Board of Regents

October 2008 Minutes - University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Held in the Dreyfus University Center

October 3, 2008

9:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Elizabeth Burmaster, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Mary Cuene, Danae Davis, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Colleene Thomas, José Vásquez, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:   Regent John Drew

- - -

UW-STEVENS POINT PRESENTATION: LEADING FROM THE CENTER – CHANCELLOR LINDA BUNNELL
Stating that it has been a great pleasure to be welcomed by so many enthusiastic UW Stevens Point students, Regent President Bradley noted that there is much to be proud of at this campus, including applied research activities, the arts, and study-abroad programs.  The university community, he said, is energized to prepare global citizens of the future.

The presentation began with a video featuring former Secretary of Defense and Wisconsin Congressman Melvin R. Laird, who spoke of UW-Stevens Point as a special university with exceptional students.  For more than 55 years, he related, the Laird Youth Leadership Scholarships and Laird Day Programs have been providing opportunities to these students.  The keynote speaker at this year’s program was James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers.  The programs are designed to bring to campus the best and brightest students from northern and central Wisconsin for a day of inspiration.  The values taught include awareness and appreciation of the larger world – a central tenet of Leading from the Center.

Chancellor Bunnell began her remarks by noting that Mr. Laird is a native of Marshfield and has been a good friend of UW-Stevens point since his days in the state senate in the 1940s.  She also welcomed State Senator Julie Lassa, Representative Louis Molepske, Stevens Point Mayor Andrew Halverson, Wausau Mayor Jim Tipple, and Wisconsin Rapids Mayor Mary Jo Carson.       

She thanked Sentry Insurance CEO Dale Schuh for Sentry’s sponsorship of a concert by Wynton Marsalis, as part of the Sentry Invitation to the Arts Program and for Sentry’s five-year renewal of the program.  Mr. Marsalis also was leading master’s classes for UW-Stevens Point students, as well as high school and middle school students from Central Wisconsin and Milwaukee.  

Chancellor Bunnell also recognized John and Patty Noel, founders of Travel Guard Insurance in Stevens Point, for their commitment to the arts and for providing access to higher education through Compass Scholarships.  The Noel Group selects three or four Wisconsin students per year from racial or ethnic minorities and awards them a full tuition, fees, room and board scholarship for four years.  The scholarship holders are expected to remain in Stevens Point during the summer months and work in meaningful jobs for the Noel Group in areas related to their academic majors.  To date, UW-Stevens Point has enrolled 19 Compass Scholars.  The Noels had been chosen to receive the 2008 Governor’s Award in Support of the Arts in recognition of their leadership over two decades in supporting the arts and making university education possible for many underserved and disadvantaged students.

Chancellor Bunnell then described the Leading from the Center Festival, which would be held in the Melvin Laird Room after the morning’s meetings.  The festival would showcase accomplishments of students and faculty, in bringing to life the university’s Vision 2015.

Vision 2015 connects the university to the future by:

  1. Challenging students to become global citizens;
  2. Reflecting and projecting the university’s history and values in the life and look of the campus;
  3. Promoting the dialogue and debate of the liberal arts and sciences;
  4. Taking responsibility for wellness;
  5. Continuing leadership at the national forefront of environmental stewardship;
  6. Demonstrating the power of communication and the arts; and
  7. Partnering with others for a vibrant economy.

This fall, the Chancellor reported, UW-Stevens point enrolled 9,120 students; and the academic talent of the freshman class, as measured by ACT scores, grade point averages, and class ranks is the highest in the university’s history.

The diversity of the student body continues to grow, and the university has become a more attractive choice for transfer students, especially from nearby UW-Marathon County and UW-Marshfield/Wood County.  International student enrollments also continues to increase.

Chancellor Bunnell reported that UW-Stevens Point led the UW comprehensive universities in the amount of externally funded applied research done on campus. From work in biofuels in developing the Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology, to the new Geographic Information Systems Center, to the Northern Aquaculture Research Station in Bayfield, UW-Stevens Point remained on the leading edge of applied research relevant to Central Wisconsin. 

This relevance, she continued, is appreciated by partners such as the Marshfield Clinic, where the university’s emerging masters program in Informatics and undergraduate degree in Health Science, along with efforts to establish a regionally based nursing program in partnership with area technical colleges, mesh well with the clinic’s nationally recognized research and services. 

In a video appearance, Dr. Karl Ulrich, President of the Marshfield Clinic, noted the clinic’s dependence on colleges and universities to supply many of its 6,200 employees, in addition to physicians.  Stating that local campuses are of critical importance, he noted the propensity of people, especially in rural areas, to remain in the area where they were trained and make their homes there.  Physicians and others who the Clinic recruits also love the rural lifestyle and the ease of living it involves.

Chancellor Bunnell remarked that it is a privilege for the university to partner with the Marshfield Clinic, as well as with Ministery Healthcare and Aspirus.  The clinical doctorate in Audiology is an important area of programmatic growth related to health and wellness, a movement that began at UW-Stevens Point in the 1970s – the first program to be nationally accredited by the National Wellness Institute.

In response to area need, the Chancellor continued, UW-Stevens Point is developing a Masters in Leadership – one of only nine in the country.  The Center for Leadership Excellence and Economic Development in Wausau, which was opened a year ago, represents a continuation of the pursuit of the university’s mission to serve all of central Wisconsin.

In videotaped remarks, Dwight Davis, Chairman and CEO of Greenheck Fan Corporation, spoke of the partnership between his business and UW-Stevens Point, which includes programs through which Greenheck pays the cost for its employees to take classes at the university.  The corporation also hires university graduates and currently has about 60 employees with degrees from UW-Stevens Point.  In addition, the university has reached out and worked with Greenheck to develop courses specific to its needs, an example of which is the Leadership University – a two-year program that the corporation conducts in collaboration with the university to train future leaders needed to run the growing business.

Thanking Mr. Davis for his remarks, Chancellor Bunnell pointed out that the ventilation system for the Bird Cage at the Beijing Olympics was developed by Greenheck Fan.

Leading from the Center, the Chancellor noted, not only provided the theme for these meetings, but also UW-Stevens Point’s Growth Agenda proposal – a three biennium request to the Board and to the State.  While the campus attracts students from all over Wisconsin, the percentage of students from its immediate service area that choose UW-Stevens Point is among the highest in Wisconsin.

Even so, she pointed out, it is important to also consider the high percentage of adults with only high-school degrees in this area and in counties to the north.  It will be necessary to partner with the Technical Colleges and the UW Colleges in order to successfully reach these populations. 

Turning to the area of economic growth, Chancellor Bunnell remarked that the university is fortunate to have a focused and hard-working regional economic development consortium, Centergy, led by Ruder Ware attorney, Bill Tehan.  Centergy, she said, has reached out to UW-Stevens Point and partner institutions in ways that reflect a deep understanding of the importance of the university and colleges to the tri-county region and beyond. 

In a videotaped statement, Mr. Tehan pointed out that strong workforce development is driven by the university and that well-trained four-year graduates are needed to support the regional economy.  In addition, workers often need retraining through educational services offered in the region.  UW-Stevens Point, he said, is a strong partner in making businesses in central Wisconsin successful. 

Chancellor Bunnell noted that UW-Stevens Point leads from the center by building on its heritage, dating back to 1894.  Moving into the 21st century, the university continues to build on its years of service to regional partners to create an even greater impact.

One key area of opportunity, the Chancellor said, is sustainability, an area in which the university’s connections date to the dawn of the American conservation movement in the early 1900s.  At that time, UW-Stevens Point offered conservation courses, taught by Fred Schmeeckle.  In the 1960s, the university embraced the environmental movement and emerged as a national leader in natural resources education.  Today, UW-Stevens Point has the nation’s largest undergraduate program and a masters program in high demand nationally and internationally.  At the urging of faculty, the university engaged in sustainable practices long before it became popular and was the first to sign the presidents’ and chancellors’ climate commitment.

