said that full-scale exercises are performed twice a year and that the plan has been activated 17 times.  Training was done for police response to an active shooter, with the campus crisis plan activated in real time.

Turning to UW-Madison’s training program, Chief Riseling reported that the program is robust and is shared with other UW institutions and other institutions nationally and internationally.  She then showed a video that is part of that training program on what to do in the case of an active shooter on campus.

 

Associate Vice President Rubin then spoke of System-wide initiatives.  In the area of communication and coordination, he noted that the intent is to utilize expertise from around the system to address issues of prevention, intervention and aftermath response and then to share ideas and best practices for the benefit of all. 

To organize these efforts, the report called for the formation of the President’s Advisory Committee on Health, Safety and Security, a group of system and campus representatives from the areas of academic and student affairs, campus police, risk management, health services, legal counsel, human resources, government relations and communication and operations review and audit.  The committee is charged with identifying risks, gathering and sharing information about them, forming ad-hoc committees to study them, as necessary, in greater detail, and recommending system-wide policies, procedures and guidelines, where appropriate.

An ad hoc committee has been formed and charged to report on mental health issues, and a campus safety coordinators group has been formed to enhance communications around the system on these issues. 

A second system-wide initiative is concerned with training, on the basis that a system-wide approach is more efficient and cost effective than individual training programs on each campus.  With leadership from the President’s Advisory Committee, the Chief Student Affairs Officers, and the UW-Madison Police Department, three statewide training sessions – each with more than 100 participants -- have been held for members of campus Threat Assessment Teams and a fourth session is planned for December.

In addition, there have been a number of local and regional sessions, designed for UW police personnel, on advanced threat assessment and how to make students, faculty, and staff more aware of these issues in an effort to prevent or better respond to violent incidents. 

The Advisory Committee recently conducted a system-wide survey to determine what other areas of training should be the focus of future programs.

A third area of system-wide focus has been related to funding and resources.  Actions that have been taken include system funding of training sessions and contracting with UW-Madison to provide continuity of operations planning (COOP) and maintenance services to all UW institutions.  The system also will provide funding for campuses to achieve basic radio interoperability,

There is continued pursuit of state, federal and other forms of external funding opportunities to see, for example, whether federal stimulus funding might be available for campus safety and security initiatives.  However, most funding  for meeting expectations in the report so far has come from campus reallocation, segregated fees, and differential tuition. 

 

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Connolly-Keesler asked Ms. Roter about the financial impact of safety initiatives on UW-Oshkosh.

Ms. Roter replied that the total cost, which is met from a variety of funding sources, had not been calculated; but it was helpful that external funding had been received for mental health initiatives. 

Regent Connolly-Keesler felt that it would be important to track such data, since campus safety is a key priority for the UW System.  She asked if families are notified if there is an incident on campus, to which Ms. Roter replied that the university maintains a listserve for parents and that they also can sign up for text messages or find information on the campus web site.  In addition, individual families will be contacted, if appropriate.

As a Regent representative to the committees that worked on campus safety efforts, Regent Bartell said he had advocated for bringing the matter before the Board periodically as a means of highlighting these efforts, which are becoming very successful. 

He commended former Senior Vice President Don Mash, Associate Vice President Larry Rubin, Chief Sue Riseling and others for all their good work.  While challenges remained, progress was being made.

Regent Loftus asked how an influenza pandemic and quarantine might fit into these plans.  In response, Chief Riseling said that the structure lends itself to emergencies of weather or public health, as well as response to violence.

Regent Vásquez inquired about the cause of delay in text messaging and e-mailing information in an emergency.  Chief Riseling replied that, while preparing the message takes about three minutes or less, the message then goes to massive servers and is sent to many thousand e-mail and text addresses.  It is that part of the process that takes some time. 

The discussion concluded and the meeting was adjourned at 12:40 p.m., upon motion by Regent Walsh, seconded by Regent Smith.

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Madison, Wisconsin

 

UW-Madison
Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall
Friday, June 5, 2009
9:00 a.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

 
Approval of Minutes of the May 7 and 8, 2009 Board Meeting
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Remarks of Appreciation by Regent President Bradley
Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Elizabeth Burmaster
Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Elizabeth Burmaster
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Colleene Thomas
Resolution of Appreciation:
Regent Colleene Thomas
Additional Resolutions of Appreciation
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report.
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Support for UW System by Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce
Support for UW System by Wisconsin Higher Education Business Roundtable
2009 Academic Staff Excellence Awards
Amy Lloyd, Leadership Training Coordinator for Student Life, UW-River Falls
Lezli Redmond, Director of Statewide Intervention Programs for Tobacco Research and Intervention, UW-Madison
Educational Talent Search Program, UW-Fox Valley
Successful Accreditation Review for UW-Stout
UW-Milwaukee, Children’s Research Institute and Medical College of Wisconsin Awarded $8.5 Million Grant
UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells and Vice Chancellor Petra Roter Receive Awards
UW-Whitewater Outreach Program Advances Growth Agenda for Wisconsin
UW-Whitewater Paintball Team Wins National Championship
Kristine Andrews Appointed Councilor of the Council on Undergraduate Research
Installation of Carillon at UW-Green Bay
UW-Oshkosh Publication, “War Through Their Eyes”.
Resonant Microsystems to Locate in Eau Claire
Technology Innovations
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Thanks to Regent Womack
UW-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension for the Tenor High School
UW-River Falls Presentation of Campus Academic Plan
First Reading of Revised Missions:  UW-Stout and UW-La Crosse
Report of the Senior Vice President
Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Related Academic Approval Items
Revisions to Chapters UWS 17 and 18, Wisconsin Administrative Code
Approval of Revisions to Chapters UWS 17 & 18 Wisconsin Administrative Code
Consent Agenda
Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A./B.S. in Women’s Studies University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Game Design and Development University of Wisconsin-Stout
Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Property Management University of Wisconsin-Stout
Approval of Appointments to Natural Areas Preservation Council
Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate
2009-10 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension for the Tenor High School
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE
Expanding Access Through Integration in the University of Wisconsin System
Update:  UW System Identity Theft Prevention Policies
Update: Federal Legislation Affecting Higher Education
Update:  Human Resources System Project Planning
UW-Green Bay Food Service contract with A’viands, LLC
UW-Green Bay Food Service Contract with A’viands, LLC
Consent Agenda
UW-LaCrosse Bookstore Services Contract with Follett Higher Education Group
UW-Madison Contract for Financial Services Opportunities with UW Credit Union
Report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee
Report of the Associate Vice President
2009-11 Capital Budget Update
Building Commission Actions
UW-La Crosse: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct Residence Hall Project
UW-Madison: Authority to Seek Waiver of Wis. Stat. s.16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. s.13.48(19) to Allow Selection of a Construction Manager-at-Risk for Construction of: (1) the Athletics Hockey/Swim Facility and (2) the Wisconsin Energy Institute
UW-Madison: Authority to Grant Easements to the City of Madison for Access to West Madison Agricultural Research Station Land for Sewer Facilities and Improvements
UW-Platteville:  Authority to Construct a Forensic Laboratory House and Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stat. s.16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. s.13.48(19) to Allow the University to Construct the Project
UW-Stevens Point: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct Waste Management Center Project
UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects
Consent Agenda
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Residence Hall Project, UW-La Crosse
Authority to Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stats § 16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48(19) to Allow the Selection of a construction Manager-at-Risk for construction of: (1) the Athletics Hockey/Swim Facility and (2) the Wisconsin Energy Institute, UW-Madison
Authority to Grant Easements to the City of Madison for Access to West Madison Agricultural Research Station Land for Sewer Facilities and Improvements, UW-Madison
Authority to Construct a Forensic Laboratory House and Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to Allow the University to Construct the Project, UW-Platteville.
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Waste Management Center Project, UW-Stevens Point
Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System
ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS
President of the Board
Vice President of the Board
Appreciation to Regent President Bradley
Secretary of the Board, Assistant Secretary of the Board, Trust Officer and Assistant Trust Officers
CLOSED SESSION
Authorization to Appoint: Interim Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Authorization to Appoint: Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Parkside


