Board of Regents

Decmber 2008 Minutes - University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

LaCrosse, Wisconsin

UW-LaCrosse
Held in the Cartwright Center
December 4, 2008
10:00 a.m.

- Regent President Bradley presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Elizabeth Burmaster, Judith Crain, Mary Cuene, Danae Davis, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, Colleene Thomas, and Betty Womack

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents Eileen Connolly-Keesler, John Drew, José Vásquez and David Walsh

- - -

UW SYSTEM CLIMATE STUDY

In opening remarks, UW System President Kevin Reilly noted that the campus climate survey was designed to assess how well participating campuses were meeting the goals of providing an inclusive, supportive learning and employment environment for students, faculty and staff of diverse backgrounds. 

The campus climate assessment was piloted at five institutions – UW-La Crosse, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Stevens Point and the UW Colleges’ 13 campuses.  Next spring four more institutions will participate – UW-Eau Claire, UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, and UW-Whitewater. The assessment involves a comprehensive survey distributed to all students, staff and faculty, featuring wide-ranging questions about campus life related to academic success, job satisfaction, the general campus environment, etc.

This study must be done, the President said, because it is imperative to expand the educational pipeline to include a broader cross-section of the population if the United States is to maintain and grow its competitive economic advantage.  In that regard, he pointed out that too many young people in the country are not getting the education they need to succeed in a knowledge-based economy and that, in order to ensure students’ success, it is widely accepted that they must be equipped with the skills, knowledge, abilities and habits of mind that include multicultural competence and the ability to work with people who represent diverse cultures and perspectives

It also is recognized, he added, that an inclusive and supportive learning and working environment, including issues of race and ethnicity, gender, religious affiliation, socioeconomic background, veteran status and more, is important to the recruitment and retention of talented faculty, staff and students. 

Stating that the study must be done now, President Reilly indicated that the issues identified by the survey must be addressed expeditiously because they impact the educational environment and quality of learning.  These efforts, he said, are an extension of the services and support already provided to enable student success. 

President Reilly then called on Interim Assistant Vice President Vicki Washington and Lisa Beckstrand, Director of the Inclusivity Initiative, to present more information on the climate study.

Ms. Washington began by thanking the campuses that participated in the pilot study, noting that it took courage to face sometimes painful results.  Noting that a welcoming climate benefits all students, she listed the following reasons for conducting a climate assessment:

  • To foster a caring university community that provides leadership for constructive participation in a diverse multicultural world;
  • To open the doors wider for underrepresented groups;
  • To improve the environment for working and learning on campus.

The objective of the project is to provide the UW System with institutional information, analysis, and recommendations related to campus climate that will be used in conjunction with other data to provide an inclusive view of the respective campuses and a system-wide review.  Projected outcomes are to:

  • Learn constituent groups’ perceptions about campus climate;
  • Understand their perceptions about campus responses to climate issues, such as pedagogy, curricular issues, professional development, inter/intra-group relations, and respect issues;
  • Use results to inform ongoing work regarding diversity.

Ms. Beckstrand explained that the process includes review of research already conducted, work by campus committees and governance groups, followed by distribution of the survey, examination of the results and development of action plans based on that information.

Referring to research on climate in higher education, Ms. Beckstrand quoted from literature, noting the significant impacts of campus climate on creating knowledge and stating that “preserving climate that offers equal learning opportunities . . . is a primary responsibility of educational institutions.”

She pointed out that campus climate affects the following areas, which, in turn, affect the climate:  Access/retention; research/scholarship; curriculum/pedagogy; inter-group/intra-group relations; university policies/service; and external relations.  Actions that influence the campus climate can be categorized as:  Symbolic actions; fiscal actions; administrative actions; and educational actions.

The process from August 2007 to date included the following steps:  UW System became aware of bias incidents at several campuses; Rankin & Associates, a premier consultant who has done more than 70 studies in that area was hired; a Climate Study Working Group was formed; Fact-finding group meetings with stakeholders were convened; a protocol and survey instrument were developed; the survey was administered; data were analyzed; and survey results were presented on campus.

Ms Washington noted that the institutions participating in the pilot year of the study were:  UW Colleges, UW-La Crosse, UW-Milwaukee; UW-Oshkosh, and UW-Stevens Point.  Four of those institutions also were involved in the Equity Scorecard project.

The survey instrument consisted of 87 questions, with additional questions added by the institutions.  It included space for respondents to provide commentary and was available in on-line of paper-and-pencil options.  All members of each university community were invited to participate.  Results included respondents’ personal experiences, perceptions of climate, perception of institutional actions, and input into recommendations for change.

Limitations included a self-selection bias; caution in generalizing results with a less than 30% response rate; and not reporting groups of fewer than ten persons in order to protect confidentiality. 

As to response, Ms. Washington reported that 13,469 people participated in the survey.  The response rate for faculty was 34%; for academic staff, 42%; for classified staff, 40%; and for students, 14%.  Students of color responded at a higher rate than other students.  Ms. Beckstrand and Ms. Washington also outlined response rates by gender, racial identity, disability status, and sexual orientation. 

Among the successes found in the survey were:

  • 72% to 87% of respondents indicated they were comfortable with the climate.
  • The majority of students indicated they were satisfied with their educations.
  • The majority of employees were satisfied with their jobs.

Challenges included the following:

  • Widespread institutional classicism between and among peer groups (faculty, academic staff, classified staff);
  • High incidence of sexual assault occurring on or off campus;
  • Numerous incidents of racial profiling on most campuses;
  • Retention of students of difference, especially students of color and sexual minorities.

Turning to individual institutional results, Ms. Washington indicated that concerns at the UW Colleges included the following.

  • Staff members were more likely than faculty and student respondents to experience harassment.
  • Staff members reported that they had less status and, consequently, less privilege within the institution than other employees.
  • A higher percentage of sexual minority respondents believed they had experienced harassment.

Concerns at UW-La Crosse included the following:

  • 14% of responding students and 30% of responding employees had personally experienced “exclusionary, intimidating, offensive and/or hostile conduct.”
  • A significant percentage of employees who experienced such conduct felt it was due to “Institutional status,” i.e. academic and classified staff versus faculty.
  • 96 students and employees (4% of respondents) believed they had been victims of sexual assault; 86 of the 96 were students; 57% occurred off campus.

             
Concerns at UW-Milwaukee included the following:

  • One-third of all respondents (31% of white respondents and 38% of respondents of color) indicated they were aware of harassment on campus within the past two years.
  • Most of the observed harassment was based on race (36%), ethnicity (36%), gender (33%), sexual orientation (28%).
  • 61% of respondents with learning disabilities (and 51% with physical disabilities) believed they had experienced offensive, hostile or intimidating behavior based on their disability.

Ms. Beckstrand reported that concerns at UW-Oshkosh included the following:

  • Overall, classified staff members and students of color are less satisfied and comfortable on campus than others.
  • One quarter of all respondents indicated that they were aware of or had observed harassment on campus within the last two years.
  • Most of the observed harassment was based on sexual orientation (49%), gender (30%), ethnicity (29%), race (28%), gender identity (24%), gender expression (24%).
  • The culture of drinking plays a significant role in sexual assaults.  Assault victims’ comments indicated they had been drinking and, when they knew the assailant, that person also had been drinking.

Concerns at UW-Stevens Point included:

  • 51 respondents (3%) believed they were victims of sexual assault and the majority of those did nothing to report the assault or seek help.
  • 17% of respondents believed they had experienced some form of exclusionary, intimidating, offensive or hostile conduct; and the majority did not report it.
  • The greatest source of perceived harassment was generally within the status (e.g. student against student, faculty against faculty).
  • 50% of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual respondents believed they had experienced harassment in the form of derogatory remarks.

Concluding the presentation, Ms. Washington indicated that chancellors and provosts at the five institutions were working with their diversity leadership committees and other stakeholders to develop action plans and that participants in the second round of the Climate Study (December 2008-09) would be UW-Eau Claire, UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, and UW-Whitewater.

A presentation then was made on the UW-La Crosse Climate Survey by Barbara Steward, Director of Multicultural Student Services, and Carmen Wilson, Special Assistant and Advisor to the Chancellor.  Ms. Steward began by pointing to survey results showing that most students and employees were comfortable or very comfortable with the campus climate. 

Fourteen percent of students and 30% of employees had experienced exclusionary, intimidating, offensive and/or hostile behavior. 

Dr. Wilson explained that, of the women students who had experienced such behavior, 47% said it was because of  gender, while a much smaller percentage of men had the same perception.  A similar pattern was evident among women and men employees.

Of those who experienced offensive, hostile or intimidating conduct, few faculty and students felt it was due to institutional status, while the percentage was much higher among academic and classified staff – figures which reflect the issue of classism, which is similar across campuses.

Among students and employees of color, most thought that offensive, hostile or intimidating conduct they experienced was due to race, while very few white students and employees felt that race was a factor in the negative conduct they experienced.  Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual students were much more likely than heterosexual students to attribute offensive, hostile or intimidating conduct to their sexual orientation; and students and employees with disabilities were likely to attribute offensive conduct they experienced to their disabilities. 

Ms. Stewart related that five forms of offensive, hostile, or intimidating conduct were reported:  Deliberately ignored or excluded; felt intimidated or bullied; stares; derogatory remarks; and isolated or left out when working in groups. 

Ninety-six respondents (four percent) reported being victims of sexual assault while at UW-La Crosse.  Of these, 86 were students.  Most assaults occurred off-campus and most were done by other students.  More than 90% did not report the assault, other than to a friend, or seek help from campus or community resources.

