Board of Regents

June 2008 Minutes - University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

 

UW-Milwaukee

Held in the UW-Milwaukee Union

Wisconsin Room

June 5, 2008

9:00 a.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

PRESENT:                               Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Thomas, Vásquez, Walsh, and Womack

 

UNABLE TO ATTEND:          Regent Connolly-Keesler and Regent Shields

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The meeting was convened in open session at 9:00 a.m., at which time the following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt, was adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Drew, Pruitt, Smith, Spector, Thomas, Vásquez, Walsh, and Womack (14) voting in the affirmative.  There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9477:   That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider appointments of chancellors for UW-Madison, UW-Parkside, and UW-Whitewater, as permitted by s.19.85(c), (e),  and (f), Wis. Stats.;and to consider an annual personnel evaluation and salary adjustment, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.-

The following resolutions were adopted in the closed session:

Approval of Salary: President of the University of Wisconsin System

Resolution 9478:           
That, upon recommendation of the President of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, the annual salary for Kevin P. Reilly, President of the University of Wisconsin System, be increased, effective July 1, 2008 and June 1, 2009, as per the attached recommendation.

UW-Whitewater:  Authorization to Appoint Chancellor

Resolution 9479:            
That, upon recommendation of the Special Regent Committee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Richard J. Telfer be appointed Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, effective June 6, 2008, at a salary of $199,500.

UW-Parkside:  Authorization to Appoint Chancellor

Resolution 9480:            
That, upon recommendation of the Special Regent Committee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Robert D. Felner be appointed Chancellor-Designate July 1, 2008 through July 31, 2008 and appointed Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, effective August 1, 2008, at a salary of $205,000.-

UW-Madison:  Authorization to Appoint Chancellor

Resolution 9481:            
That, upon recommendation of the Special Regent Committee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Carolyn A. Martin be appointed Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, effective September 1, 2008, at a salary of $437,000.

The Board arose from closed session at 10:30 a.m.

 

Introduction of Regent-Designate Kevin Opgenorth

            Regent President Bradley welcomed Kevin Opgenorth, who had been appointed to the Board by Governor Doyle as the non-traditional student member, effective June 9, 2008, succeeding Regent Shields.

            Mr. Opgenorth is a student at UW-Platteville, majoring in Business Administrtion and Economics.  A military veteran, he served for three years in the army, including a one-year deployment in Iraq.

 

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UW-MILWAUKEE PRESENTATION:  BUILDING THE RESEARCH UNIVERSITY OF THE FUTURE

Recalling his remarks to the Board last year, Chancellor Carlos Santiago noted, that, with a campus of only 93 acres, UW-Milwaukee has too many people on too little land and that there is a need to look for new space.  Although the university has the Water Institute located at the Port of Milwaukee and the School of Continuing Education downtown, most of the 29,000 students are served on the main campus.    

In discussion with the City of Milwaukee and Milwaukee Public Schools, progress is being made in locating an Academic Health Center and a School of Public Health in the central city.   In partnership with Milwaukee County and others, plans are being made to bring the university’s engineering programs to a UWM Innovation Park in Wauwatosa, focusing on high-tech economic development. 

Noting that UW-Milwaukee’s first Chancellor, J. Martin Klotsche, had written of the struggle to grow the university, with promises to extend the campus failing to materialize, Chancellor Santiago recalled that, when he came to Milwaukee four years previously, it was with the charge to build an urban public research university – a mission of key importance to both the city and the state.

Thirty years ago, he remarked, Milwaukee County’s per-capita income was higher than that of Dane County.  Ten years later, the balance had shifted, with the gap now at 41%.  Statewide, per-capita income in Minnesota is $4,000 higher than in Wisconsin. If Milwaukee, Minneapolis, and Chicago are eliminated from the comparison, per-capita income in the three states is fairly equal, showing that something has happened in Minneapolis and Chicago that has not happened in Milwaukee.

 What happened, he observed, is that Minnesota and Illinois reinvested in their public research universities.  While the City of Madison is very much a creation of UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee is a creation of the City of Milwaukee, serving its labor force, which now has changed.  Under the leadership of Mayor Barrett, he said, the city is reinventing itself and the university must follow.  Noting that not all are impacted equally by the decline in southeastern Wisconsin, he pointed out that African Americans are more adversely affected than others. 

UW-Milwaukee, he stated, is the only university large enough and comprehensive enough to support the region and move it toward the future to which all aspire.  While master planning is crucial, the city and region cannot wait for it to be completed before taking advantage of opportunities to move forward.

As to building the research infrastructure, the Chancellor observed that, while UW-Milwaukee has always had great research, a critical mass of faculty are needed in science and engineering – two areas that are critical to growing the economy. 

In southeastern Wisconsin, he noted, all institutions together generate $200 million in research – a figure that is much too small.  By comparison, the University of Illinois – Chicago generates $300 million; Northwestern and the University of Chicago, $900 million; UW-Madison, $700 million; and the University of Minnesota, $500 million.  The goal for UW-Milwaukee is to build its research to $100 million by means such as launching new schools and institutes, hiring the right faculty, and reallocation.

Referring to UW-Madison Chancellor John Wiley’s support for UW-Milwaukee’s goals, he indicated that Chancellor Wiley recognizes the need for a significant research institution in Milwaukee in order for UW-Madison to build the necessary bridges and have the desired impact in that city. 

Because UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee are very different institutions, Chancellor Santiago indicated, the strategy is to build UW-Milwaukee’s research differently.  Steps include the campaign for UWM, which exceeded its goal; reallocating existing dollars to provide seed funding that will generate more extramural support; and continuing to build the Growth Agenda.  In the current state budget, the Regents, Governor and Legislature supported $10 million for Growth Agenda initiatives at UW-Milwaukee.  The university would return with requests for the second and third installments of the total $30 million that is needed. 

Referring to the importance of doctoral programs in building a research university, the Chancellor indicated that the number at UW-Milwaukee had increased from 19 to 25 since 2004.  While doctoral programs are expensive, he pointed out that they attract the best faculty talent and that UWM will continue to expand in this area.

In addition, UW-Milwaukee has proposed two new schools:  The Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the School of Freshwater Sciences – the first of its kind in the nation.   The School of Public Health, the Chancellor stated, is desperately needed by the city and thus has become a top priority. He noted the importance of its location in the city and indicated that the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health will be an active partner.

Commenting on the importance of student access to UW-Milwaukee, he pointed out that the number of people in the city with bachelor’s degrees – 18% of the population – is much too small. 

Areas of research strength, he continued, include:

  • Healthcare
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Biomedical Engineering, at the campus in Wauwatosa
  • Fresh Water

 

The Chancellor emphasized that the university would reach out to the region with its research and that partners – private, public and nonprofit – would be needed for success.  He then introduced two of those partners:  Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, a steadfast supporter of UWM; and business leader and philanthropist Joseph Zilber, who has dedicated his life to the city and is strongly supporting UWM through his philanthropy.

Mayor Barrett then offered remarks, first welcoming State Senator Tim Carpenter, who also was attending the meeting.  Referring to the city’s ongoing efforts to reinvent itself, he emphasized its location on the “Fresh Coast” – the largest fresh water supply on the planet.  With higher education and water, he said, Milwaukee has the ingredients to transform itself for the future. 

The School of Public Health, he emphasized, is vital to addressing the challenges of the city.  Major areas of progress include program planning and fundraising.  There are plans for an accredited school, with masters’ and PhD programs in three areas and programs in four of five major areas.  As to fundraising, the Mayor thanked Mr. Zilber for his extremely generous $10 million gift, which would be leveraged into more resources going forward.

With regard to need for the school, Mayor Barrett noted that Milwaukee has a critical mass of public health issues and problems that must be addressed, including sexually transmitted diseases, the seventh worst infant mortality rate in the nation, especially among African Americans, the seventh highest percentage of teen pregnancy, and high rates of asthma, childhood diabetes, and gun violence. 

In conclusion, he urged that the Wisconsin Idea – the university as a partner to the community – be emphasized in this part of the state, adding that the problems that make critical the location of a school of public health in Milwaukee also have an impact on the entire state.

Mr. Zilber asked the Board to support establishment of a school of public health in order to address problems such as inadequate immunizations and areas with no doctors or dentists, among many others.  The school, he said, should be located in Milwaukee – the seventh poorest city in the nation – and should be the responsibility of UW-Milwaukee, which needs to be strong if it is to help Milwaukee move forward.

In conclusion, he noted bipartisan support for the school, which would benefit the entire state.

 

Concluding his presentation, Chancellor Santiago asked that the Board:

  • Approve the Schools of Freshwater Sciences and Public Health
  • Approve the PhD program in Africology and other doctoral programs in the academic plan
  • Support the master plan for the campus and UW-Milwaukee’s budget initiatives.

 

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GROWTH AGENDA AND NEED-BASED FINANCIAL AID

Noting that reaching a broader, deeper cut of Wisconsin’s population is crucial to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, President Reilly indicated that the plan has always been to drive the state’s prosperity by helping more citizens attain baccalaureate degrees, thereby creating an environment that will allow Wisconsin to compete successfully in a global market.  Without adequate need-based financial aid, he pointed out, entire sections of the population will be priced out of higher education; and the state will be crippled by their loss.

Despite significant increases in financial aid, Wisconsin still ranks as a relatively low-aid state.  For many students, he said, loans are a wise investment that will greatly increase their lifetime earning potential by enabling then to obtain a college degree.  For some families, however, the thought of $20,000 of debt may be so intimidating that they forego college altogether.  Availability of need-based financial aid can be the deciding factor for students and families in that situation.

It is a primary responsibility of federal and state governments to ensure that higher education is affordable for students, he noted, because it is in government’s best interest to ensure access to higher education, which is the key to success in today’s knowledge-driven economy.  While state and federal governments must invest in students who need financial assistance, he added that private contributions also have a role to play in alleviating the financial burden for students with demonstrated need.  Therefore, the effort to fully fund need-based financial aid will focus on both governmental and private resources. 

Noting that privately-funded contributions have long been a key element in financing building projects, endowed faculty chairs, research projects and other initiatives, President Reilly said that these efforts will be expanded to include private gifts as a component of financial aid, as part of the UW’s brain-gain commitment.  In that regard, he referred to the discussion in April of working to double the $6 million that the UW System awards annually in privately funded need-based financial aid. 

As to recent accomplishments in that regard, he recalled that last November the Board heard from Dick George, CEO of the Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation, about the $40 million investment made by that company in the Wisconsin Covenant.  In addition, the UW-Madison Foundation has begun a campaign to raise need-based financial aid, which will be matched by the Foundation up to $20 million.  In March, there was announcement of a campaign by UW-Madison faculty members to raise funds for need-based financial aid, which will be matched by the UW-Madison Foundation as well.  The UW Bookstore responded by contributing $60,000 to the campaign. 

Building on the momentum generated by these generous gifts, the UW System has established a working group composed of campus financial aid directors, along with Regent Connolly-Keesler and others, to provide guidance on moving forward in a coordinated effort. 

At the forefront of the fund-raising movement for need-based aid, John and Tashia Morgridge founded the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars with an extremely generous $175 million gift to create a permanent endowment to provide funds for those in need.

To speak about the mission and vision of this organization, President Reilly introduced Mary Gulbrandson, Executive Director of the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars.  Before working for the Fund, she dedicated more than 30 years to the Madison Metropolitan School District in leadership roles, including chief of staff to the superintendent of schools.

Ms. Gulbrandson began her presentation with a video of the Morgridges discussing the intent of their gift.  John Morgridge emphasized the great value of going on to a university or technical college after high school and expressed the hope that their gift of scholarships would enable many to take advantage of that opportunity.  Tashia Morgridge noted that young people face many challenges including financial ones.  Their gift is intended to give hope to those with such challenges so that they can go to college without facing a huge burden of debt.  Money earned by the endowment will be distributed to four-year, two-year, and technical colleges and universities; and financial aid officers will make the grants. 

Ms. Gulbrandson said that the intent is for the endowment to impact generations of students.  $5.5 million will be spent in the first year, in grants of $3,500 per year for students at four-year institutions and $1,800 per year for students at two-year institutions.  To establish eligibility, students complete a federal financial aid form. Students demonstrating financial need may receive a Pell grant and local or institutional scholarships.  Costs not covered by those sources are eligible for funding from the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars.  The intent is not to replace other grants and scholarships, but to fund the remaining unmet need, which otherwise would need to be covered by loans and work-study jobs. 

At this time, grants will be for full-time students, who are recent high school graduates and are attending public institutions, although private institutions may be added later.   The decision was made to award substantial grants to fewer students, rather than small grants to many students.  The hope is to keep growing the fund to provide more grants in future years.  If students make satisfactory progress in their first year, they will be eligible to keep the grants going forward.   UW-Madison researchers will study the difference the grants make in educational outcomes for students.  In addition, a mentoring component may be added.

In conclusion, Ms. Gulbrandson indicated that she has been meeting with UW System and Wisconsin Covenant staff to discuss how the different need-based financial aid efforts fit together most effectively.

In discussion following the presentation, Ms. Gulbrandson responded to a question from Regent Crain by explaining that, of the students who meet federal financial need criteria, the Higher Education Aids Board will select at random 600 students who will start at UW four-year universities and 600 who will start at the Wisconsin Technical Colleges and UW Colleges.   The amount involved will be $5.5 million in the first year and $7.5 million in future years. 