In a videotaped message, Tom Howatt, President and CEO of Wausau Paper, remarked that UW-Stevens Point plays a critical role in educating people of the central Wisconsin region.  Graduates of the Paper Science program, he said, are not only technically capable, but are also mature, poised and ready to contribute from day-one as they join employers in the paper industry – characteristics that are critical to the industry’s success in today’s difficult environment.  Workers who graduate in the region, he noted, are more likely stay and contribute to its economic development.  In addition, he indicated that the university is an asset that helps his company recruit employees because of the atmosphere and opportunities that it provides for them. 

As another partner, the Chancellor introduced Jerry Whitburn, President of Church Mutual Insurance, which operates in all 50 states and has its home office in Merrill.

Stating that UW-Stevens Point is well worth the state’s continued investment, Chancellor Bunnell noted that last year the university brought forth an ambitious campus and facilities master plan that met with the Board’s approval and received strong support from the community.  Indicating that the university would continue to dream big, she said that the Center for Innovation and Collaboration, the campus’ first academic building since 1975, must move forward soon. 

During the current academic year, she planned to put together a team to explore moving the university’s athletics program to the NCAA Division II level to give coaches and athletes greater recognition regionally and nationally. 

In addition, the Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technologies will come to full fruition, driven initially by biofuels research and two large grants obtained recently.

In conclusion, Chancellor Bunnell noted that the leaders and supporters of UW-Stevens Point are “but the current stewards of a great institution.  The single most important constant as we continue to write our history is our students.  Year in and year out, they leave our campus and go into our region, state, nation and world, transformed by the commitments of faculty and staff to their education, the same commitments our university community has made to those students since 1894.”  She expressed concern about the level of compensation that could be offered to those talented people and looked forward to a discussion of that matter in November.


ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE UW SYSTEM
In opening remarks, President Kevin Reilly indicated that he would mention three distinct but related items:

  1. System-wide participation in the national Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA)
  2. The UW System Accountability Report
  3. The performance measures that were included with the 2009-11 biennial budget submission.

He recalled that in November 2007 the UW System announced that all 13 of its four-year institutions would participate in the VSA – a new national initiative to publish standardized performance data and other information. Earlier this week, it was announced that new VSA College Portraits were published online for each of those campuses.  Noting that the UW Colleges also were working toward participating, the President remarked that this is one more way to demonstrate the UW’s commitment to being accountable to students, parents, and taxpayers.  Interim Associate Vice President Sharon Wilhelm would provide an overview of the initiative, and Shari Ellertson, coordinator of UW-Stevens Point’s participation in the VSA would show that institution’s VSA website.

Ms. Wilhelm also would provide an update on the ongoing effort to refine the UW System’s annual Accountability Report, which has been published since 1993 when the UW became the first statewide system of higher education in the United States to publish such a report.

The effort being undertaken is to align the report more closely with the Advantage Wisconsin strategic framework, its seven core strategies, and the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin. 

With regard to performance indicators, he noted that the four indicators developed years ago would need to be revisited in view of the Growth Agenda.  Because of the need to work closely with a variety of internal and external constituencies, the performance measures would not be changed at this time.  Instead, the Board would be asked to make slight modifications to the previous goals connected with the indicators in order to reflect progress that has been made over time. 

Ms. Wilhelm began her remarks by noting the UW System’s long history of accountability reporting, with the most recent report – Achieving Excellence – developed in 1999.  Seven of its eight editions have included institution-specific accountability reports developed in cooperation with each UW institution. 

The current accountability report consists of three sections, the first of which provides insight into the context in which the UW institutions function.  The second section provides six broad goals emphasizing the UW’s service to students, and 20 indicators associated with them.  Performance is compared to national benchmarks and targets.  The third section is a compendium of other specialized reports on various aspects of the UW System.

While the primary objective of revising the report is to align it with the seven core strategies of the Advantage Wisconsin strategic framework, it also provided an opportunity to examine the strengths and weaknesses of the report.  One strength is the manageable number of indicators; however, navigation of the report could be made easier and thus more accessible to readers.

Next spring’s report, Ms. Wilhelm said, is to be considered a transitional report, with changes primarily focused on structure and formatting.  Next would come the work of revising targets for some current indicators and gathering more input as to other indicators that might be of value to add to future reports.

The strategic framework, she noted, consists of the three goals of the Growth Agenda – more graduates, well-paying jobs, stronger communities – along with three enabling strategies to prepare students and achieve the Growth Agenda goals.  The strategic framework, therefore, provides not only a new organization for the accountability report, but also represents an expansion of emphasis.  While the old report’s goals focused primarily on the student experience, the new framework would position the student experience within the broader context of the UW System’s contributions to the state.  To reflect the broader emphasis, some new accountability indicators would be proposed.

The proposed layout of the new report was designed to direct attention to a chart or table of progress on the accountability indicator and help the reader understand its relationship to the Advantage Wisconsin strategy.  To that end, the chart or table would be larger and more prominent; and the goal statement for the indicator would be clearly and simply stated, along with the status: “Achieved”, “Not Achieved” or “Mixed Performance”.  Text would be kept to a minimum.

On the right side of the page, a sidebar would list related information for specific groups of students or ways that the UW System is working to achieve progress on the accountability indicator. 

Ms. Wilhelm then outlined proposed accountability indicators, along with examples of related information, for each of the seven core strategies.  For the core strategy of Preparing Students, three existing indicators would be used:  Post-baccalaureate exams, critical thinking, and study-away experiences.  Related information would include information on students’ learning and multicultural experiences, along with study-away data by race/ethnicity.

The core strategy of More Graduates would have several indicators used in the past, including access for Wisconsin high school graduates, enrollments, retention rates, and graduation rates.  The new report would continue to show these indicators by race/ethnicity as well as for all students.  Degrees conferred would be a new indicator.  Over the next several months, retention and graduation rates would be discussed and new targets developed.  Many items from the old report would be included as related information, such as pre-college participation, distance education, academic advising, and Wisconsin’s educational attainment rate.

The core strategy of Well-Paying Jobs would have three indicators:  Increasing research funding, which formerly was included in the accountability report; contribution to the Wisconsin economy, one of the performance measures which estimates the impact on earnings of bachelors degree recipients compared to high school graduates; and degrees in high-need and leading-edge fields, which would be a new indicator showing the link between academic programs and areas of projected economic growth.

The core strategy of Stronger Communities would have two indicators: Civic participation of students and community outreach and education efforts.  Over the coming months, work would be done with UW-Extension and others to determine the best ways to measure the latter efforts.

The core strategy of Resources would include growing the university’s financial resources, and the proposed indicator of reporting total revenue would be a new indicator for the accountability report.  Given the importance of human resources to the university, the indicator of faculty and staff diversity, which was first included in the preceding year’s report, would continue to be utilized.

For the strategy of Operational Excellence, the proposed indicators would be continued from the past report, including administrative costs and credits to degree, which have been reported for many years, and energy efficiency, which was included for the first time in the preceding year’s report.

With regard to collaborations, one indicator that had been reported in the past is collaborative academic programs.  Other types of collaboration – with the K-12 system, with other agencies or with regional partnerships such as New North – are examples of collaborations that would be included under related information.  Student transfer from non-UW institutions and information on articulation agreements would be included as supporting evidence of collaboration with other higher education sectors.

Turning to institutional accountability reports, Ms. Wilhelm noted that they have consisted of several common indicators – enrollment, retention/graduation rates, student involvement, and credits to degree.  In addition, campuses chose indicators specific to their institutional missions and strategic planning processes.

For the spring 2009 report, the common indicators would be kept much the same. Campuses would be asked to review their institution-specific indicators in light of the Advantage Wisconsin strategic framework and could continue to use existing indicators or develop new ones as appropriate.  In addition, campuses involved in the Equity Scorecard initiative would be asked to include data from those activities in their reports.

Turning to the Voluntary System of Accountability, Ms. Wilhelm noted that it is a joint project of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC).  In 2006, the Lumina Foundation awarded a grant to AASCU and NASULGC to fund creation of an accountability system providing equivalent measures among public four-year institutions on a national scale. The purpose is to increase public understanding and to provide an equal basis for comparison to students, parents, government officials and other parties to whom public institutions of higher education are accountable.