Respondents offered a number of reasons for not reporting alleged sexual assaults.  Some felt they would not be believed or feared reporting the incident.  Some commented that they were too embarrassed or did not want others to know the assault occurred.   Others said that they just wanted to forget it happened, or that it became more real for them when they stated it out loud. Several did not report the incidents because the perpetrators were their friends and they didn’t want to get them in trouble.  Others seemed to blame themselves for the assaults because they were drinking, or felt that others would say it was their fault because of how they were dressed. 

In conclusion, the presenters indicated that as a next step, the campus was gathering an implementation team to develop action steps and a site was set up for web-based feedback on the report.

Regent Crain expressed strong concern about the 287 reported sexual assaults – calling it an alarming and very disturbing number.  She strongly urged that this problem be a major area of focus. 

Indicating that the problem is not unique to Wisconsin, Dr. Rankin said that there is a rape culture on campus, often fueled by alcohol. 

Referring to statistics from UW-La Crosse, Regent Crain noted that 23 reported being assaulted by strangers.  While that was true, Dr. Rankin explained, many of those respondents stated they were too drunk to know who assaulted them.

Indicating that student affairs officers are working on the problem, Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin noted that the report shines a light on this disturbing issue and gives it a sense of urgency.

Dr. Wilson added that a violence prevention specialist had been on the UW-La Crosse campus, which led to a higher number of students reporting assaults. 

Ms. Washington said that the same is true on other campuses.  While there is increased reporting, the number of such assaults remains under-reported.

In response to a question by Regent Smith as to how the UW System compares with other institutions, Dr. Rankin said that the full report would indicate similarities to other states, as well as areas that are unique to the UW System.

With regard to the methodology of the survey, Regent Bartell inquired about staring as a form of offensive or hostile conduct and asked why employees experience more offensive conduct than students.  He also asked whether it is reasonable to expect both positive and negative responses.

Dr. Rankin replied that stares, exclusion and other behaviors contribute to a hostile climate in which a student might feel singled out and left out because of his/her skin color or other difference.  As to employees, she indicated that part of the problem is that there is a lack of communication among classes of employees and that classified staff, across the country, feel the most disenfranchised and devalued.  With regard to both positive and negative responses, she explained that some respondents are personally comfortable in the campus climate, but at the same time see problems for others.

Regent Loftus asked how the survey was conducted and whether it included a representative sample of possible respondents.

Dr. Rankin replied that the survey was created with input from representatives of each of the participating campuses.  Questions were based on previous research and customized for the UW System.  The survey was e-mailed to the entire campus community, and campus committees were asked to encourage participation.  Responses, which were sent to Dr. Rankin, were anonymous. 

In response to a further question by Regent Loftus, Dr. Rankin indicated that each campus would receive its own report. 

Regent Falbo asked about the ability to identify broader issues from the survey, to which Ms. Washington replied that the January report from Dr. Rankin would help to identify such issues.  Dr. Rankin added that best practices would be identified as well.

Chancellor Wells pointed out that, in order to improve, it is necessary for a campus to keep focused on the issues identified in the survey.  At UW-Oshkosh, the intention was to make it part of the Inclusive Excellence Plan.

Regent Loftus requested a copy of the survey.
 
Regent Davis commended the pilot campuses for having the courage to take on uncomfortable issues and thanked the next four campuses for stepping up.  She asked what the Board could do to help.

President Reilly replied that this discussion contributed to a feeling of transparency around tough issues and provided fodder for the second round of surveys.  The Campus Climate Study, he said, helps to make the UW a national leader in this area.

Dr. Rankin said she was impressed by the UW’s willingness to engage in these difficult issues and noted in that regard the Board’s role in external relations.  She also remarked that, by its interest, the Board made a positive contribution to campus climate.

Regent Spector commented that, while reporting problems is important, there is also a need to educate students about appropriate behavior.

Dr. Rankin agreed, noting that many problems occur in students’ first year on campus. There is a need for education, through curriculum and other means, about being responsible members of the campus community.

Regent Thomas remarked that the survey results reflected what she and other students have experienced and commented that different approaches are needed for students and employees.  While a behavior like staring clearly is a less onerous problem than assault, she observed that dealing with smaller problems first could help to change the larger picture and make worse problems less difficult to address.

THE STORY BEHIND THE NUMBERS:  UW-LA CROSSE PRESENTATION

Introducing the presentation, Chancellor Joe Gow remarked that, while numbers are used to quantify success, they may tell only part of the story – a part without reference to emotion, passion or inspiration.

The presentation would include several video stories behind the numbers – including stories of an international student, of parents and students arriving on campus, of students who give back to the community, of students becoming involved in the political process, and of a student who overcame great obstacles to become an inspiring success. 

Noting the rapid growth in UW-La Crosse’s study-abroad program, Chancellor Gow indicated that there also has been encouragement of international students and scholars to come to UW-La Crosse. 

He then introduced Jay Lokken, Director of the Office of International Education, who indicated first that the university’s success in becoming a leader in international education in the UW System and nationwide stemmed from a shared vision that Wisconsin students must have global competencies to be successful in the 21st century and that, to successfully internationalize education, an integrated model would be needed, including recognition that all aspects of the university – the curriculum, faculty, students, administration and student life – are all part of the global village.  It also meant reaching out to sister cities, international organizations, elected officials and international businesses.

Funds were set aside to create the International Development Fund for faculty and staff, allowing hundreds to present at international conferences, engage in faculty exchanges, develop new curricula and establish new international programs for students. 

The UW-La Crosse student government confirmed its commitment to international education by making it a recipient of special tuition funding.  In that regard it was noted that UW-La Crosse is one of the few universities in the country at which differential tuition is earmarked for student scholarships and international undergraduate research.   

In 2004, UW-La Crosse was chosen by the American Council on Education to present in Washington D.C. as a leading institution for internationalization in higher education. 

UW-La Crosse also collaborates with the La Crosse Public Schools on internationalization models; and the School of Education is developing a global focus curriculum to ensure that teacher education graduates have global competencies.  A special point of pride is the La Crosse Northwood International Charter School, an excellent resource for students and the entire community.

Participation in the university’s study abroad program increased from 100 to 500 in less than 10 years; and students now come to campus with the expectation that they will study abroad no matter what their major.  Nearly one-fourth of UW- La Crosse seniors have studied abroad – more than twice the rate of peer institutions.  UW-La Crosse students have the opportunity to study at top partner universities worldwide; and short-term programs allow them options to study abroad without delaying time to degree. 

There also are international events on campus, such as the international student banquet that allows students, staff, and the community to sample the foods and customs of the campus’ 350 international students.  Last year, these students had an economic impact of $6.1 million on the community. 

In summary, Mr. Lokken emphasized that students need cross-cultural skills, world languages, critical thinking skills and international experiences to be successful and that investment in international education today can yield impressive dividends tomorrow

A video then was shown about the story of Volodymyr Volkov, a student from the Ukraine who came to study at UW-La Crosse. He was especially impressed by the welcoming people and the strong Political Science Department on campus, which helped him to get an internship in Washington D.C.  

Introducing the next video presentation, Carmen Wilson, Assistant and Advisor to the Chancellor, noted that the popularity of UW-La Crosse results in four to five applications for every first-year opening and a retention rate of nearly 90% to the sophomore year.  The video showed Chancellor Gow helping new students move into the residence halls and serenading them by playing the guitar and singing.

             
Noting that nearly 80% of seniors and almost half of incoming freshmen have engaged in community service or volunteer work, Chancellor Gow introduced Garth Tymeson, a faculty member in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science, and Shelley Wetzel, project director of the YMCA, to describe a special mentoring program.

Professor Tymeson pointed out that people with disabilities are more vulnerable to physical inactivity and sedentary lifestyles than the general public for a number of reasons, including lack of programs, untrained staff, inaccessible facilities and cost of special equipment.  Solutions require innovative, multidisciplinary approaches, including collaborations with community agencies and families.  Such a solution is UW-La Crosse’s physical activity mentoring program for children with disabilities that is part of the adapted physical education teacher preparation program.  This grant-funded program, he remarked, has a significant impact on UW-La Crosse students and many persons in the community as well.

Ms. Wetzel added that the program gives college students opportunities to apply their knowledge and skills to real-world situations that meet significant community health needs.  Not only is the program a great fit for service learning, she observed, it also guides parents on how to teach their children and encourages families to increase physical activity levels. 

A video then was shown of UW-La Crosse students working with children with disabilities and their families, which described the benefits and rewards that accrued to all from these activities.

Turning to student involvement in the political process, Chancellor Gow introduced Professor of Political Science Joe Heim who described the extent of student participation in recent elections.  Four years ago, he reported, more than 98% of eligible students voted on campus.  In the 2008 election 2,376 students residing on campuses cast votes – the highest single ward total among the city’s 17 wards; and the total for the largely student neighborhood surrounding campus also was impressive, with an 80-90% turnout in campus wards.  He congratulated the students for demonstrating convincingly the power of their vote.

He noted a long tradition of regional and national politicians visiting the university and community of La Crosse, including John McCain, Chelsea Cinton, Michelle Obama, President Clinton, and President-Elect Obama.  According to a recent survey, two-thirds of UW-La Crosse students reported that the university contributed quite a bit or very much to their personal development and knowledge about voting in local, state, and national elections with activities including voter registration drives, campus debates, and other events.  Professor Heim felt that the key to the university’s success in student engagement in the political process has been the collective efforts of many on campus, including the student association, the university’s Joint Legislative Relations Committee, composed of students, faculty and academic staff, and a supportive administration. 