 

MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

 

UW-Madison
Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall
Friday, June 5, 2009
9:00 a.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

PRESENT: Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Elizabeth Burmaster, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Mary Cuene, Danae Davis, John Drew, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Colleene Thomas, José Vásquez, and David Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regent Betty Womack

 

- - -

Approval of Minutes of the May 7 and 8, 2009 Board Meeting

The minutes of the May 7 and 8, 2009 meetings of the Board of Regents were approved, upon motion by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Cuene.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Remarks of Appreciation by Regent President Bradley

Regent President Bradley expressed appreciation for the trust and confidence placed in him as Regent President by his colleagues on the Board, in the university system, campus and state leaders, and others.  He thanked the Regents for never saying “no” to his requests and thanked Secretary Temby and staff for their assistance and support. 
-
Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Elizabeth Burmaster

In introductory remarks, Regent Walsh noted that Regent Burmaster had spent her entire career caring deeply about the importance of education. 

After receiving her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from UW-Madison, she taught at Madison East High School under then Principal and former Regent Milton McPike.  Moving to school administration, she served as Principal of Hawthorne Elementary School and then as Principal of Madison West High School. 

Choosing to run for office as Superintendent of Public Instruction, she was elected in April 2001 with over 60% of the vote and re-elected in 2005 with 62% of the vote.  One of her primary goals at DPI was the New Wisconsin Promise – to raise the achievement of all students and close the gap between students of color and other students.

She was granted Honorary Degrees by Beloit College and Edgewood College.

As she prepared to move to a new challenge as President of Nicolet Area Technical College, Regent Walsh expressed appreciation for the insight, patience and wisdom she had brought to the Board of Regents and especially for her leadership of the Education Committee.

Stating that she had been a wonderful colleague who would be much missed by all, he presented the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation and accompanied by a standing ovation for Regent Burmaster.

Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Elizabeth Burmaster

 

Resolution 9634: WHEREAS, Elizabeth Burmaster has served as the 25th State Superintendent of Public Instruction and an Ex Officio Regent of the University of Wisconsin System from 2001 to 2009; and 

WHEREAS, Elizabeth has been an active member and past co-chair of Wisconsin’s PK-16 Leadership Council – which partners with business, industry, and government to create a seamless educational system from pre-kindergarten through college – and has used her role as a Regent to encourage the formation of regional PK-16 partnerships across the state; and 

WHEREAS, she has championed, at the state and national level, access and opportunity in public education as moral and social justice issues, and as an economic imperative to prepare students to contribute to a vibrant 21st-century society, including being a proponent of turning STEM to STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics), setting the arts in their rightful place as an integral part of a culture of creativity and innovation; and

WHEREAS, she has helped select top UW leadership positions as a member of special chancellor search committees for UW Colleges and UW-Extension, and UW-Milwaukee, and also assisted with the search and selection of the UW System President; and

WHEREAS, Elizabeth has served on numerous standing committees, including chairing and vice chairing the Education Committee, chairing the Student Discipline and Other Student Appeals Committee, and serving on the Executive Committee; the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee; and the Teaching Excellence Awards Committee; and

WHEREAS, in her role as state superintendent, she launched the New Wisconsin Promise, a pledge that has expanded four-year-old kindergarten by 90 percent in her eight years as superintendent, ensured small class sizes, increased professional development opportunities for teachers and other educational staff, and maintained the high PK-12 standards for which Wisconsin is known; and

WHEREAS, she will soon bring her considerable educational and administrative talents and experience to her new role as president of Nicolet Area Technical College;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offers thanks and commendation to Elizabeth Burmaster for her many life achievements, her outstanding support of students of all ages, and her exceptional service to the citizens of Wisconsin.

 

Regent Walsh presented her with a plaque and President Reilly presented a UW System medallion. 

Expressing her appreciation, Regent Burmaster remarked on what a pleasure it had been to serve as Superintendent with two Governors and to serve on the Board of Regents with two UW System Presidents, five Regent Presidents and 24 Chancellors.  During that time, she said that she had learned a great deal about the commitment of the people of the UW and the state to access and equity in quality education.

Noting that her father was the first in his family to attend high school, she related that, after graduation, he went to work on the family farm, but then went on to UW-Madison, where he worked in the Stock Pavilion and enrolled in the College of Agriculture.  He earned a Ph.D in Biochemistry, with inspiration from the greatest of teachers, including Professors Steenbock, Baldwin and Elvehjem.

Her mother, who studied in the School of Music, also benefited from great teachers, including Professor Mills, Morphy, and Eastman.  One of the first Tudor Singers, she went on to teach music.  During the WWII, her father went to Maryland as a scientist with Professor Baldwin.  That is where he and her mother raised their family and taught them to believe that everything is better in Wisconsin because of its educational system.  Her father, who became widowed, was proud of her position on the Board of Regents and urged her to protect the great teachers and the Wisconsin Idea. 

In conclusion, she expressed appreciation for the honor of serving, stating that “Everything is still better in Wisconsin because of its educational system.”
-
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Colleene Thomas

Welcoming Regent Thomas’ parents, Cynthia and David Thomas, Regent Pruitt congratulated them for raising a remarkable daughter.  A student Regent’s service, he pointed out, is one of the most difficult of balancing acts because the incumbent is asked both to represent students and to keep other constituencies in mind. 

Commending Regent Thomas for striking that balance, he observed that she has the remarkable capacity to see the big picture and extend the view for the long term.  He admired her selfless dedication to facilitating the reorganization of United Council and the thoughtful way she balanced student costs versus quality concerns.  Demonstrating good instincts also in her service on the Regent Committee for the UW-Madison Chancellor Search, he said, no one came better prepared to make solid contributions.

Stating that it had been a genuine honor to serve on the Board with her, Regent Pruitt presented the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation, with a standing ovation for Regent Thomas.

Resolution of Appreciation:
Regent Colleene Thomas

 

Resolution 9635: WHEREAS, Colleene Thomas has dedicated two years in exemplary service as a Student Regent of the University of Wisconsin System from 2007 to 2009; and 

WHEREAS, her civic engagement and leadership on behalf of students has been publicly commended, including at a Board of Regents meeting at which time fellow students cited her “commitment and dedication in promoting the student voice in Wisconsin,” and particularly noted her work in advocating for the model of shared governance; and

WHEREAS, her participation on the Education Committee has helped continue high-caliber academic programs at all UW institutions and her membership on the Regent Meeting Effectiveness Committee has contributed to improved quality and efficiency of these board meetings; and

WHEREAS, Colleene has served as a member of the Teaching Excellence Awards Committee, helping the board select recipients for the highest recognition bestowed on members of UW System’s faculty and instructional academic staff, recognizing them for making student learning and success their primary mission; and

WHEREAS, her astute student perspective has helped guide the direction of two UW institutions through her service on special chancellor search committees for UW-Madison and UW-Whitewater; and

WHEREAS, she has brought together Regents, chancellors, student leaders, and other academic leaders in face-to-face discussions about opportunities for working together toward common educational goals, thereby strengthening communication among these groups and illustrating her active commitment to effective shared governance on all levels; and

WHEREAS, she has been a strong advocate for inclusive excellence and creating community on UW campuses, supporting President Kevin P. Reilly’s efforts to ensure that the UW System models inclusive excellence in all its education and employment practices, working to close the achievement gap and enroll a broader cross-section of Wisconsin’s diverse population;

 

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offers thanks and commendation to Colleene Thomas for her distinguished and dedicated service to the citizens of Wisconsin and the UW System.