In November 2007 the VSA Oversight Board was created; and that same month a letter was sent to that board indicating the UW System’s intention to participate in the VSA.  While the initiative on the national level focused initially on four-year schools, progress on development of a college portrait for two-year colleges remains a priority for the UW System.

The VSA’s College Portrait is divided into three sections:  Consumer Information, Student Experiences and Perceptions, and Student Learning Outcomes. The VSA’s timeframe for posting items to the College Portrait spans four years, providing campuses with time to implement additional surveys and learning outcomes assessments. 

The College Portraits can be found on the websites of UW campuses, and the national website lists VSA participants by state.  There also are links to each UW campus College Portrait through the UW System home page. 

Noting that the VSA provides valuable accountability information for all stakeholders, Ms. Wilhelm introduced Shari Ellertson for a description of UW-Stevens Points College Portrait.

Ms. Ellertson began her remarks by indicating that on the first page of the College Portrait there is an opportunity to provide introductory text for each campus.  There is information on enrollment characteristics and undergraduate success and progress, with more opportunity to provide customized information.   While the information would traditionally cover success and graduation from one institution, the College Portrait expands this framework to include graduation and enrollment at other institutions as well.

The second page provides more consumer information, including financial information and costs, including a college-cost calculator, which UW-Stevens Point developed to determine the net cost of attendance.  Also included is information on how many students receive financial aid and on degrees and areas of study. 

The third page provides information on the living and learning environment, including faculty composition, campus safety, Carnegie classification, and future plans of bachelor’s degree recipients. 

The second section, Student Perceptions and Experiences, involves one of four national surveys, the National Survey of Student Engagement being the one used in the UW System.  Included are the areas of active learning, student satisfaction, and engagement with faculty. 

The third section, Student Learning Outcomes, includes a customizable opportunity to explain how those outcomes are measured.  One of three instruments can be used to measure learning gains in critical thinking and communication skills.  This, Ms. Ellertson noted, is the most complicated section, with a four-year roll-out timeframe.  The information compiled by UW-Stevens Point showed significant gains in these areas.

Thanking Ms. Wilhelm, Ms. Ellertson and others for their hard work on this project,  President Reilly explained that the standardized format was developed in response to criticism that information about universities is available, but not easy to analyze or compare.  The format also is customizable, so that each institution can present what is unique to its campus.  The purpose of the College Portraits is to help students find what they want and need for a successful university experience.  The UW System, he said, is proud to be one of the first to sign on as participants; and the VSA is pleased with the work that has been done by the UW.

Regent Bartell asked if the UW-Stevens Point portrait included information on study-abroad programs and participation, to which Ms. Ellertson replied that the information, while not included in the portrait, is provided through a link to the university’s website.

Regent Crain remarked that it is important to show retention and graduation rates of people of poverty.  She asked about progress in that regard, to which Ms. Wilhelm answered that, using Pell Grant eligibility to identify students of poverty, that information could be provided.

In response to a question by Regent Vasquez, Ms. Ellertson said that the VSA policy is that the College Portrait must be within one click of the university’s home page and that UW-Stevens Point’s can be found under “Future Students”.  Ms. Wilhelm added that there will be links to the College Portraits in a variety of places.

Chancellor Wells indicated that a national marketing effort for the VSA has been urged to make the public aware of the College Portraits.

Regent Smith asked if there is any information available on what graduates do after graduation and what they earn,  noting that students and parents would find that information helpful.   Ms. Ellertson replied that UW-Stevens Point collects such information through a survey and has suggested to the VSA that it be added to the College Portraits.    

In reply to a question by Regent Cuene about the assessment portion of the portrait, Ms. Ellertson explained that, for the customizable section, there is a link to the university’s assessment website, which may be expanded.  For the common measure, UW-Stevens Point would use the College Assessment of Proficiency.

Regent Davis inquired about the timeline for revising the Accountability Report and how the Regents would be engaged in that activity.  In reply, Ms. Wilhelm indicated that the spring 2009 report would be transitional and would provide an opportunity for Regent feedback.  The 2010 report was expected to be in the new form.  Noting that the Achieving Excellence format had been used for eight years, she added that it was modified as needed over time.

Regent Loftus inquired about adding the indicator of “total revenue” under the category of “resources”.  Vice President Debbie Durcan explained that, to meet the goals of the Growth Agenda, more than state resources will be needed and that growth in various sources of revenue might vary from year to year.  Regent Loftus asked if the goal would be to increase total revenue, rather than state support specifically, and Ms. Durcan replied that total revenue could be used as a starting point and refined in the future.

President Reilly added that more students must be enrolled and graduated to achieve Growth Agenda goals.  Success will require making best use of all revenue sources, along with driving down costs in a variety of ways.    

Regent Falbo requested information on unfunded cost per student. 

Stating the Board’s pride in the transparency of the Accountability Report, Regent President Bradley asked what is measured in the area of critical thinking.  Ms. Ellertson replied that, at UW-Stevens Point, it is defined as the ability to analyze, summarize, and expand on an argument.  President Reilly added that the instruments used for these measures are new and would require refinement.

The discussion concluded and the meeting was adjourned at 11:35 a.m.
Submitted by: Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Stevens Point, Wisconsin

UW-Stevens Point
Held in the Dreyfus University Center
Friday, October 3, 2008
9:00 a.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

 
Approval of Minutes of August 21 and 22, 2008 Meetings
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report.
Thanks to UW-Stevens Point
Visit to Wisconsin Congressional Delegation..
Wisconsin Taxpayers’ Alliance Report
November Meeting Agenda
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Letters to Candidates
Update on Growth Agenda Action Steps
#8:  Expand UW-Madison Connections Program
#10:  New Wisconsin Idea Public Policy Forums
Higher Education Day
Introductions
Christine Quinn, Provost and Vice Chancellor, UW-Extension
Stephen H. Kolison, Jr., Associate Vice President for Academic and Faculty Programs, UW System Administration
Walter Zakahi, American Council on Education (ACE) Leadership Fellow
Reports on UW System Chancellor Search and Selection Process
UW-Eau Claire Marching Band Performs at Lambeau Field
Malcolm Brett Elected to Public Broadcasting Service National Board of Directors
UW-Parkside Student Voting Initiative
Increase in International Students
UW-Oshkosh Becomes Fair Trade University
UW-Richland Partnership with Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture
Wisconsin Transfer Equity and Accountability Study
Professor Richard Masters’ Design Selected for New U.S. Penny
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE
UW-Stevens Point Presentation: Leading From the Center to Create a Safe Campus
Trust Funds
2008 Proxy Season Voting Results
Acceptance of Bequests over $50,000
Committee Business
Approval of 2009-11 Biennial Budget Performance Measures
Roles and Responsibilities of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee
4th Quarter Gifts, Grants, and Contracts
Report of the Vice President
Consent Agenda
UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of Bequests
UW System 2009-11 Biennial Budget Performance Measures
REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
UW-Stevens Point:  Authority to Adjust Budget of Waste Management Center
UW-Stout: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust Project Budget and Construct Hovlid Hall Renovation and Addition Project
UW System:  Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects.
UW-Whitewater:  Authority to Construct Softball Bleachers Portion of Multi-sport Phase III Project
Consent Agenda
Authority to Adjust the Budget for the Waste Management Center project, UW-Stevens Point
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Hovlid Hall Renovation and Addition Project, UW-Stout
Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System
Authority to Construct the Softball Bleachers Portion of the Multi-Sport Phase III Project, UW-Whitewater
UW System:  Six Year Physical Development Plan
UW Colleges:  Annual Report of City and County Financial Support
Report of the Associate Vice President
Building Commission Actions
Streamlining Capital Planning Process
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
UW-Stevens Point – Leading from the Center:  Academic Programs to Advantage Central Wisconsin
Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapters UWS 17 and 18
Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapters UWS 17 & 18
Report of the Senior Vice President
Update on Waukesha County Educational Needs
Plan 2008 and Inclusive Excellence Timeline.
Consent Agenda
Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Reappointments
ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS
Resolution of Appreciation: UW-Stevens Point
Closed Session


 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Stevens Point, Wisconsin

 

UW-Stevens Point
Held in the Dreyfus University Center
October 3, 2008
9:00 a.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

PRESENT:  Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Elizabeth Burmaster, Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, Mary Cuene, Danae Davis, Michael Falbo, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Colleene Thomas, José Vásquez, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents John Drew and Thomas Loftus

- - -

Approval of Minutes of August 21 and 22, 2008 Meetings
Upon motion by Regent Walsh, seconded by Regent Vásquez, the minutes of the August 21 and 22, 2008 meetings of the Board of Regents were approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report
A written report was provided.