Introducing the final segment of the presentation, Chancellor Gow noted that nearly 80% of UW-La Crosse students have reported that the university helped them cope with their non-academic responsibilities, including work and family; and he introduced Amy Sullivan, Director of the Self-Sufficiency Program, to tell an inspirational story of student success.

In opening remarks, Ms. Sullivan explained that the Self-Sufficiency Program (SSP) is a college preparatory program unlike any other in the nation.  Her job is to recruit, inspire, and then prepare low-income parents, mostly single mothers, for a college education.  To do so, she works with social service agencies, schools, the media, and other organizations to offer a bridge to college for non-traditional students who mostly are among the working poor.

The SSP was founded in 1988 as an outreach program of the Women’s Studies Department, with a mission to address barriers that exist for poor women to access and succeed at higher education.  Classes, which are free of cost, are held early in the evening, with free child care provided.  While most participants are single mothers, the program is open to men and women of all ages, the only criteria being that they have a high school diploma and a strong interest in exploring a college education. 

The three main objectives of the program are to:

  1. Familiarize students with college programs, admissions, and financial aid;
  2. Work with them on critical thinking, writing, and math skills; and
  3. Customize a personal education plan that sets each student up for success.

However, it is the informal objectives, Ms. Sullivan remarked, that form the heart and soul of the SSP experience.  In the program, students find a welcoming environment where they can air their fears and anxieties about returning to school, where they can find like-minded classmates to dream and struggle alongside them, and where they learn that their life experience as multi-tasking parents is a valid asset when considering college.  Among their activities, participants read and analyze poetry, prose, history and the media; they learn about and tour UW-La Crosse and Viterbo University; they learn about college admission procedures, financial aid, and stress/time management skills; and they meet successful SSP graduates.

Five years ago, the SSP Advisory Board started a scholarship for non-traditional adult students, called the Locally Grown Scholarship, which has raised $50,000 to date from locally raised donations.  This scholarship not only helps students with school expenses, but also connects them to the broader community who support and cheer their successes.   

With more than 350 graduates, Ms. Sullivan continued, the SSP has many success stories, including UW-La Crosse graduate Libia Aguilar who won a Gates Millennium Scholarship in 2000 and now is an attorney in La Crosse, and Alisha Amann, currently in her last year of medical school in Missouri.  Many graduates continue to live and work in the La Crosse area as educators, nurses, social workers and – soon – a veterinarian.

A video then was shown about the trials and triumphs of one SSP student, Audreyona Chavez, a single mother who persevered to achieve her vision of becoming a veterinarian and a proud role model for her young son.

Upon conclusion of the presentation, the meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

La Crosse, Wisconsin

UW-La Crosse
Held in the Valhalla B, Cartwright Center
Friday, December 5, 2008
9:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

 
Approval of Minutes of the November 6, 2008 Meeting
Report of the President of the Board
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report.
Thanks to UW-La Crosse
Meetings with Legislative Leaders
UW-Platteville’s Nanotechnology Center
Liberal Education Initiative
January 16, 2009, Board Meeting
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Remarks on State Budget Crisis and the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin
#7:  Collaborate with PK-12 Community to Enrich College Preparation
#11:  Grow Need-Based Financial Aid
#1:  Commit to a Coherent Set of Learning Outcomes for all UW Baccalaureate Graduates
Remarks by Congressman Ron Kind
Free Test Preparation Materials offered by KnowHow2GOWisconsin
Black Thursday Exhibit at UW-Oshkosh
UW-Milwaukee Panther Family Weekend
State Program Achievement Award Won by UW-Milwaukee’s Life Impact Program
UW-Eau Claire and UW-Madison Recognized as Top Producing Schools for Numbers of Students Receiving Fulbright Fellowships
UW-Whitewater Graduates the Most Teachers in the UW System
UW-Superior Student Named Winner of 2008 Elie Wiesel Foundation of Humanity Prize in Ethics Essay Contest
Expansion of 4-H Gateway Academy
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
2009-2014 Five-Year Plan for Wisconsin Partnership Program, UW-School of Medicine and Public Health
Presentation of UW-La Crosse Academic Plan
Growth Agenda Action Step: Endorsement of Shared Learning Goals
UW-Milwaukee Program Authorizations
Report of the Senior Vice President
Review of Sabbatical Guidelines
Project Lead the Way
Principles for Offering Professional Doctorates
Budget Situation
Consent Agenda
Wisconsin Partnership Program: UW School of Medicine and Public Health 2009 – 2014 Five-Year Plan
Endorsement of Shared Learning Goals: University of Wisconsin System
Program Authorization (Implementation): Ph.D. in Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Program Authorization (Implementation): Doctor of Nursing Practice, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Program Authorization (Implementation): B.S. in Materials Science, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Program Authorization (Implementation): Bachelor of Science Education, University of Wisconsin-Stout
Program Authorization (Implementation): Bachelor of Science Technology, Education University of Wisconsin-Stout
Program Authorization (Implementation): B.S. in Geosciences, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Establishment of the Lumber Grading Training Program, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE
State Fiscal Update
Operations Review and Audit
Follow-up on Occupational Health and Safety Training
Follow-up on Cost of Textbooks
Audit Status Update
Trust Funds: Affirmation of UW System Investment Policy Statement
Committee Business
Review of Source of Funds by UW System Institution
Quarterly Gifts, Grants and Contracts Report
Approval of UW-Madison Contract with Collegiate Licensing Company
Report of the Vice President
Consent Agenda
University of Wisconsin System Trust Funds Investment Policy Statement
UW-Madison Trademark Licensing Agreement with Collegiate Licensing Company
Approval of 2009-11 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations
2009-11 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations.
REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE
UW-La Crosse: Master Plan Update
UW-Madison: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the TomoTherapy Addition Project for the School of Veterinary Medicine
UW-Madison: Authority to Demolish the Union South Building and Hi Ray Hall for Purposes of Site Development
UW-Oshkosh: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Academic Building Project
UW-Platteville: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Williams Fieldhouse Addition – Phase I Project
UW-Stevens Point: Authority to Accept a Gift of Land to Benefit the Treehaven Field Station
UW-Whitewater: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Drumlin Hall Dining Hall Renovation Project
Authority to Seek Enumeration of Additional 2009-11 Capital Budget Projects:  (1)UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiative, (2) UW-River Falls Hagestad Hall Renovation Project (Including Waiver of Regent Policy 19-8 to Fund the Project), and (3) UW-Stout University Center Renovation and Infrastructure Project
UW System:  Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects
Report of the Associate Vice President
Building Commission Actions
Consent Agenda
Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the TomoTherapy Addition Project for the School of Veterinary Medicine
Authority to Demolish the Union South Building and Hi Ray Hall for Purposes of Site Development, UW-Madison
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Academic Building Project, UW-Oshkosh 
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Williams Fieldhouse Addition – Phase I Project, UW-Platteville
Authority to Accept a Gift of Land to Benefit the Treehaven Field Station, UW-Stevens Point
Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Drumlin Hall Dining Hall Renovation Project, UW-Whitewater
Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System
Authority to Seek Enumeration of Additional 2009-11 Capital Budget Projects
Authority to Seek Enumeration of Additional 2009-11 Capital Budget Projects – (1)UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiative, (2)UW-River Falls Hagestad Hall Renovation Project, and (3) UW-Stout University Centers Renovation and Infrastructure Project, UW System
ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS
Resolution of Appreciation to UW-La Crosse
Resolution of Appreciation: UW-La Crosse
Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Colleene Thomas
CLOSED SESSION

 

 

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the
                                                  
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

La Crosse, Wisconsin

UW-La Crosse
Held in the Valhalla B, Cartwright Center
December 5, 2008
9:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Elizabeth Burmaster, Mary Cuene, Danae Davis, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Kevin Opgenorth, Charles Pruitt, Brent Smith, Colleene Thomas, and José Vásquez

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents Eileen Connolly-Keesler, Judith Crain, John Drew, Michael Spector, David Walsh, and Betty Womack

- - -

Approval of Minutes of the November 6, 2008 Meeting
Upon motion by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Smith, the minutes of the November 6, 2008 meetings of the Board were approved as distributed.

- - -

Report of the President of the Board
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report
A written report was provided.
-
Thanks to UW-La Crosse
Extending thanks to the UW-La Crosse community for their generous hospitality, Regent President Bradley noted that this was the Board’s first formal visit to the campus in eight years and that everyone had made the visitors feel most welcome.  The Regents appreciated all the hard work that went into preparations for the visit and especially enjoyed the opportunity to talk with faculty, staff and students.  
-
Meetings with Legislative Leaders
Regent President Bradley reported that he and President Reilly were scheduling meetings with new state legislative leaders, including their first meeting with new Assembly Speaker-Elect Mike Sheridan.  They also had been reaching out to legislators on both sides of the aisle to invite questions and convey their continued interest in working together on higher education issues. 
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UW-Platteville’s Nanotechnology Center
Regent President Bradley reported that seven UW campuses were gathering for the opening of the new Nanotechnology Center for Collaborative Research and Development at UW-Platteville.  The Center will accelerate transfer of knowledge into leading-edge jobs and economic growth for Wisconsin.  In doing so, it will link UW System faculty with Wisconsin companies and entrepreneurs; serve as a catalyst to applied research and technology transfer; and enable students to experience, first-hand, the steps of innovation, including market analysis, technology strategy, and business planning. 
 The new center, Regent President Bradley remarked, is one more example of how the UW System is working with the larger community to leverage regional economic growth and workforce development.
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Liberal Education Initiative
Regent President Bradley reported on a recent conference, titled “Liberal Education: A Unifying Mission for the 21st Century University,” jointly sponsored by the UW System and the System Advisory Group on the Liberal Arts (SAGLA). 
The conference focused attention on the national initiative, titled Liberal Education and America’s Promise, in which the UW System is a pilot partner.  Both Regent President Bradley and President Reilly spoke, as did Lieutenant Governor Barbara Lawton and Carol Geary Schneider, President of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U).  More than 130 faculty and staff from UW institutions assembled to discuss the kinds of learning essential to students and citizens. 
The UW System is part of an AAC&U grant, funded by the Carnegie Corporation, to work on General Education reform, with a particular focus on underserved students.  That project – called “Give Students a Compass” – brings together the UW System, the California State University System, and the Oregon University System in an effort to transform teaching and learning in systemic ways.  Regent President Bradley expressed pride in being in the center of this cutting-edge work on a national scale. 
To further promote these efforts, President Reilly, together with Lieutenant Governor Lawton, convened a group of policy makers from education, government, the media, business, and the non-profit sector to provide leadership in rallying the public behind the value of a broadly integrative 21st century education. 
Both the Liberal Education initiatives and the Nanotechnology Center, Regent President Bradley remarked, are directly linked to the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.
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January 16, 2009, Board Meeting
Regent President Bradley announced that a special meeting of the Board was being planned for January 16, 2009, at 2:00 p.m., to appoint new chancellors for UW-Green Bay and UW-River Falls. 