 

Regent Pruitt presented Regent Thomas with a plaque containing the resolution, and President Reilly presented a UW System medallion in appreciation for her service.

Expressing her gratitude for the honor, Regent Thomas said she was humbled by “the collective talent, experience, and dedication of people in this room,” as well as by the thousands of people who work in the UW System and “make great things happen every day.”

However, she pointed out, there also have been sad events, many related to alcohol and drug abuse by students, and other problems related to racism, classism, and gender bias. While strong efforts are under way to address these issues, she was convinced that real change will come only through a cultural shift in behavior and peer expectations by students themselves.

Regent Thomas stated her conviction that education must be made more challenging, constantly provoking new thought, and that, despite budget deficits, the university must keep striving to be greater, to better educate future leaders and to solve community problems.

In closing, she thanked the Board staff and System leaders and staff, especially President Reilly, Associate Vice President Rubin, Melissa Kepner, Cindy Graham, and Dave Giroux.  She also thanked the chancellors for their commitment to student leadership and her fellow Board members, stating, “I cannot adequately describe how privileged I have felt to be embraced as your colleague.”  Finally, she recognized her parents for a “lifetime of guidance and recognition of the value of public service.” 

 

Regent Crain requested that the Board be provided with copies of the remarks by Regent Burmaster and Regent Thomas.
-

Additional Resolutions of Appreciation

Resolutions of appreciation to UW-Stevens Point Chancellor Linda Bunnell, UW-River Falls Interim Chancellor Connie Foster, and UW-Green Bay Interim Chancellor David J. Ward were adopted by acclamation, in recognition of their leadership and service.
-

Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report

A written update on the Wisconsin Technical College System Board was provided.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Support for UW System by Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce

President Reilly reported that Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce (WMC) has embarked on a plan called “Moving Wisconsin Forward, which sets forth the group’s ideas for economic renewal, including its support for the UW System--support for increased flexibilities in management and capital planning, support for financial aid, and recognition that adequate state funding must be provided for the UW to succeed. 

The President stated that the UW is pleased to work with WMC statewide and to strengthen this important relationship.
-

Support for UW System by Wisconsin Higher Education Business Roundtable

President Reilly reported that the Wisconsin Higher Education Business Rountable, which is composed of prominent business leaders, also has spoken in support of the UW System’s budget. 

Despite tough economic times, the Rountable recognizes the importance of funding the university and providing more financial aid for students.  The group also supports increased flexibilities in the state building process, in order to make more efficient use of scarce resources.
-

2009 Academic Staff Excellence Awards

Regent Connolly-Keesler, Chair of the Regent committee that selected the award winners, welcomed the 2009 award recipients, stating that, with this award, “the Board of Regents recognizes the dedicated work, vital services, and outstanding contributions of the UW System’s academic staff.  These winners embody the hard work, dedication, and ‘out of the box’ thinking of all our talented UW System academic staff.  The Board is pleased to honor a group that helps to strengthen and invigorate not only our UW institutions, but the communities in which they serve.”  Each winner receives a $5,000 stipend to support their professional development or other activities to enhance a university program or function.

Each UW institution was invited to submit one nomination for the awards, and the winners were chosen by a Regent committee consisting of Regent Connolly-Keesler, Regent Drew, Regent Opgenorth, Regent Smith, Regent Vásquez, and Regent Womack.

The following criteria were used by the committee in making its selections:

    • Excellence of Performance: Performance that consistently and substantially exceeds in quality the expectations for the position, has set superior standards of excellence, and has resulted in important and significant contributions to his or her department and institution
    1. Personal Interaction: Performance that consistently and substantially demonstrates ability and willingness to work positively and effectively with others
    2. Initiative and Creativity: Performance that consistently and substantially demonstrates an innovative approach to the job
    3. Outstanding Achievement: Performance that consistently and substantially has resulted in important and significant contributions to the departmental unit and the university and has resulted in distinction in one’s profession – campus wide, system wide, state wide, nationally or internationally.

     

    Stating that the committee was impressed by the quality and achievements of all of the nominees, Regent Connolly-Keesler noted that they represent the great accomplishments and commitment of academic staff across the UW System and that they all should take great pride in having been nominated for this prestigious award.

     

    Amy Lloyd, Leadership Training Coordinator for Student Life, UW-River Falls

    Presenting an award to Amy Lloyd, Leadership Training Coordinator for Student Life, UW-River Falls, Regent Smith noted that she worked with two others in creating the iRock Program, which recently won the UW-River Falls Chancellor’s Award for Program Excellence and was selected as a finalist for the Regents’ Program Award for Excellence. 

    Characterized as very student-focused, energetic and creative, Ms. Lloyd has consistently gone above and beyond her job responsibilities. In each of her several positions at UW-River Falls, she has focused on carrying out the university’s mission to help “students learn in order that they may be successful as productive, creative, ethical, engaged citizens and leaders with an informed global connection.”   

    She excels in working with students to identify their needs and then creating programs that meets them.  She also has done outstanding work in leadership development, as evidenced in her Social Justice Series where students learn to address inequality and injustice on campus, in their communities, and within society. 

    Herself a true leader, Ms. Lloyd inspires those around her through her enthusiasm, creativity and support; and she collaborates with many different programs and people, both on and off campus, to develop and offer successful programs.

     

    Thanking the Board for recognizing the contributions of academic staff, Ms. Lloyd said that she was honored to be one of the recipients of this year’s awards.  She had found a career, she reflected, that fit her strengths and passion, “which makes the work I do hardly work at all.  I am able to sustain such a high level of involvements as a leadership and service coordinator because it truly energizes me.”

    Critical to her professional success, she said, are the students with whom she works and the environment in which she works.  In terms of the university’s mission, Ms. Lloyd indicated that UW-River Falls is made up of individual faculty and staff who have agreed to support that central theme, and that collaboration has been key to enabling her to be creative in developing programs. 

    As an example, she cited the Social Justice Series, which included 15 faculty/staff volunteers facilitating 70 students, who participated in a half-day interactive experience on power, privilege, and oppression.  The event required the help of several campus partners, collaborating on funding, logistics, facilitating book groups, marketing, and assessment.  At the end of the semester, more than 600 people had signed up as “allies” for the issue about which they had learned. 

    Remarking that the students had taught her a great deal, Ms. Lloyd said that they come to the university to be challenged and they want to leave the campus a better place than when they arrived.  A committee of students has helped to develop a mission and plan for leadership and service programs and assisted in implementing an international service trip program to Uganda to build a school.  They also produced the Social Justice Series and held a semester-long leadership development program for first-year students. 

    In conclusion, she expressed her gratitude to the students, faculty, staff, and administrators with whom she had worked for the past five years and also extended special thanks to her husband Bryan for his understanding and encouragement.