Regent Burmaster inquired about relationships with the Wisconsin Covenant, and Ms. Gulbrandson replied that the strongest tie between the two programs is in the message that encourages young people to talk about “when”, not “if”, they go to college. 

Regent Davis asked how availability of the grants would be made known, to which Ms. Gulbrandson explained that materials and the program’s web address will be given to all high schools.  While students will become eligible for the grants through the federal financial aid application process and do not have to apply separately, she emphasized the importance of making known the availability of the grants so that financial barriers do not become a reason for students to forego college.

Regent Bartell inquired about how to avoid reduction of state funding for financial aid, in view of the large influx of privately funded grants.  Ms. Gulbrandson suggested emphasizing the economic benefit to the state of increasing the number of college degrees.

Regent Walsh asked about corporate contributions to the fund and whether they could be focused on the children of employees.

Replying that the fund’s only focus is on financial need of students across the state, Ms. Gulbrandson said that attempts have not been made at this time to raise money from corporations, although that could enter the conversation as time goes on.

Regent Thomas expressed appreciation on behalf of students for the powerful generosity of the Morgridges in establishing this financial aid fund.

Thanking Ms. Gulbrandson for her presentation, President Reilly noted that income inequality is increasing across America.  In 1986, 11% of the national income was earned by one percent of the population, while, by 2005, 21% of all income was earned by the top one percent.  On the other hand, the bottom 50% of the nation’s population lost ground and have felt more financial strain than in the past.  The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, a national think tank, reported that the income gap between the top and bottom income quintiles has grown significantly in most states over the past 20 years.  By this measure, Wisconsin’s growth in inequality ranked 23rd in the nation. 

Pointing out that there is an educational gap that parallels the financial one, he cautioned that, if current trends continue, the nation will lack a diverse and informed public that can participate in a knowledge-based economy and succeed in today’s world. 

On the other hand, he observed that gifts like those of the Morgridges, Great Lakes, and others go a long way to provide access to higher education for all students, regardless of financial status.  “Drawing on such generosity, we can reverse the negative trends and make the promise of American democracy a reality for more of our young people.”

To that end, President Reilly announced that he and his wife, Kate, had decided to make a gift of $70,000 of his next year’s salary to the Reilly Family Scholarship Fund at the UW Foundation – a permanent endowment established last year to provide need-based grants to students at all 26 UW System campuses. 

The message to Wisconsin K-12 students, he said in conclusion, is:  “Study hard.  Take college prep classes.  Be a good citizen – and we will find a way for your family to afford your UW education.”  That also is the message of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, of the Wisconsin Covenant, of KnowHow2Go Wisconsin, of the Morgridge gift and of the Great Lakes gift.     

 

On behalf of the Board and students, Regent President Bradley thanked President and Mrs. Reilly for their generosity.

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UW-Milwaukee Neighborhood Concerns

Regent President Bradley reported that two groups – the Mariner’s Neighborhood Association and a student group – had asked to speak to the Board.  Given the very busy agenda and the need to be fair to already-scheduled presenters, he had decided not to grant the request.  However, he had asked Regent Spector, Regent Davis, Regent Drew, and Regent Womack to meet with both groups and listen to their concerns.

 

The meeting was recessed at 12:14 p.m.  and reconvened at 1:15 p.m.

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UW SYSTEM 2008-09 ANNUAL OPERATING BUDGET AND TUITION AND FEE SCHEDULES

In opening remarks, President Reilly recognized the Board’s strong concern for keeping tuition affordable and for the quality of educational programs and student services.  The 2008-09 annual budget for the second year of the 2007-09 biennium, he said, reflects the ongoing commitment to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, which has been endorsed by leaders across the state for its efforts to enroll and retain more students, produce more college graduates, and invigorate the development of high-growth industries across the state.  UW campuses have enthusiastically begun to implement a number of initiatives to advance this plan.

As to challenges, the President noted that the momentum of the Growth Agenda must be balanced with significant state budget shortfalls, including a $25 million lapse in the current biennium and another $25 million lapse in the 2009-11 biennium. The recently passed budget repair bill also will require the UW System to absorb some part of the $270 million lapse to all state agencies.  If the reduction is reasonable and flexible, the hope is to avoid holding back on implementing Growth Agenda initiatives. In addition, the Legislature recently revised a previously approved pay plan that would have provided a two percent pay plan increase in July and a one percent increase in April 2009 for faculty, academic staff and non-represented classified staff.  The revised plan provides a one percent raise in July 2008 and a two percent increase in June 2009.  This further exacerbates the serious compensation competitiveness problem for faculty and staff.

Referring to the significant impact of the Veterans Tuition Remission program, President Reilly remarked that the program is a key component of the state’s educational vitality and a worthwhile way to support veterans.  Participation in the program has nearly tripled since 2005, but state funding has not kept pace.  With less than 25% of the estimated costs covered in the current state budget, this is a major fiscal challenge and a large part of the tuition recommendation for the coming year.

The President thanked chancellors, provosts, faculty and staff for managing these challenges by holding positions vacant, delaying purchases, reducing travel and reallocating funds, while remaining dedicated to the mission of providing high quality education to students.

With regard to tuition, President Reilly recommended an increase for resident undergraduate students of 5.5%, mirroring the modest 5.5% increase approved last year, which at that time was the lowest increase in seven years.  With this proposed increase, UW-Madison’s tuition would remain the second-lowest among the Big 10 universities.  Tuition at that institution would rise by $348 annually, by $340 at UW-Milwaukee, and by $265 at the comprehensive universities. 

Of the 5.5% increase, .7% would go to fund pay plan and health insurance costs, along with utilities for the UW’s 59 million square feet of facilities – all costs that must be met.

With the hope that it would be on a one-time basis, three percent of the increase would partially fund the state-mandated Veterans Tuition Remission Program.  While the UW strongly favored subsidizing university education for veterans, President Reilly pointed out that the veterans served to protect everyone, not just other UW students and their families, and that all taxpayers would be proud to support them – just as they did after World War II.  Therefore, it was hoped that the state would honor its current and future veterans by fully funding the remissions with state general purpose revenue.

Of the 5.5% increase, 1.6% would fund Growth Agenda initiatives. 

Tuition increases for nonresident undergraduate and resident graduate students would be the same dollar amount as for resident undergraduate students, consistent with previous actions by the Board.

President Reilly also recommended that tuition at the UW Colleges be frozen at 2006-07 levels, to preserve points of access for over 12,000 students enrolled in the 13 two-year colleges and others who would be attracted by the Colleges’ low tuition and high quality.  This freeze also brings the UW Colleges more in line with Wisconsin Technical College System tuition rates for liberal arts transfer students.

He then called on Associate Vice President Freda Harris, who provided further detail about the proposed budget.

Ms. Harris began by indicating that the 2008-09 budget of $4.7 billion consists of 25% state funding of $1.2 billion, academic tuition of $981 million, and $2.6 billion of other funds. 

Included is new funding of $53.5 million GPR/fees, most of which is for new programs and initiatives that will increase the number of students in the system, help to grow the number of people with baccalaureate degrees, add good jobs, increase student success and increase the ability to receive external funding. 

The budget includes more than $30 million for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, which will enable the UW to add more than 2,000 new full-time-equivalent students, grow online enrollments and advance targeted programs to meet regional and state needs.

The budget includes $3.3 million in new funding to recruit and retain faculty in high-need areas.  Also included is $2.5 million in one-time matching funds for lung cancer research, which must be matched by the Medical School with private gifts.

Tuition would increase by $348 at UW-Madison, $340 at UW-Milwaukee, and $265 at the comprehensive universities.  Tuition at the UW Colleges would be frozen to maintain a low-cost entry point for students.  Tuition would remain at the 2007-08 rate for nonresident graduate students, who provide critical support to research and instruction, particularly at UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee.  Remissions for those students are part of the cost to compete with other institutions for the best graduate students.  UW tuition for nonresident graduate students is among the highest in its peer group and has become a significant burden on academic departments.  Holding the tuition at the 2007-08 rate would bring the UW closer to the peer median.

Tuition increases would help to fund Growth Agenda initiatives and salary increases approved by the Joint Committee on Employment Relations.  For the first time, the Board was being asked to consider increasing tuition to fund veterans’ remissions.  For the first three years of the program, the UW had covered the cost of these remissions without adding the charge to tuition.  However, the cost has grown from $4.3 million in 2005-06 to $17.5 million in the current year.

To help manage these costs, the state set aside $5 million to fund remissions at the UW System and the Wisconsin Technical Colleges, of which $4 million was expected to go to the UW.  The UW System also had $5.5 million available for salary increases that were budgeted at a higher percentage than approved by the Joint Committee on Employment Relations.  Those funds would be used on a one-time basis for veterans’ remissions, leaving $8 million unfunded.  When coupled with the required state lapse from the budget, required reallocations would total $20.5 million in 2007-08. 

For 2008-09, the UW would need to reallocate $12.5 million for required lapses, along with an undetermined amount under the Budget Repair Bill, which included an additional $270 million in lapses for state agencies this biennium.  With those lapses, UW institutions no longer would have the capacity to reallocate for veterans’ remissions without reductions of services for students.  Remissions were expected to total around $23 million, with about $5 million expected from the state, leaving an $18 million shortfall.  A tuition increase on a one-time basis was being requested to cover this amount.  The state would be asked to fully fund veterans’ remissions in 2009-11, and the federal government was working on a G.I. Bill that would provide additional educational benefits for veterans who have served since September 2001. 

Even with the proposed tuition increases, tuition at UW institutions would be among the lowest in their peer groups, and UW-Madison would continue to have the second lowest tuition in the Big 10.

Improvements in need-based financial aid include grants to students in public post-secondary institutions by the Fund for Wisconsin Scholars; a 10% increase in the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant program, and a program begun by the UW System to increase private need-based aid. 

Under the proposed budget, segregated fees would increase an average of $57 at four-year institutions.  A large part of the increases were due to major campus projects, without which the segregated fee increase would average $25.  Segregated fees at the UW Colleges would increase an average of $36, primarily due to addition of mental health services staff.  The only UW institutions without mental health staff, the Colleges wished to add these services in response to the Campus Safety Report.

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Loftus inquired about the one-time charge for veterans’ remissions, and Regent Smith replied that it would amount to 60% of the proposed tuition increase.  Regent Loftus remarked that the remissions would be subsidized by students at the four-year universities, but not by students at the two-year colleges, because of the proposed tuition freeze at those institutions. 

Ms. Harris explained that the Tuition and Financial Aid Working Group found that tuition is lower than at peer institutions for the doctoral and comprehensive universities, but not at the Colleges, which preserve a low-cost access point for students.

Regent Loftus asked if the proposed budget reflected growth in the veterans’ remission program, to which Ms. Harris replied that it assumed growth of 10%, which was a low estimate considering that the program has been growing by about 20%.

Regent Smith cautioned against pitting one group of students against another and asked about the expectations for obtaining additional funding. 

In response, President Reilly expressed the hope that clear messages are being sent about government’s obligation to invest in veterans’ remissions on behalf of all taxpayers.       

Regent Falbo expressed discomfort about students having to pay for the remissions.  He suggested separating the tuition increase into two parts  - a three percent one-time increase for the remissions and a regular two and a half percent increase to cover ongoing costs.  

Regent Davis expressed support for the freeze on tuition at the UW Colleges and asked how long it should remain in place in order to put the Colleges in the best market position.

Ms. Harris replied that the gap between tuition at the Technical Colleges and the UW Colleges was narrowing.  She felt that another year of a tuition freeze should put the colleges in a competive position.

Regent Pruitt asked UW-Madison Provost Pat Farrell to comment on the importance of holding down tuition increases for nonresident graduate students.  Provost Farrell replied that, to compete for the best graduate students, universities are expected to offer competitive stipends.  Noting that UW-Madison’s are on the low side, he said that becoming competitive is made more difficult by higher tuition and that funding agencies will not pay for stipends.  On the other hand, most private universities have a bankroll they can use to pay for the best graduate students, who fuel the research engine.

Regent Burmaster asked if the tuition increase would be 2.5% were it not for the $18 million gap in funding for veterans’ remissions, and Ms. Harris replied in the affirmative.  Regent Burmaster felt that there should be an effective means to convey that message in order to create the momentum needed to obtain funding.

Noting the sensitivity of the issue, Regent Walsh cautioned against separating the tuition charges.  He did not feel the Legislature was at fault in this matter, given current economic difficulties. 

Regent Spector agreed that it would not be healthy to highlight the issue and that it would pit one group against another.

Regent Falbo thought it would make sense to isolate the one-time charge.

Regent Bartell recalled that United Council students had urged no tuition increase.  When asked what they would recommend eliminating to make that possible, they did not have an answer.  Since then he had received compelling messages from students, telling their stories about lack of income, working full-time while going to school, and accumulating over $20,000 in debt.  While many could afford the proposed increase, with tuition still among the lowest in the Big 10, he asked what one would say to those students who could not afford it.

President Reilly remarked that students do not want access to an education of poor quality; and, although budget cuts can always be made, they do have a negative impact on students.  He observed that the case is not always well made that the monetary value of a college degree – a million dollars in increased earnings – compares favorably to a loan debt of $20,000.  At UW-Madison, he noted, a 5.5% tuition increase amounts to $170 more per semester.