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM
Remarks on State Budget Crisis and the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin
Stating that the UW System will do its part to address the budgetary crisis, President Reilly indicated that several important steps already had been taken.

  1. In October, he had directed chancellors to approve all new hires, determining whether they are essential to the university’s mission at this time.
  2. He directed that chancellors monitor and approve all out-of-state travel funded by state tax dollars or tuition.  In doing so, the chancellors must determine if the trip is essential to the employee’s duties and whether cancelling it would incur penalties.  Faculty and staff will be encouraged to explore other avenues of communication, such as video conferences and telephone conferences.
  3. An initiative is being considered to offer a three-year baccalaureate program at selected campuses.  Such an accelerated degree structure could lower educational costs for well-prepared students in selected majors, by using more advanced placement courses, online classes, and summer study.  He had asked Senior Vice President Martin to work with faculty and academic leaders to explore how such an approach could preserve the content and quality of a UW degree within a shortened time frame.
  4. The UW System has decreased credits to degree from an average of 145 in 1994 to 135 in 2004, for a seven percent savings in the per-unit cost of the degree.  This effort was noted in a recent article in Change magazine by Jane Wellman, Executive Director of the Delta Project on Postsecondary Costs, Productivity and Accountability.  The article stated the “the savings to the state from these increases in productivity opened up an additional 12,000 seats in the UW System.  The reduction in credits also meant that students were able to complete their degree in less time, shaving the better part of one semester off their time to the degree.  The direct savings to the students from not having to pay the additional semester of tuition and fees was close to $3,000 per student – well above the cost of (for instance) a five percent tuition increase and more than half the amount of the maximum Pell grant for the neediest student.”
  5. UW campus provosts had been asked to examine the current array of degree-granting programs to identify low-enrollment programs and consider how they might be realigned to make better use of resources while continuing to support workforce needs of the state.

At the same time, President Reilly emphasized the importance of the university’s overall mission – to produce college-educated citizens who are prepared to succeed in the innovation economy and weather economic challenges.  In that regard, he noted that persons with a bachelor’s degree are half as likely to be unemployed as those without one.  By maintaining the capacity to enroll and educate students, to help create new industries and jobs, and to enhance life in local communities across the state, he said, the UW will function as an engine of recovery and renewal for Wisconsin.  “We will continue to advance the Growth Agenda as our vision for the state’s prosperous future; and the familiar triumvirate of growing people, growing jobs, and growing communities will benefit us all.”  In that regard, he called attention to a new Growth Agenda for Wisconsin brochure, explaining what the agenda is and why it is so important. 

Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin then provided an update on Growth Agenda Action Steps, noting that considerable progress had been made since her last report.  As examples, she then provided updates on three of the steps.


#7:  Collaborate with PK-12 Community to Enrich College Preparation
Initial efforts have been focused on working collaboratively with the Wisconsin Technical Colleges, independent colleges and the PK-12 community to address math preparation for Wisconsin students, beginning with identification of competencies needed for college preparation and aligning those with high school academic standards.  This should reduce the need for math remediation in college. 
Approximately 50 high schools will participate in piloting the Early Math Placement Test, which is designed to inform high school students about their level of math preparation and to recommend what math courses they should take prior to graduation in order to best prepare for college math.  Statewide implementation is planned for fall 2009.
A statewide event to bring together college faculty and high school teachers to share best practices has been targeted for 2009-10.


#11:  Grow Need-Based Financial Aid
A system-wide working group has been convened to begin development of an implementation plan.  Additional staff resources have been deployed to this initiative, and an individual has been designated to work with institution and foundation leaders and with the system-wide working group.  Data is being collected from each institution on need-based financial aid campaigns, and campuses are continuing to prioritize and raise more private need-based financial aid, even in this difficult economic environment.


#1:  Commit to a Coherent Set of Learning Outcomes for all UW Baccalaureate Graduates
Reporting completion of this action step, Senior Vice President Martin noted that a resolution would be brought forward as part of the report of the Education Committee.
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Remarks by Congressman Ron Kind
Referring to UW-La Crosse as one of the UW’s bright stars, Congressman Kind commended Chancellor Gow for his leadership. 
Even in the current economic crisis, he felt that there are opportunities for the UW System, some of which relate to the recently reauthorized Higher Education Act, although funding challenges will be significant.  The proposed Stimulus Package could provide funding for the Innovation Act passed last year, as well as other opportunities for universities to utilize federal funding.

Noting that there are five UW campuses and four Technical Colleges in Western Wisconsin, Congressman Kind commented on the interesting and innovative work they were undertaking and on the great value of higher education to the way of life of people in that area.

He cautioned, however, that the university will face challenges in attracting talent in the current economic climate and state budget crunch.  With huge job losses in the past few months and more to come, he predicted that innovation will be the key to success.

In conclusion, he commended Assistant Vice President Kris Andrews for keeping Wisconsin’s congressional delegation well informed and pledged a continued partnership with the UW System.

In discussion following his remarks, Congressman Kind responded to a question from Regent Falbo by indicating that there was much skepticism in Washington about bailing out the auto industry.  It was understood, however, that the industry plays a vital role in the economy, with one in ten jobs related to it in some way.  If a loan were made, he thought a requirement would be that the industry becomes more productive, although the UAW had already made huge concessions.  Both houses of Congress were awaiting a signal from the White House.


Congressman Kind thanked Regent Burmaster for her outstanding service as State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

 
Regent Burmaster inquired as to whether President-Elect Obama, who has given a high priority to college access, might include financial aid in the Economic Stimulus Package.  Replying that it would be worth considering, Congressman Kind indicated that the recent increase in the Pell Grant is a step in the right direction, adding that TRIO and Gear-Up programs also are targeted to high-need students.  Additional funding could be provided to these programs directly or through the Stimulus Package.


In response to a question by Regent Loftus about the new GI Bill, Congressman Kind remarked that veterans need career advancement; that the new bill will fund access to their education; and that the Obama administration will play a key role in providing that funding.  He added that there are provisions in the Higher Education Act to help veterans as well.
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Free Test Preparation Materials offered by KnowHow2GOWisconsin
President Reilly reported that KnowHow2GOWisconsin has begun to offer free online test preparation materials to Wisconsin students for the SAT and ACT exams, with easy-to-use tutorials and interactive practice sessions.  The program includes a vocabulary builder of more than 2,000 words and can be adapted to each student’s ability level.  It is made possible through a College Access Challenge Grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

The KnowHow2GO program, launched in November 2007, is a partnership between the UW System, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, the Wisconsin Technical College System, and the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.  Its purpose is to help students turn their dreams of college into reality by providing the resources they need to follow that path.    
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Black Thursday Exhibit at UW-Oshkosh
A major new exhibit opened at UW-Oshkosh about the student demonstrations known as Black Thursday, which took place on November 21, 1968.  On that day, African American students attending Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh, as it was then called, engaged in demonstrations that resulted in mass arrests and expulsion of 94 students.  While such demonstrations were taking place all across the country in 1968, this was the first to occur in Wisconsin.  Nearly 100 former students, faculty, staff, law enforcement, and community members were interviewed as part of the project.

UW-Milwaukee Panther Family Weekend
It was reported by President Reilly that nearly 700 parents and other family members attended UW-Milwaukee’s first Panther Family Weekend in October.  Visitors were treated to a traditional Milwaukee fish fry, a performance by ComedySportz, free films in the Union, a men’s soccer game, and breakfast with Chancellor Carlos Santiago.
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State Program Achievement Award Won by UW-Milwaukee’s Life Impact Program
President Reilly congratulated UW-Milwaukee’s innovative Life Impact Program for disadvantaged students with children for winning a Program Achievement Award from the State of Wisconsin.  The program – a partnership with the Jane Bradley Pettit Foundation – helps disadvantaged student parents complete their education and move into family-supporting careers.  Thirty-nine students currently are enrolled. The State Council on Affirmative Action and the Office of State Employment Relations presented the award in October.
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UW-Eau Claire and UW-Madison Recognized as Top Producing Schools for Numbers of Students Receiving Fulbright Fellowships
It was reported by President Reilly that UW-Eau Claire had been recognized by the Chronicle of Higher Education as one of the top producing schools for the number of students receiving Fulbright Fellowship grants this year.  Out of five UW-Eau Claire applicants, two received fellowships, placing the university among the top 20 master’s institutions nationally.  UW-Madison, with 19 students earning fellowships out of 76 applicants, placed in the top 10 for U.S. research universities.