Thanks to UW-Stevens Point
Regent President Bradley began by thanking Chancellor Bunnell, the UW-Stevens Point community and the many students who contributed their time to welcome Regents and other meeting participants.

Visit to Wisconsin Congressional Delegation
Reporting on the annual trip that he and President Reilly made to visit the Wisconsin Congressional Delegation, Regent President Bradley said that he had been very impressed by the members’ knowledge of the UW campuses in their districts. 

They shared a letter with each member, signed by Presidents Bradley, Reilly and all the chancellors, urging their support for full funding of the America COMPETES Act, which calls for significant federal investment in research in the physical sciences and engineering. 

They also discussed the impact of closing the General Motors plant in Janesville and some campus efforts, especially by UW-Rock County, to alleviate the impacts of this closing. 

In their visit with Senator Russ Feingold, they were joined by Chancellor Carlos Santiago for a discussion of the Senator’s interest in water issues and the role that might be played, particularly by UW-Milwaukee, in addressing some of those challenges.

In meeting with Congressman David Obey, Regent President Bradley extended to him an invitation to address the Board of Regents, perhaps in November or February,  about the direction of higher education in today’s society.

These meetings, Regent President Bradley remarked, are as important on the federal level as they are on the state level to maintaining solid and positive relationships needed to move the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin forward.

Wisconsin Taxpayers’ Alliance Report

Regent President Bradley reported that the Wisconsin Taxpayers’ Alliance, a nonpartisan state budget watchdog, recently released a study showing that Wisconsin lagged behind all other states except one in providing funding increases for higher education over the last five years.

In response, the Wisconsin State Journal ran an editorial that called on the state not to “skimp” on higher education.  It went on to say:  “Budget constraints demand that Wisconsin control spending.  But if the state is to enjoy the growth that generates jobs, boosts incomes and pours revenue into government budgets, it cannot let its support for higher education continue to sag.” 

Stating that the UW’s message has traction among the business community and others, President Reilly noted the thick binder that has been compiled of letters and editorials of support from all over the state for the Growth Agenda. 

November Meeting Agenda
President Bradley reported that the November Board meeting would be a one-day meeting for in-depth discussion of two major issues, without need to take action at that time. 

One topic would be the “graying” of the faculty and resulting problems with academic workforce recruitment and retention - - a topic increasingly relevant because over 50% of UW faculty and instructional staff are age 50 and older, which will result in significant numbers of retirements in coming years.

The second subject would relate to professional doctorates and the issue of  the comprehensive universities being able to meet student needs by offering such degrees. 

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Letters to Candidates
President Kevin Reilly reported that letters were being sent to all state legislative candidates to provide them with information about the UW System and about the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  The letters also directed them to additional information about initiatives in their areas and highlighted the UW System’s efforts to be a lean and efficient steward of its resources.

Update on Growth Agenda Action Steps
            Stating his appreciation for the commitment and energy that faculty, staff, and students from around the System have been contributing to turn these ideas into reality, President Reilly introduced Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin to provide an update.

#8:  Expand UW-Madison Connections Program
Announcing that this step has been completed successfully, Vice President Martin invited Regent Davis, chair of the Education Committee, to make remarks regarding the presentation made to the committee the preceding day.

Noting that UW-Madison is not able to accommodate all of the academically strong students who apply for admission, Regent Davis indicated that the UW-Madison Connections program was developed to alleviate pressures on freshman enrollment by creating a dual-admission program between that campus and partner institutions. 

Through the program, selected UW-Madison freshman applicants who are Wisconsin residents are offered participation in the Connections program as an alternative to freshman enrollment on the UW- Madison campus.  These applicants are academically qualified for UW-Madison admission, but cannot be admitted directly because of space limitations on the size of the freshman class. 

The program was piloted in 2001, in partnership with four UW Colleges.  Over time, it was expanded to include all 13 UW Colleges, three Wisconsin Technical Colleges, and the College of the Menominee Nation.  The program then was expanded further to include any of the UW comprehensive institutions that wish to participate; and, beginning this fall, UW-Green Bay will join the program.  Four additional comprehensive campuses planned to participate in fall 2009:  UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Stout. 

The Connections program, Regent Davis remarked, is a promising way to ensure that Wisconsin will enroll more of its best students and graduate them with baccalaureate degrees, as well as enhance access to the sought-after Madison campus.

#10:  New Wisconsin Idea Public Policy Forums
Senior Vice President Martin reported that framing for this initiative and the larger core strategy of Stronger Communities occurred at a recent Wingspread Conference sponsored by UW Colleges and UW-Extension, titled “Rethinking the Civic Mission of Public Higher Education in Wisconsin”. 

David Wilson, Chancellor of the UW Colleges and UW-Extension, reported that 40 state leaders – regents, legislators, UW chancellors, leaders of the Technical Colleges and independent colleges and universities, and corporate CEO’s - engaged in extensive dialogue on renewing the Wisconsin Idea, with the product to serve as a national model on civic engagement.  A report, to be published by Wingspread, will be presented to President Reilly and then to the Board of Regents. 

Dr. Martin indicated that public policy forums will grow out of this beginning, with the first ones to be at UW-Eau Claire, UW-Madison and the UW Colleges/UW-Extension. 

Higher Education Day
Reporting on plans for Higher Education Day on October 7th, President Reilly indicated that the day provides an opportunity for educational institutions to assist Wisconsin students in focusing on how to reach their goals.  It is the third year that the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, and higher education institutions have collaborated in this important celebration.

Higher Education Day, the President remarked, is an additional tool to continue the important work of spreading the word throughout communities across Wisconsin about the value of a college education – a key message in the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  In past years, UW’s involvement included opportunities for students, families, and state leaders to visit campuses and open houses held by financial aid offices to help people better understand that complex topic.

This year, the UW would have an even larger role.  For the first time, the KnowHow2GO campaign would participate, partnering with EdVest, the state’s college savings program, to present a video contest for Wisconsin students in grades 7 through 10.  The students would create videos dramatizing one of the four KnowHow2GO to college steps:  1) Be a pain and let everyone know of your intention to go to college; 2) push yourself; 3) find the right fit; and 4) get your hands on some cash.  Contest winners would receive EdVest scholarships.

The UW also joined with Higher Education Day partners to produce a power-point presentation about higher education opportunities in Wisconsin that could be used by school guidance counselors across the state to provide students and families with information on Wisconsin’s post-secondary institutions, along with an overview of what students need to do to succeed in achieving their college dreams.  The presentation would be available year-round on the Treasurer’s Higher Education Day website. 

Introductions
Christine Quinn, Provost and Vice Chancellor, UW-Extension
President Reilly welcomed Provost Quinn, who came to Wisconsin from Minnesota, where she served as Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs at Winona State University.  She earned her undergraduate and master’s degrees in Education and Vocational Rehabilitation from UW-Madison and her Ph.D from the University of Minnesota.  She has more than 20 years of experience in higher education, including several years as a faculty member and department chair at UW-Stout.

Stephen H. Kolison, Jr., Associate Vice President for Academic and Faculty Programs, UW System Administration
President Reilly introduced Stephen Kolison, who had recently assumed the position of Associate Vice President following the retirement of Ron Singer.  With more than 17 years of experience as a faculty member and administrator, Dr. Kolison most recently served as Dean and Research Director for the Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Research at Tennessee State University.  He earned his doctorate in Forest Economics from Iowa State University, having completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Liberia.  His new role is to provide leadership and support in planning, development, and review of academic and research efforts in the UW System.