Urging that the Board adopt the proposed resolution, Regent Vásquez felt that it would not be viable to avoid raising tuition.  In that regard, the proposal attempts to move forward without pitting groups of students against each other.

In response to a question by Regent Smith, Ms. Harris explained that tuition would become part of the base budget and would be used for tuition remissions.  If that cost should go down, the money could be used for other needs, allowing a lower tuition increase in the future.

Regent Crain observed that, while all felt discomfort about raising tuition, she was concerned about educational quality, as well as about the burden of higher costs.

While she recognized the need for a tuition increase, Regent Thomas pointed out that it also is important to recognize that, when tuition is raised, some will be excluded from attending the university and will not be able to obtain the education needed to earn an extra million dollars.

She supported the idea of highlighting the amount needed to pay veterans’ remissions so that families would be alerted to the situation.  She did not think that to do so would pit students against each other, but that it would draw attention to the fact that financially-strapped students are being asked to bear a burden that the state and nation are not willing to fund.

Adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Smith and seconded by Regent Spector:

 

2008-09 Operating Budget including Rates for Academic Tuition, Segregated Fees, Textbook Rental, Room and Board, and Apartments; Academic Tuition Refund Policy and Schedule; and Annual Distribution Adjustments

 

Resolution 9482:            

That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2008-09 operating budget be approved, including rates for academic tuition, segregated fees, textbook rental, room and board, and apartments; the tuition refund policy and schedule; and annual distribution adjustments as attached in the document 2008-09 Operating Budget and Fee Schedules, June, 2008.  The 2008-09 amounts are:

 

 

GPR

$1,189,756,579

25.1%

 

 

Academic Tuition

$980,981,001

20.7%

 

 

Total GPR/Fees

$2,170,737,580

45.8%

 

 

Other

$2,560,958,961

54.2%

 

 

Total

$4,731,696,541

100.0%

 

 

Regent Loftus moved to amend the resolution to approve a 2.5% increase in tuition and to vote on the remainder if that amendment prevailed. The motion was seconded by Regent Falbo. 

Regent Loftus commented that he was reluctant to see the tuition increase for veterans’ remissions put into the base budget because of concern that the state would not fund it and the money would remain in the base.

In response to a question about proposed federal veterans’ benefits, President Reilly indicated that they would be paid directly to educational institutions. 

Regent Walsh spoke in opposition to the amendment, urging the Board not to tie a portion of tuition directly to veterans’ remissions.  In that regard, he pointed out that tuition pays for many other expenses, including faculty salaries and utilities.   

Regent Davis spoke in opposition to the amendment because of concern that splitting the question would be complicated and might not be received as intended. 

Regent Burmaster said that she was hearing students call for a tuition increase at the rate of inflation and that 5.5% would be too high.  With regard to perception and messaging, she was convinced by Regent Thomas’ remarks that asking students and families to accept the extra tuition for remissions on a one-time basis would be more readily understood and accepted than would a tuition increase of 5.5%.  However, she agreed that Regents Walsh and others were correct and therefore would not vote for the amendment.

While he recognized the importance of messages, Regent Pruitt was troubled by the precedent that might be set by the proposed amendment in identifying percentages of a tuition increase to meet one-time challenges.

The question was put on the amendment, and it failed on a voice vote.

Urging the Regents to vote against the resolution, Regent Shields commented on how difficult it would be for students to afford the additional $300.  He expressed appreciation, however, for the tuition freeze at the UW Colleges.

The question then was put on Resolution 9482, and it was adopted on a voice vote.

The meeting was adjourned at 2:40 p.m.

Submitted by:  Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

 

UW-Milwaukee

Held in the Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee Union

June 5, 2008

4:55 p.m.

 

- President Bradley presiding -

 

PRESENT:                               Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Pruitt, Shields, Smith, Spector, Thomas, Vásquez, Walsh, and Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:          Regent Connolly-Keesler

- - -

The meeting was convened in open session at 4:55 p.m., at which time the following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt, was adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Womack, Vásquez, Thomas, Spector, Smith, Pruitt, Loftus, Drew, Davis, Cuene, Crain, Burmaster, Bradley, and Bartell (14) voting in the affirmative.  There were no negative votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9483:            

That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:45 p.m.

Submitted by: Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

UW-Milwaukee

Held in the Wisconsin Room

UW-Milwaukee Union

June 6, 2008

9:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Pruitt, Shields, Smith, Spector, Thomas, Vásquez, and Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND:  Regent Walsh

- - -

Approval of Minutes of the April 10 and 11, 2008 Meetings

Upon motion by Regent Vásquez, seconded by Regent Shields, the minutes of the April 10 and 11, 2008, meetings of the Board were approved as distributed.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Resolution of Appreciation:  Regent Emeritus Peggy Rosenzweig

Stating that Regent Emeritus Rosenzweig, is a “champion and a leader for education in Wisconsin,” Regent Burmaster recalled that Regent Rosezweig had served for five years as a Regent, for five years as a member of the Educational Communications Board and for five years as a member of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board. 

She had served in the State Legislature for 20 years – from 1993-2002 in the Senate and from 1983-1992 in the Assembly.  While in the Legislature, she was a member of the Joint Committee on Finance and a co-chair of the Joint Audit Committee.  Education, health care, and the environment were her passions.  Thanks to a bill she had introduced, Wisconsin became a leader in professional board certification for teachers.  She was a leader in establishing the Badger Care health program and in the Wisconsin Historical Society Foundation. 

Regent Burmaster spoke of Regent Emeritus Rosenzweig as a woman of distinction who balanced her commitment to public service with dedication to her family, including her husband, five sons and many grandchildren. 

Regent Burmaster then presented the following resolution of appreciation to Regent Emeritus Rosenzweig, which was adopted by acclamation, accompanied by a standing ovation:

Resolution 9484:    WHEREAS, Peggy Rosenzweig dedicated over five years in service to the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, from 2003 to 2008; and

WHEREAS, Peggy has devoted her career, both on this Board and in the state legislature, to ensuring that all Wisconsin residents have the opportunity to pursue their dreams of higher education; and

WHEREAS, she was a tireless advocate on behalf of youth and Wisconsin’s educational systems during her time in the state Assembly and Senate, serving in key legislative roles in the Joint Committees on Finance and Audit, as well as the standing Education committees; and

WHEREAS, Peggy’s knowledge and experience in education policy has fueled her commitment to efficiency and accountability, lending insight to policies and practices in the UW System; and

WHEREAS, she has provided expert direction to the Hospital Authority Board, the Wisconsin Technical College System Board, and special policy review committees, as well as to the Physical Planning and Funding and Business, Finance and Audit committees; and

WHEREAS, Peggy values investing early in Wisconsin’s leaders, and she has been a vocal and consistent supporter for Wisconsin’s young leaders, in particular encouraging and mentoring many young women to reach their highest potential and become agents of change in their realm of influence; and

WHEREAS, through service on four UW chancellor selection committees and one UW System President selection committee, Peggy helped to identify talented leaders to lead our institutions to even greater future success;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offer thanks and commendation to Peggy Rosenzweig for her many life achievements and for her service as a member of this Board.

Regent Burmaster presented Regent Emeritus Rosenzweig with a plaque containing the resolution and with a certificate of appreciation from Governor Doyle.

President Reilly presented her with a UW System medallion.

Regent Rosenzweig began her remarks by speaking of the great honor it had been to serve with so many outstanding leaders. It had been among the most rewarding of her experiences because of the students with their energy and passion for learning, the faculty with their dedication to scholarly learning and teaching, the leadership of the President and chancellors, and the hard work of the staff. 

As a citizen board, she observed, the Regents have a role somewhat comparable to that of the Legislature.  Like that body, the Board has statutory powers and is called on to respond to demands and criticisms.  The Board does not operate the university, as the Legislature does not operate state government. 

Noting that the Board had grappled with a number of big issues during her tenure, Regent Emeritus Rosenzweig expressed her hope that the Board’s actions will provide valuable guidance to the institutions in the future.  In that regard, she had served as a member of a committee that developed an expedited process for dismissal of faculty and staff who engage in serious misconduct.  In another case, the Board had tightened sick leave reporting in response to a Legislative Audit Bureau report, resulting in a new sense of trust by the public and Legislature.  In both of these instances, she reflected, the Board had the opportunity to gain a better understanding of shared governance. 

She had especially valued the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the scope of the Wisconsin Idea and to become acquainted with the individual UW campuses that comprise an educational system that is much greater than the sum of its parts.  She also appreciated learning about the Technical College System and about the UW Hospital and its excellence of care mission. 

In conclusion, she stated that Wisconsin is blessed with a great public higher education system and that she would continue to advocate for this treasured resource.  Remarking that her service on the Board had been rich and rewarding, she expressed gratitude to Governor Doyle and to her colleagues for their wise counsel, friendship and fellowship over the years.

-

Resolution of Appreciation:  Regent Thomas Shields

Expressing gratitude to Regent Shields for his service, Regent Connolly-Keesler presented the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation, accompanied by a standing ovation.

Resolution 9485:   WHEREAS, Thomas Shields dedicated two years in service to the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, from 2006 to 2008; and

WHEREAS, Tom has dedicated a substantial amount of his undergraduate experience to serving the students of Wisconsin in many capacities, as the Vice President of the Oshkosh Student Association, President of UW-Fox Valley Student Association, Vice President of United Council, and the UW System Student Representative on the State of Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board; and

WHEREAS, in honor of his leadership on campus, Tom has been named the 2008 recipient of the UW-Oshkosh Political Science Department Isaac Kayando Memorial Leadership Award; and

WHEREAS, university students have benefited greatly from Tom’s work in these organizations, and his service as the first non-traditional Student Regent on this Board, through his relentless commitment to the importance of accessible and affordable higher education; and

WHEREAS, he was an important member of this Board in that Tom voiced the unique concerns of the UW System’s non-traditional students and worked diligently to champion the many opportunities and pathways that lead to higher education; and

WHEREAS, Tom worked on the Board’s Physical Planning and Funding Committee to ensure that each university facility provides a safe and productive environment for students, faculty and staff, and on the Business, Finance and Audit Committee to oversee the financial well being of the entire UW System; and 

WHEREAS, through service on the Committee on Student Discipline and Other Student Appeals, Tom offered his valuable insight in resolving student appeals in a fair and expedient manner;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offer thanks and commendation to Thomas Shields for his service as the first non-traditional student member of this Board.

Regent Connolly-Keesler presented Regent Shields with a plaque containing the resolution, and President Reilly presented him with a UW System medallion.

Regent Shields thanked Governor Doyle for the opportunity to serve on the Board and his Regent colleagues from whom he had learned so much.  In that regard, he expressed special appreciation for the mentoring he received from the late Regent Emeritus Milt McPike and for the orientation to the Student Regent role from Regent Emeritus Chris Semenas.  He thanked Chancellor Wells for his support, and also thanked his family and his partner for theirs.  In conclusion, he expressed appreciation to all those who had become like family to him during his time on the Board.

-

Resolution of Appreciation:  Chancellor Don Betz

In a tribute to Chancellor Betz, Regent Pruitt recalled that, when the Board met at UW-River Falls some months ago, he had offered a resolution of appreciation to the university.  At that time, he found an editorial in the River Falls Journal written by Chancellor Betz, in which he wrote that an essential dimension of the university is engagement, also known as service learning and leading from the middle.  Promoting leadership in others, Regent Pruitt remarked, is one way in which the Chancellor demonstrated his own leadership skills. 

Extending best wishes from Chancellor Betz’s many friends in Wisconsin, Regent Pruitt offered the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation, accompanied by a standing ovation.

Resolution 9486:  WHEREAS, Don Betz dedicated three years of service as the 16th Chancellor of UW-River Falls, from 2005- 2008; and

WHEREAS, under the leadership of Chancellor Betz, the campus community of faculty, staff and students have created and are implementing the strategic plan, “Living the Promise,” emphasizing the core development areas of globalization, sustainability, inclusiveness and leadership development; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Betz led UW-River Falls to accept the challenge of Gov. Jim Doyle to become energy neutral by 2012, now emerging as a national higher education model through selection to the STARS (Sustainability Tracking, Auditing, & Rating System) project of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education; and

WHEREAS, under his leadership, the campus has significantly expanded its long-standing commitment of providing faculty expertise and student service-learning projects to assist communities in their pursuit of economic, environmental and social sustainability through the founding of the St. Croix Institute for Sustainable Community Development; and

WHEREAS, Chancellor Betz successfully worked with the Wisconsin Legislature to obtain approval for a $14.5-million expansion of the George R. Field South Fork Suites residence hall to meet the housing needs of 240 students, and obtained $1.1 million in planning money for a proposed Health & Human Performance Building that will serve 8,000 students, faculty, staff and community members each year; and

WHEREAS, as a result of the recent accreditation process, the Higher Learning Commission accrediting team cited eight strengths at UW-River Falls, particularly noting the quality of the governance relationship among students, faculty, staff and the administration that produced the university’s strategic plan, “Living the Promise;”

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offer thanks and commendation to Don Betz for his many life achievements and for his service as Chancellor of UW-River Falls.