Started in 1946, the Fulbright Fellowship is considered one of the most successful international academic exchange fellowship programs, with about 1,500 student participants this year. He congratulated the Wisconsin winners for their accomplishments.
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UW-Whitewater Graduates the Most Teachers in the UW System
President Reilly reported that UW-Whitewater turned out the most teachers in the UW System, according to the latest Teacher Supply and Demand Analysis Report, with 479 teacher education graduates in 2006-07. 
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UW-Superior Student Named Winner of 2008 Elie Wiesel Foundation of Humanity Prize in Ethics Essay Contest
President Reilly congratulated UW-Superior senior Mae Gibson, winner of the nationwide 2008 Elie Wiesel Foundation of Humanity Prize in Ethics essay contest.  A Nobel Laureate, Mr. Wiesel is a Holocaust survivor and noted educator and author.  The annual competition challenges college students to analyze ethical issues confronting them in a personal, 4,000-word essay.  For her essay, “God in Our Ethics”, Ms. Gibson will receive a $5,000 scholarship. She recently returned from New York, where she had the honor of meeting with Mr. Wiesel.   

Expansion of 4-H Gateway Academy
UW-Extension and UW Colleges Chancellor David Wilson and Kern Family Foundation President James Rahn announced expansion of the 4-H Gateway Academy to 20 sites – doubling last year’s number and providing the ability to reach 500 middle-school students next summer.  The academy’s day camps are designed to inspire middle-school students to explore science, technology, engineering, and math and to consider careers in those fields. 

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Regent Davis, chair, presented the committee’s report.


2009-2014 Five-Year Plan for Wisconsin Partnership Program, UW-School of Medicine and Public Health
The Education Committee and Business, Finance, and Audit Committee met jointly to take action on the second five-year plan for the Wisconsin Partnership Program.  Dean Robert Golden, of the School of Medicine and Public Health, described the organizational and governance structure of the program and the process followed in developing the 2009-14 five-year plan.

He also reviewed the responsibilities of the Board of Regents for the program as follows:

  1. The Board created the Oversight and Advisory Committee (OAC), which has the most significant oversight role for the program, as well as a programming role.
  2. The Board approves appointments of new members and the bylaws for the OAC.
  3. The Board reviews and approves five-year plans.
  4. The Board reviews and accepts annual reports.
  5. The Board will review program and financial audits of the program, beginning early in 2009.

Dr. Golden’s presentation included examples of academic and research programs, as well as community partnerships, funded by the program, along with their contributions to the health of the people of Wisconsin and to achieving a fully integrated School of Medicine and Public Health at UW-Madison.

The next five years will see continuation of successful programs, as well as funding of new initiatives.  However, a 20% drop in the endowment’s value since last year will slow down some of the program’s plans.

Explaining how the two traditionally separated domains of medicine and public health are being integrated, the Dean stated the goal is creating real change in public health outcomes for the entire state.  Because the public health perspective is critical to producing a new kind of clinical workforce, the program will continue reconfiguring how medical students are taught, so as to incorporate a deep understanding, as well as hands-on clinical experiences, in the public health area. 

The Partnership Program is funding that change, along with many community and academic partnerships that are working to improve the health of Wisconsin’s people and to reduce health disparities among different population within the state, especially those involving low-income and racial minority groups.

Dean Golden also noted a cutting-edge report card on Wisconsin’s health, developed by Professor Emeritus David Kindig, which is being held up as a national model.  Dr. Kindig and his colleagues received a large grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help other states replicate it.

While Wisconsin got an overall health grade of B-, the state’s grade for reducing health disparities was a D.  Prompted by questions from Regent Loftus, Dr. Kindig and Dean Golden explained ways in which health disparities are measured and the indicators used by the Partnership Program to hold itself accountable.

Overall, the members of both committees expressed satisfaction with the Dean’s report and with the due diligence of the Wisconsin Partnership Program to direct its resources in ways that can make an important difference in the health of the state, including some of its most at-risk populations, especially those in metropolitan Milwaukee and rural communities.

The Committees unanimously passed a resolution approving the new plan for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Presentation of UW-La Crosse Academic Plan
Provost Kathleen Enz Finken provided an overview of La Crosse’s academic programming and its strengths in both undergraduate and graduate education.

She also described areas that will receive closer attention in the next year, now that new senior leadership is in place, including a revised mission, potential reorganization of select departments and colleges, and full-fledged strategic planning.  A new academic plan will emerge as the core of that planning process.
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Growth Agenda Action Step: Endorsement of Shared Learning Goals
The committee heard from Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin and UW-Eau Claire Professor Scott Oates on the process and results leading to completion of Action Step #1: Endorsement of Shared Learning Goals.

The original language of Action Step #1 stated that the UW System would commit to a coherent set of learning outcomes for all UW baccalaureate graduates and “articulate succinctly and clearly what its baccalaureate graduates ought to know and be able to do as competent citizens in a 21st century knowledge-based, globally competitive democracy.”

Senior Vice President Martin emphasized that, in developing a process to carry out that commitment, it was critical that individual missions and identities of each UW institution be respected, as well as shared governance, which gives faculty at each institution authority over curricular matters, including General Education and assessment of student learning.

Describing the process that followed, Professor Oates indicated that it began with a meeting of 60 faculty members last May, after which points of agreement emerged to guide the work, including the realization that there were already significant similarities in learning outcomes across UW campuses

There was broad consensus that shared learning goals have great public value to those in the UW community as they perform their various roles and in interactions with Wisconsin families, community members, and policy makers.  It was agreed that those goals should be displayed prominently at every campus and on the UW System website, helping, as Regent Spector said, to make the case for the importance of higher education to the State of Wisconsin.

The committee expressed its appreciation to Senior Vice President Martin, Professor Oates and other faculty and staff, whose hard work moved this Action Step forward, and noted the importance of speaking coherently and forcefully about the knowledge, skills, and habits of mind that students need to thrive in the 21st century.

A resolution endorsing the shared learning goals was approved for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW-Milwaukee Program Authorizations

The committee approved the PhD in Environmental and Occupational Health and the Doctor of Nursing Practice for inclusion in the consent agenda

It was concluded that the PhD in Environmental and Occupational Health is a well-designed program that draws on existing campus strengths and addresses demonstrated environmental health needs in Milwaukee.  The program would be housed in the new School of Public Health, provided that the school receives legislative approval.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice was the first of three DNP programs to be brought to the Board.  A year ago, the Education Committee heard a presentation on the need for DNP programs throughout the state and country, a need driven by changing practice requirements and marketplace demands; and the preceding month the Board had a policy discussion on the subject of professional doctorates in general.

In response to a question by Regent Loftus, the committee was assured that no new GPR dollars would be required for either of these doctoral programs.

The committee passed resolutions approving both programs for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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Report of the Senior Vice President
Review of Sabbatical Guidelines

Senior Vice President Martin reviewed key features of the UW System’s sabbatical program, noting that a listing of faculty receiving sabbaticals for 2009-10 had been provided to the Board.

Dr. Martin invited feedback on the sabbatical guidelines; and Regent Spector suggested that the shared learning goals be integrated into the guidelines, which will be brought back to the committee with those revisions.

Project Lead the Way

The committee heard an update on Project Lead the Way, which is a non-profit organization focused on preparing the future technical and engineering workforce in America by working with middle and high schools to develop and offer challenging curricula in pre-engineering.

The Wisconsin program receives generous support from the Kern Family Foundation, based in Waukesha.

The UW System has been working with the Department of Public Instruction to ensure that Project Lead the Way courses will be accepted as science-equivalent courses necessary for freshman admission to UW institutions.

Principles for Offering Professional Doctorates

Senior Vice President Martin reported that she is working with the provosts to draft principles for offering professional doctorates, which will be presented to the Board in February 2009.  If approved, they would be used at the comprehensive institutions to inform the development of program proposals for Board consideration.


Budget Situation

Dr. Martin reported to the committee on some of the ways in which the Academic Affairs area is attending to the budget situation.
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Consent Agenda

Upon motion by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Falbo, the following resolutions were adopted by the Board as consent agenda items on a unanimous voice vote.

Wisconsin Partnership Program: UW School of Medicine and Public Health 2009 – 2014 Five-Year Plan

Resolution 9560:  That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents approves the 2009 - 2014 Five-Year Plan of the Wisconsin Partnership Program, which was collaboratively developed by the Oversight and Advisory Committee and the Medical Education and Research Committee of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, in accordance with the Order of the Insurance Commissioner and the Grant Agreement between the UW System Board of Regents, the UW Foundation, and the Wisconsin United for Health Foundation, Inc.

Endorsement of Shared Learning Goals: University of Wisconsin System

Resolution 9561:  That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents endorses the UW System’s Shared Learning Goals for Baccalaureate Students in fulfillment of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin Action Step #1.

Program Authorization (Implementation): Ph.D. in Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9562: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Ph.D. in Environmental & Occupational Health.

Program Authorization (Implementation): Doctor of Nursing Practice, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Resolution 9563:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Doctor of Nursing Practice.

Program Authorization (Implementation): B.S. in Materials Science, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Resolution 9564: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Materials Science.

Program Authorization (Implementation): Bachelor of Science Education, University of Wisconsin-Stout

Resolution 9565: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Science Education.

Program Authorization (Implementation): Bachelor of Science Technology, Education University of Wisconsin-Stout

Resolution 9566: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stout and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Science Technology Education.

Program Authorization (Implementation): B.S. in Geosciences, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Resolution 9567: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Geosciences.