Walter Zakahi, American Council on Education (ACE) Leadership Fellow
Introducing Walter Zakahi, President Reilly noted that the ACE fellowship is recognized as one of the most respected in the country.  Dr. Zakahi, who is Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences at New Mexico State University, would spend his time in UW System Administration studying the operation of higher education systems and working in the area of diversity.

Reports on UW System Chancellor Search and Selection Process
President Reilly recalled that on July 1, 2008, shortly after the failed search for a new Chancellor of UW-Parkside, he had announced that the UW System would undertake a detailed review of the procedures used to recruit, screen, and select chancellor candidates.  The results would be used to improve the process.

To lead the review, the UW System engaged Dr. Stephen R. Portch, Chancellor Emeritus of the University System of Georgia. Dr. Portch served for 18 years in the UW System in positions that included Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Chancellor of the UW Colleges and Professor of English. He has had extensive experience in managing high-level academic searches in Georgia and elsewhere around the country.

Indicating that Dr. Portch had completed his review, President Reilly summarized the report’s recommendations for Regent reaction and advice.   With regard to reference checking, Dr. Portch suggested that the System President and/or members of the Board visit the home campus of lead candidates to conduct scheduled or unscheduled interviews. On one hand, the President remarked, doing so could provide deeper insights than could be obtained from telephone interviews.  On the other hand, there would be significant cost in terms of both time and money; and some qualified candidates, including sitting chancellors and presidents, could be discouraged from applying by the prospect of this kind of intensive scrutiny.  For example, visits to one candidate’s institution might prompt others to withdraw, rather than risk being perceived as a second choice.

With regard to responsibilities of the external search consultant, Dr. Portch recommended consistent involvement during the final phases of the selection process, as has been done in some past searches, to ensure that UW leaders benefit fully from this outside advice.  Information gaps would be closed by more clearly identifying which reference checks are to be performed by the campus search and screen committee, the external consultant, and the UW System President and how that information is to be shared with others.

Dr. Portch also suggested that the external consultant be selected jointly by the chair of the Special Regent Committee, the UW System President, and the faculty chair of the institutional search and screen committee.  Stating that this recommendation would be implemented, President Reilly said that, along with more explicit written guidelines concerning the consultant’s responsibilities, the joint selection process would clarify lines of communication and accountability, helping to ensure that information is shared appropriately with all key decision makers.

Another suggestion by Dr. Portch was to consider a blended search committee that would combine membership from the currently separate campus and Regent committees.  In that regard, President Reilly noted that Regent policy provides for the System President to appoint an institutional search and screen committee with majority faculty membership and that addition of Regent membership could cause the committee to become quite large.  He also pointed out that Regent involvement in the recruitment and screening phases would require a significantly greater time commitment from Board members than serving on special Regent committees to review the finalists.

Finally, Dr. Portch suggested creating a “relatively high level position in the President’s office to oversee all chancellor searches”, as has been done by some other universities, or to employ a second consultant as an “owner’s representative” in the process.  President Reilly’s reaction was to doubt that the cost of such a position could be justified.  However, he did want to explore additional ways to gain more hands-on oversight and information exchange throughout the process.

In conclusion, he noted Chancellor Portch’s assessment that:  “The UW System policies and procedures are sound, thorough, and specific.  However, the changing search environment suggests some revisions may be helpful and timely.”

In discussion following the President’s remarks, Regent Davis inquired about the rationale for a blended committee, to which President Reilly replied that the purpose would be to have all perspectives, including those of Regents, at the table from the beginning and throughout the process.  Regent Davis noted that this also is the intent of the charging meeting that is held at the beginning of the search. 

Regent Falbo did not believe that the current level of Regent participation gives the Board enough background information to make a well-informed decision. 

Regent Crain thought that the large size of a blended committee would be a problem, and President Reilly raised the question of whether the blended committee would make recommendations to a special Regent committee or to the full Board.

Remarking that, over the years, the UW has had great success in hiring excellent chancellors, Regent Connolly-Keesler suggested that Regents might attend campus visits by candidates, rather than serving on the search committee, and could also participate in reference checking.

President Reilly agreed that attending campus visits might be helpful and added that, given Dr. Portch’s advice not to move too quickly through the final stages of the process, it would be possible to arrange for more Regent involvement in interviewing references.  However, he cautioned that it is possible to lose candidates to other searches if too much time is taken.

Agreeing that the process should not be rushed and should be better controlled, Regent Vasquez did not support creation of a blended search committee.  In that regard, he thought it healthy for the faculty, staff and other members to analyze candidates from their perspective, rather than adding Regent perspectives at that time.

President Reilly added that it is necessary to align hiring recommendations with Regent meeting dates; otherwise, special Board or Executive Committee meetings would be needed.

Regent Falbo felt that all involved should have better knowledge of their responsibilities.  If blended search committees were not formed, he suggested that it be a responsibility of the Special Regent Committee to attend some of the campus visits and become better informed about the candidates.  He urged further consideration of employing a professional representative, internally or on-call.  The value that such a professional could bring to the process, he felt, should be viewed as a saving, rather than a cost.  Finally, he said that he would like to see UW provosts apply for chancellorships at other UW institutions.  He understood, however, that the process might inhibit doing that successfully.

President Reilly indicated that search firms can be more effectively used and their responsibilities can be better formalized.

Regent Vásquez agreed with Regent Connolly-Keesler’s idea and suggested that attending campus presentations be made a requirement for special Regent committee members.  He suggested periodic auditing to make sure that searches are going well, rather than close oversight on a daily basis. 

Regent Smith remarked that, while some fine-tuning would be helpful, the search and selection process generally has worked very well.  In his experience, interviews with finalists are only part of the decision-making process.  Other elements involve what the campus search committee has done and campus views about the candidates, as well as results of internet searches and reference interviews. Regent committee members, therefore, have a great deal of information available when the time comes to make a decision.

Regent Crain agreed with the idea of Regent committee members attending candidate forums on campus, not as participants, but as observers, although she did not think that all members should be required to attend all sessions.  Noting that there were two searches currently under way, she asked that any changes to the process be made promptly.

Regent Spector commented that telephone calls could not be as informative as talking in person to people in person.  He hoped that option would be kept available for use if needed.  President Reilly agreed that it might be helpful in certain circumstances.

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago remarked that, in order to encourage sitting presidents to become candidates, public universities increasingly are discontinuing open campus visits by finalists.  Instead, the board meets with a number of top candidates and announces the choice of one finalist who then is presented to the campus.

UW-Stevens Point Chancellor Linda Bunnell recalled that, when she served as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs in the Minnesota system, she chaired all of the chancellor search committees as the representative of the board.  In that capacity, she advised the board about the strengths and weaknesses of the candidates. 

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joe Gow observed that allowing the campus to take the lead in the search lends a sense of legitimacy to the process that might be lacking if only one finalist were presented.  While he would not change a process that has worked well because of one unusual case, he felt that better training of the campus search committee would be helpful.

UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells remarked that the position of chancellor or president is unique and not well understood by members of search committees.  He suggested adding chancellors to the committees as non-voting members.

Noting that he had participated in 24 such searches, UW-Green Bay Interim Chancellor David J. Ward agreed that the UW System’s process has worked well overall.  He pointed out, however, that chancellorships today are less attractive than they once were, resulting in more reliance on consultants to recruit candidates.  He suggested that a standard be set for limiting the number of searches in which a consultant could be involved.

Noting the many talented leaders already serving in the UW System, Regent Davis suggested that they be encouraged to apply for chancellorships at other UW institutions.           

UW-Parkside Interim Chancellor Lane Earns pointed out that many UW provosts had, over time, gone to chancellor or president positions in other states.  The problem, he felt, is the perception that a provost of another UW institution would bring the philosophy of that campus and would not understand the local environment.  Therefore, such candidates tend to be unfairly eliminated early in the competition.