Regent Pruitt presented Chancellor Betz with a plaque containing the resolution, and President Reilly presented him with a UW System medallion.

Chancellor Betz expressed his appreciation to the UW System leadership, the Board, the chancellors, and the UW-River Falls community, noting that he had learned a great deal from his chancellor colleagues, UW System staff, and President Reilly, whose leadership had attracted him to Wisconsin. 

As a parting wish, he expressed the hope that the state would not treat the UW System like any other state agency, rather than as its engine for economic and cultural development, and would decouple the university from some of the restrictions that limit its ability to innovate and revitalize.

Referring to the talented chancellors with whom he had the privilege to serve, Chancellor Betz asked that they be given the latitude and trust needed to lead effectively.  Calling collaboration the key a successful future, he asked that they be encouraged to collaborate with each other, the Technical Colleges, the UW Colleges, the private sector and other entities.

The UW System, he pointed out, has been asked to do more with less for too long and with too few people.  While faculty and staff try mightily, greatness cannot be achieved through continuous budget lapses.  Urging that the state invest long-term in university faculty, staff and leadership, he predicted that the rewards would be great and that Wisconsin could be a national model in sustainable community development, economic growth and other areas.

In conclusion, he referred to the Wisconsin Idea, with its promise transcending the borders of the state, as a model for others and a demonstration of the values that attracted him to Wisconsin; and he expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to serve as Chancellor of UW-River Falls.

-

Resolution of Appreciation:  Chancellor Bruce Shepard

Regent Crain began her words of tribute by indicating that she presented this recognition with great sadness and deep appreciation.  Since he took office in 2001, she remarked, Chancellor Shepard made an unprecedented mark on the university and community; and he is widely admired by Regents and others throughout the UW System and the state for what he has accomplished. 

On behalf of the community of Green Bay and the UW System, she expressed heartfelt thanks for his leadership and great regret at his departure.  With regard to the feelings of the community, she said: “We now believe that UW-Green Bay has an unlimited, exciting future.  We will never be the same and we won’t let you down.” 

She also thanked Cyndie Shepard for all of her contributions to the arts, to children, and to at-risk students, especially through the nationally recognized Phuture Phoenix program. 

Expressing deep gratitude and best wishes to Chancellor and Mrs. Shepard, Regent Crain concluded by saying: “May you find worthy challenges and great happiness.”

The following resolution was offered by Regent Crain and adopted by acclamation, accompanied by a standing ovation.

Resolution 9487:  WHEREAS, Bruce Shepard served as the fourth Chancellor for the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, from 2001-2008; and

WHEREAS, Bruce forged new partnerships between the campus and the Green Bay community, and led the campus in the development of Northeastern Wisconsin’s Growth Agenda, a plan to grow the campus’ enrollment by nearly 40 percent and equip the campus to better serve the region’s diverse needs by connecting learning to life; and

WHEREAS, under his direction, UW-Green Bay gained unprecedented private financial support that provided funding for significant infrastructure updates and expanded educational opportunities including new student scholarships, the first endowed chair, as well as the renovation of the University Union, the new Kress Events Center, and other university facilities; and

WHEREAS, Bruce and his wife Cyndie together launched the nationally-recognized Phuture Phoenix Program to encourage at-risk youth to plan ahead for college; and

WHEREAS, he sought out collaborations across higher education institutions to provide more northeastern Wisconsin residents with the opportunity to attain a bachelor’s degree, and as a result, UW-Green Bay started the Bachelor of Applied Studies degree program in partnership with regional technical colleges; and

WHEREAS, Bruce valued input from campus and community members, and always founded his vision for UW-Green Bay in the firm belief that the students, faculty and staff he worked with were capable of great things;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offer thanks and commendation to Bruce Shepard for his many life achievements and for his service as Chancellor of UW-Green Bay.

Regent Crain presented a plaque containing the resolution to Chancellor Shepard, and President Reilly presented him with a UW System medallion.

Stating that he was honored to have served the UW System and UW-Green Bay, Chancellor Shepard first expressed appreciation to his wife, Cyndie, for all she had done on behalf of UW-Green Bay and the diverse communities of the region.  She is so familiar and well-liked on campus, he noted, that the students call her “Mom.”

Thanking the chancellors for their insights and support, he remarked that much of the UW System’s success relates to the relationships among these groups of leaders.  He thanked President Reilly for understanding and supporting UW-Green Bay’s unique role, and he thanked the Regents for maintaining high aspirations for UW-Green Bay and for holding the campus accountable for achieving them.

In conclusion, he expressed special appreciation to the Green Bay community, indicating that he and Mrs. Shepard would take with them more value than they had contributed.

-

Resolution of Appreciation:  Executive Senior Vice President Don Mash

Introducing the resolution, Regent Smith expressed appreciation for Dr. Mash’s more than 40 years of service in higher education, noting that his passion for advancing the value of public higher education has been a tremendous asset to the UW System.

Regent Smith then offered Resolution 9488, which was adopted by acclamation, accompanied by a standing ovation.

Resolution 9488:    WHEREAS, Don Mash has dedicated over 40 years to higher education, including three years as the UW System Executive Senior Vice President; and

WHEREAS, Don developed experience and expertise in the campus chief executive role at UW-Eau Claire, George Mason University and Wayne State College, which provided him a unique perspective on campus operations and priorities in his position as UW System Executive Senior Vice President; and

WHEREAS, Don led our university in the Advantage Wisconsin strategic planning process in which he was able to highlight each campus’ individual strengths while also strategically focusing our collective ability to address some of the Wisconsin’s greatest challenges; and

WHEREAS, through his leadership of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin and strategic action steps, he has worked tirelessly as an advocate for the UW System with the state legislature, and with community and business partners to promote the university’s position as an economic engine for Wisconsin’s prosperity; and

WHEREAS, Don is passionate about the importance of higher education that is both excellent and affordable, leading the university in supporting the Wisconsin Covenant and the KnowHow2GO campaign to make education accessible to more students; and

WHEREAS, he has been a consistent and thoughtful counsel throughout his service to President Kevin P. Reilly and university colleagues;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System hereby offer thanks and commendation to Don Mash for his many life achievements and for his service as University of Wisconsin System Executive Senior Vice President for Administration.

Regent Smith presented a plaque containing the resolution to Dr. Mash, and President Reilly presented him with a UW System medallion.

Dr. Mash began his remarks by expressing appreciation for the opportunities afforded him in Wisconsin to head a wonderful campus at UW-Eau Claire and to serve for three years in UW System Administration.  It had been a labor of love, he indicated, both because of the importance of public higher education and because of the wonderful people who are the keys to success.  In that regard, he cited the chancellors for leading, inspiring, and creating partnerships for their institutions; President Reilly and the System Administration staff, who had further heightened his appreciation of what it takes to maintain and advance a great university system; and the Regents for their governing role, their respect for the individual campuses and the system as a whole, and their strong commitment to public higher education.  “All of you,” he said, “have enriched my life immeasurably.”

When he came to Wisconsin 10 years ago, he recalled telling colleagues that he was going to what arguably was the best higher education system in the country.  Although he now would modify that characterization somewhat, he felt that it still is one of the best and has done a great job in the face of significant budget reductions. 

The challenge of having a treasure, he reflected, is to figure out how to at least maintain, if not enhance, it.  With an institution of the high status and reputation of the UW System, he cautioned, special care must be taken not to lose that renown because of the great difficulty of re-establishing it.  Noting that it cannot be turned on and off like a faucet, he expressed concern about the damaging effects of the deep budget reductions of recent years. 

What is needed, he emphasized, is to muster strong messages to create the support for the UW System that is needed for the state to move forward.  While tuition still is relatively low, it has risen with the decline in state support to a level of being nearly equal with state funding as a source of budgetary dollars. 

In order to maintain and promote the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, Dr. Mash said that it is necessary to convey two values, the first of which is the very positive impact of an educated population on the economy and quality of life, in such matters as reduced crime rates, reduced health care costs, and enhanced levels of civic engagement.  The second is the value to students of making the best investment that they can make in their future by going to college.  In many cases, he added, financial aid will be needed to enable students to succeed and enrich the state.

In addition to these two values – one for the state and one for the individual student – Dr. Mash said that Wisconsin needs a long-term vision for what the state can become.  The messages conveying these values and vision must be restated frequently and kept in the public eye in order to build the support necessary for the UW System and Wisconsin to succeed in the future.

-

Reappointment of Regent Falbo and Regent Walsh

Regent President Bradley congratulated Regent David Walsh and Regent Michael Falbo, who had been reappointed by Governor Doyle to new 7-year terms from 2008 to 2015.

-

Review of Past Year

This being the Board’s annual meeting, Regent President Bradley summarized major activities of the past year.  Some of those big-picture issues included:

  • Shifting student demographics and the challenges they have posed to the Board and to the campuses;
  • Increasing demands from students and the businesses that will employ them;
  • An uncertain economy; and
  • The changing demands of a globally competitive market.

What the Board has done, he said, is to carry out its duty under Chapter 36 of the Statutes to determine the needs of higher education in the state and to advocate for those needs.  That has been done primarily through continued development of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin – a regionally-based, needs-driven plan to help the State of Wisconsin and its citizens prosper. 

Last November, he recalled, the UW System received a prudent investment from the Governor and Legislature when they approved new funding for the Growth Agenda.  There was an outpouring of support from around the state, from both ends of the political spectrum, and from community and business leaders for the Growth Agenda vision, thanks to the persistent work of many university and civic leaders, especially President Reilly and the chancellors.  Meetings with legislators and other state leaders fostered a productive dialogue that emphasized common goals. 

With statewide bipartisan support, development of the Growth Agenda was continued through the establishment of think tanks comprised of UW System faculty and staff, business and community leaders, students, parents and members of the general public.  Each think tank focused its efforts on one of seven core strategies aimed at effectively advancing the Growth Agenda.  They delved deeply into the big issues the state is facing and generated some interesting big ideas that became the Growth Agenda Action Steps adopted by the Board in February.  Regent President Bradley thanked all who contributed their time, energy and good ideas to the think tanks. The eleven Action Steps, he said, have become the scaffolding for the Growth Agenda as it continues to evolve.

The entire process, he continued, has been transparent and collaborative with Wisconsin leaders and taxpayers.  Both he and President Reilly met several times with the Governor and a number of state legislators, including Assembly Speaker Mike Huebsch, Representative Steve Nass, and Senate Majority Leader Russ Decker, to share their vision, noting their responsibility in Chapter 36 of the Statutes to determine the state’s needs for higher education and to advocate for those needs.  Many other Regents, he added, have been active in advocating for students and the state, through editorials, letters, and meetings with state leaders, in the Capitol and in their local communities.

As an illustration of the unified message being conveyed, Regent President Bradley cited the work done by many in advocating for nationally competitive compensation for faculty and staff by making the case to invest wisely in the thousands of talented individuals who make possible the quality of UW institutions.  Advocacy in this area will continue through future opportunities to work with legislators and the Governor on long-term solutions to the compensation issue.

Another effort, he continued, has been the important work of Regents Falbo, Loftus, and Walsh – all U.S. military veterans – who have taken the lead in addressing the issue of funding the state-mandated veterans tuition remissions.

During the past year, the Board also experimented with a new meeting calendar, which has the advantages of both allowing staff to focus less time on arranging meetings and more time on other important work and providing blocs of time for the Board to delve more deeply into complex policy issues without the pressure of needing to vote on those issues at the same time.

While sustaining momentum for the Growth Agenda, work also was being done to fill five chancellor vacancies; and Regent President Bradley thanked the members of the Board who had served on the Regent Selection Committees involved in these important efforts.

In conclusion, he noted that, while much had been accomplished, much remains to be done and that all look forward to addressing those challenges over the coming year.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

UW System Report on Campus Safety

In introductory remarks, President Reilly referred to research that shows there to be less frequent incidents of violence on college campuses than in the wider society.  However, tragedies, such as those at Northern Illinois University and Virginia Tech, serve as reminders of the very serious responsibility to provide clear guidance on matters of emergency preparedness.

Last spring, the President formed the Commission on University Security, which consisted of 18 members, including Regent Jeff Bartell and UW-Madison Police Chief Sue Riseling.  The Commission was charged with making recommendations for how UW institutions could prevent, intervene, respond, heal, and resume operations if confronted with a threat of, or actual incidence of, major violence.  In July 2007, the Commission issued its report, which identified 17 recommendations that have enhanced campus readiness to respond to such a situation.

At the same time, Governor Doyle established his Task Force on Campus Safety, aimed at all colleges in the state, with goals of reviewing current campus safety practices and developing recommendations.  The Task Force issued its report in November 2007. 

Both of these reports formed the basis for the UW System’s current Report on Campus Safety.   President Reilly then called on Executive Senior Vice President Donald Mash to present an overview of that report.

Dr. Mash began his remarks by indicating that, following the tragedy at Virginia Tech, UW campuses immediately began reviewing their own campus circumstances and procedures.  When the report of the President’s Commission was made last year, it was noted that several of the recommendations already were being implemented.  Dr. Mash then coordinated responses to the report, working with Assistant Vice President Larry Rubin, Julie Gordon, Director of the Office of Operations Review and Audit,  System Legal Counsel Anne Bilder and Chief Riseling.  In addition, each chancellor named a campus coordinator, who also assisted in the implementation efforts. 