Establishment of the Lumber Grading Training Program, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Resolution 9568: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents delegates to the Dean of the College of Natural Resources at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, the authority to establish a lumber grading training program in accordance with 2007 Wisconsin Act 208 of the Wisconsin Legislature.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

The committee’s report was presented by Regent Smith, chair.
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State Fiscal Update

Tom Anderes, Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs reported that the state currently is estimating a $5.4 billion shortfall for the 2009-11 biennium and a $346 million shortfall for the remainder of the 2008-09 fiscal year.

The Governor had indicated that he wants to implement hospital and oil assessments; protect core services, such as public safety, education, and infrastructure; avoid passing deficits to local governments; and maintain an investment in moving the state forward and creating jobs.

In response to the challenging fiscal climate, the UW System had taken a number of actions, including strengthening position controls, implementing guidelines to limit travel costs, continuing efforts to enhance efficiency and cost-effectiveness, and assessing academic and administrative programs within the context of reduced resources and relative value.  Work will continue to define strategies that will be coordinated with the Board.
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Operations Review and Audit
Follow-up on Occupational Health and Safety Training

Sheri Ackley, Director of the UW System Office of Safety and Loss Prevention, provided a progress report on implementing the recommendations of an earlier review.  The report presented a framework for efforts to strengthen and coordinate activities related to occupational health and safety training.  The committee was assured that, for each recommendation, action has been taken or a plan is in place to address the recommendation.  Another follow-up will be provided in nine to twelve months.

Follow-up on Cost of Textbooks

Julie Gordon, UW System Director of Operations Review and Audit, presented follow-up information related to an earlier review of the cost of textbooks.  The presentation highlighted actions taken byUW institutions to control the cost of textbooks, including text rental programs, early adoption programs, and alternatives to traditional textbooks.  The committee noted that further work in this area is needed and will continue to monitor progress.

In discussion at the Board meeting, Regent Pruitt commended the piloting of text rental programs by UW-Marshfield and UW-Sheboygan but pointed out that there had not been much progress beyond those efforts.  He asked what could be done to convey the Board’s sense of urgency about the matter, as students and families are struggling to meet these costs.

Regent Smith indicated that the same concern had been expressed by committee members in their long discussion.  He noted that one key to holding down costs is early identification of required texts so that students can shop for the best bargains.  However, no solutions beyond that had been offered.

Regent Burmaster added that committee members discussed how to involve faculty without the perception of an affront to academic rigor or freedom but felt at a loss as to how to make real progress in reducing costs.

Regent Bartell also expressed frustration about the lack of progress and asked what the Board could do to move forward.  Noting that a number of four-year and two-year institutions have rental programs, he questioned why others could not establish them.

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago remarked that early adoption of assigned textbooks would be a low-cost way to make progress.  He said that it would be difficult for the larger institutions to implement rental programs and noted that faculty need flexibility to change textbooks as knowledge changes.  Adding that the publishing industry is responsible for high costs, he noted that publishers often bundle textbooks with more expensive products. 

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joe Gow indicated that the campus text rental program is popular but that some aspects of it need to be subsidized.  He said that faculty would like to keep costs down for students and that on-line materials are provided as they are developed.  While faculty and academic leaders are doing what they can, he noted that publishers are the main drivers of textbook costs and that their motive is to make as much profit as possible. 

Regent Bartell asked if there would be a way to reward faculty who take steps to reduce costs, and Senior Vice President Martin said that she would bring the matter to the next meeting of the Faculty Representatives.

UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin said that faculty have tried to hold down costs, noting that they are restrained in some respects by copyright laws.  Noting that, at research universities, materials are constantly changing and that faculty themselves write textbooks, she suggested that financial aid may be the best way to cover the cost of texts.

Stating that continued efforts must be made, Regent Falbo noted that not all materials change rapidly and commented that, while early adoption should be encouraged, it would not be an adequate solution.  He suggested that the vast buying power of the UW System might be harnessed in some way to reduce costs.

Regent Smith noted that Congress took action on cost issue in the College Opportunity and Affordability Act. 

Regent Thomas expressed thanks for the attention being given to this matter because the costs are difficult for students to shoulder and are not factored into all financial aid calculations.  Indicating that some professors list page numbers that have changed from previous texts and offer on-line reserves, she also suggested helping student governments arrange book swaps.
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Audit Status Update

Director Gordon presented a status report on major activities of the Office of Operations Review and Audit, including information on six current projects and on current Legislative Audit Bureau projects affecting the UW System.  These included the Annual Financial Report audit, to be presented in February 2009, the annual compliance audit of federal grants and expenditures, and a statewide analysis of the state’s Accountability, Consolidation, and Efficiency Initiative.  She also provided a brief update on the mental health audit, with a broader update to be provided at the February meeting.
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Trust Funds: Affirmation of UW System Investment Policy Statement

Assistant Trust Officer Doug Hoerr outlined three minor changes to the Investment Policy Statement, two of which slightly alter the acceptable ranges for the asset allocation to Global Tactical Assets and to Private Equity with no change to the target allocation of 25% and 10%, respectively.  The third change was made to reflect the Board’s earlier decision to no longer require subscription to a proxy service, but rather to require a proxy review.  All other aspects of the Investment Policy Statement were reaffirmed. 

Mr. Hoerr also provided an update on investment returns.

The committee passed a resolution to make the proposed changes and affirm the statement for inclusion in the consent agenda.

In response to a question by Regent President Bradley during discussion at the Board meeting, Regent Smith indicated that the spending rate is four percent.
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Committee Business
Review of Source of Funds by UW System Institution

Lynn Paulson, Assistant Vice President for Budget and Planning, presented a tutorial on each of the major sections of the UW System Annual Budget Red Book.  He outlined the wealth of financial information available to the Board and provided the committee members with a CD containing all of this information for fiscal year 2008-09.

Quarterly Gifts, Grants and Contracts Report

Vice President Deborah Durcan reported that total gift, grant and contract awards for the period ending September 30, 2008 were up $92.5 million from the preceding year.  The committee asked to hear from the UW-Madison Dean of the Graduate School at a future meeting.

Approval of UW-Madison Contract with Collegiate Licensing Company

UW-Madison representatives Casey Nagy and Cindy Van Matre discussed the eight-year agreement between UW-Madison and the Collegiate Licensing Company for provision of trademark licensing services. 

The committee passed a resolution approving the contract for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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Report of the Vice President

Vice President Durcan updated the committee on the IRS College and University Compliance Project, the recent Big 10 Business Officers’ meeting, and recently-filed mandatory reports.
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Consent Agenda

Adoption by the Board of the following resolutions as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Thomas, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

University of Wisconsin System Trust Funds Investment Policy Statement

Resolution 9569: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents, in regards to the Investment Policy Statement for the University of Wisconsin System Trust Funds, approves the revisions described below and otherwise affirms its adoption of the policy statement:

  1. The allocation range for the investment strategy Global Tactical Asset Allocation (in Appendix 6) is changed from “23 percent to 27 percent” to “20 percent to 30 percent,” with no change to the target allocation of 25 percent. 
  2. The allocation range for Private Equity (in Appendixes 5 and 6) is changed from “seven percent to 13 percent” to “five percent to 15 percent,” with no change to the target allocation of ten percent.
  3. In the summary description of Regent Policy 31-13, Investment and Social Responsibility (in Appendix 3), the wording “a proxy review service will be subscribed to” is changed to “proxy review will be conducted.”

UW-Madison Trademark Licensing Agreement with Collegiate Licensing Company

Resolution 9570: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin- Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves an eight-year contract with Collegiate Licensing Company to administer UW-Madison’s trademark licensing program effective July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2016.

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Approval of 2009-11 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations

Having presented information on the 2009-11 unclassified pay plan recommendations to the Business, Finance and Audit Committee, President Reilly and Tom Anderes, Senior Vice President for Administration and Fiscal Affairs, made a similar presentation to the full Board.

Senior Vice President Anderes began by reviewing discussion at the November Board meeting.

Key issues affecting recruitment and retention were identified as:

  1. State economic conditions.  While the state revenue shortfall was estimated at $3.1 billion at that time, the situation had worsened; and the current estimate was $5.4 billion.
  2. Implications of the aging workforce, with faculty and staff retiring in increasing numbers, presenting planning and resource challenges.
  3. Salary comparison with peer universities.  Wisconsin’s position below the peer average results in increasing difficulty in attracting and retaining faculty and staff.  In 2007-08, UW System salaries were almost 10% below peer medians.

Salary increases of 7.78% would be required annually for two years to reach the peer median, an estimate that included an increase in peer salary adjustments of 3.1% annually, which could be adjusted downward at this time, given the steepness of the economic downturn.  

Following Board action at this meeting, next steps would be for the President to forward the pay plan recommendations to the Office of State Employment Relations (OSER) in mid- to late December.  OSER later would present the biennial compensation plan to the Joint Committee on Employment Relations (JCOER) for approval.

President Reilly remarked that the current $5.4 billion shortfall estimate was a huge change and showed that all revenue streams were declining sharply.  Given that situation, a 7.78% annual increase in 2009-11 was not considered realistic.  Although the UW System was obligated to let the state know the size of the salary gap, the economic crisis – now the greatest since the 1930’s - prompted a recommendation that is less that what he had hoped.

Given the depth of the crisis and the anguish of families dealing with job losses, he noted that the question arises as to why any increase would be recommended.  The answer, he said, relates to the intense competition for talent that will continue and accelerate. In that regard, he pointed out several considerations:

  1. A 5.23% salary adjustment per year for four years was adopted in 2007-09 as a goal.
  2. It is reasonable to assume that peers would average around a 2.0% salary increase annually (down from the 3.1% estimate in July).
  3. A 2.5% adjustment per year in 2009-11 would scale back from the established goal of 5.23% per year, while perhaps providing some progress in closing the gap.