     

    Lezli Redmond, Director of Statewide Intervention Programs for Tobacco Research and Intervention, UW-Madison

    Presenting the award to Ms. Redmond, Regent Drew referred to her 17 years of exceptional service to the university and state.  Prior to joining the staff of the Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention in 2001, she expertly led several large and complex projects for the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, including launching and directing the landmark Women’s Health Initiative Madison site.  The Madison WHI met and often surpassed national recruitment, retention and quality goals; and core outcomes as to what interventions help and harm women were realized in no small amount by her hard work. 

    More recently, she has been recognized nationally for her expertise and innovative state programming in tobacco intervention.  The Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line has been highly successful, providing barrier-free treatment services to state residents, and is recognized as one of the most effective in the nation. 

     

    Expressing her gratitude for the award, Ms. Redmond stated her satisfaction in providing leadership for the programs with which she has been involved.  While funding for the quit line and training has been cut by 40 percent in the budget, she said that efforts would continue, in conjunction with Tobacco Free Wisconsin.

    As keys to her success, she identified students, faculty and staff with whom she had worked, especially Dr. Michael Fiore, head of the Center for Tobacco Research and Prevention, as well as scientists and staff members across the state.

    A second key has been the resources and atmosphere of the university, with its values of innovation, collaboration, and lifelong learning.

    The third key was the public and private partners, including health systems that collaborated in offering the programs and making them successful.

    In closing, Ms. Redmond said that it has been an exciting adventure to lead programs that embody the Wisconsin Idea – implementing best practices and learning from communities across the state – and that she has seen the power of collaboration to create change. 

     

    Educational Talent Search Program, UW-Fox Valley

    Presenting the Regents’ Academic Staff Award for Program Excellence, Regent Vásquez said the Educational Talent Search Program at UW-Fox Valley was selected because it addresses two of the primary priorities of the Board of Regents: Increasing the number of baccalaureate degree holders and increasing the diversity of the UW’s student body and graduates.  The ETS program contributes toward meeting those goals by providing a bridge between K-12 school districts and UW System institutions for first generation, low-income and historically under-represented students, providing programming and support to encourage middle and high school students to pursue college degrees.  The only TRIO program that serves students as early as sixth grade, it reaches them at a critical time when future plans and expectations are being developed. 

    Since its inception in 2006, the ETS program has had impressive success, with 100% of non-senior participants in the most recent year retained and promoted to the next grade and all 72 seniors applying for college.  Since the program began, 92 participants have enrolled in UW System institutions and 50 more at other universities.

    Regent Vásquez presented the award to Terri Holtzman, Director of the Educational Talent Search Program.

     

    Thanking the committee and Board for choosing the Educational Talent Search Program for the award, Ms. Holtzman said she was honored to accept on behalf of UW-Fox Valley, its partners – the Menasha and Kaukauna school districts--and on behalf of students who aspire to higher education.

    She recognized program coordinators, Dawn Grenzer and Kerry Johnson, who “put their heart and soul into the success of the program each and every day: logging over 35 hours of workshop time with students each month and over 5,000 hours of personal student contact every year.”  It is this kind of focused attention, she said, that has led more than 170 Wisconsin high school graduates from Kaukauna and Menasha to apply for college, and more than half have gone to a UW campus. 

    Noting that the program has had a positive impact on the lives of the 620 participants, she remarked that its success comes directly from the UW System’s commitment to collaboration with K-12 schools as a path to increase access for students.

     

    Expressing her gratitude for the award, Ms. Grenzer said that it is inspiring to be able to instill hope in students.   The key to success, she remarked, is buy-in from the school districts and the access and visibility they provide to the program.  

    Noting that many low-income students have misconceptions about college, she indicated that they benefit from the campus tours offered by the program and from help with financial aid applications.  What they find is that they can do something they never dreamed would be possible:  Go to college. 
    -

    Successful Accreditation Review for UW-Stout

    President Reilly commended UW-Stout for a very successful accreditation review by the Higher Learning Commission, which is part of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 

    UW-Stout was praised for its commitment to continuous quality improvement and other principles associated with the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, won by the university eight years ago.  In their report, the reviewers said:  “UW-Stout is a role model nationally and internationally on quality improvement in higher education.” 
    -

    UW-Milwaukee, Children’s Research Institute and Medical College of Wisconsin Awarded $8.5 Million Grant

    UW-Milwaukee, the children’s Research Institute, and the Medical College of Wisconsin received a federal grant of $8.5 million to combine their individual areas of expertise to form a national research powerhouse in the area of children’s environmental health. 

    The Children’s Environmental Health Science Core Center is the only such center in the country and also is unique in its broad, team-based approach. Five-year funding was provided by the National Institute for Environmental Health Science.
    -

    UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells and Vice Chancellor Petra Roter Receive Awards

    President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Wells upon his receipt of the Oshkosh Student Association’s first Shared Governance Award in recognition of his commitment to students and the shared governance process. 

    Petra Roter, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, was honored with the association’s Doug McLean Memorial Award for student advocacy and outstanding dedication, commitment and service to students.
    -

    UW-Whitewater Outreach Program Advances Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

    President Reilly reported that, with a $90,000 grant from the UW System Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion, a new UW-Whitewater program was being launched for adults who left the university with one semester of coursework to complete.  So far, 330 students from 2001 to the present have been identified.
    -

    UW-Whitewater Paintball Team Wins National Championship

    President Reilly commended the UW-Whitewater Paintball Team, which won the first-ever National Collegiate Paintball Association Championship, defeating Texas A&M 2-1.  Representing the Midwest-North region, the Warhawks outlasted 55 other teams at the championships. 

    Recalling that it had previously been reported that the UW-Whitewater Men’s Wheelchair Basketball Team also won a national title, he extended hearty congratulations to the Warhawks athletics program.
    -

    Kristine Andrews Appointed Councilor of the Council on Undergraduate Research

    President Reilly congratulated Kristine Andrews, Assistant Vice President for Federal Relations on her appointment to a one-year term as a Councilor in the At-Large Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR).  Noting that the UW System endorses the Council’s belief that faculty members enhance their teaching and contribution to society by involving undergraduates in research, he expressed confidence that Ms. Andrews would be a strong contributor to that mission.

    Other UW System representatives to CUR include Dr. Bill Campbell, Director of Grants and Research at UW-River Falls, who is the treasurer; Linda Freed, UW-Oshkosh Director of Sponsored Program, who is Chair of the At-Large Division; and Vijendra Agarwal, UW-La Crosse Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, who is Chair of the Physics and Astronomy Division.
    -

    Installation of Carillon at UW-Green Bay

    President Reilly reported that UW-Green Bay was celebrating installation of its brand new carillon outside the north entrance of the University Union.  A gift from the family of UW-Green Bay’s founding Chancellor Ed Weidner and other friends of the university, the 35-foot tower has more than 400 pre-loaded melodies and also will feature selections written by Music Professor Cheryl Grosso.  The formal dedication reception was set for June 6th.
    -

     

    UW-Oshkosh Publication, “War Through Their Eyes”

    Calling attention to a new UW-Oshkosh publication, titled “War Through Their Eyes”, President Reilly reported that it was a student journalism project led by Adjunct Journalism Professor Grace Lim.  Fifteen students in her Writing for the Media class were involved in this ambitious project to tell the stories of student veterans. 