The challenge that the Report on Campus Safety addressed successfully, Dr. Mash remarked, was to provide overall guidance while recognizing differences among the individual UW campuses.  He then called on Assistant Vice President Rubin to discuss system-wide initiatives recommended in the report.

Dr. Rubin began his remarks by thanking Salvador Carranza, of the Office of Academic and Student Services, for his major contributions to the report.  Indicating that the first system-wide initiative involves developing strategies to enhance overall communication and coordination among the campuses, Dr. Rubin reported that an initial effort in that regard was formation of the Campus Safety Coordinators Group, consisting of a representative from each campus who serves as the contact person for that institution on issues of campus safety and security.  This group has provided progress reports on their campus efforts, coordinated campus reviews of the Report on Campus Safety, identified immediate training needs, and shared ideas, issues and best practices with one another.

The report recommends either an expanded role for this group or establishment of another group to address an even wider range of safety, security, and health-related issues.  One example of an issue that such a group might address is the growing concern about uninsured or under-insured students, especially lack of adequate coverage for mental health counseling.

The second system-wide initiative relates to training, with regard to which the report recommended that, instead of each institution addressing training needs, the system-wide group take leadership in designing a comprehensive, ongoing health, safety and security training program.  Noting that some such efforts have already begun, Dr. Rubin thanked Chief Riseling and her staff for taking the lead in offering a number of training sessions designed for members of campus review teams and for campus police and security staff.  The sessions have been well-attended and well-received; and a number of additional sessions already are scheduled around the state.

The third system-wide initiative relates to resource and funding issues.  Although every institution is enhancing its safety and security efforts, there are growing cost implications; and costs for implementing a number of the expectations are significant.  The report recommended that the UW System seek state and external funding for these efforts in the form of state budget requests, federal grants, and proposals to public and private organizations, especially in the areas of mental health counseling, radio interoperability and police and security staffing.

To address the final system-wide initiative, related to plans for sharing and reporting on the progress made by the campuses and the system in addressing safety and security expectations, Dr. Rubin called on Julie Gordon, Director of the Office of Operations Review and Audit.

Ms. Gordon began her remarks by noting that UW institutions were already developing crisis plans at the time of the Virginia Tech tragedy and that the UW System has contracted with UW-Madison to provide expertise to other campuses. 

The Office of Operations Review and Audit had done a number of related reviews, including a 2005 review of police and security and a review of mental health services that would be provided to the Board later in the year.

Dr. Mash’s request for a compilation of steps that had been taken to promote safety resulted in a lengthy list, from reviews of procedures and policies to establishment of multi-disciplinary review teams. 

Ms. Gordon’s office planned to make a progress report to the Board in one year – the minimum length of time needed to seek resources and make the changes necessary to meet some of the expectations in the report.  The office would assist with fact gathering, data analysis, and information on best practices across the country.

Ms. Gordon then introduced Christy Brown, UW-Milwaukee Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administrative Affairs, to discuss enhancing a culture of safety in the campus community.  Evidencing his commitment to this goal, Chancellor Santiago made significant investments that improved prevention, intervention and aftermath practices outlined in the Report of the President’ Commission on University Security. 

In the spring of 2007, he directed the convening of a broad-based group called the S.A.F.E (Safety Awareness for Everyone) Campus Committee.  In fall 2007, he approved several safety initiatives, many recommended by the committee. 

Prevention at UW-Milwaukee, Ms. Brown reported, focuses on three strategies:

  • Increased awareness
  • Heightened visibility
  • Improved external relationships. 

Increased awareness efforts have included a new campus safety website, training in self-defense, and active shooter training provided to law enforcement staff.

In the area of heightened visibility, the Chancellor approved hiring of five additional sworn and armed police officers and four additional non-sworn security officers, with three new officers already on board.  In addition the police department gained approval for two additional patrol cars which will provide both mobility and visual presence.  There also is the student escort service, called BOSS (Be on the Safe Side), with hours of service extended from 2 a.m. to 4 a.m.

While these efforts have been welcome and well-utilized, Ms. Brown remarked that the most successful effort to increase visibility has been the new SAFE Walker patrols that began in December 2007.  To date, SAFE Walkers have been students trained to patrol the neighborhoods and act as extra eyes and ears in the campus community, primarily in the late evening to early morning hours.  The program has also been praised by community neighbors, and some have volunteered to serve as SAFE Walkers themselves. 

Ms. Brown then introduced UW-Milwaukee Police Chief Pamela Hodermann for more information about that program.

Indicating that she has received many compliments about the program from both campus and community people, Chief Hodermann gave two examples of life-saving successes that occurred when the SAFE Walk program first began.  In one case, SAFE Walkers saw a man bleeding profusely on the street.  Their prompt calls for police and an ambulance saved the man’s life.  In another case, SAFE Walkers on a very cold night heard the cries of an elderly neighbor who had fallen on the ice on his porch and could not get up.  Had they not been there to help him inside, he could easily have frozen to death. 

She then introduced two of the SAFE Walkers:  Andrea Kloehn, a criminal justice major who planned to become a police officer; and Jeffrey Riederer, a marketing major, who also aspired to a career in law enforcement.

Concluding her remarks, Chief Hodermann indicated that there now are 30 SAFE Walkers, who work from 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m., reporting break-ins, burglaries, and any other potentially dangerous situations.  Since the inception of the program, there has been a reduction in crimes in the neighborhoods around campus.

Thanking Chief Hodermann and the students, Ms. Brown noted that SAFE Walkers extend the reach of the university’s law enforcement staff. 

Another prevention strategy, Ms. Brown continued, is improved external relationships, an example of which is the campus’ strong relationship with the Milwaukee Police Department and the ability to communicate with other jurisdictions through county-wide radio interoperability. 

Indicating that relationships with community neighbors also are critical to creating a culture of safety, Ms. Brown said that, through a new student program called COAST (Community Outreach and Assistance for Student Tenants), student leaders work as liaisons in the neighborhoods around the university, assisting with rental issues, civic responsibility and community programs.    

Moving to the areas of intervention in and aftermath of a crisis situation, Ms. Brown indicated that the university had formed a Threat Assessment Team to identify, review and monitor potentially troubling behavior of faculty, staff and students.  A SAFE Alert Notification System has been established through which text messages and e-mails would relay instructions should there be a life-threatening incident.  There also will be a public announcement system with scrolling message boards for use under similar circumstances. 

In addition, the university has developed an Emergency Operations Plan to guide actions during a crisis; and, with help from the UW System, work is being done to complete the campus’ Continuation of Operations Plan to resume activities should a crisis occur.

Finally, the Chancellor created the UWM Task Force on Campus Safety, led by Stan Stojkovic, Dean of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, which will provide an independent view of what is being done and what else could be done with regard to campus safety.  The task force includes representatives of the Milwaukee Police Department, the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, the City Attorney’s Office, UW-Madison Police Chief Sue Riseling, and other members. 

In conclusion, Ms. Brown observed that safety is everyone’s responsibility and that improvements will continue to be made in prevention, intervention and aftermath practices; increasing awareness of safety and security issues; and involving the campus community, neighbors, and expert resources.

In response to a question by Regent Womack, Ms. Brown indicated that the Safety Commission has recommended drills and tabletop exercises to assess readiness.  As a first step, staff are being trained, after which the exercises will be conducted.   Dr. Mash added that system-wide training programs also could be helpful in that regard.

Replying to a question by Regent Loftus, Ms. Gordon indicated that the program review of mental health services is being drafted and will be provided at an upcoming meeting.  It will focus on what types of services are provided and student use of those services, as well as on approaches by other institutions to cover the significant costs that are involved. 

Regent Loftus asked that the report also describe funding sources for mental health services and how they are integrated into other student health services.  In that regard, he commented that they should be fully integrated with such services, rather than left on the periphery.

Regent Bartell made several points based on his participation as a member of the President’s Commission and following efforts.  First, he pointed out that UW campuses are safe places, with rates of violent crime much lower than for comparably aged populations off campus. 

Second, the most effective efforts focus on prevention, through such means as multidisciplinary review teams and mental health services.

Third, coordination with local police departments is important, as is weapons training for police and radio interoperability.

Fourth, reallocation has been used to fund most safety initiatives to date.  In that regard, he complimented the campuses for the efforts they had made without new funding.

Fifth, every institution has different circumstances; and campuses should be relied upon to develop plans that suit their own situations.

Sixth, it will be helpful to have another report in a year’s time in order to keep these important issues in the forefront. 

In conclusion, he complimented Dr. Mash, the campuses, and Chief Riseling for their efforts and leadership in producing a good balance of initiatives going forward.

Regent Womack remarked on the importance of extending efforts to surrounding communities as well as the campus itself.

In that regard, Chancellor Santiago noted that UW-Milwaukee was extending text messaging to neighbors on a voluntary basis.  He cautioned, however, that two new vehicles and two additional security officers came at a cost of half a million dollars, which would not be available for academic programming.  Mental health services also carry a high price, which will have impacts on other parts of the campus.

Dr. Mash added that campuses have beneficial relationships with municipal police and community mental health agencies to provide services. 

Concluding the discussion, President Reilly thanked Dr. Mash and Regent Bartell for their leadership and thanked the campuses for all their efforts.  The campuses and system, he said, would continue to focus on safety and report back to the Board in a year.

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Update on Growth Agenda Action Steps

Indicating that great strides have been made in progress on Growth Agenda Action Steps, which resulted from the Advantage Wisconsin strategic planning process, President Reilly called on Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin to provide an update on work being done to advance the Action Steps.

Indicating that considerable progress has been made since her last report, Senior Vice President Martin provided the following highlights:

  • Learning Outcomes for all UW Baccalaureate Graduates:  After the end of the academic year, more than 60 faculty members met and identified several common themes in place at UW institutions.  Leadership in the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative is ongoing at several institutions, with significant activity in multiple areas at UW-Madison and formal adoption by the UW-Oshkosh Faculty Senate of learning outcomes incorporating liberal education as a core value. 
  • Wisconsin KnowHow2Go Network:  A working group is building on existing programs, including UW-Green Bay’s Phuture Phoenix and UW-Madison’s ambassadors and PEOPLE mentors, along with UW-Milwaukee’s and UW-Parkside’s high school mentors.  Committee on Baccalaurate Expansion funding has been provided for a new program at UW-Eau Claire, called Line Up for College; and a best practices event and pilot project is planned for fall.
  • Public Policy Forums:  Plans are under way for two public policy forums annually, utilizing experts to cover national issues impacting Wisconsin.  Leadership for the first three will be provided by UW-Eau Claire, UW-Madison, and UW Colleges/UW-Extension.  The first forum will occur in spring 2009.

In conclusion, Dr. Martin thanked the provosts for providing leadership in implementation of these Action Steps, which are moving forward in very exciting directions. 

In response to a question by Regent Davis, Dr. Martin indicated that the 11th Action Step is Fundraising for Need-Based Financial Aid.

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2009-11 Biennial Budget Review Process and Financial Aid Recommendation

In opening remarks, President Reilly recalled that it had been two years since development of the proposals that became the initial Growth Agenda biennial budget package. Even then, he remarked, there was recognition of the profound implications of its success on improving the lives of Wisconsin residents and communities statewide. 

Moving into the 2009-11 biennial budget process, he emphasized the importance of holding fast to the vision of higher per-capita incomes, more Wisconsin college graduates, more high-growth businesses, and a better quality of life.  While enormous momentum has been gained over the past year because the Growth Agenda has been embraced by so many state leaders, he cautioned that the UW remains very vulnerable in this uncertain economic climate. 

The biennial budget process, he explained, begins at this meeting with proposed resolutions on funding for the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant program and veterans’ tuition through increased GPR allocations to the Higher Educational Aids Board. 

In August, the Board would be asked to approve 2009-11 budget proposals, with specific institutional requests for Growth Agenda initiatives that address needs of local communities and leverage the unique capabilities of each UW institution.

The goal at this meeting would be to provide a preliminary, broad overview of the kinds of budget initiatives being developed

Turning to the issue of more competitive compensation for faculty and staff, President Reilly recalled that, when student leaders spoke to the Board in April, one of their top priorities was to improve the UW System’s ability to recruit and retain quality instructors and researchers and dedicated advisors and counselors.  While they want an affordable education, they made clear that they also want – and deserve – a high quality educational experience.

The Growth Agenda vision, the President emphasized, cannot be achieved if campuses cannot hire and keep the professors best qualified to teach and to engage in job-creating research; and vacancies in these jobs are becoming harder and harder to fill. 

For example, the Chronicle of Higher Education reported in April that UW-Madison Assistant Professor Jon Pevehouse had not even finished his first year in Wisconsin before other universities started making offers to him.  He eventually left for the University of Chicago, doubling his salary. 

The Badger Herald reported last year that the deans of the 13 UW Colleges earn significantly less than most peer college presidents. 

There also are regular reports of UW faculty and staff searches that have failed because the salaries offered are lower than the local school district or the local technical college.

Therefore, President Reilly had decided, in consultation with Regent President Bradley and Regent Vice President Pruitt, to form a UW Commission on Competitiveness and Compensation to examine this issue more deeply and consider its short and long-term implications for Wisconsin.  The commission would include not only UW colleagues, but also Regents, students, and community and business leaders – people who understand the importance of the university in ensuring a competitive position for Wisconsin in a global, knowledge-based economy.  It is expected that the commission’s recommendations would be ready by early 2009, in time to be factored into development of the next pay plan.