In conclusion, President Reilly recommended:

  1. A 2.5% salary adjustment in fiscal years 2010 and 2011, a recommendation that would maintain public support in a tough environment and help to hold down tuition;
  2. Endorsement of state group health insurance benefits for domestic partners, which are offered by many public and private entities, as a matter of basic human fairness and to become more competitive in recruiting and retaining faculty and staff;
  3. Adoption of pay plan distribution guidelines providing for not less than one-third to be distributed on the basis of merit/market and not less than one-third to be distributed on the basis of solid performance for pay plans greater than 2%.  Pay plans of 2% or less may be distributed across the board to satisfactory performers, based on annual evaluations.  These guidelines had been used over a number of biennia.   

Stating his support for the recommendations, Regent Smith inquired as to the dollar difference between 2.5% and 5.2% and the approximate cost of domestic partner benefits.

President Reilly replied that a 2.5% increase would total $23.9 million and that a 5.2% increase would amount to around $50 million.  Associate Vice President Al Crist added that, with a one percent participation rate, domestic partner benefits could be expected to cost about $1.3 million. 

Regent Bartell also expressed his support for the resolution and inquired about the peer groups.  Mr. Crist replied that they were established in 1984 by a Governor’s Commission, with separate peer groups for UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, and the comprehensive universities, including the UW Colleges and UW-Extension.

Noting that he had chaired that Governor’s Commission, Regent Loftus recalled that the recession of the 1980’s resulted in a tax increase and a reduction of 30,000 students in the UW System.  The peer group system was developed as a means of determining the amount of catch-up pay needed.

Regent Bartell asked if the 10% gap is an aggregate number, and Mr. Crist replied in the affirmative.

Adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Davis, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

2009-11 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations

Resolution 9571: Whereas, the University of Wisconsin System vision, embodied in the UW System’s Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, is to be the state’s premier developer of advanced human potential, the knowledge-economy jobs that employ that potential, and the thriving communities that sustain citizens and businesses alike; and,

Whereas, the Growth Agenda is a plan to produce more college graduates, stimulate job creation, and strengthen local communities; and,

Whereas, the UW System’s success in achieving this vision and implementing the Growth Agenda requires the ability to effectively leverage its own human capital; and,

Whereas, to succeed in an increasingly competitive national and global higher-education marketplace, the UW System must have the means to continue attracting, hiring, and retaining the most diverse and best possible corps of faculty, academic staff, academic leaders, and classified staff which will require long-term efforts that position the UW System to provide both competitive compensation and supportive work environments; and,

Whereas, pursuant to s.230.12(3)(e) Wis. Stats., the Regents are charged with the responsibility to recommend to the Director of the Office of State Employment Relations a proposal for adjusting compensation and employee benefits for faculty, academic staff, and senior academic leaders for the 2009-11biennium; and,

Whereas, the Director is required to submit a proposal which shall be based upon the competitive ability of the Board of Regents to recruit and retain qualified faculty, academic staff, and senior academic leaders, data collected as to rates of pay for comparable work in other public universities, recommendations of the Board of Regents, and any special studies carried on as to the need for any changes in compensation and employee benefits to cover each year of the biennium; and,

Whereas, for the 2007-08 fiscal year average faculty salaries are 9.89% behind peer median salaries: and

Whereas, with an originally estimated 3.1% increase in peer median salaries for the current year and for each year of the 2009-11 biennium, a 7.78% increase each year of the biennium would close the gap between average faculty salaries and faculty peer median salaries; and

Whereas, the Board of Regents is cognizant of the difficulty of funding the pay plan needed to close the gap between our average faculty salaries and faculty peer median salaries in the current economic environment; and

Whereas, while original estimates of the widening of the salary gap with peers were made prior to the down turn in the economy, an assumption can be made that peer salary increases will not be as high as the earlier estimate, and

Whereas, while formal final information on salary increases at peer institutions is not available, a reasonable estimate is that peer median salaries will increase on average by 2% each year of the next biennium; and

Whereas, the Board of Regents embarked on a plan beginning with the 2007-09 biennium that recommended a 5.23% pay plan each year for the next four years that would close the gap between our average faculty salaries and peer median salaries: and

Whereas, the current economic conditions require an adjustment to the plan initiated in 2007-09, and

Whereas, the Board of Regents is committed to continuing to close this gap in our ability to offer competitive salaries, and

Now, therefore be it resolved;

That the Board of Regents supports the pay plan recommendation of the UW System President providing for increases such that average unclassified salaries will not fall farther behind peer salaries for each year of the 2009-11 biennium for faculty, academic staff, and senior academic leaders.  Pursuant to 230.12(3)(e) Wis. Stats., the Board directs the UW System President to transmit to the Director of the Office of State Employment Relations currently available information on unclassified salaries for UW System peer institutions and related economic indices, and the Board’s request that the Director recommend to the Joint Committee on Employment Relations a salary increase for each year of the biennium of 2.5%, and the necessary related increase for unclassified salary ranges and salary minima.

Further, the Board of Regents directs the UW System President to convey to the Director of the Office of State Employment Relations the Board’s endorsement of state group health insurance for domestic partners of all state employees, and encourages the Governor and the Legislature to amend state statutes to provide that benefit.

Further, the Board of Regents adopts the pay plan distribution guidelines originally adopted in 2003-05 for 2009-11 if the pay plan exceeds 2% each year.  However, the Board suspends those pay plan distribution guidelines if the authorized amount for an unclassified pay plan is 2% or less in any year, and permits that in such instance the pay plan percentage may be distributed across-the-board to all those who have at least a solid performance rating, with any unused funds distributed by the Chancellor to address critical salary needs.

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REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE

The Committee’s report was presented by Regent Bartell, chair.
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UW-La Crosse: Master Plan Update

The committee heard an update of the UW-La Crosse master plan, which consisted of an update on the progress of the campus’ most recent capital projects, including the stadium and fields project, the new academic building, and the proposed new residence hall. 
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UW-Madison: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the TomoTherapy Addition Project for the School of Veterinary Medicine

The project, to be completely funded by gifts of $2.5 million, including contributions of equipment from the TomoTherapy company, would provide space for innovative and unique treatment of animals in the veterinary oncology program.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW-Madison: Authority to Demolish the Union South Building and Hi Ray Hall for Purposes of Site Development

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority as a first step in the Union South construction project, for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW-Oshkosh: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Academic Building Project

Authority was requested to increase the project budget and construct the new academic building at UW-Oshkosh.  With a design heavily influenced by principles of sustainability, the building and systems would be about 50% more energy efficient than the current State of Wisconsin Building Code, with a minimum goal of including 10% renewable energy. 

The building is expected to obtain a LEED Gold Rating, and the campus plans to use the renewable energy sources as an educational tool.

The committee approved a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW-Platteville: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Williams Fieldhouse Addition – Phase I Project

Authority was requested to increase the project budget to $5.3 million and to construct Phase I of the Williams Fieldhouse Addition project.  This phase would construct new space to meet student wellness, recreation and general education needs and would be funded by program revenue-supported borrowing, including a segregated fee increase of $44 per year, approved by the Student Segregated Fee Allocation Committee.

The committee approved a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW-Stevens Point: Authority to Accept a Gift of Land to Benefit the Treehaven Field Station

Authority was requested to accept a gift of 21 acres of land from the UW-Stevens Point Foundation to expand the university-owned acreage to approximately 40 acres at the Treehaven Natural Resource and Education Center.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW-Whitewater: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Drumlin Hall Dining Hall Renovation Project

Approval was requested to increase the project budget to $1.3 million and construct the Drumlin Hall dining hall renovation project, which would construct a small addition and a new entry with a staircase, an elevator, and a gathering space to the south side of Drumlin Hall and remodel both the first and second floors.  Debt service for the project would be paid from program operations.

The committee passed a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda. 
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Authority to Seek Enumeration of Additional 2009-11 Capital Budget Projects:  (1) UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiative, (2) UW-River Falls Hagestad Hall Renovation Project (Including Waiver of Regent Policy 19-8 to Fund the Project), and (3) UW-Stout University Center Renovation and Infrastructure Project

One of these projects was the UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiative that would modify the UW System Six-Year Plan and the 2009-11 Capital Budget by requesting a multi-biennia fund for development of projects at UW-Milwaukee.  While the total request of $123.4 million in state funding would be about the same amount as proposed in the six-year plan for UW-Milwaukee, this initiative would provide flexibility in determining specific projects to be funded, the mix of fund sources and the timing used to proceed.  Included would be acquisition of Columbia-Saint Mary’s Hospital; a Freshwater Science renovation and addition; a new research building; and acquisition of land non-contiguous to the campus. 

The request was modeled after the 2001 UW-Madison BioStar process that enumerated state funds with matching gift funds over multiple biennia for development of specific academic and research facilities, providing flexibility to align with fundraising success and real estate market realities.

A second project was to remodel the former student union at UW-River Falls, now called Hagestad Hall, to create a one-stop enrollment services center.  The request included a waiver of Regent Policy 19-8 to allow the use of student-approved segregated fees to fund the $4 million remodeling project.  The Regent policy
specifies that facilities housing student administrative services should be funded by state general funds.  However, due to funding constraints and higher priorities at UW-River Falls and throughout the UW System, it would be years before state funding would be available for the renovation. 

Desiring new space for student administrative services, the campus requested use of segregated fees to support the project; and the $43 per year fee increase was approved by the Student Facilities and Fees Board. 

The committee concluded that it would be appropriate to waive the policy in this case, although Regent Opgenorth expressed concern about doing so.