While provosts have been encouraged to apply, President Reilly asked Senior Vice President Martin to discuss the matter with them again.  He also thought the charge to the campus search committees could include the benefits of considering such candidates, who generally are more knowledgeable about the institution than candidates from other states.   

UW-Extension and UW Colleges Chancellor David Wilson added that he, too, had been struck by the number of UW campus leaders, including UW College deans, who go to other states and their absence from Wisconsin searches.  The in-state talent pool, he said, should not be overlooked and might contribute to longer tenure among chancellors.

Regent Vásquez suggested that the Regent committee could send a message encouraging UW leaders to apply. Chancellors could help to reassure the campus search committees that such candidates, if chosen, would not try to replicate their former institutions.

Regent Pruitt added that nontraditional candidates, as well as internal candidates, should be encouraged to apply. 

Agreeing that the current process has worked well, Regent Walsh observed that public transparency makes it more difficult to assemble a pool of well-qualified candidates, resulting in more reliance on consultants.  He suggested more careful vetting of possible consultants, including discussions with schools they recently served.  With respect to vetting of candidates, he commented that there is no substitute for due diligence and that face-to-face interviews are important.  Steps should be taken, he said, to improve and expand the pool and more time should be taken at the end of the process for due diligence.

UW-Parkside Interim Provost Jerry Greenfield agreed that campus search and screen committees should be better educated about the position of chancellor, about consideration of candidates from other UW institutions, and about the role and responsibility of members of the committee.  He noted that external candidates sometimes do not apply if it is known that there is a strong internal candidate.

President Reilly added that it not only is important to choose the right search firm, but to choose the right consultant within that firm.

On the basis of the foregoing discussion, he intended to:

  1. Make the suggested changes to the search guidelines
  2. Schedule a telephone call with the chairs of the UW-River Falls and UW-Green Bay committees
  3. Restart the UW-Parkside search
  4. Consult with Regent leadership about the larger recommendations that were discussed and provide the Board with his thoughts on those matters.

Thanking all for the discussion, Regent President Bradley noted that hiring of Chancellors is among the most important of the Board’s duties.  He also expressed appreciation to Stephen Portch for his thoughtful review.

Regent Spector asked if Erroll Davis, the current Chancellor of the University System of Georgia and former UW System Regent, might be invited to speak to the Board.  Noting that he and Mr. Davis are both active members of the National Association of System Heads, President Reilly indicated that Mr. Davis might be invited in conjunction with presentation of diversity awards that he endowed.

UW-Eau Claire Marching Band Performs at Lambeau Field
President Reilly reported that the 230-member Blugold Marching Band performed for 71,000 fans at Lambeau Field for the Green Bay Packers’ season-opener against the Minnesota Vikings – the second time they had that honor.  The band is the largest marching band of any NCAA Division III institution.  

Malcolm Brett Elected to Public Broadcasting Service National Board of Directors
President Reilly congratulated Malcolm Brett, Director of Broadcasting and Media Innovations at UW-Extension, on having been elected to the Public Broadcasting Service National Board of Directors. 

UW-Parkside Student Voting Initiative
It was reported by President Reilly that UW-Parkside’s student government had recently launched its “Voter Initiative: Parkside” project.  Efforts include speeches by local leaders and transportation for voters to the clerk’s office to cast ballots.

Increase in International Students
Noting that an objective of the Growth Agenda is to increase access and encourage diversity in the student population, President Reilly reported that several campuses have experienced growing numbers of international students.  For example, UW-Whitewater was welcoming its largest ever international population – 150 students – coming from across the world, including Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom.

UW-Oshkosh Becomes Fair Trade University
Reporting that UW-Oshkosh recently became the first university in the United States to be designated a Fair Trade University, President Reilly noted that the intent of the fair trade movement is to support production that offers farmers and artisans a living wage and humane working conditions, while also protecting the environment. About 70 universities in Europe have Fair Trade University status.

To become a Fair Trade University, UW-Oshkosh’s four governing bodies endorsed a resolution that among its provisions called for selling fair-trade certified coffee, tea, and chocolate in university dining establishments whenever feasible; offering fair-trade certified food products and handicrafts at university stores, and encouraging students, faculty and staff to purchase these items.  The program will be overseen by the new Campus Sustainability Council. 

UW-Richland Partnership with Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture
President Reilly reported a new educational alliance between UW-Richland and the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture in Spring Green.  Under the agreement, students who spend their freshman and sophomore years at UW-Richland and earn their Associate of Arts and Science Degrees can apply to the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture as juniors and earn Bachelor of Architectural Studies Degrees. 

Wisconsin Transfer Equity and Accountability Study
It was reported by President Reilly that the UW System is participating in a new study on how to increase the number of minority students who transfer into bachelor’s degree programs – an objective that promotes the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  The study, a collaboration between the UW, the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS), and the University of Southern California Center for Urban Education, has been funded by the Ford Foundation in the amount of $535,000.

Goals include increased access for racial and ethnic minorities to the UW Colleges and then transfer of those students from the UW Colleges and the WTCS to four-year institutions.  Teams of faculty, staff, and administrators will inquire into transfer policies and practices with a focus on how to achieve parity in successful transfer outcomes across racial and ethnic groups.
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Professor Richard Masters’ Design Selected for New U.S. Penny
President Reilly congratulated UW-Oshkosh Art Professor Richard Masters, whose design featuring Abraham Lincoln’s log cabin had been selected as one of four designs for the new U.S. penny.  The coins will be released into circulation on Lincoln’s 200th birthday – February 12, 2009.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE
Regent Smith, chair, presented the committee’s report

UW-Stevens Point Presentation: Leading From the Center to Create a Safe Campus
The committee heard a presentation on actions that UW-Stevens Point has taken to ensure a safe campus, including hiring of additional police officers and counselors, arming of police officers, communication system upgrades, and educational sessions for faculty.  The university also planned to coordinate emergency notification with surrounding neighborhoods. 

The committee was impressed with the progress made by UW-Stevens Point in implementing the recommendations of the President’s Campus Security Commission and looked forward to a status report from other campuses on their progress.

Trust Funds
2008 Proxy Season Voting Results
            The committee heard a report on 2008 results proxy voting of shareholder proposals, as addressed in Regent policy.  In 2007, categories that received support included:  expand or report on fair employment policies; disclose and monitor political contributions; report on sustainability; and track and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

Acceptance of Bequests over $50,000
The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda a resolution to accept eight bequests, with a total value of $2.8 million, primarily benefitting UW-Madison.

Committee Business
Approval of 2009-11 Biennial Budget Performance Measures
The committee approved, for inclusion in the consent agenda, goals and targets for 2009-11 biennial budget performance measures, including targeted enrollment growth of more than 4,000 FTE over fall 2007 enrollments, a retention rate of 82%, an overall System graduation rate of 65%, and continuing to increase the UW’s contributions to the Wisconsin economy each year.

Roles and Responsibilities of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee
Primary responsibilities typically assumed by Business, Finance, and Audit committees in higher education were discussed.  These include establishing financial controls and managing risk, managing an open budget process, developing tuition policies and rates, connecting capital project planning and debt financing decisions, and ensuring that an active and transparent audit process is in place. 

The committee discussed a memo by Tom Anderes, Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs, and considered several reporting options and the Board’s need for financial information to ensure that institutions are meeting their goals.

4th Quarter Gifts, Grants, and Contracts
Vice President Debbie Durcan reported to the committee that total gift, grant and contract awards for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2008 were $1.2 billion, a decrease of $83.2 million from the previous year.  Federal awards decreased $47.5 million, while non-federal awards decreased $35.7 million.  The decreases in federal research awards were due primarily to timing issues.  Gift funding for the Microbial Sciences Building at UW-Madison in the preceding year accounted for the decline in non-federal awards in 2007-08.

Report of the Vice President
Vice President Durcan updated the committee on recently submitted reports required by statute, including the Auxiliary Reserves Report, Using Continuing Appropriation Authority to Serve Adult Students, and Base Salary Adjustments to Recognize Competitive Factors.

Consent Agenda
Adoption by the Board of Resolutions 9549 and 9550 as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Davis, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of Bequests

Resolution 9549: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the bequests detailed on the attached list be accepted for the purposes designated by the donors, or where unrestricted by the donors, by the benefiting institution, and that the Trust Officer or Assistant Trust Officers be authorized to sign receipts and do all things necessary to effect  the transfers for the benefit of the University of Wisconsin.

Let it be herewith further resolved, that the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, the Deans and Chairs of the benefiting Colleges and Departments, the President, and the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, express their sincere thanks and appreciation to the donors and their families for their generosity and their devotion to the values and ideals represented by the University of Wisconsin System.  These gifts will be used to sustain and further the quality and scholarship of the University and its students.

UW System 2009-11 Biennial Budget Performance Measures

Resolution 9550: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the specified goals and respective targets for the 2009-11 Biennial Budget Performance Measures.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
Regent Bartell, chair, presented the committee’s report.

UW-Stevens Point:  Authority to Adjust Budget of Waste Management Center
The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda a request to adjust the budget of the UW-Stevens Point waste management center project to a total of $4.4 million.  The facility, the first of its kind built at a university or technical college in Wisconsin, would feature a pilot wastewater treatment plant, a composting lab, a microbiology lab, and an adjoining recycling center that would offer training opportunities in materials recycling. 

Originally enumerated at $2.5 million in the 2005-07 budget, it became clear early in the process that it would not be feasible to construct the facility as a pre-engineered metal building, as initially directed.  The budget increase was caused by inflation and the need to reprogram to a design more suitable to the facility’s purpose. 

UW-Stout: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust Project Budget and Construct Hovlid Hall Renovation and Addition Project
The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda a resolution granting authority to increase the project budget and construct the Hovlid Hall renovation and addition project, which would renovate space in this north campus building, constructed in 1960, to provide modern double occupancy resident rooms, expanded restrooms, modern kitchen and lounge areas, and food service facilities.  The budget increase would be needed because of construction inflation and an increase in the scope of the project to include a larger food service component.

The $12.4 million project was originally enumerated at $8 million in the 2005-07 budget.  It was noted that flaws in the state capital budget planning process and timing would continue to cause the need for budget increases until the process is reformed.

UW System:  Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects
The committee adopted for inclusion in the consent agenda a resolution approving construction of seven minor projects under the all agency maintenance fund program, including the UW-Madison Walnut Street Heating Plant chiller replacement project that would replace two steam driven chillers with two new electric chillers and increase the chilled water capacity of the plant substantially.  The debt serve would be paid from annual energy cost savings from the fuel and utilities appropriation, with an expected payback of less than seven years.

UW-Whitewater:  Authority to Construct Softball Bleachers Portion of Multi-sport Phase III Project
The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda a resolution granting authority to construct the softball bleachers portion of the multi-sport phase III project.  The campus requested construction of this portion of the larger project so that the bleachers would be in place by spring of 2009.  It would be funded by $3.5 million in program revenue supported borrowing and gift funds.

Consent Agenda
Adoption by the Board of the following resolutions as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Bartell, seconded by Regent Vasquez and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

Authority to Adjust the Budget for the Waste Management Center project, UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9551:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to adjust the budget for the Waste Management Center project by an increase of $2,655,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing–UW Infrastructure, for a total estimated project cost of $4,444,000 ($1,789,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing and $2,655,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing-UW Infrastructure).

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Hovlid Hall Renovation and Addition Project, UW-Stout

Resolution 9552: That, upon the recommendation of the of the UW-Stout Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to (a) increase the budget by $3,830,000 ($1,580,000 Residual Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, and $2,250,000 Program Revenue-Cash), and (b) construct the Hovlid Hall Renovation and Addition project at an estimated total project cost of $12,400,000 ($8,570,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $1,580,000 Residual Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, and $2,250,000 Program Revenue-Cash).

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9553:  That, upon the recommendation of the of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to Authority to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $14,637,000 ($896,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $350,000 Agency Funds; $11,748,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; $530,000 Program Revenue Cash; and $1,113,000 Gift and Grant Funds). 

Authority to Construct the Softball Bleachers Portion of the Multi-Sport Phase III Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9554: That, upon the recommendation of the of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to revise the funding for the Multi-Sport Phase III project by an increase of $172,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and a decrease of $172,000 Gifts Funds and construct the bleacher portion of the project for $172,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.  The total project cost is revised to $3,474,000 ($172,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $3,302,000 Gift Funds).

UW System:  Six Year Physical Development Plan
Associate Vice President David Miller presented the six-year plan that represented the 2009-15 capital budget priorities for the 15 UW institutions for the next three biennia.  The purpose of this comprehensive planning document was to allow the UW institutions, Board of Regents, Department of Administration, Legislature and other policy makers to better understand and manage facility needs.  The plan would remain flexible to accommodate changing needs.

The plan provided considerable detail about projects requested for funding in 2009-11 and less for projects to be funded in later years.  It also identified several complex projects for pre-design and advance enumeration in order to achieve a well-developed building program, conceptual layout, schedule and budget.

It was requested that copies of the plan be provided to all Regents.

UW Colleges:  Annual Report of City and County Financial Support
UW Colleges and UW-Extension Vice Chancellor Steve Wildeck reported to the committee that counties and local municipalities contribute about $7.9 million annually for financial support of the UW Colleges, furnishing the facilities for the colleges, which have an ensured value of $32 million.

The committee expressed appreciation for this very important partnership and for the generous contributions of local entities.

Report of the Associate Vice President
Building Commission Actions
Associate Vice President Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $71 million for projects at its September meeting.

Streamlining Capital Planning Process
Reporting on efforts to improve the capital planning process, Mr. Miller discussed construction project delivery methods, including whether the state hires a single prime contractor, a construction manager at risk, or multi-prime contractors.  It was indicated that most in the private sector use a single prime contractor and that use of multi-prime contractors is not considered cost effective.  Some progress has been made in this area.

Another area involves scope and budget uncertainty resulting from an 8-10 year timeframe for projects.  By the time the project reaches the bidding stage, costs have changed substantially; and it therefore is necessary to make large adjustments.  It was hoped that there would be recommendations for improvements in this area. 

In discussion at the Board meeting, Regent Spector inquired about selection of architects; and Associate Vice President Miller explained that selection is done by a seven-member committee – five from the Division of State Facilities and two from the university.  Decisions are criteria based, but subjective, with use of a point system and preference for Wisconsin architects.

Noting that campus buildings mean a great deal to alumni and other supporters, Regent Spector suggested that money might be raised in order to give the buildings a more distinctive appearance without costing more taxpayer dollars.

Regent Connolly-Keesler added that endowments should be created to maintain new buildings so that they do not deteriorate and cause a situation that would disappoint donors.

UW-Platteville Chancellor David Markee added that campuses do a good job of maintaining such buildings, but must reallocate and cut elsewhere in order to do so.  With gift-funded facilities, he added, there is more flexibility in architect selection and building materials.

Regent Vásquez reported that his experience in the non-profit sector had been that donors are willing to give money to construct a building, but not for maintenance.

Regent Connolly-Keesler said that an endowment for maintenance should be made part of the fund-raising campaign, with the understanding that it is for future protection of the investment.

UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells indicated that it is more difficult for the comprehensive universities to raise money for construction or an endowment than it is for an institution like UW-Madison.  With regard to selection of architects, he noted that the university has a minority of votes on the committee and that other members often are concerned about whether a new building will “fit in” with existing facilities – many of them from the 1960’s building boom when little attention was paid to interesting architecture.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Regent Davis presented the committee’s report.

UW-Stevens Point – Leading from the Center:  Academic Programs to Advantage Central Wisconsin
Provost Mark Nook spoke to the committee about the five academic programming areas on which the campus will focus as it develops its Growth Agenda and Vision 2015.  They include: 

  1. The Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology
  2. The Health Sciences
  3. Business and Economics
  4. New Media Development
  5. International programs

Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapters UWS 17 and 18
Jane Radue, Assistant Director of the Office of Operations Review and Audit, and Chair of the Review Committee, provided an overview of the report and its key recommendations for amending the Chapters UWS 17 and 18.  She identified the following steps in the administrative rulemaking process:

  1. The UW System reviews the rules and proposes changes.
  2. Recommended revisions are submitted to the Legislative Council Rules Clearinghouse for review
  3. The Board will conduct a public hearing, following which the proposed rules may be revised. 
  4. The draft rules are then submitted to the Legislature for review and hearings, as needed.
  5. The goal is to have the revised rules promulgated and in effect at all UW institutions by fall 2009.

The Chapter 17 revisions sought to clarify, streamline, and improve the efficiency of the rules’ format, scope, educational sanctions, hearing process, and emergency suspension process. 

The Chapter 18 revisions sought to improve organization, update language and areas of conduct, and comport with new laws.

The committee had a long and complex discussion of the proposed revisions, during which many points of view were examined. 

Regent Thomas expressed a number of well thought-out concerns that she raised on behalf of students throughout the system with whom she spoke.  The Review Committee addressed many of those matters on a point by point basis. 

Regent Opgenorth asked that Chapter 18 be further amended to include enabling language for chancellors to enact campus-wide smoking bans and to impose fines for violations.  The UW-Platteville student government recently passed a non-binding resolution to make the campus smoke free. It was discovered afterwards, however, that state statutes do not permit imposition of a fine for this purpose.            

After extensive discussion and guidance from General Counsel Pat Brady, as well as Review Committee members, the committee decided not to further amend the rules at this time because of state statute limitations on regulating outdoor air, as well as the cumbersome process for amending the Administrative Code.  It became clear that adding other amendments would require further vetting, slow down the approval process, and prohibit promulgation by fall 2009.

Regent Davis stated the committee’s appreciation to Regent Opgenorth for raising the issue and assured him that an appropriate process would be determined for moving forward. 

Regent Loftus took issue with the proposal to allow disciplining of certain student behaviors if they impacted a “substantial university interest,” on the basis that such a provision is ambiguous and could be misused.  The Review Committee explained that the intent was for the term to have flexibility for each campus.

Regent Spector suggested an amendment to delete Section H from Section 17.10, so as to remove appeals of student suspensions from programs or majors from discretionary review by the Board of Regents; and the Education Committee approved that amendment.  It would remain possible to review suspensions or expulsions from the university.

On behalf of the Education Committee, Regent Davis commended the Review Committee for its fine work in balancing the rights of students with the need to ensure safety and adherence to the characteristics of the different UW campuses.  In particular, she acknowledged the work of Jane Radue, Anne Bilder, Dale Burke, and Jan Shepard.

Adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Davis and seconded by Regent Cuene:

Revisions to Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapters UWS 17 & 18

Resolution 9555:  That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Secretary of the Board of Regents and staff transmit the attached draft rules amending Chapters 17 and 18, Wisconsin Administrative Code, to the Legislative Council for review, pursuant to ch. 227, Wisconsin Statutes.

Regent Opgenorth considered permissive language regarding a smoking ban to be important given the health issue of second-hand smoke.  He noted that campuses would be allowed, but not required, to pursue such policies.

In response to a question by Regent Bartell, General Counsel Brady explained that, under state statutes, campuses do not have authority to impose fines for smoking outside, because state law deals with indoor, but not outdoor,  air.  Chancellors, however, would be free to encourage non-smoking in outdoor, as well as indoor, areas.

Chancellor Markee thought that, even without imposing fines, there would be progress toward compliance on a voluntary basis.

Regent Bartell agreed with the suggestion made by Regent Crain at the Education Committee meeting that a committee be formed to look at the issue as review of the draft rule revisions goes forward.

The question was put on Resolution 9555, and it was adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Report of the Senior Vice President
Update on Waukesha County Educational Needs

Senior Vice President Martin recalled that in June a report had been received from the Waukesha Higher Education Coalition, which was formed to bring together business, county, and public higher education partners in the region.  Included in the coalition was the Waukesha County Action Network (WCAN), which had been pressing for several years to increase baccalaureate and graduate degree offerings and to enhance workforce development in Waukesha County.  The report described ways in which coalition members have worked together and issued a set of recommendations.

In July, President Reilly, Chancellor Wilson, and Associate Vice President Singer met with WCAN Board representatives Margaret Farrow, Jose Delgado, and Bronson Haase.  A next step would be to pursue bringing the UW-Platteville engineering program to UW-Waukesha.  In that regard, WCAN would bring CEOs of engineering firms to the table to discuss local resources, needs, and commitments.  

Plan 2008 and Inclusive Excellence Timeline
Senior Vice President Martin reported the following:

  1. The Board would hear the final report on Plan 2008 at its one-day meeting in March 2009.
  2. Ten UW institutions are now participating in the Equity Scorecard project, which is producing excellent work and data that institutions can use to help underserved students.
  3. Last spring, the UW System made its first round of grants through a new program called “Closing the Achievement Gap”.  The goal is to develop and support programs that are effective in promoting institutional change to foster access and excellence for historically underrepresented populations.  A total of $300,000 was awarded in 2008-09 for a variety of projects.
  4. A report on the Climate Study would be made at the December meeting.


Consent Agenda
Upon motion by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Crain, the following resolution was adopted by the Board as a consent agenda item on a unanimous voice vote.

Wisconsin Partnership Program UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Reappointments

Resolution 9556:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the reappointments of Philip Farrell, David Kindig, and Gregory Nycz to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee for four-year terms beginning November 1, 2008 through October 31, 2012.

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ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS
Regent Burmaster presented the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation with a standing ovation of appreciation to UW-Stevens Point.

Resolution of Appreciation: UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9557:  WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System recognizes UW-Stevens Point’s leadership in the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, commending its  “Leading from the Center” initiative to increase the number of graduates and improve the home-grown business and industry environment of Central Wisconsin; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Linda Bunnell is marshaling the resources of the university to help meet the needs of Central Wisconsin through increased applied research activities in such critical areas as biofuel, aquaculture, nano-technology, and geographic information systems, while encouraging students to become engaged global citizens; and

WHEREAS, UW-Stevens Point’s presentations highlighted exciting new academic programs supporting the institution’s mission and economic development, including the new Health Sciences Program, which has student demand five times higher than initial expectations; and

WHEREAS, the Regents appreciated learning more about UW-Stevens Point’s participation in the Voluntary System of Accountability, a nationwide effort to offer comparable university data to students and the public, and to measure enhanced student learning; and

WHEREAS, the Regents were refreshed by a brisk morning tour of the campus’s beautiful 275-acre nature reserve, alight with fall color, and enjoyed world-class entertainment sponsored by the campus partnership with Sentry Insurance to promote the arts, which has inspired talented young people throughout the region; and 

WHEREAS, UW-Stevens Point is at the forefront of sustainability, fostering the emerging Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology – a collaborative research, teaching, and outreach center that will act as an economic development center for the region;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks Chancellor Linda Bunnell and the entire UW-Stevens Point community for graciously hosting this October 2008 meeting, showcasing the exciting educational, cultural, and economic activities emanating from the heart of Wisconsin.

Chancellor Bunnell thanked Stephen Ward, Executive Director for External Relations, for his leadership and creativity in making arrangements for these meetings. 
To President Reilly, she presented a gift of running socks and to Regent President Bradley, she presented a print, titled “The Regent” by master woodcut artist Ray Gloeckler. 

The meeting was recessed at 11:45 a.m. and reconvened at 11:50 a.m.

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Closed Session
The following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt, was adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Womack, Walsh, Vásquez, Pruitt, Falbo, Davis, Cuene, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Burmaster, and Bradley (11) voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions. 

Resolution 9558:  That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider UW-Madison Honorary Degree nominations, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending and potential litigation, as permitted by 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats..

The meeting was adjourned at 12:10 p.m.

Submitted by:

Judith A. Temby, Secretary