As to the overall issue of budget development, President Reilly noted that all 15 UW institutions had begun in January to develop proposals for the upcoming biennial budget.  Given the stringencies of the current economic climate, each proposal was being weighed in a very competitive process to determine how well it would fit with the core strategies identified in the Growth Agenda and the Advantage Wisconsin strategic planning process:

  • Preparing students for lifelong success
  • Producing more graduates
  • Stimulating creation of well-paying jobs
  • Building stronger communities

Noting that initial budget submissions totaled about $63 million, President Reilly reported that they had been shaped into a package totaling less than $39 million in GPR and fees over the biennium, reflecting strategic and tough discussions about cost effectiveness and “bang for the buck” of each of the proposals.  It also is important, he added, that each proposal include measurable outcomes, so as to further the UW’s commitment to accountability to Wisconsin taxpayers.

With regard to Regent input in shaping the budget proposal, President Reilly indicated that, between the June and August meetings, Regents would have an opportunity for individual conversations with System staff on development of budget initiatives, in which they will be able to ask questions and provide advice as budget development proceeds.  On the first day of the August meetings, there would be a discussion only session in which the Regents could talk together about the proposed budget and their reactions. On the second day of the August meetings, discussion could continue, after which the Board will be asked to vote on the 2009-11 biennial budget proposal. 

He then called on Associate Vice President Freda Harris to provide an overview of biennial budget development to date.

Ms. Harris began by noting that the planning process had been proceeding without benefit of the Governor’s biennial budget instructions and major policy themes. It was hoped that those would be forthcoming soon.  Two years ago, the Governor’s instructions identified 11 priorities, including investing in education.  While budget instructions asked state agencies to request no increases in GPR appropriations, an explicit exception was provided for UW System instruction and research activities focused on economic growth. 

The Legislative Fiscal Bureau estimated that the state would have a $1.7 billion structural deficit going into the 2009-11 biennium. Because of that deficit, similar instructions regarding new initiatives were expected, the hope being that the Governor would again provide an exemption for initiatives designed to advance the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin. 

Indicating that the initiatives being brought to the Board are the strongest proposals made by the institutions, to advance the Growth Agenda, Ms. Harris said that requests were received for 10 additional system-wide programs and that institutional requests had been reduced from $63 million GPR/fees biennially to $39 million.  The initiatives were prioritized by reviewing them against the goals of the Growth Agenda and the Action Steps that had been identified to move the Growth Agenda forward.  Factors considered were:  Whether there were other options available to achieve the goals without additional funding; whether there were matching funds available from business, reallocation by the institution, or through federal grants; whether the outcomes were a good match for the investment; how much time it would take to achieve the outcomes and whether, if the outcomes could not be achieved within the next two biennia, a portion of the initiative could be delayed until another budget.

The three initiatives to be presented at this meeting were:

  • The Recruitment and Retention Initiative
  • The Libraries Initiative
  • Growth Agenda II. 

The Recruitment and Retention Initiative would be similar to funding included in the last two biennia.  The 2007-09 budget provided $6.7 million in ongoing funds to help institutions recruit and retain high-demand faculty.  That funding has been very helpful in competing against outside offers.  However, the gap between UW and peer salaries has continued to increase. 

This request would seek $15 million in GPR/fees biennially to recruit and retain top faculty and staff.  A separate request for a general pay plan for all faculty and staff would be submitted later in the year.  Without a recruitment and retention fund, the UW could continue to lose more of the faculty and staff who maintain the high-quality education provided to students and bring in the federal funding so essential to the state’s economy.

The Library Initiative would request $6 million GPR/fees in ongoing funding to expand research across all UW institutions by providing money to acquire electronic content in areas of new knowledge and to expand access to UW-Madison’s electronic collections for faculty across the UW System.

Explosive growth in the information marketplace, compounded by large cost increases for periodicals and lack of resources to acquire them, has had a crippling effect on faculty research, limiting the ability of researchers to keep up-to-date in their fields, pass knowledge on to students and transfer research into economic growth for the state.  It is difficult to attract and retain quality faculty when core information resources are not available, and inadequate electronic resources impacts the ability to compete for research grants because it takes too long to retrieve materials through interlibrary loan.

The Growth Agenda II initiative contained three components:  The first, Increasing Baccalaureate Degrees, would cost about $14 million.  Six of the four-year campuses, the UW Colleges and UW-Extension have proposed initiatives in this category.  UW-Green Bay, UW-Oshkosh, UW-La Crosse and UW-Whitewater would grow their enrollments by 1,734 students. 

UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh would move forward with the second phase of their Growth Agenda initiatives and grow enrollments to match regional needs.  UW-Whitewater would increase growth in high-demand, high-need areas, working with community partners; and UW-La Crosse’s enrollment growth would occur through a differential tuition initiative approved by the Board in December 2007, with financial aid funds being sought to help students pay the cost of the differential.  The UW Colleges and UW-Extension would continue implementation of the Adult Student Initiative with a goal of doubling online enrollments from 4,500 to 9,000 over four years.  UW-Parkside and UW-Superior would focus on improved success for students through greater retention and graduation rates.

The second component, Technology and Workforce Development, would total $23 million, with initiatives at the two doctoral and four comprehensive institutions.  UW-Madison would seek matching funds that would allow retention of more than 500 graduate students and would leverage $23 million in federal funds.  UW-Milwaukee would move forward with Phase II of its Research Initiative, including cluster hires and establishment of the schools of Freshwater Sciences and Public Health.  UW-Platteville would expand engineering programs to UW-Washington County and UW-Sheboygan.  UW-River Falls would increase enrollments, expand agricultural programs, work with WiSys on a Tissue and Cellular Innovation Center and infuse sustainability principles into curriculum development.  UW-Stevens Point would increase enrollments, provide funds for the Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology, strengthen core programs and develop programs in areas of high need for the region.  UW-Stout would establish a Discovery Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.  These initiatives would add more than 1,000 students.

The third component, related to the Wisconsin Idea, would include two initiatives at UW-Platteville and UW-Eau Claire, totaling $2 million.  The Engagement Center initiative at UW-Platteville would provide a means for the campus and students to become involved in developing solutions to real-world problems.  The Eau Claire Applied Behavior Program would add qualified graduates in an area where the state is behind in training programs and analysts working in the field.

Turning to other items, Ms. Harris noted that cost-to-continue initiatives would allow maintenance of the currently approved level of programming, including full funding of faculty and academic staff pay plan increases of two percent effective June 2009.  While these increases would be in effect for one month in 2008-09, the state would need to add the other eleven months of funding to the base budget in 2009-11.  Other cost-to-continue items would include increases to utilities and fringe benefit rates, the Lawton Minority Undergraduate Retention Grant Program and the Advanced Opportunity Program.

Statutory language requests, many of which had been presented in previous biennia, would help serve students more efficiently and minimize administrative costs.

Replying to a question by Regent Falbo, Ms. Harris indicated that dollar amounts for specific initiatives would be made available over the course of the summer.

In response to a request by Regent Pruitt, Ms. Harris offered a brief explanation of “biennial math”, which consists of funding in the first year of the biennium being continued into the second year, so that the cost in the second year is twice the cost of the first year plus what would be requested for the second year.  On the other hand, ongoing cost refers to the cost in the second year, which is carried on into future years.  For example, a request for a $5 million increase in recruitment and retention funding in each year of the biennium would total $5 million in the first year and $10 million in the second year, for a biennial total of $15 million.  The ongoing cost would be $10 million. 

Regent Vásquez requested that new Regents be paired with one or more experienced Regents in briefing sessions, and President Reilly concurred, noting that care must be taken not to inadvertently constitute a quorum of a committee and that maintaining an informal atmosphere is desirable.  Regent President Bradley added that most briefings are done with two or three Regents.

Turning to the matter of financial aid, Ms. Harris noted that, because a focus of the Growth Agenda is on increasing enrollment of adult students and students from economically disadvantaged families, it is necessary to increase need-based financial aid and improve services that address the needs of diverse populations of students.  Finding a way to help Wisconsin families afford higher education, she said, continues to be a top priority for the UW and the state.

She then presented for consideration two resolutions, the first of which asked the Board to support a request to remove the specific dollar maximum for the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant WHEG award, providing greater flexibility in reducing financial barriers faced by the neediest students, and a modification that would increase each student’s WHEG award by at least the same dollar amount as the dollar increase in undergraduate academic student fees, thereby granting a dollar-for-dollar hold harmless increase to eligible UW students.

The second resolution asked the state to fully fund the Veterans’ Tuition Remission program and to consider modifying current language to allow federal educational programs that specifically cover the cost of tuition and fees only, not living expenses, to take precedence over the state’s GI Bill benefits.  Noting that such a program is under consideration at the federal level, she explained that there would no decrease in benefits to veterans and that such language would help ensure the continued viability of both state and federal programs. 

Adoption of Resolution 9489 was moved by Regent Shields, seconded by Regent Thomas and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

WHEG Hold Harmless Program

Resolution 9489:  WHEREAS, the Board of Regents is greatly concerned that children from lower- and middle-income backgrounds are facing a future with fewer opportunities and, therefore, has made it a priority to increase the possibility for low- and middle-income students to participate in public higher education in Wisconsin; and

WHEREAS, the Wisconsin Higher Education Grant program for University of Wisconsin students (WHEG-UW) is the primary state need-based financial aid program to assist low-income students in attaining a college education; and, 

WHEREAS, despite an average 12.9% annual increase in WHEG-UW funding over the past decade, Wisconsin ranks below the peer average in state grant awards per full time equivalent (FTE) student and many students are increasingly relying on loans and personal debt to finance their college education; and

WHEREAS, section 39.435(3) of the Wisconsin Statutes establishes a maximum WHEG award of $3,000, and the maximum award in 2008-09 will be $2,980; and,

 WHEREAS, the statutory maximum award limit for the state-funded Wisconsin Tuition Grant for students attending private institutions was removed by Act 16 of 2001; and,

WHEREAS, additional funding that increases each student’s WHEG-UW award to match the change in academic fees will assure that students are not be priced out of college due to increases in tuition; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Regents has identified increased need-based financial aid as critical to Wisconsin’s economic future and the success of the Growth Agenda.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System requests that the statutory language of the WHEG program be modified to remove the specific maximum for the WHEG-UW award, which would provide greater flexibility in reducing the financial barriers faced by the neediest students while continuing to provide financial assistance to at least as many students as received an award in the previous academic year; and, 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Board requests that the statutory language of the WHEG-UW program be modified to provide that each student’s WHEG-UW award will increase by at least the same dollar amount  as the dollar increase in undergraduate academic student fees, thereby granting a “dollar-for-dollar” hold harmless increase to eligible University of Wisconsin students.

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Upon motion by Regent Drew, seconded by Regent Vásquez, the following resolution was adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Full Funding of Veteran’s Tuition Remissions

Resolution 9490:  WHEREAS, all Wisconsin citizens benefit from the sacrifice of veterans and their families.

WHEREAS, the Wisconsin GI Bill (2006 Wisconsin Act 468) recognizes those sacrifices and furthers the state’s educational investment and opportunity for economic development by providing a 100 percent tuition remission for veterans and eligible family members; and

WHEREAS, funding in the amount of $5,013,700 in 2007-08 and $6,562,300 in 2008-09 was provided through the Higher Educational Aids Board to cover the cost of Wisconsin GI Bill remissions at University of Wisconsin System and Wisconsin Technical College System institutions;

WHEREAS, $17.5 million in remissions for University of Wisconsin System institutions alone were granted during 2007-08;

WHEREAS, and the cost of these remissions has created a significant and increasing fiscal burden on University of Wisconsin institutions, and access and quality concerns for students.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Regents and the institutions of the University of Wisconsin System strongly support full state General Program Revenue (GPR) funding of all remissions granted through the Wisconsin GI Bill as essential for increasing access to higher education for Wisconsin’s veterans and their families, as well as for other Wisconsin students and their families, and ensuring that all students will continue to receive a high quality University of Wisconsin education; and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Board of Regents remains supportive of the Wisconsin GI Bill; that if the federal government enacts legislation providing veterans' educational benefits that are payable directly to educational institutions for tuition and fees, as opposed to providing lump sum benefits directly to veterans that may be used for all educational expenses including housing and books, then the Board would further support a statutory revision to the Wisconsin GI Bill to require veterans and their families to utilize such federal support before accessing tuition and fee remissions under the Wisconsin GI Bill; that such revision would not result in a decrease of benefits to any veteran and would avoid losing millions of federal dollars that would otherwise be available to support Wisconsin veterans; and that a revision would be sought in cooperation with the appropriate state and federal agencies, as a means of ensuring coordination of services and benefits to veterans as well as the long-term fiscal stability of the programs.

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Welcome to New Academic Leaders

President Reilly introduced Bill Laatsch, who had been named Interim Provost of UW-Green Bay.

The President noted the appointment of David J. Ward, President of NorthStar Economics, Inc., as Interim Chancellor of UW-Green Bay.  Dr. Ward had a long and distinguished career in the UW System at UW-Green Bay, UW-Oshkosh, and UW System Administration.

UW-River Falls Provost Connie Foster was welcomed as incoming Interim Chancellor for that university.  She also has served as Dean of the College of Education and Professional Studies. 

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Congratulations to UW-River Falls Women’s Track and Field Team

President Reilly congratulated the UW-River Falls Women’s Track and Field team on winning the NCAA Division III national championship – the first national title for the school since the men’s hockey team won the NCAA national championship in 1994. 

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Commendation to UW-Whitewater Students

The President commended UW-Whitewater students for their response to the bursting of a water pipe, which left the campus without hot water and steam for about a week.  Instead of complaining about cold showers, students used the situation to help others in much greater need.  Several student groups joined together to raise money for the Rotary India Water Trust – an organization that develops a sustainable water supply for about a million people in 650 villages.  The students posted signs on campus that said:  “Think not having a hot shower is bad?  Try not having clean drinking water.”   He congratulated the students for turning a negative experience into a positive and meaningful one.

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UW-Eau Claire Women’s Softball Team Wins Division III National Championship

President Reilly congratulated the UW-Eau Claire Women’s softball Team on winning the Division III National Championship.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

 Regent Davis, Chair, presented the committee’s report.

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UW-Milwaukee Presentations

Regent Davis reported unanimous approval by the committee, for inclusion in the consent agenda, of two new schools and a new Ph.D. program for UW-Milwaukee.

Campus Academic Plan

Presenting UW-Milwaukee’s evolving campus academic plan, Provost Rita Cheng enumerated the new Ph.D., master’s and baccalaureate degree programs being planned over the next few years, many of which would be housed in the Zilber School of Public Health and the School of Freshwater Sciences.

School of Public Health

The School of Public Health would be organized to:  conduct rigorous public health research and scholarship; educate the current and future public health workforce; and influence development of strategies and policies to promote health among diverse populations.

The new school would follow the standards of the national accrediting body for schools of public health, with the goal of seeking accreditation around 2012-2014.  It would focus on five public health disciplines, conduct interdisciplinary research and hire faculty to teach in the targeted areas. 

The school would be connected to the community through its research, teaching and service and would collaborate with other UW-Milwaukee schools, as well as with the Medical College of Wisconsin, the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, and the Milwaukee Health Department. 

Legislative approval would be sought in 2009.

School of Freshwater Sciences

The committee was informed that, while much of the infrastructure is in place for the new school through the research and physical plant of UW-Milwaukee’s WATER Institute, plans are being made to create a unique school. 

There are no other schools of Freshwater Sciences in the country; and UW-Milwaukee is poised to take a leadership role – nationally and internationally – in promoting research, teaching, and science on the sustainability, human and environmental health components, and the technology and policy issues of freshwater systems.

Establishment of the school would add to the university’s Ph.D. portfolio and provide access to new extramural funding.  Collaborations have already begun with the new School of Public Health and many UW-Milwaukee departments, the Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Institutes of Health, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, UW-Madison’s Nelson Institute and Center for Limnology, and programs at UW-Oshkosh and UW-Green Bay.

Ph.D Program in Africology

Noting that the program had been under development for more than eight years, Regent Davis emphasized the global nature of the program and its capacity to strengthen outreach and linkages to the greater metropolitan community.  Based in a strong department, the program would address a national need for doctorally prepared Africology gratudates.

Dr. Joyce Kirk, Chair of Africology, presented the program, recognizing her faculty, most of whom attended the meeting, as well as Vel Phillips, former Wisconsin Secretary of State, judge, and civil rights leader.

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Report of the Senior Vice President

Background on Proposed Western Technical College/UW-La Crosse Liberal Arts Degree Program

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin reported that the program was approved by the Wisconsin Technical College System Board in May and would come to the Board of Regents in August.  At that time, an update also would be provided on the Chippewa Valley Technical College-UW-Eau Claire program approved in 2007.

Dr. Martin recalled that, when the latter program was being considered, La Crosse was the only other region of the state identified for a liberal arts transfer degree.  That proposal was based on the CVTC model, as a collaborative degree drawing upon the strengths of both Western Technical College and UW-La Crosse. 

She expressed the hope that the program would meet the criteria established in 2007 as part of the Board’s review and approval process; and she asked that any concerns be brought to her attention so that they might be addressed in August.

Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Related Academic Approval Items

Senior Vice President Martin provided an overview of the annual Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Related Academic Approval Items, including a break-down by minority status and gender. 

The committee approved the report, which finalizes the tenure process for many deserving faculty, for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Consent Agenda

Regent Davis reported that the committee approved seven resolutions as part of its committee consent agenda, six of which were new program authorizations.

Adoption of the following resolutions by the Board as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Spector, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

Establish the School of Public Health University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9491: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the UW System Board of Regents authorizes the establishment of the School of Public Health at UW-Milwaukee.  The establishment of the School of Public Health at UW-Milwaukee requires additional approval by the Wisconsin Legislature per Chapter 36.09 (1)(gm) of the Wisconsin Statutes.

Establish the School of Freshwater Sciences University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9492:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the UW System Board of Regents authorizes the establishment of the School of Freshwater Sciences at UW-Milwaukee.  The establishment of the School of Freshwater Sciences at UW-Milwaukee requires additional approval by the Wisconsin Legislature per Chapter 36.09 (1)(gm) of the Wisconsin Statutes.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Africology University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9493:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the PhD. in Africology.


2008-09 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status

Resolution 9494: That, upon recommendation of the respective Chancellors and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2008-09 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status be approved.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A. in Design Arts University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Resolution 9495:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.A. in Design Arts.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A. in Arts Management University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Resolution 9496: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.A. in Arts Management.

Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Resolution 9497:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work.

Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Plastics Engineering University of Wisconsin-Stout

Resolution 9498: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Plastics Engineering.

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.A. in Spanish University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9499: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the M.A. in Spanish.

Program Authorization (Implementation) M.A. in Women’s Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9500:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the M.A. in Women’s Studies.

Acceptance of the Proffer from the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

Resolution 9501: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents accepts the proffer of $11,509,605 made by the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for fiscal year July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences and Music.  

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

The committee’s report was presented by Regent Brent Smith, Chair

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UW-Milwaukee Presentation: Overview of the Master Planning Process

Christy Brown, Interim Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administrative Affairs, presented the committee with an update on UW-Milwaukee’s Master Planning Process.

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Differential Tuition Proposals

UW-Madison School of Engineering Undergraduate Differential Tuition

The committee approved a differential tuition initiative of $700 per semester, to be phased in over a three-year period, for students enrolled in the School of Engineering. 

Funding would be directed to four areas: 1) faculty; 2) engineering shop and undergraduate labs; 3) student services; and 4) new programs and curricular innovations.  The additional funding would allow the college to add more sections of bottleneck courses; and, as a result, it is anticipated that time-to-degree would be reduced and, hence, total tuition paid by many engineering students would be reduced as well.

Private funds would be raised for need-based financial aid, with the college committed to raising 25% of the total provided through differential tuition for this purpose. 

The tuition proposal was developed with input from Polygon, an umbrella organization consisting of student leaders from 55 student organizations in the college.  Polygon voted 80% in favor of an undergraduate differential tuition; and representatives of Polygon spoke in favor of the proposal at the committee meeting, as did a representative from Rockwell Automation.

The committee amended the resolution to require that the differential tuition be reviewed and submitted to the Board for re-approval in three years, and then approved the resolution as amended.

Upon motion by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Shields, the following resolution was adopted by the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Madison School of Engineering Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9502: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the differential tuition for all UW-Madison undergraduate students enrolled in the Engineering Major beginning in the Fall Semester of 2008-09.  The proposed tuition increase will be phased in over three years: $300 per semester ($600 per year) in 2008-09; $500 per semester ($1,000 per year) in 2009-10; and $700 per semester ($1,400 per year) in 2010-11 and ongoing.  The differential would be prorated for part-time undergraduate students.  The differential tuition will be reviewed for re-approval by the Board of Regents in three years

UW-Superior Undergraduate Differential Tuition

The committee approved a two-part differential tuition for UW-Superior.  The first part would replace an expired library initiative differential of $75 per semester with a $68.50 differential which would continue to be used for library initiatives.  The second part would use $35 per semester to expand student career services.  The differential tuition would total $103.50 per semester or $207 per year.

Student Government President Stefan Fletcher described the student review process and spoke in support of the resolution.  The UW-Superior Student Senate approved resolutions in support of each of these differential tuition components on April 21, 2008; and there will be annual review by the students of the differential. 

Adoption by the Board of the following resolution was moved by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Shields, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Superior Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9503: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Superior and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves an increase of $57 to the differential tuition for all UW-Superior undergraduate students beginning in the fall semester of 2008-09.  The tuition differential would increase from $75 per semester to $103.50 per semester ($207 per year).  The differential would be prorated for part-time undergraduate students.

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UW System Information Technology Report and Plans

The committee received a report from Associate Vice President Ed Meachen on the status of six large IT projects.

Mr. Meachen also provided on update on strategic information technology plans being prepared on each campus. 

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UW System Trust Funds Revision to Policy on Investment and Social Responsibility

Investment Analyst Tom Reinders presented to the committee a revision to the Board’s trust fund policy that would remove the requirement for using a proxy voting service.  Staff believe that there are other, more cost effective approaches available to address this need.

The committee approved a resolution approving the proposed revision for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Committee Business

Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (3rd Quarter)

Vice President Debbie Durcan reported that total awards of $888 million were reported for the quarter ending March 31, 2008, representing an increase of $23.8 million from the prior year.

Quarterly Expenditures – Budget to Actual Report (3rd Quarter)

Vice President Durcan presented a schedule of UW System expenditures through the third quarter of the fiscal year.

Consideration of Salary Range Adjustment for Chancellor, UW-Milwaukee

The committee approved a resolution to amend the salary range for the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor to address equity and salary compression concerns.  The range was last reviewed in February 2006.

Adoption by the Board of the following resolution was moved by Regent Smith, seconded, and adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Drew, Falbo, Loftus, Pruitt, Shields, Smith, Spector, Thomas, Vásquez, and Womack (17) voting in the affirmative.      

Consideration of Salary Range Adjustment: Chancellor University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9504: Whereas, s. 20.923 (4g), Wis. Stats., gives the Board of Regents the authority to establish salary ranges for: System President; Senior Vice Presidents; Chancellors; UW-Madison Vice Chancellor; and UW-Milwaukee Vice Chancellor; and

Whereas, the Senior Executive Salary Policy (Regent Policy Document 6-5 as amended October 10, 2003) specifies that UW senior executive salary ranges shall be adopted by resolution by a majority of the full membership of the Board of Regents in open session by roll call vote at a regularly scheduled meeting, for the ensuing fiscal year, after review of peer salary survey information; and

Whereas, Chancellor Santiago’s salary is 16.2% below the projected peer median for 2007-08 and nearly the lowest among the peers; and

Whereas, Chancellor Santiago’s salary of $291,284 is $38,919 below 95% of the projected peer median for 2007-08

Now, therefore be it resolved;

That, in accordance with Wisconsin statutes and Regent Policy Document 6-5, the Board adopts a new salary range for the university senior executive in senior executive salary group seven as set forth in the attached, effective July 1, 2008.

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Report of the Vice President

Update on FY08 Utility Expenditure Projections

Vice President Durcan provided the committee with an update on fiscal year 2008 utility expenditures, which showed an estimated $21 million surplus.  Those savings would be applied to the state’s revenue shortfall.

2008 College Sustainability Report Card

Vice President Durcan briefed the committee on the results of the 2008 College Sustainability Report Card, with the UW System receiving a B+, up from a B last year.

Patent Infringement Litigation

The committee received an update from UW-Green Bay Chief Information Officer Kathy Pletcher on the patent infringement litigation that involved the vendor for the course management software used throughout the UW System.   The university has moved to a new version of the software that the vendor believes to be non-infringing.

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Consent Agenda

Regent Smith moved adoption of the following resolutions as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent Shields and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW System Trust Funds Revision to Policy on Investment and Social Responsibility

Resolution 9505:  That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves a revision to Regent Policy 31-13, Investment and Social Responsibility, such that item 3. reads as follows:

3.  To enhance the Board's awareness of social concerns, the Regents through the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee will direct University of Wisconsin System Administration to conduct a proxy review to highlight proxy resolutions related to discrimination and substantial social injury.

UW-Oshkosh Food Service Contract with Sodexho Management, Inc.

Resolution 9506: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contract with Sodexho Management, Inc., to provide Dining Services at the University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh effective July 11, 2008 for a period of seven years.

UW-Eau Claire Bookstore Contract with Barnes and Noble

Resolution 9507: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contract with Barnes and Noble to provide Bookstore Services to the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire effective July 1, 2008 for a period of seven years.

UW-Platteville Bookstore Contract with Follett Higher Education

Resolution 9508:  That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the contract with Follett Higher Education to provide Bookstore Services at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville effective, July 1, 2008 for a period of seven years.

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REPORT OF THE Physical Planning and Funding Committee

Regent Bartell, Chair, presented the committee’s report.

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UW-Milwaukee Presentation: Master Plan Update

Following an introduction by Chancellor Carlos Santiago, Claude R. Schuttey, Director of the Office of University Architects/Planning and Transportation, reviewed progress on the master planning process, what each phase would involve, how shared governance has been involved, and potential sites for growth.  The process is expected to take 18 months to complete.

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Report of the Associate Vice President

Building Commission Actions

It was reported by Associate Vice President David Miller that the Building Commission approved about $33.5 million in projects at its April meeting.  The funding breakdown was $15 million in general fund supported borrowing, $17 million in program revenue, and $1.5 million in gift and grant funds.

Discussion of 2009-11 Capital Budget

The committee began review of the 2009-11 Capital Budget request that would be presented to the Board for approval in August.  The draft included specific requests for the biennium and outlined anticipated projects and funding over the next six years, in accordance with a statutory requirement that each state agency submit an agency-wide six-year plan to the Department of Administration biennially. 

While some state universities operate differently, the UW System must rely on state bonding authority for its building projects.  State general fund supported borrowing (GFSB) has been declining – from $445 million in 2001-03 to $393 million in the current biennium.  The UW has the largest share – 70% – of that amount.

Mr. Miller reported that the proposed Capital Budget would require a significant but reasonable increase in GFSB. By practice, the state’s annual general fund bonding capacity is restricted by limiting annual GFSB debt service to four percent of general purpose revenue.

For the 2009-15 period, UW System institutions requested about 55 projects totaling $1.36 billion in state funding.  The six-year plan anticipates funding 27 projects, costing $767 million.  In the last six-year period, funding of $418 million was provided.   Unknown factors that could impact the 2009-11 Capital Budget and the six-year plan include improvements to or replacement of coal-fired heating plants.

The percentage of critical maintenance projects requested by campuses that have been funded dropped from 70% in 2003-05 to 22% in 2007-09.  It would cost more than $200 million per biennium to begin reducing the maintenance backlog.  In addition, routine operational maintenance funding has not received any increases in more than 20 years despite the growth in university facilities, bringing the UW’s average dollars per square foot spent on upkeep well below the national benchmark. 

Because of this serious deficit, Regent Bartell cautioned, buildings will not last as long as they should; and disrepair will lead to student dissatisfaction.  The committee planned to report back on these matters in the fall.

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Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct New Academic Building, UW-La Crosse

The committee approved, for inclusion in the consent agenda, requested authority to construct a new academic building, which would provide the campus with 46 new general assignment classrooms equipped with modern educational technology.  The cost of $44 million included $6 million of gifts raised by the UW-La Crosse Foundation.  As a result of a student-led initiative, the request also added funding to the project to attain a LEED Silver Rating and to use renewable energy sources as an educational tool.

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Authority to Enter into Land Use Agreement to Allow the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation to Construct a Faculty Office Building and Accept the Facility as a Gift-in-Kind, UW-Madison

The committee approved, for inclusion in the consent agenda, the request for authority in order to allow construction of this building, funded entirely by the Medical Foundation.  The building would consist of faculty offices and academic support areas and would connect to the existing Clinical Sciences Center.

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Authority to Construct Outdoor Track Lighting Portion of Williams Fieldhouse Addition Phase I Project, UW-Platteville

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Authority to (1) Purchase a Parcel of Land with Improvements at 2016 Briggs Street and (2) Acquire Nine Parcels on Land on Briggs Street in the City of Stevens Point for Parking Development, UW-Stevens Point

A resolution granting the requested authority was approved by the committee for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

The committee approved a resolution granting approval to construct seven minor projects under the all-agency maintenance fund program. 

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Committee Consent Agenda

The committee approved four resolutions requesting minor actions, including granting an easement, approval of minor budget adjustments to two projects, and amendment of the Board Bylaws to change the name of the Physical Planning and Funding Committee to the Capital Planning and Budget Committee to better reflect the committee’s responsibilities.

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Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct New Academic Building Project, UW-Superior

A resolution approving the Design Report and granting the requested authority was approved by the committee for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Authority to Revise Funding of the Jim Dan Hill Library Renovation, UW-Superior

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Consent Agenda

It was moved by Regent Bartell and seconded by Regent Falbo that the following resolutions, which had been unanimously approved by the committee, be adopted by the Board as consent agenda items.  The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote.

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the New Academic Building Project, UW-La Crosse

Resolution 9509:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-La Crosse Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the New Academic Building project be approved and authority be granted to increase the scope and budget by $250,000 Program Revenue-Cash and construct the project at a total cost of $44,250,000 ($36,950,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $350,000 Building Trust Funds, $950,000 Program Revenue-Cash, and $6,000,000 Gift Funds).

Authority to Enter Into a Land Use Agreement to Allow the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation to Construct a Faculty Office Building and Accept the Facility as a Gift-in-Kind, UW-Madison

Resolution 9510: That, upon the recommendation of the of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to permit the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation (UWMF) to construct a new Faculty Office Building adjacent to the University of Wisconsin Clinical Science Center (CSC), under terms of a land use agreement with the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, and to accept the completed facility as a gift-in-kind from the foundation. 

Authority to Construct the Outdoor Track Lighting Portion of the Williams Fieldhouse Addition Phase I Project, UW-Platteville

Resolution 9511: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct the Outdoor Track Lighting portion of the Williams Fieldhouse Addition Phase I project at a cost of $250,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Authority to (1) Purchase a Parcel of Land with Improvements at 2016 Briggs Street and (2) Acquire Nine Parcels of Land on Briggs Street in the City of Stevens Point for Parking Development, UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9512:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to (1) purchase a 0.303-acre parcel of land and improvements located at 2016 Briggs Street in the city of Stevens Point for $88,000 Program Revenue-Cash, plus closing costs; and (2) purchase the remaining nine parcels along Briggs Street within the Board of Regents approved boundary as they become available at a total estimated cost of $870,000 (in 2008 dollars) funded by a combination of Program Revenue-Cash and Program Revenue Supported Bonding, as appropriate.

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9513: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $10,078,400 ($244,600 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $944,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; $7,482,100 Program Revenue Cash; and $1,407,700 Gifts and Grants).

Permanent Easement for Access to Private Property Adjacent to the Rhinelander Agricultural Research Station, UW-Madison

Resolution 9514:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents grant a 100-foot long by 20-foot wide permanent easement in the Town of Stella for access to private property located adjacent to the Rhinelander Agricultural Research Station.

Authority to Adjust the Budget of the Fine Arts Center Remodeling and Addition Project, UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9515:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to increase the project budget of the Fine Arts Center Remodeling and Addition project by $463,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – UW Infrastructure at total estimated project cost of $27,118,200 ($25,120,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $115,000 Residual General Fund Supported Borrowing, $307,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – Facilities Repair, $463,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – UW Infrastructure, $1,000,000 Gift Funds, and $113,200 Agency Funds).

Authority to Adjust the Budget of the Dreyfus University Center Remodeling and Addition Project, UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9516:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to increase the project budget of the Dreyfus University Center Remodeling and Addition project by $500,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing for a total estimated project cost of $24,922,000 ($16,500,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $6,000,000 existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $1,472,500 Program Revenue-Cash, and $949,500 General Fund Supported Borrowing-Utilities Repair and Renovation).

Amendments of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents

Resolution 9517:  That the attached amendments to the Bylaws of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, which are presented to change the name of the Physical Planning and Funding Committee to the Capital Planning and Budget Committee to more accurately reflect the responsibilities of the committee, be adopted.  

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the New Academic Building Project, UW-Superior

Resolution 9518: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Superior Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct the New Academic Building project at an estimated total project cost of $31,374,000 ($23,174,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $1,200,000 Building Trust Funds-Contingency, and $7,000,000 Gift Funds).

Authority to Revise the Funding of the Jim Dan Hill Library Renovation, UW-Superior

Resolution 9519: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Superior Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to revise the funding and budget for the Jim Dan Hill Library Renovation project by an increase of $847,800 General Fund Supported Borrowing–UW Infrastructure, and a decrease of $1,125,000 Gift Funds, for a total estimated project cost of $7,546,200 ($4,292,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $1,254,200 General Fund Supported Borrowing–UW Infrastructure, and $2,000,000 Gift Funds).

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ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

President of the Board

Regent Bradley was nominated for re-election as President of the Board by Regent Crain, who expressed enthusiastic support of the Regents and system and campus leaders for his leadership.  His work as President and in other capacities on the Board, she said, has merited respect for his skills and appreciation for his tireless efforts on behalf of higher education.  He has led with intelligence, thoughtfulness, good humor and encouragement of all and has served the state and students in an excellent manner.

There being no other nominations, Regent Bradley was re-elected President of the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

Thanking the Regents for their support, Regent President Bradley expressed appreciation for their willingness to take on extra assignments whenever asked and for always coming prepared and helping the UW System to keep moving forward.   

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Vice President of the Board

Nominating Regent Pruitt for re-election as Vice President of the Board, Regent Spector remarked that he has been a wonderful aid to the President and much more, contributing insightfulness, good humor, political wisdom, good judgment and first-rate relationships with the Governor and Legislature to his leadership of the Board.  

There being no other nominations, Regent Pruitt was re-elected Vice President of the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

Thanking his colleagues for their support, Regent Vice President Pruitt said that he was honored to be elected to this position and looked forward to the year ahead.

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Secretary of the Board, Assistant Secretary, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers

The following officers were nominated for re-election by Regent Shields.  There being no other nominations, they were elected on a unanimous voice vote.

Judith Temby, Secretary

Cheryle Goplin, Assistant Secretary

Deborah Durcan, Trust Officer

Patricia Brady and Doug Hoerr, Assistant Trust Officers. 

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ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee

The following resolution, presented by Regent Spector, was adopted by acclamation, with an ovation of appreciation to Chancellor Santiago and UW-Milwaukee.

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9520:  WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System congratulates UW-Milwaukee on its commitment to progress and growth, as evident through the campus’s presentations and reports and approval of the School of Public Health and Freshwater Sciences; and

WHEREAS, UW-Milwaukee is dedicated to building a vibrant and innovative research university which will continue to be a crucial component of the economic vitality of southeastern Wisconsin; and

WHEREAS, under the leadership of Chancellor Carlos E. Santiago, UW-Milwaukee has strengthened the campus’s relationships with community and business leaders, as clearly represented through the advocacy of Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett and business leader and philanthropist Joseph Zilber on behalf of the campus; and

WHEREAS, as displayed in the reports on its master planning process, UW-Milwaukee has established a sound foundation from which to launch a revitalization of the campus infrastructure that will attract students and foster learning; and

WHEREAS, through the Access to Success campaign and other efforts, UW-Milwaukee continues to be a leader and innovator in providing educational opportunities that are accessible and affordable for many students, and the campus has consequently experienced increased enrollment and student interest; and 

WHEREAS, the Board has appreciated learning about the plans for new academic programs that are directly tailored to the needs of the Milwaukee-area community while seeking to prepare Wisconsin’s students to compete in a global information economy;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks UW-Milwaukee for generously hosting this extremely busy June 2008 meeting, and thanks the staff, faculty, and students involved for providing a productive and welcoming environment for our meetings.

The meeting was recessed at 12:20 p.m. and reconvened at 12:40 p.m.

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CLOSED SESSION

At 12:40 p.m., the following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt and seconded by Regent Davis, was adopted on a unanimous voice vote, with Regents Womack, Vásquez, Thomas, Spector, Smith, Shields, Pruitt, Loftus, Falbo, Drew, Davis, Cuene, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Burmaster, Bradley, and Bartell (17) voting in the affirmative.

Resolution 9521: That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider the purchase of property on behalf of UW-Madison, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to consider appointment of Interim Chancellors for UW-Green Bay and UW-River Falls, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to confer with legal counsel concerning pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.; to consider pay plan salary adjustments for senior executives, and for faculty and staff with salaries above 75% of the President’s salary, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; and to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c),Wis. Stats.

The following resolutions were adopted in closed session:

Property Acquisition for the School of Music Performance Building

Resolution 9522: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to exercise the Board of Regents’ power of eminent domain granted under Section 32.02(1) and 36.11(9), Wis. Stats., to acquire land and improvements located at 704 and 728 University Avenue in the City of Madison, for the purpose of providing an adequate site for the proposed School of Music Performance building.  The cost of acquisition will be paid from proceeds of the land development agreement with the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF).

UW-Green Bay Authorization to Appoint: Interim Chancellor

Resolution 9523: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, David J. Ward be appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, effective June 23, 2008 at a salary of $205,000.

UW-River Falls Authorization to Appoint: Interim Chancellor

Resolution 9524: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Constance D. Foster be appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, effective July 1, 2008 at a salary of $194,146.

Approval of 2008-09 Salaries: Salary Adjustments for Senior Executives and Salaries Above 75% of the President’s Salary

Resolution 9525:  That, upon the recommendation of the President of the UW System Board of Regents and the President of the UW System, 2007-08 base salaries for university senior executives, and for faculty and staff whose salaries are or will be above 75% of the UW System President’s 2007-08 salary be increased as per the attached Schedule A and Schedule B, effective July 1, 2008 and June 1, 2009 or the appropriate contract effective date and,

Further that, the pay plan increases reflect the phased 2008-09 pay plan for university senior executives, faculty, and academic staff approved by the legislature’s Joint Committee on Employment Relations and,

Finally that, the base increases to reflect market and equity adjustment considerations as per the attached Schedule A, be effective July 1, 2008.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:50 p.m.

Submitted by: Judith A. Temby, Secretary