The third project was the UW-Stout University Center Renovation and Infrastructure project, which would extensively remodel the existing Memorial Student Center.  A pre-design process, in which students participated, has been completed.  The remodeling would include food service venues; student organization, student newspaper, and student government spaces; the bookstore; the service center; and meeting rooms.  Work also would include window replacements and renovating the infrastructure of the entire building, including plumbing, mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, and life safety systems. 

The Student Senate approved support of the $18 million renovation with a segregated fee increase of $171.88, to be phased in over three years.  The amount is based on anticipated enrollment projections and twenty-year bonds.

The committee approved a resolution approving the requested Capital Budget additions and revisions for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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UW System:  Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

Authority was requested to construct fourteen minor projects on seven campuses under the all agency maintenance fund program.  One of these would be the UW-Eau Claire Phillips Hall Material Science Center Laboratory remodeling project that would provide new research laboratory space for the NanoStem program – a regional initiative involving UW-Eau Claire, UW-Stout and the Chippewa Valley Technical College.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.
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Report of the Associate Vice President
Building Commission Actions

Associate Vice President David Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $43 million for projects at its October and November meetings, including $19 million in general fund supported borrowing, $22 million in program revenue, $1 million in gift and grant funds, and $1 million in all other funds.
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Consent Agenda

Adoption of Resolutions 9572-9579 by the Board as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Bartell and seconded by Regent Burmaster.  At the request of Regent Davis, Resolution 9578 was removed from the consent agenda.

The question was put on Resolutions 9572-9577 and 9579; and they were adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the TomoTherapy Addition Project for the School of Veterinary Medicine

Resolution 9572: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct the TomoTherapy Addition project for the School of Veterinary Medicine at an estimated total project cost of $2,546,000 Gift Funds.

Authority to Demolish the Union South Building and Hi Ray Hall for Purposes of Site Development, UW-Madison

Resolution 9573: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to demolish the Union South building and the Hi Ray Hall building on the UW-Madison campus at a total estimated cost of $2,325,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Budget and Construct the Academic Building Project, UW-Oshkosh

Resolution 9574: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Oshkosh Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the New Academic Building Project be approved and authority be granted to: (a) increase the budget by $214,000 Program Revenue Borrowing (Utilities Fund) and $25,000 Building Trust Funds, and (b) construct the project at a total cost of $48,239,000 ($40,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $214,000 Program Revenue Borrowing, $25,000 Building Trust Funds and $8,000,000 Gift Funds).

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Williams Fieldhouse Addition – Phase I Project, UW-Platteville

Resolution 9575: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to:  (a) increase the project scope and budget by $1,639,000 existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, (b) seek a waiver of Wisconsin Statutes s.16.855(14) under the provisions of s. 13.48 (19) to accept a single prime contractor bid for the project, and (c) construct the Williams Fieldhouse Addition Phase I project at a total project cost of $5,366,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

Authority to Accept a Gift of Land to Benefit the Treehaven Field Station, UW-Stevens Point

Resolution 9576: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to accept a gift from the UW-Stevens Point Foundation of approximately 21 acres of land which is valued at $31,650 and located at the Treehaven Field Station near Tomahawk, Wisconsin.

Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Drumlin Hall Dining Hall Renovation Project, UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9577: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Whitewater Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Drumlin Dining Hall Remodeling project be approved and authority be granted to: (a) increase the budget by $109,000 Program Revenue-Cash, and (b) construct the project for a total cost of $1,384,000 ($1,275,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $109,000 Existing Program Revenue-Cash).

Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System

Resolution 9579: That, upon the recommendation of the of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $10,564,100 ($5,380,400 General Fund Supported Borrowing, $191,800 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $861,500 Gifts and Grants, $639,000 Agency Cash, $2,791,400 Program Revenue-Cash, and $700,000 Other Funding Sources Cash).

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Authority to Seek Enumeration of Additional 2009-11 Capital Budget Projects

Adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Pruitt and seconded by Regent Falbo. 

Authority to Seek Enumeration of Additional 2009-11 Capital Budget Projects – (1) UW-Milwaukee Master Plan Initiative, (2) UW-River Falls Hagestad Hall Renovation Project, and (3) UW-Stout University Centers Renovation and Infrastructure Project, UW System

Resolution 9578: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2009-11 Capital Budget Revisions and Additions request be submitted to the Department of Administration and the State Building Commission.

  1. UW-Milwaukee: Master Plan Initiative $240,000,000, ($123,400,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing*, $55,600,000 Existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $1,000,000 Building Trust Funds, and $60,000,000 Gift Funds), *Inclusive of $20M request with BOR-approved 2009-11Capital Budget Request
  2. UW-River Falls: Hagested Hall Renovation Project $4,000,000, ($3,125,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $875,000 Program Revenue-Cash).  This project involves waiver of Regent Policy 19-8.
  3. UW-Stout: Memorial Student Center Renovation Project $18,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing

While she favored flexibility in moving forward with the UW-Milwaukee initiatives, Regent Davis noted the importance of the projects and asked how the Regents would be kept informed and involved as they moved forward.  Associate Vice President Miller replied that they would be brought to the Board and the Building Commission to approve funding on a per-project basis. 

Regent Bartell noted that the Board’s action to seek enumeration would demonstrate commitment, which would be important for those projects involving donors.

Regent Pruitt commended UW-Milwaukee for completing its work on the master plan. 

With regard to the UW-River Falls project, Regent Womack asked if there had been a pattern of waiving Regent Policy 19-8.

Replying in the negative, Mr. Miller said that the policy had only been waived once – in 1999 – for a UW-Madison Student Health Services facility.  In this case, the choice was whether or not to make the building desirable for student use. 

President Reilly pointed out that, in both cases, the policy was being waived for buildings that provide important student services.

While students wanted the building to be renovated, Regent Opgenorth expressed concern about the precedent of using student fees for that purpose.

Mr. Miller assured the Board that this was a rare circumstance and that he would not want to bring forward a request to use such funding for a building that was not student centered. 

Regent Loftus asked how rapidly projects could be under way in order to stimulate the economy, and Mr. Miller replied that they had been asked by the state and federal governments to put together a list of projects that could be done quickly for possible stimulus package funding.  In that regard, he noted that UW-Madison’s Union South, the UW-La Crosse academic building, and a number of other projects would be bid in 2009.  

At the suggestion of Regent Falbo, Regent President Bradley offered a friendly amendment to include wording to the UW-River Falls project that it involves a waiver of Regent Policy 19-8.

The question was put on Resolution 9578 as amended, and it was adopted on a unanimous voice vote. 

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ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-La Crosse

Regent Smith commended Chancellor Gow and Special Assistant Carmen Wilson, noting that UW-La Crosse is a special place with a special role in the community.  He then offered the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation, with a standing ovation.

Resolution of Appreciation: UW-La Crosse

Resolution 9580:   WHEREAS, the members of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System are pleased to see UW-La Crosse’s commitment to progress and growth, as demonstrated through the campus’s presentations and reports; and

WHEREAS, UW-La Crosse is dedicated to contributing to the scholarly, social, and cultural welfare of our state through its nationally recognized academic programs; and

WHEREAS, UW-La Crosse has demonstrated its commitment to its motto, Mens Corpusque – mind and body  by launching the most ambitious fundraising appeal in the campus’ storied 100-year history, a comprehensive fundraising campaign that supports six bold initiatives, including the construction of a new Veterans Memorial Field Sports Complex and “Centennial Hall,” a new academic building; and

WHEREAS, UW-La Crosse’s academic profile for incoming freshmen consistently ranks first among comprehensive universities in the UW System, based on ACT and class rank, and  in addition, the university’s retention rate of 87 percent and graduation rate of 66.3 percent are second only to Madison in the UW System; and

WHEREAS, UW-La Crosse’s student athletes have captured 22 national championships and numerous conference titles since 2001, and boast an average GPA that is highest in the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and above that of the entire student body; and

WHEREAS, UW-La Crosse’s faculty and staff, under the leadership of Chancellor Joe Gow and his executive team, have raised the campus to a level of preeminence among public comprehensive universities in the Midwest, illustrated by its #2 ranking among public universities that offer bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the Midwest by U.S. News & World Report and its #39 ranking among public colleges nationwide in the most recent listing of the Kiplinger’s 100; and

WHEREAS, the emergence of regional and global economies powered by scientific and creative discovery, new technology, and professional expertise demands well-educated and highly trained men and women of broad experience and deep character; 

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System extends its deep appreciation to the staff, faculty, and students of UW-La Crosse for their efforts in supporting the mission of the UW System and generously hosting this productive December 2008 meeting.

Chancellor Gow thanked Regent Smith for his staunch support of UW-La Crosse and higher education in general.  He expressed appreciation to Dr. Wilson for the excellent meeting arrangements, to Jim Jorstad for the videos and educational media that he created, and to a host of others who made the visit possible. 
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Resolution of Appreciation to Regent Colleene Thomas

UW-La Crosse student leaders Derek Kockler and Eric Fuhrmann presented a resolution to Regent Thomas from the UW-La Crosse Student Association, commending and thanking her for setting forth a model of shared governance and for her commitment to promoting the student voice. 

The meeting was recessed at ll:35 a.m. and reconvened at 11:45 a.m.

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CLOSED SESSION

The following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt, was adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Davis, Loftus, Opgenorth, Pruitt, Smith, Vasquez, and Womack (10) voting in the affirmative.  There were no negative votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9581:  Move into closed session to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted

by 19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats., and to consider a UW-Milwaukee honorary degree nomination, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m., with no actions having been taken.

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary