Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

River Falls, Wisconsin

UW-River Falls

Held in the University Center, Riverview Ballroom

October 4, 2007

10:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

PRESENT:                               Regents Bartell, Bradley, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Davis, Falbo, Pruitt, Rosenzweig, Salas, Shields, Smith, Thomas, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND:          Regents Burmaster, Cuene, Loftus, McPike, and Spector

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UW-RIVER FALLS PRESENTATION – INTRODUCTION AND LIVING THE PROMISE: SERVING AND SUSTAINING OUR COMMUNITIES

            UW-River Falls Chancellor Don Betz began his presentation with a video, created by UW-River Falls student Ryan Griffin, highlighting the university’s environmental and community commitments and the many opportunities available to students, including study-abroad programs and service learning opportunities, which, along with excellent academic programs, open the doors of knowledge and demonstrate the power of learning.

            The Chancellor introduced and welcomed two special guests: Matt Nikolay, field representative for U.S. Senator Russ Feingold, and Mark Aumann, staff assistant to U.S. Representative Ron Kind. 

            In opening remarks, Chancellor Betz observed that economic and growth prospects are bright for Pierce, Polk and St. Croix counties, with St. Croix being the fastest growing county in the state and among those in the nation forecast to have high percentage growth rates.  Noting that River Falls is part of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, he indicated that UW-River Falls is the residential comprehensive university nearest to the metro area and its burgeoning population.  Located at the intersection of contrasting urban and rural lifestyles, the university is well positioned to address, in collaboration with others, the challenges and opportunities presented by the coming population growth.

            Turning to the history of the River Falls community and university, the Chancellor indicated that the community was founded in 1848 by Joel Foster, a Mexican war veteran.  Twenty-five years later, the state chose the community as the site of its fourth normal school, which has evolved 133 years later into a bountiful region and a thriving university, nurtured by the dreams of generations of people. 

            Today, UW-River Falls encompasses about 780 acres of main campus and two farms, and enrolls more than 6,400 students, the most in its history.  Noting that the rate of growth has been at a controlled annual pace of two-plus percent per year for the past three years, the Chancellor cautioned that scarcity of resources in all areas dictates proceeding prudently.  Stating that UW-River Falls embraces the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin and the Advantage Wisconsin Strategic Framework, he pointed out that both must have adequate resources in order to be successful. 

            UW-River Falls, he indicated, is among the most powerful economic engines in the region, fueling growth through annual institutional expenditures and spending by faculty, staff, students and visitors, as well as by hosting many large gatherings and summer camp for the Kansas City Chiefs.  In addition, the university promotes a high quality of life by educating citizen-leaders for the region.

            The university consists of four colleges and the Office of Graduate and Outreach Programs.  The colleges are: the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business and Economics, and the College of Education and Professional Studies. 

            This fall, UW-River Falls enrolled 1,300 new freshmen – a record high number – from 400 high schools. Current students come from 71 of the state’s 72 counties, a dozen U.S. states and 16 other countries.  Student retention from the first to second year is 75%, with a strategic plan target of 80% - a challenging goal given that is 57% of the student body are first-generation college students and family income is among the lowest in the UW System.

            UW-River Falls has nationally competitive four and six-year graduation rates and the second lowest credits to degree in the UW System.  The university is in the top tier of Midwest public universities in the 2008 US News and World Report survey and among the best in the Midwest in the Princeton Review ratings. 

            Above all, Chancellor Betz stated, UW-River Falls faculty and staff are passionate about teaching, about learning and about serving.  That they truly help students learn is evidenced by consistently high satisfaction ratings that graduates give their university experience. 

            In ongoing efforts to build the future of the region, UW-River Falls works in partnership with UW-Stout, UW-Eau Claire, the Technical Colleges, the UW Colleges and UW-Extension, as well as with a broad range of public and private partners.  

            The university’s pathway for the coming years is its strategic plan, “Living the Promise”, which was the consensus outcome of meetings with hundreds of people on and off campus and a “visions and values” survey to which hundreds responded.  “Living the Promise,” the Chancellor said, “is our individual and collective pledge of responsibility to our students, to our communities, to Wisconsin, and to each other.  For us, the jewels in the crown of that pledge are integrity and intentionality.”

            The premier strategic goal is the Culture of Learning, which invites fresh ideas and opportunities to help students learn.  The Culture of Learning is cultivated in many ways, including faculty development, undergraduate research, civic engagement, global connections, and opportunities for service.

            The university seeks to fulfill its mission to build the future of the region and state, Chancellor Betz said, “by educating students to become engaged citizens and leaders who create more sustainable communities, who understand the importance of inclusiveness, and who embrace knowing and serving the community. . . Civic engagement is a declared value here.”