    The 80-page book, which includes compelling and personal stories and photographs of 13 soldiers and three marines at UW-Oshkosh, has attracted national attention and recently was featured on the ABC News website. Ms. Lim said that the publication “gives these student soldiers and marines a forum to tell the world why they enlisted, what they did, and what they felt at the front lines of war.”
    -

    Resonant Microsystems to Locate in Eau Claire

    President Reilly reported an announcement by Resonant Microsystems that it will locate operations in Eau Claire to produce nano-scale products under a contract with the Department of Defense.  UW-Eau Claire, UW-Stout, Chippewa Valley Technical College have been working for several years to make this happen, furthering the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin goal of attracting new businesses and creating new jobs.

    Resonant Microsystems came to Eau Claire because of the unique blend of research, education and manufacturing expertise in the Chippewa Valley.  UW-Eau Claire is involved through the sophisticated scientific instrumentation available in its Materials Science Center; UW-Stout is applying its manufacturing process expertise; and Chippewa Valley Technical College is the home of nano-manufacturing.  The company hopes to hire local college graduates, as well as laid-off workers from the area.  Because of defense contract rules, the jobs cannot be outsourced and should be here to stay.
    -

    Technology Innovations

    President Reilly reported that UW-Madison doctoral student Adam Wilson made news across the country with his development of a “brain-computer interface” that would allow people to use social networking technology using only their brains.  He is among a group of researchers worldwide working to perfect a communication system for people whose bodies may be incapacitated, but whose brains function normally, such as people with ALS, a brain-stem stroke, or a spinal cord injury. 

    Noting that others in the UW System are making good use of social networking technologies, he indicated that the UW System has its own Facebook page and Twitter feed and that UW-Stout has 2,300 Facebook fans. 

    KnowHow2Go Wisconsin is on Facebook, MySpace, Twitter and Ning.  UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin has her own Facebook page, and UW-Whitewater Chancellor Dick Telfer posts regular updates to his video blog, which is then tweeted to 300 followers.  UW-Green Bay has more than a dozen individual twitter feeds for admissions, campus news, residence life, tutoring, and other campus offices.

    Several campuses have their own YouTube channels, some are using iTunes University to post podcasts of classroom lectures, and some are using blogs to engage alumni and other stakeholders. 

    President Reilly commended “all of these exciting new ways to better serve our students, share our successes more widely, and build strong public support.”

    - - -

    REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

    Regent Davis, Chair, presented the committee’s report.
    -

    Thanks to Regent Womack

    Regent Davis expressed special gratitude to Regent Womack for the thoughtful gifts and cards she had purchased for the Regents Burmaster and Thomas who were completing their terms on the Board.
    -

    UW-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension for the Tenor High School

    Tenor High School, which sought a five-year contract renewal, is operated by Seeds of Health, a non-profit focused on the educational and health needs of Milwaukee women and children.  The school’s mission is to offer students the opportunity to earn both a high school diploma and a Milwaukee Area Technical College certificate in a specific area of concentration. 

    A model school, it is financially sound; its students perform well across a variety of measurers and there is strong parental involvement, strong leadership and a good relationship with MATC.  Bob Kattman, of the UW-Milwaukee Office of Charter Schools and Marcia Spector, Director of Seeds of Health, spoke about how this is a school that should be replicated.  Ms. Spector also met recently with Tony Evers, incoming State Superintendent of Public Instruction on that topic.

    The committee discussed how to widen the impact of charter schools that are creating innovative and successful learning environments for some of Milwaukee’s most at-risk students, including ways in which UW-Milwaukee and other UW schools could advance the research into charter schools, resulting in better prepared students and teachers, especially for challenging urban environments, like Milwaukee.

    Stating that UW-Milwaukee, Seeds of Health, and the principal and teachers at Tenor High are all to be commended on such an outstanding school, Regent Davis reported that the committee passed a resolution approving the contract extension for the full five years for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    UW-River Falls Presentation of Campus Academic Plan

    The plan was presented by Connie Foster, Interim Provost and outgoing Interim Chancellor, and Terry Brown, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and outgoing Interim Provost. 

    The committee heard about UW-River Falls’ successful reaccreditation by the Higher Learning Commission and about some of its signature programs in agriculture, teacher education, STEM education, and high-impact teaching practices.

    The campus also re-examined its entire program array, consisting of 47 undergraduate majors and a total of 130 academic programs, counting minors, options, emphases and tracks.  This seemed too many for the university’s size, resulting in a dilution of its mission and in programs that were neither effective nor sustainable.

    Dr. Foster and Dr. Brown led a comprehensive and rigorous review of every program, resulting in a recommendation that 20% of the programs be enhanced, 60% maintained, and 20% eliminated, reduced or rethought.  Work will begin next year to act on that recommendation.

    Reporting that the committee was impressed by that process and with the university’s sense of identity and awareness of its strengths, as well as challenges, Regent Davis commended the interim leaders at UW-River Falls who are “handing over to Chancellor Van Galen an institution in very strong shape.”
    -

    First Reading of Revised Missions:  UW-Stout and UW-La Crosse

    The committee was informed that both campuses followed inclusive processes for revising their missions, with repeated input from governance groups and faculty, staff and students campus-wide. 

    UW-Stout was guided by its polytechnic designation and identity.

    Not having revised its mission statement in 20 years, UW-La Crosse developed a statement that is current and aligned with the campus identity.

    The next stage in the process would be for both campuses to conduct public hearings of their new mission statements, presided over by a Regent.  Following those public hearings, each campus would bring its proposed mission to the Board for approval.
    -

    Report of the Senior Vice President

    Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Related Academic Approval Items

    Noting that each June, the committee accepts a report containing the names of all faculty members who have been newly tenured, promoted and hired with tenure, Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin reviewed the tenure and promotion data disaggregated by minority status and gender. 

    Commending the talent, hard work and dedication of those faculty, the committee discussed, with input from provosts, the kind of investment institutions make when they hire new faculty and the lengths to which they go to evaluate and mentor them so that they can succeed.

    While the report showed that 98% of those who were considered for tenure in 2009 received it, that does not mean, the committee was advised, that virtually everyone who is hired gets tenure.  Instead, some appointments are not renewed during the six-year process leading to tenure.

    The committee approved a resolution accepting the report for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    Revisions to Chapters UWS 17 and 18, Wisconsin Administrative Code

    Regent Davis recalled that action the preceding month had been postponed so that additional information could be gathered from the campuses and there could be further consultation with key constituents.  This information showed that there were not many suspensions system-wide and even fewer expulsions in any given year.

    Regent Spector reviewed revisions made since the last meeting, two of the most significant of which were in the section detailing the information provided to students under investigation and in the section addressing attorney participation at nonacademic disciplinary hearings.

    In committee discussion, members focused on language changes that sought to clarify and emphasize both the educational purpose of the misconduct hearings and the expectation that students would participate and speak for themselves.

    The committee was joined for the discussion by Regents Bartell, Vásquez, and Drew.  Regent Bartell crystallized for many a point in the language on misconduct hearings; that is, the extent of the hearing examiner’s authority in determining the conditions under which a witness could be questioned.

    After deliberation, the committee decided to write some additional language for Chapter 17.12(4)(c), which was drafted by Regents Spector, Thomas, and Bartell, with guidance from General Counsel Pat Brady and Jane Radue, of the Office of Operations Review and Audit.

    The revision to s.17.12 (4)(c)  would read as follows:

    The hearing examiner or committee:

    1. Shall admit information that has reasonable value in proving the facts, but may exclude immaterial, irrelevant, or unduly repetitious testimony.
    2. Shall observe recognized legal privileges.
    3. May take reasonable steps to maintain order, and to adopt procedures for the questioning of a witness appropriate to the circumstances of that witness’s testimony.

     

    On a vote of 4-1, the committee recommended approval of the proposed rules, with that amendment.

    The committee wanted to ensure that campus personnel could use their professional judgment to ensure both due process for students under investigation and sensitivity towards victims of crimes; and most committee members felt that the language of the rules allowed some latitude and flexibility in how hearing examiners and other campus personnel could implement them.

     

    Adoption by the Board of the following resolution was moved by Regent Davis and seconded by Regent Spector:

     

    Approval of Revisions to Chapters UWS 17 & 18 Wisconsin Administrative Code

     

    Resolution 9636: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the proposed rules amending Chapters UWS 17 and 18, Wis. Admin. Code, are hereby approved, together with the “Report to the Legislature, Clearinghouse Rule 08-099,” and that the Secretary of the Board of Regents, pursuant to s. 227.19, Wis. Stats., notify the presiding officer of each house of the Legislature that the proposed rules are in final draft form, and cause a statement to appear in the Wisconsin Administrative Register that said proposed rules have been submitted to the presiding officer of each house of the Legislature.

     

    Stating that he would vote against the resolution, Regent Loftus commented that campus disciplinary authority should not be extended off campus.  He saw no compelling reason to do so and believed that students could be placed in double jeopardy of discipline both on and off campus. 

               

    He also was concerned that only wealthier students would be able to afford attorneys and that fewer women would come forward if they faced cross examination.  In support of that view, he cited letters from the UW-Madison Dean of Students and other organizations concerned with violence against women.
               

               

    Regent Walsh stated his concern for due process for accused students, particularly in cases of suspension or expulsion.  He did not believe that including attorneys in the process should be viewed as an obstacle to the truth; rather, he considered unchecked power of an investigator to be a greater concern. 

               

    He was pleased with the changes that had been made to permit representation by an attorney in cases of suspension or expulsion – disciplinary actions that would create a record that would follow the student for life.

               

    Regent Vásquez expressed concern about students who might not be able to afford legal representation and asked if there would be any possibility that institutions could help, perhaps by providing a list of attorneys who might do pro bono representation.

               

    Regent Spector replied that a survey showed that some institutions provide such a list, and that others could be encouraged to do so.

               

    Regent Bartell added that an attorney’s participation is limited.  While a student could have an attorney in any situation, he or she could question witnesses and speak on behalf of the student only in cases of suspension or expulsion or if the student is charged with a crime.   The hearing examiner would be able to place victims or witnesses in another room or require written questions in order to protect them.  He believed that the proposed language provided a reasonable balance. 

               

    Regent Walsh questioned the appropriateness of requiring written questions.

               

    Noting that revision of the rules included review of a wide range of opinions, Regent Spector recalled that one incentive for the amendments was the concern by campus neighbors about bad behavior on the part of students; and representation by counsel was among the other issues that arose. He and others involved in the revisions considered it important to extend the university’s authority off campus in a limited way and thought that submission of questions would be appropriate in some circumstances.

               

    Pointing out that a great deal of attention had been given to the many positions that were voiced, he urged that Board to move forward and approve the proposed amendments.

               

    Regent Davis pointed out that one writer revised his position, deciding that the last revision was a reasonable response to his concerns.  Noting that numerous e-mails had been received protesting delay in implementing the new rules, she remarked that the process has been lengthy, and that there has been a great deal of consultation and response to concerns and suggestions.  She urged support for the proposed rules.

               

    Regent Loftus questioned the meaning of the term “serious and repeated” as it pertains to off-campus violations of municipal law.

               

    Regent Spector replied that municipal law violations are just one category on the list of behaviors subject to sanctions.  They cover a range of violations, including noise ordinances.  It was felt that in fairness such violations should be serious and repeated in order to warrant disciplinary action.

               

    Regent Thomas remarked that the language before the Board represented a series of compromises, and she thanked Jane Radue for her work in these negotiations.  While students initially had been strongly opposed to sanctions for off-campus misconduct, many had now moved to a position of tacit support.

               

    Noting that disciplinary systems do not always work in favor of victims, Regent Connolly-Keesler asked if the Board would receive a report on how the new rules were working.

               

    President Reilly agreed that such a report would be provided.

               

    Regent Walsh commented that, if a hearing examiner were to require written questions, it would not be possible to conduct cross-examination.  While he was sure that the proposed provision was well-intended, he felt strongly that protections are needed for students who might not be guilty of the charges.

               

    Regent Vásquez felt that the proposed rules balanced protections for the accused with protections to keep victims and witnesses from feeling intimidated.

               

    Regent Burmaster expressed agreement with Regent Walsh, particularly in cases of off-campus misconduct charges.  She asked for the opinion of chancellors with regard to the rules.

               

    Chancellor Markee said he felt that the proposed rules represented a reasonable compromise, noting that his staff had been involved in the language that was written.  He added that cases resulting in suspension or expulsion were rare.

               

    Regent Spector pointed out that attorneys could participate in the hearings if suspension, expulsion or criminal charges were involved. 

               

    Regent Walsh moved that the following language be added at the end of s17.12(4)(c) 3., “provided, however, whatever procedure is adopted, the student is provided due process in questioning of witnesses.”   The motion was seconded by Regent Loftus.

               

    Regent Spector explained that the proposed language sought to find a middle ground and allow for the unusual case in which a particularly vulnerable witness might require a separate room or other measures.  He did not believe that education beyond the 12th grade would be a property right involving due process protection. 

               

    Regent Loftus expressed concern that the proposed rules could result in fewer reports of sexual assault by creating a process that victims would want to avoid.

               

    Regent President Bradley inquired about the recourse for a student who felt the hearing process had treated him or her unfairly, and Regent Spector replied that there would be opportunities to appeal to the chancellor and then to the Board.

               

    Regent Walsh moved to modify his motion to read as follows:  “provided, however, whatever procedure is adopted, the student is allowed to effectively question the witness.”  The modification was accepted by Regent Loftus and the motion passed on a unanimous voice vote.

               

    Regent Loftus then moved to postpone action on the proposed rules, and the motion was seconded by Regent Burmaster.

               

    In response to a question by Regent Crain as to the rationale for his motion, Regent Loftus explained that he did not believe the proposed rules were ready to send to the Legislature and that he opposed using university disciplinary authority for off-campus conduct. 

               

    Urging the Board not to support the motion to postpone, Regent Davis observed that the proposed rules represented a delicate compromise with all constituents.  She did not believe that delay would bring forth any new information and felt it was the Board’s responsibility to move the rules forward.

               

    Regent Walsh moved the previous question on the motion to postpone.  The motion was seconded by Regent Loftus and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

               

    The question then was put on the motion to postpone, and it was defeated on a voice vote, with Regent Burmaster and Regent Loftus voting in favor of the motion.

               

    Regent Walsh moved the previous question on the main motion.  The motion was seconded by Regent Smith and carried on a voice vote.

               

    Put to a roll-call vote at the request of Regent Loftus, Resolution 9636 was adopted, with Regents Walsh, Vásquez, Thomas, Spector, Smith, Pruitt, Opgenorth, Falbo, Drew, Davis, Cuene, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Bradley, and Bartell (15) voting in favor of the resolution and Regents Loftus and Burmaster (2) voting in opposition.

               

    Regent Davis thanked all those who devoted so much time and energy to the rule revision process, including the Review Committee, General Counsel Pat Brady, Jane Radue, and Regent Thomas. 

               

    Expressing special gratitude to Regent Spector for this gracious and inclusive leadership of a very complex process, she noted that he had gone “above and beyond in seeking consultation and re-consultation, to make sure that all voices could be heard and to balance – as much as humanly possible – the competing interests and concerns of many, many people…This two-and-a-half year process has been open and transparent and has had enormous integrity.  I commend those who worked so hard to preserve that.”   
    -

               

    Consent Agenda

               

    Regent Davis moved adoption of Resolutions 9637-9643, which had been approved unanimously by the Education Committee, as consent agenda items; and the motion was seconded by Regent Cuene.

               

    At the request of Regent Spector, Resolution 9637 was removed from the consent agenda.

               

    Put to the vote, Resolutions 9638-9643 were adopted by the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

     

    Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A./B.S. in Women’s Studies University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

    Resolution 9638: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.A./B.S. in Women’s Studies.

     

    Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Game Design and Development University of Wisconsin-Stout

    Resolution9639: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Game Design and Development.

     

    Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Property Management University of Wisconsin-Stout

    Resolution 9640: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Property Management.

     

    Approval of Appointments to Natural Areas Preservation Council

    Resolution 9641: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the appointments of Dr. James Bennett and Dr. Joy Zedler, for terms effective immediately, and ending July 1, 2012, as University of Wisconsin System representatives to the Natural Areas Preservation Council.

     

    Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

    Resolution 9642: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents accepts the proffer of $3,316,899 made by the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for fiscal year July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Music. 

     

    2009-10 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status

    Resolution 9643: That, upon recommendation of the respective Chancellors and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2009-10 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status be approved.

    Adoption of Resolution 9637 was moved by Regent Falbo, seconded by Regent Vásquez, and adopted on a voice vote, with Regent Spector abstaining because of his sister’s position as Executive Director of Seeds of Health, Inc.

     

    The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Charter School Contract Extension for the Tenor High School

    Resolution 9637: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the charter school contract with Seeds of Health, Inc., together with amendments to the contract, maintaining a charter school known as the Tenor High School.

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    REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

    The committee’s report was presented by Regent Smith, Chair
    -

    Expanding Access Through Integration in the University of Wisconsin System

    UW Colleges and UW-Extension Chancellor David Wilson gave a presentation about on-going efforts and impacts of the integration of the UW Colleges and UW-Extension, indicating that the goal was to identify cost savings and efficiencies that could be achieved through integrating the operations of the Madison-based administrative offices of the two institutions.
               

               

    He reported that the institutions have developed a common vision of maximum access, have made significant strides in strategic planning, and are developing collaborative programs.  Representatives from his senior leadership team addressed various aspects of the integration.
                -

               

    Update:  UW System Identity Theft Prevention Policies

               

    Julie Gordon, Director of the UW System Office of Operations Review and Audit, discussed the status of campus plans to implement the recently established Board policy addressing “red flags” that may indicate potential identity theft activity in relation to UW financial accounts.  She reported that all four-year UW institutions and the UW Colleges have submitted plans for identity theft prevention programs and that the plans meet the federal requirements.
    -

               

    Update: Federal Legislation Affecting Higher Education

               

    Kris Andrews, Assistant Vice President for Federal Relations, provided a summary of two of the Obama administration’s priorities affecting higher education:  increasing the number of Americans with college degrees and an increased emphasis on science.

               

    She highlighted changes to student aid, including increasing the amount of the Pell Grant and indexing future increases to the Consumer Price Index plus one percent to address inflation. 

               

    With regard to scientific research, Ms. Andrews reported that President Obama’s recent budget doubles funding for the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.  She and a researcher from UW-Stevens Point had been invited to submit a policy paper for congressional consideration on how all UW System institutions are actively engaged in research, working with undergraduate students, and what Congress can do to support such opportunities.
    -

               

    Update:  Human Resources System Project Planning

               

    Senior Vice President Tom Anderes presented information on the status of  Human Resources System project planning, which should conclude by late summer.  A recommended option for development will be presented in September.
    -

               

    UW-Green Bay Food Service contract with A’viands, LLC

               

    The committee was informed that the proposed resolution would create a seven-year contract with A’viands LLC to provide dining services at UW-Green Bay. 

               

    Matthew Schumwinger, representing food service workers at UW-Green Bay, expressed concern that the contractor had not provided assurances that existing employees would be hired; and Sheila Miller, a food service worker at UW-Green Bay, spoke about the employment ads placed by A’viands. 

               

    The committee decided to bring the contract before the Board after more information could be gathered on the future employment of existing food service workers.

               

    To begin the discussion, Regent Smith moved adoption of the following resolution; and the motion was seconded by Regent Connolly-Keesler.

     

    UW-Green Bay Food Service Contract with A’viands, LLC

    Resolution: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin- Green Bay and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contract with A’viands, LLC to provide Dining Services to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, effective August 1, 2009 for a period of seven years.

     

    Rich Lampe, Director of Purchasing, reported that he had received a letter assuring that A’viands will interview all current staff.  He added that, in a similar situation at UW-Superior, existing workers were hired and the transition went smoothly. 

    Noting that willingness to interview current employees offered no assurance that they would be hired, Regent Drew felt that the policy should specify that the successful bidder assume the collective bargaining agreement in place, which is a common practice.  Adding that the contract with employees runs for another two and a half years, he pointed out that employees with 20 years of experience might end up with no job. 

    Upon motion by Regent Loftus and seconded, it was voted to postpone the matter until the next meeting.

    Indicating the companies typically want to retain current workers, Mr. Lampe pointed out that postponement might mean that an extension with the current vendor would need to be negotiated.

    Regent Drew remarked that postponement would give A’viands time to state its intentions. 

    In response to a question by Regent Smith, Mr. Lampe said that, in the UW-Superior case, contract language specified that current employees be given a fair trial.  He was not aware of any problems in other transitions.

    Ruth Anderson, Assistant Vice President of Administrative Services, pointed out that vendors competed on the basis of a given set of standards.  She felt it could be problematic to make a change at this time.

    Regent Falbo added that a resolution needed to be found so that the situation would not occur again.
    -

    Consent Agenda

    Regent Smith moved adoption by the Board of the following resolutions, which had been approved unanimously by the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent Connolly-Keesler and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

     

    UW-LaCrosse Bookstore Services Contract with Follett Higher Education Group

    Resolution 9644: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contract with Follett Higher Education Group to provide Bookstore Services at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, effective July 1, 2009 for a period of seven years.

     

    UW-Madison Contract for Financial Services Opportunities with UW Credit Union

    Resolution 9645: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves a contract with the UW Credit Union to provide financial services opportunities (including ATM, Campus Space Lease, and ID-Debit Card services) to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, effective September 1, 2009 for a period of ten years. 

    - - -

     

    Report of the Capital Planning and Budget Committee

    Regent Bartell, Chair, presented the committee’s report.
    -

    Report of the Associate Vice President

    2009-11 Capital Budget Update

    Reporting on progress of the 2009-11 capital budget, Associate Vice President David Miller indicated that the Joint Committee on Finance approved a total statewide capital budget of approximately $512 million in new general fund supported borrowing.  This was an increase of about $89 million over last biennium and reversed the trend of decreased funding in the last three budgets.  Of that amount, the UW System would receive about $380 million for 17 major projects and maintenance of existing facilities.  The budget also included $486 million for 19 major projects funded by program revenue borrowing and gifts.

    The Joint Committee on Finance added two major projects – the UW-Madison nursing facility ($47 million; one-third gift funding) and advance enumeration of the UW-Eau Claire education building.  This is the first budget in which the committee added general fund supported borrowing and made no cuts to all-agency funding.  The Eau Claire building had been included as a 2111-13 project, for which the Building Commission authorized design, and so is consistent with the six-year plan.  The UW-Madison nursing building was on the Board’s priority list for 2005-07, but had been deferred to make way for other projects and to reflect the pace of fundraising. 

    Addition of these projects would raise the level of funding for the next biennium and make room for another project in 2111-13.

    Building Commission Actions

    Mr. Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $88 million for projects at its May meeting, consisting of $32 million in general fund supported borrowing, $55 million in program revenue, and $1 million in gift/grant funding. 

    He reported that the university would continue to advocate for capital planning and construction flexibilities to reduce delays, save costs, and improve the process. 

    Support for these measures by Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce and the Higher Education Business Roundtable is very much appreciated.
    -

    UW-La Crosse: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct Residence Hall Project

    The project would construct a 500-bed, $48 million residence hall that would replace two older halls that would be demolished to make room for an academic building.

    The committee approved a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    UW-Madison: Authority to Seek Waiver of Wis. Stat. s.16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. s.13.48(19) to Allow Selection of a Construction Manager-at-Risk for Construction of: (1) the Athletics Hockey/Swim Facility and (2) the Wisconsin Energy Institute

    The committee was informed that the waiver would be needed for timing reasons and approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    UW-Madison: Authority to Grant Easements to the City of Madison for Access to West Madison Agricultural Research Station Land for Sewer Facilities and Improvements

    The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    UW-Platteville:  Authority to Construct a Forensic Laboratory House and Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stat. s.16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. s.13.48(19) to Allow the University to Construct the Project

    The committee was informed that the project would be constructed by building construction management students and would be used by criminal justice students to experience opportunities to learn crime scene investigative techniques. 

    A resolution granting the requested authority was approved for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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    UW-Stevens Point: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct Waste Management Center Project

    This $4.5 million project, Regent Bartell reported, was first brought forward in 2004 and has been an example of the need for procedural reforms.

    The committee passed a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

    The first of these requests was implementation of multiple energy conservation projects at UW-Oshkosh based on a recently completed comprehensive energy audit.  The debt service would be paid from annual energy cost savings from the fuel and utilities appropriation.  The second project would replace exterior windows in a UW-Parkside residence hall with new energy efficient units. 

    The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
    -

    Consent Agenda

    Adoption by the Board of the following resolutions as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Bartell, seconded by Regent Opgenorth, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

     

    Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Residence Hall Project, UW-La Crosse

    Resolution 9646: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-La Crosse Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Residence Hall project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total estimated cost of $48,000,000 ($43,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $5,000,000 Program Revenue-Cash).

     

    Authority to Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stats § 16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48(19) to Allow the Selection of a construction Manager-at-Risk for construction of: (1) the Athletics Hockey/Swim Facility and (2) the Wisconsin Energy Institute, UW-Madison

                            Resolution 9647: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek a waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to allow selection of a Construction Manager-at-Risk (CM) for construction of (a) the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Hockey/Swimming Facility at an estimated budget of $27,787,000 Gift Funds, and the Wisconsin Energy Institute, at an estimated budget of up to $100,000,000 ($50,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing and $50,000,000 Gift and Grant Funds). 

     

    Authority to Grant Easements to the City of Madison for Access to West Madison Agricultural Research Station Land for Sewer Facilities and Improvements, UW-Madison

    Resolution 9648: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, a permanent easement together with a temporary limited construction easement be granted to the city of Madison for access across the West Madison Agricultural Research Station’s (WMARS) farm land to construct public sanitary sewer facilities and associated improvements. 

     

    Authority to Construct a Forensic Laboratory House and Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under Provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to Allow the University to Construct the Project, UW-Platteville

    Resolution 9649: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to (a) construct a forensic laboratory house at the UW-Platteville Farm for a total estimated project cost of $140,000 Agency Funds and (b) seek a waiver of Wis. Stat. § 16.855 under provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to allow for construction by UW-Platteville Building Construction Management students and selected subcontractors.

     

    Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Waste Management Center Project, UW-Stevens Point

    Resolution 9650: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Waste Management Center project be approved and authority be granted to construct the project at a total cost of $4,550,000 ($1,789,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing-Existing and $2,761,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing).


    Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

    Resolution 9651: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $2,794,300 ($2,339,300 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $455,000 Program Revenue-Cash).

    - - -

    ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

    President of the Board

    Nominating Regent Charles Pruitt for President of the Board, Regent Smith recalled that and Regent Pruitt had served as Co-Chairs of the Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion and that he had served on the Business, Finance and Audit Committee with Regent Pruitt as Chair.  He was confident that Regent Pruitt would provide innovative, collaborative and thoughtful leadership, based on his passion for students and higher education.

    The nomination was seconded by Regent Drew, and Regent Pruitt was elected President of the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

    Expressing appreciation for the confidence placed in him, Regent Pruitt stated that he would be honored to serve as President, with the help of his fellow Regents.  He felt privileged to follow in the footsteps of Regent President Bradley, who had been an extraordinary leader. 
    -

    Vice President of the Board

    Regent Michael Spector was nominated for the office of Vice President of the Board by Regent Crain, who remarked that, in his four years on the Board, he has earned the respect and confidence of his fellow Regents and other UW System and campus leaders.  With his experience in education, commitment to educational opportunity, and collegial, respectful leadership style, she was confident that he would serve with excellence.

    Seconding the nomination, Regent Bartell commented that Regent Spector excelled at reconciling different views and moving people forward. 

    Regent Spector was elected Vice President of the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

    Thanking the Board, Regent Spector said that he looked forward to working with Regent Pruitt and President Reilly, both of whom he greatly admired.
    -

    Appreciation to Regent President Bradley

    President Reilly thanked Regent President Bradley for his unselfish service, stating that it had been a pleasure and privilege to work with him.  He also looked forward to working with the Board’s new leadership.

    Regent Walsh added his congratulations to Regent President Bradley on two years of outstanding leadership.
    -

    Secretary of the Board, Assistant Secretary of the Board, Trust Officer and Assistant Trust Officers

    Regent Crain nominated the following for re-election:  Judith Temby, as Secretary; Cheryle Goplin as Assistant Secretary; Deborah Durcan, as Trust Officer; and Pat Brady and Doug Hoerr as Assistant Trust Officers

    They were re-elected on a unanimous voice vote.

    - - -

     

    The meeting was recessed at 12:30 p.m. and reconvened at 12:50 p.m.

    - - -

    CLOSED SESSION

    The following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt, was adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Thomas, Vásquez, and Walsh (16) voting in the affirmative.  There were no negative votes and no abstentions.

    Resolution 9652: That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider appointment of a UW-Parkside Chancellor, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(c) and (e); to consider appointment of a UW-Platteville Interim Chancellor, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(c) and (e); to confer with legal counsel regarding pending and potential litigation, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(g); and to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by Wis. Stats. §19.85(1)(c).

    During the closed session, the following resolutions were adopted:

    Authorization to Appoint: Interim Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Platteville

    Resolution 9653: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Carol Sue Butts be appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, effective August 1, 2009 at a salary of $194,146.

    Authorization to Appoint: Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Parkside

    Resolution 9654: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Deborah L. Ford be appointed Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, effective August 1, 2009 at a salary of $199,500.

     

    The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m.

    Submitted by:
    Judith A. Temby, Secretary