            The goals and initiatives of “Living the Promise” highlight the power of learning as a response to accelerating change – a permanent fixture of the future – by preparing students to lead change and direct it to serve the needs of families and communities.  With confidence in the power of learning, the university pledges to intentionally grow the next generation of productive, creative, ethical and engaged citizens and leaders with an informed global perspective and to do this by infusing the curriculum, activities and partnerships with concentrations on sustainable community development, leadership, inclusiveness and global literacy. 

            The second goal of “Living the Promise”, the chancellor continued, is to model sustainability principles, as evidenced by the St. Croix Institute for Sustainable Community Development, which was created as the university’s response to Governor Doyle’s energy independence directive in fall 2006, at which time four UW institutions, including UW-River Falls, were invited to “go off the grid” by 2012.

            To discuss the institute’s activities, he introduced Dr. Kelly Cain, director of the institute and a 20-year member of the Plant and Earth Sciences Department. 

            To define “sustainable community development”, Dr. Cain explained that the term is synonymous with engaged leadership at the local level in the attempt to avoid the un-sustainability evidenced by myriad global threats to the ecosystem, including rapid population growth, loss of crop and grazing land, depletion of tropical forest, species extinction, fresh water shortages, depletion of fisheries, global warming, acid rain, human health threats, and energy resource depletion.

            Among the most immediate of those threats, he said, are climate change and peak oil and natural gas production which will be reached around 2010-11, after which production will decrease and prices will rise.  In that regard, he referred to statements made by Matthew R. Simmons, of Simmons and Company International, advisor to Vice President Cheney’s 2001 White House Energy Task Force. Mr. Simmons referred to peak oil and gas as a “world class crisis …[that] rivals or exceeds global warming” and called for a “Manhattan Project” to deal with the situation.

            Stating that Wisconsin is a leader in those efforts, Dr. Cain referred to Governor Doyle’s Declaration of Energy Independence and Executive Order 191, which created a Governor’s Task Force on Global Warming, charged with issuing a report and recommendations before the end of the year.

            The St. Croix Institute, he said, “walks the talk” for incremental improvement, integrating students into the process through service learning.  In order to succeed, globally literate people are needed to bring everyone to the table.  The institute helps to create student leaders who will carry its mission into the future.

            As examples of partnerships, he referred to an energy audit and wind mapping study, carried out in collaboration with WPPI (Wisconsin Public Power Institute) and the River Falls Municipal Utility.  There also are presentations and study circles conducted in cooperation with the Phipps Center for the Arts and the St. Croix Valley Community Foundation, along with a range of other partnerships.  Success, he emphasized, depends on strong partnerships among universities, local governments, organizations, and businesses, which are focused on re-localization and self-sufficiency.

            Some of the students involved were:  Nick Bisley, who worked on a trail and septic design project for eco-tourism in Yunnan, China; Andrew Taylor, who worked on a trail design project between the communities of Spring Valley and Elmwood; Eric Wickstrom, who received a $7,000 grant from the UW System for a food composting and vermin-culture project; Stacy Dekkers, who worked on a green purchasing policy and guidelines in an internship with the St. Croix Institute; and Ian Johnson, who worked in an internship with the River Falls Municipal Utility in the Powerful Choices program.

            He then introduced River Falls Mayor Don Richards, a strong supporter of sustainable community development.  Mayor Richards noted that River Falls was chosen by Wisconsin Public Power as one of two communities in Wisconsin to lead by example, with 5.5% of the city’s ratepayers having chosen to buy sustainable energy.  This ranked the city 9th in the United States in green power programs.  The city also passed a resolution to join a national group striving to become inclusive communities, making River Falls one of only two so designated in the state. 

            Dr. Cain then introduced Jennifer Borup, associate professor of Social Work, who spoke about faculty and student commitment to those in need as a component of sustainable community development.  In that regard, she explained that her field views sustainability not only at the level of economic and environmental planning, but also from the standpoint of the family as the basis of community.

            Pursuant to that commitment, the UW-River Falls Social Work Program met a need that no other entity has been able to address.  Using a model begun at UW-Green Bay, UW-River Falls joined with 24 county human service directors, the Wisconsin Division of Children and Family Services, and the federal government to provide in-service training for county child protection staff, supervisors, and directors.   Because there are no state monies to train child protective staff and many counties are too small to develop their own programs, universities worked with counties to develop training partnerships that could join with the state and bring in federal dollars. 

            These partnerships, said Professor Borup, are unique in the country and have been remarkably successful.  In 1998, she wrote the grant that secured funding for the Western Wisconsin Child Welfare Training Partnership, which last year trained 961 professionals.  The result has been that counties have adopted practices to benefit families and make children safer.

            The next presenter was Jean Batiste Uwimana, an alumnus of UW-River Falls and a master’s degree student at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute in Public Policy.  He has been working with Dr. Cain on an internship project to measure the carbon footprint of the UW-River Falls campus – the amount of carbon released to the atmosphere as a result of burning fossil fuels, electric power, travel and other sources of carbon.

            Benefits of the project include: Helping to manage sources of carbon production; helping to maximize energy efficiency and avoid utility costs, saving millions of dollars over the long term; and helping the university meet its pledge to the American Colleges and Universities President’s Climate Commitment. 

            In addition, the project will help the university eventually to take advantage of carbon cap and trade of emission certificates as a source of revenue, using the power of the marketplace to reduce emissions in a cost-effective and flexible manner; and it will contribute to spin-off economic benefits related to the pursuit of energy independence in the St. Croix region and across the state.

            This is an example, Mr. Uwimana said in conclusion, of how internships and service learning opportunities contribute to UW-River Falls’ leadership in helping to achieve sustainable community development.

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2007-09 BIENNIAL BUDGET UPDATE AND RESOLUTION

            In opening remarks, Regent President Bradley spoke of the broad public support for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin and the consistent message of support conveyed by legislators, both Republican and Democratic, in the Senate and Assembly.

            President Reilly and UW-Madison Chancellor John Wiley had written letters to the Conference Committee.  Chancellor Wiley’s letter said: “The cuts reflected in this version of the budget jeopardize our mission and threaten the quality of teaching, research and outreach Wisconsin citizens expect from their flagship university.”  President Reilly wrote: “Even with new money earmarked for the Growth Agenda, the net effect of the Assembly budget would be fewer class sections, reduced student services, lower quality, and higher tuition.  In this scenario, students from every legislative district would be paying more for less.” 

            Regents Colleene Thomas and Tom Shields joined with student government leaders from all 26 campuses and United Council leaders in writing a letter that stated: “It’s time for lawmakers to recognize that the future of students and the economic vitality of our state depend on a strong and vibrant public university.”

            In addition, a letter was written by a large group of business leaders – both Republicans and Democrats – to the Conference Committee expressing support for the university’s budget and pointing out that it is important to keep the state’s knowledge pipeline intact.  Those business leaders wrote: “Conscientious investment in higher education is a solid move towards our goal of creating a vibrant state economy where high-growth businesses and high-wage jobs are abundant.” 

            More than 30,000 UW-Madison alumni have contacted legislators and flooded offices with post cards in the “Save Bucky” campaign; and UW-Madison Professor Louise Robbins wrote an editorial in the Wisconsin State Journal, urging the Legislature to protect the money needed to maintain current operations and to allow the university to grow the economy.

            Regent Bradley remarked that these and other people all over the state –  Republicans, Democrats and Independents – do not see the budget as a partisan issue; they see it as a policy issue.  On that issue their message is consistent: They are asking the Legislature to fund the university’s cost to continue current operations; preserve affordable tuition and broad access; and to empower the university to move forward with the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  That message, he emphasized, has very broad support.

            President Reilly indicated that all chancellors are engaged in contingency planning in the event that no budget is passed. 

            He recently met with the UW-Oshkosh Foundation Board and UW-La Crosse Chancellors’ Community Council.  Both events were attended by 120-140 community leaders, Republican and Democratic, business people, elected officials and others who know that that state needs to reinvest in its university system. 

            Governor Doyle, he noted, spoke of the university as the core economic engine for Wisconsin and as the state’s most important competitive advantage.  There have been numerous editorials and many letters from legislators and others that have made the same point and have expressed support for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin. 

            With regard to the Wisconsin Alumni Association’s “Save Bucky” campaign, he indicated that Paula Bonner, the WAA’s executive director, had told him that alumni were supportive and eager to sign on.

            While no one wants to raise taxes, he pointed out that, unless the state reinvests in the university and per capita income is increased, there will be no choice in the future but raise taxes higher or lower quality of life. 

            If no budget is passed, President Reilly cautioned, the cost to continue current operations still will rise and the university will be forced to make draconian cuts.  Noting that the second semester will begin in a couple of months, he said that, with no budget, offerings would have to be curtailed and those cancellations would need to be made before students registered for classes. 

            To describe the situation on their campuses, he called on UW-Green Bay Chancellor Bruce Shepard, UW-Platteville Chancellor David Markee, and UW-River Falls chancellor Don Betz.

            Chancellor Shepard said that it is important for the public to understand that current costs consist primarily of personnel costs and bond obligations; therefore, reductions must be made elsewhere.  For the second semester, it would be necessary to use all reserves and funding for courses taught by adjunct faculty, in addition to which there would be a hiring freeze.  Decisions would need to be made by November 1st, before students pre-register for the second semester. 

            Indicating that the university would not reduce security or mental health services, he cautioned that, in the longer term, there would need to be more cuts and that there would be anger if students could not take the classes they need to graduate.  Community leaders, he pointed out, are hard-headed business people who understand that the state is on a downward spiral and that the university is Wisconsin’s best tool for creating a better future.

            Chancellor Markee expressed the same concerns, noting that funding for salaries and debt service have been committed.  Without provision of cost to continue funding, there would need to be a 10-12% reduction in second semester classes, mostly those taught by adjunct faculty.  In the following year, a 10% reduction in enrollments would have to be considered.   

            Noting that part of UW-Platteville’s Growth Agenda is committed to expanding engineering programs to other parts of the state, including Washington County, he cautioned that these programs could not go forward without adequate budgetary support.

            Chancellor Betz remarked that the situation is demoralizing to the university and the community as a whole.  It seemed that Wisconsin was establishing a pattern of operation that only could lead to loss of reputation and respect. 

            Noting that UW-River Falls is “full to the brim” with students, he cautioned that, as much as they would hate to make cuts of 10-12% in classes, it would be necessary to take such actions if a budget were not passed.

            Emphasizing the great outpouring of support for the Growth Agenda from people of all political persuasions, President Reilly noted that none of planned cuts need to be made if the state would make a modest reinvestment in the UW System.

            Regent Salas expressed concern about the nearly 5,000 students who qualified for state financial aid but were not receiving their grants due to the budgetary impasse.  These students, he noted, are from low income families and could not afford college without financial assistance.

            President Reilly agreed, adding that these students are the ones he is most worried about and that the state cannot afford to lose them.  The Growth Agenda for Wisconsin can be successful, he said, only if a wider, deeper cut of students attend college.

            Regent Smith inquired about impacts on the campuses to date.        

            Chancellor Keating reported that UW-Parkside has admitted 100 students on contingency, while they wait for their held-up state grants.  The students have been informed that the university will pick up the cost, if necessary, this semester, placing the university at risk if financial aid funds are not forthcoming.

            Regent Salas commended UW-Parkside for taking that action and expressed the hope that other campuses would do the same.

            Chancellor Wells added that donors are asking what will become of their gifts for capital projects if there is no budget.

            Noting that it would be extremely difficult to make up for lack of a budget through cuts, Regent Pruitt asked what level of tuition surcharge would be needed.

            Chancellor Shepard replied that $125 per semester would be needed to cover Assembly budget cuts.  To fully recover cost-to-continue funds would require three times that much.

            Regent Crain urged the Board to make a statement about the budgetary situation, and Regent Rosenzweig remarked that the public should be informed of the consequences of having no budget.

            Regent Falbo pointed out that there are donors in various stages of commitment to capital projects.  If monies had to be returned because projects could not go forward, he did not believe the donors would be likely to give money again.

            Noting that budgets are about making choices, Regent Pruitt remarked that inaction is a choice and that the resolution before the board makes that clear.

            Regent Davis observed that that students and donors would receive disheartening messages about the dire consequences of inaction on the budget.  She urged that the Legislature heed all the pleas that had been made for reinvestment in the university and act in the best interest of the state.

            Regent Thomas pointed out that it is of critical importance to students to maintain the value of their degrees.  Noting that students are becoming more aware of the budgetary problems, she said it is important to talk about their inability to take classes that they need and the consequences of losing esteemed professors.

            In response to a question by Regent Crain, Regent Walsh explained that Wisconsin is one of the few states that is legally able to continue to operate without a budget.  He commended Regent President Bradley, President Reilly and the chancellors for their leadership in conveying the message of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin that the university is an important part of the solution to the state’s problems and should be considered an investment, rather than an expenditure.  Noting that education is a top priority for Governor Doyle, he remained optimistic that there would be a successful outcome.

            Adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Connolly-Keesler and seconded by Regent Bartell:

Resolution on UW System 2007-09 Budget

              Resolution:                        WHEREAS, the cost of operating two doctoral universities, 11 comprehensive universities, 13 freshman-sophomore UW Colleges, and 72 county Extension offices has already increased due to normal inflationary factors, and the absence of a 2007-09 operating budget leaves the University of Wisconsin System without adequate resources to cover higher operating expenses; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the UW System operates and maintains more than 60 million square feet of facilities, and the absence of a 2007-09 capital budget leaves the state’s public university without necessary funds for major maintenance projects; and

                                                      WHEREAS, continuing to cut the UW by refusing to fund annual inflationary costs will only accelerate Wisconsin’s slipping further behind states like Minnesota, which now has advanced 7 points ahead of Wisconsin in the percentage of state residents with baccalaureate degrees, and $4,000 ahead in per-capita income; and

                                                      WHEREAS, per-student state support in Wisconsin is already $1,200 below the national average for four-year universities, and the Board of Regents is committed to slipping no further behind peer states in terms of educational quality and affordable access; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the shortfall in state funding created by an ongoing appropriation in 2007-08 is equivalent to the amount of state support for 6,700 full-time equivalent undergraduate students; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the shortfall in state funding created by an ongoing appropriation in 2007-08 would force the Board of Regents to choose from among a set of unacceptable alternatives: shrinking enrollments, reducing class sections and thereby extending time to degree, and a tuition surcharge on top of the 5.5 percent tuition increase already approved for the academic year;

                                                      BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents, echoing the call of students, alumni, business leaders, legislators, UW faculty and staff, and statewide media outlets, calls on the State to fund the UW System’s normal inflationary costs and make a modest investment in the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, which will increase seats on UW campuses for Wisconsin students, and ramp up research and development efforts to create and support knowledge economy jobs for our children and grandchildren.

            Regent Rosenzweig suggested inclusion of specific consequences in terms of contractual obligations, bonding and other impacts; and Regent Falbo expressed agreement with that suggestion.

            Regent President Bradley and Regent Walsh urged that action be taken at this meeting.

            Regents Davis and Crain suggested that impacts on the campuses be highlighted; and Regent Shields concurred, noting that, in addition to consequences identified by the chancellors, students are concerned about withholding of Wisconsin Higher Education Grants.

            It was suggested by Regent Smith that an accompanying news release could include examples of such impacts; and Regents Connolly-Keesler and Bartell agreed with that idea. 

            At the suggestion of Regent Salas, it was moved by Regent Walsh and seconded by Regent Rosenzweig that the resolution be amended to add in the fourth line of the second last paragraph after “tuition increase” the words “further burdening students from low and moderate income families”.  At the suggestion of Regent Rosenzweig, it was agreed that the word “tax” be added after the word “surcharge” in the same line.

            The amendment was adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

            The question was put on the resolution, as amended, and it was adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

Resolution on UW System 2007-08 Budget

              Resolution 9393:              WHEREAS, the cost of operating two doctoral universities, 11 comprehensive universities, 13 freshman-sophomore UW Colleges, and 72 county Extension offices has already increased due to normal inflationary factors, and the absence of a 2007-09 operating budget leaves the University of Wisconsin System without adequate resources to cover higher operating expenses; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the UW System operates and maintains more than 60 million square feet of facilities, and the absence of a 2007-09 capital budget leaves the state’s public university without necessary funds for major maintenance projects; and

                                                      WHEREAS, continuing to cut the UW by refusing to fund annual inflationary costs will only accelerate Wisconsin’s slipping further behind states like Minnesota, which now has advanced 7 points ahead of Wisconsin in the percentage of state residents with baccalaureate degrees, and $4,000 ahead in per-capita income; and

                                                      WHEREAS, per-student state support in Wisconsin is already $1,200 below the national average for four-year universities, and the Board of Regents is committed to slipping no further behind peer states in terms of educational quality and affordable access; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the shortfall in state funding created by an ongoing appropriation in 2007-08 is equivalent to the amount of state support for 6,700 full-time equivalent undergraduate students; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the shortfall in state funding created by an ongoing appropriation in 2007-08 would force the Board of Regents to choose from among a set of unacceptable alternatives: shrinking enrollments, reducing class sections and thereby extending time to degree, and a tuition surcharge/“tax” on top of the 5.5 percent tuition increase, further burdening students from low and moderate income families;

                                                      BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents, echoing the call of students, alumni, business leaders, legislators, UW faculty and staff, and statewide media outlets, calls on the State to fund the UW System’s normal inflationary costs and make a modest investment in the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, which will increase seats on UW campuses for Wisconsin students, and ramp up research and development efforts to create and support knowledge economy jobs for our children and grandchildren.

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PARTICIPATION BY THE UW SYSTEM IN LIBERAL EDUCATION AND AMERICA’S PROMISE (LEAP)

            Senior Vice president for Academic Affairs Rebecca Martin began her presentation by explaining that Liberal Education and America’s Promise: Excellence for Everyone as a Nation Goes to College (LEAP) is a ten-year campaign launched in 2005 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). The mission of the campaign is to make visible and understood the value of a liberal education, both for individual students and for a nation dependent on economic creativity and democratic vitality.

            The UW System was named by AAC&U as its pilot partner in moving the LEAP agenda forward, and Wisconsin became the first state to participate in the association’s advocacy and campus action activities.

            As to what is meant by a liberal education, Dr. Martin listed the following:

Liberal education is a philosophy of education that empowers individuals with broad knowledge and transferable skills, with a strong sense of values, ethics, and civic engagement.

These broad goals have endured even as courses and requirements that comprise a liberal education have changed over the years.

Characterized by challenging encounters with important and relevant issues, a liberal education prepares graduates both for socially valued work and for civic leadership in their society.

It usually includes a general education curriculum that provides broad exposure to multiple disciplines and ways of knowing, along with more in-depth study in at least one field.

By its nature, liberal education is global and pluralistic.

It embraces the diversity of ideas and experiences that characterize the social, natural, and intellectual world.

            The following essential learning outcomes were identified by AAC&U as an emerging consensus developed from broad discussions with higher education and employers:

Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, through studies in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts;

Intellectual and practical skills, including inquiry and analysis, critical and creative thinking, written and oral communication, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork and problem-solving;

Personal and social responsibility, including civic knowledge and engagement (local and global), intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning and action, and the foundations of skills for lifelong learning; and

Integrative thinking, including synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies.

            As to why the initiative is important at this time, Dr. Martin cited a recent editorial from the Wall Street Journal, urging higher education to look beyond a narrow focus on STEM disciplines and to include “reasoning, creativity and knowledge across a dozen subjects” as essential components of a 21st century education.  The editorial went on to point out that, “The liberal arts make us ‘competitive’ in the ways that matter most.  They make us wise, thoughtful and appropriately humble.  They help our human potential to bloom.  And they are the foundation for a democratic civic polity, where each of us bears equal rights and responsibilities.”  (Chester E. Finn Jr. and Diane Ravitch, “Not by Geeks Alone,” Wall Street Journal, August 8, 2007)

            The point is, she said, that the skills, abilities, and habits of mind instilled in students through a liberal education are those most needed in a 21st century global society.  The business community has been saying this as well, as evidenced by a 2006 national survey showing that 76% of employers support the contents of a liberal education. 

            The LEAP campaign in Wisconsin consists of coordinated strategies, focused on campus action, leadership, public outreach, and advocacy.

            The campus action strategies work to make the teaching and learning of liberal education goals intentional among faculty, staff and students at UW institutions. 

            Leaders in the LEAP campaign include: Regent President Bradley and President Reilly, who have spoken to audiences in Wisconsin and elsewhere, and Lieutenant Governor Barbara Lawton, a lifelong champion of liberal education and a member of the AAC&U National Leadership Council for LEAP.  A Wingspread Conference is being planned by President Reilly and Lt. Governor Lawton to build leadership and advocacy for LEAP throughout the state.

            Public advocacy and outreach strategies include campus-community dialogues and numerous outreach programs to Wisconsin citizens originating from almost every UW institution.  In addition, in concert with the Department of Public Instruction, public schools, business executives and government, the UW System is working to add value to the high school diploma by raising the rigor of high school standards, assessments and curriculum and by aligning expectations with the demands of post-secondary education and work.  Initiatives toward that end include the Partnership for 21st Century Skills and the American Diploma Project.

            Dr. Martin then introduced UW-Oshkosh Provost Lane Earns and Dr. Don Christian, dean of Arts and Sciences at UW-Eau Claire and chair of the System Advisory Group on the Liberal Arts (SAGLA).

            Provost Earns began his remarks by  recalling that, in response to Chancellor Wells’ call in 2000 to develop a strategic planning process at UW-Oshkosh, the campus formulated a set of ideas, initiatives and plans, out of which grew support across campus for components of the AAC&U’s liberal education initiative even before there was an official LEAP program

            Former Letters and Science Dean Michael Zimmerman, long an advocate of the liberal arts, became a leading figure in creation of SAGLA.  Dr. John Koker, current dean of Letters and Science also is an active member of SAGLA and a tri-captain of the campus’s Liberal Education Reform Team.  In September 2004, Dr. Earns spoke of the importance of a liberal education in his Opening Day remarks.

            In November 2004, Carol Geary Schnieder of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) spoke to the Board of Regents about the association’s liberal education initiative, which was launched as the LEAP project in January 2005, with the UW System as a pilot collaborator.

            In spring 2006, the UW-Oshkosh Magazine published the first of three special issues on Liberal Education and America’s Promise, focusing on the accomplishments of faculty, staff and students of Letters and Science.  In it, Chancellor Wells spoke of the “priceless return on investment provided by a liberating education.” In the second issue, the focus was on the value of a liberal education within the professional studies programs.  The series concluded in spring 2007 with a discussion of connecting liberal education to the community and why a liberal education forms the basis of what students need to succeed, both in their careers and in their place in a wider society.

            At that point, as Chancellor Wells and Provost Earns were preparing to bring the Liberal Education Initiative before faculty, staff and students on a broader basis, the Higher Learning Commission sent a site team to the campus as part of the 10-year reaccreditation process.  The commission granted unconditional reaccreditation but suggested that more be done to reform the General Education program and develop a university-wide assessment plan.  Since the Liberal Education initiative addresses both of those issues, a campus-wide Liberal Education Reform Team was created, which has examined the AAC&U’s Essential Learning Outcomes as a basis for moving forward. 

            To further the campus discussion, Debra Humphreys, of AAC&U, will speak at the Provost’s Summit on Teaching and Learning; and three campus leaders will be go to St. Norbert College for a state-wide conference on LEAP in November.

            With regard to the need to distribute liberal education across all colleges and levels of the curriculum, Provost Earns quoted the following comments by Chancellor Wells in UW-Oshkosh Magazine:  “…A liberal education introduces students to multiple perspectives and develops their independent, critical judgment.  It exposes them to a wide array of ideas and teaches them how to evaluate those ideas.  The introduction to new perspectives often leads students to question preexisting ideas and beliefs.  This is precisely why it is an ideal education to prepare students to function in a diverse and rapidly changing work environment.”

            In conclusion, Provost Earns indicated that accrediting bodies across all professional disciplines speak to the importance of the skills and values developed through a liberal education.

            Dean Don Christian began his remarks by reporting that, in addition to campus-based programs, there is considerable coordination among UW campuses directed toward advocating for liberal education, much of which takes place through an initiative titled “The Currency of the Liberal Arts and Sciences: Rethinking Liberal Education in Wisconsin,” which began in 2004.

            Much of the work of that initiative is guided by the System Advisory Group on the Liberal Arts (SAGLA), which has been working in the following areas: Identifying, discussing, and sharing among campuses useful models to advance liberal education; advocating publicly for liberal education; developing multi-campus and system-wide initiatives; and serving as the primary point of collaboration with the AAC&U on its LEAP campaign.

            The group includes: Chancellor Erlenbach, who serves as an honorary member, one provost, 11 deans of Arts and Sciences or Letters and Sciences, six faculty and staff, four members of System Administration, the vice president for Communication and Public Affairs at AAC&U, and the executive director of the Wisconsin Humanities Council. 

            Examples of SAGLA’s work include sharing of best practices, such as “syllabus projects” that inventory and showcase language that highlights liberal education values and campus discussions among faculty and staff to increase common understanding about liberal education.

            Examples of public advocacy activities are campus-community discussions about liberal education, public radio programming that has included a new monthly series at UW-Stevens Point on liberal education, opinion pieces and editorials, and presentations for alumni and other off-campus groups.  Some of these have emphasized strongly shared views among policy, business and university leaders about what matters most in a college education and how that view differs from that of many parents, students and members of the public. 

            System-wide efforts have included support for a liberal education conference next month that is a joint effort of the UW System, the Wisconsin Technical College System, the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities and the AAC&U.

            SAGLA is planning another conference for next year that will emphasize liberal education as a theme for building greater cohesion within universities.  Faculty, staff, administrators, business and media representatives and other non-university participants will be included.

            A very successful initiative has been an annual liberal arts essay scholarship competition, which has the purpose of promoting the value and purpose of liberal education.  The program awards three scholarships, system-wide, of $2,000 each.  Some campuses have earmarked additional scholarships for students whose essays are submitted for the system competition. 

            Concluding his remarks, Dean Christian indicated that an additional benefit of system-wide efforts is the motivation and support that participants draw from each other and from the knowledge that liberal education is being advanced in campus strategic plans and support by system-wide efforts, which are part of the AAC&U’s national LEAP campaign.

            In discussion following the presentation, Regent Crain emphasized the importance of making liberal education part of all university majors, noting that it contributes positively to personal and community, as well as career, aspects of life.  She suggested eliminating the term “general education” as not suitably descriptive of what a liberal education offers.

            Noting pressures on faculty to delve ever deeper into their specific disciplines, President Reilly observed that it is easy in such an environment to lose the connections among disciplines, but with the help of the LEAP campaign and other liberal education initiatives, that trend is starting to be reversed and faculty are becoming re-energized about liberal education.

            In response to a question by Regent Falbo, Dr. Martin indicated that many students and their parents are strongly focused on career preparation; and the mind-opening value of liberal education is not always clear to them.  In addition, the term sometimes is misunderstood to mean educating “liberals”.  For such reasons, better communication about the importance of liberal education is needed.

            Provost Earns added that, in recent years of difficult budgets, the LEAP initiative has brought faculty and staff together to focus on the community and what students need.  Dean Christian pointed out that much of the value is in communication with students about what they need to know for their future success.

            The discussion concluded and the meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p.m., upon motion by Regent Rosenzweig, seconded by Regent Davis.   

                                                                                    Submitted by:

                                                                                    Judith A. Temby, Secretary

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

River Falls, Wisconsin

UW-River Falls

Held in the University Center, Riverview Ballroom

Friday, October 5, 2007

9:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

Approval of the Minutes of the Meetings of the Board on September 6 and 7, 2007. 3

Introduction of Special Guests. 3

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 5

More Advocacy for a Strong UW System Budget.. 5

Report on the September 11 and 12, 2007 Meetings of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board   6

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 6

UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: A Collaborative Journey.. 6

Resolution Commending Campuses and Students on Civic Engagement.. 10

Resolution of Appreciation UW System Civic Engagement 11

Update on the Advantage Wisconsin Strategic Framework.. 12

Receipt of Large Grant by UW-Madison Institute for Clinical and Translational Research   14

Technology for Enhanced Security.. 14

UW-Platteville Agreement with Confucius Institute. 15

Doubling of International Student Enrollment at UW-La Crosse. 15

$10 Million Gift for UW-Milwaukee School of Public Health.. 15

New Engineering Center at UW-Rock County.. 15

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE. 16

UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: Building the Future. 16

UW Colleges: Annual Report of City and County Financial Support.. 16

UW-Platteville: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Glenview Commons Remodeling Project.. 16

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Baldwin Residence Hall Renovation Project.. 16

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects. 16

Consent Agenda.. 17

UW-Platteville: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Glenview Commons Remodeling Project 17

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Baldwin Residence Hall Renovation Project 17

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects. 17

Report of the Assistant Vice President.. 18

Building Commission Actions. 18

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 18

UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: the Global Connection.. 18

UW-Stout:  Summary of Academic Quality Improvement Program Accreditation Review by the North Central Association Higher learning Commission.. 18

Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. 19

Education Committee Priorities for 2007-08. 19

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE. 19

UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: Investing in our Future. 19

Information Technology Update. 19

Oversight and Reporting Structure. 19

Common Systems 2007-08 Expenditure Plan. 20

Information Technology Roadmap. 20

Trust Fund Items. 20

Investment Policy Statement 20

2007 Proxy Season Voting Results. 20

Follow Up on Changes to Strategic Asset Allocation Plan. 20

Report of the Vice President.. 21

Tuition and Financial Aid Advisory Group. 21

Segregated Fee Committee Update. 21

Legislative Hearing. 21

Federal College Cost Reduction and Access Act 21

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MEETING EFFECTIVENESS.. 21

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS.. 23

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-River Falls. 23

Closed Session.. 25

UW-Stout: Authority to Name the Library Learning Center the “Robert S. Swanson Learning Center”. 25


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

River Falls, Wisconsin

UW-River Falls

Held in the University Center, Riverview Ballroom

October 5, 2007

9:00 a.m.

- President Bradley presiding -

PRESENT:                               Regents Bartell, Bradley, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Davis, Falbo, Pruitt, Rosenzweig, Salas, Shields, Smith, Thomas, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND:          Regents Burmaster, Cuene, Loftus, McPike and Spector

- - -

Approval of the Minutes of the Meetings of the Board on September 6 and 7, 2007

            Upon motion by Regent Rosenzweig, seconded by Regent Shields, the minutes of the September 6 and 7, 2007 meeting were approved as distributed.

-

Introduction of Special Guests

            UW-River Falls Chancellor Don Betz introduced the following special guests:

  • State Senator Sheila Harsdorf, 10th Senate District
  • State Senator Pat Kreitlow, 23rd Senate District
  • State Representative Kitty Rhoades, 30th Assembly District
  • State Representative John Murtha, 29th Assembly District
  • State Representative Jeff Smith, 93rd Assembly District
  • Marjorie Bunce, regional representative for Senator Herb Kohl
  • Elaine Baumann, principal, River Falls High School
  • Bruce Barker, incoming president, Chippewa Valley Technical Council
  • John Berggren, CAFES Advisory Board
  • Leslie Bleskachek, Chippewa Valley Technical College River Falls campus manager, and member of the Pierce County Economic Development Commission
  • Joe Boles, partner in the law firm of Rodli Beskar Boles & Krueger; and member of the UW-River Falls Foundation Board
  • Rosanne Bump, president, River Falls Chamber of Commerce; president, St. Croix Valley Regional Tourism Alliance
  • Robert Casey, of Westconsin Credit Union in River Falls, and a member of the CBE Alumni Board
  • Steve Dzubay, Pierce County Economic Development Corporation; publisher, Rivertown Newspapers in River Falls, Hudson, New Richmond, and Ellsworth
  • Randy Farrow, president, River Falls Area Hospital and member of the CBE Business Alumni Board
  • Chancellor Emeritus George and Marcella Field
  • Kent Forsland, CEO, Designer Doors, Inc.; CBE Business Alumni Board
  • Annette Frawley, attorney with General Mills, Inc.; member of the UW-River Falls Foundation Board
  • Marian Furlong, president and CEO, Hudson Hospital
  • David Griffith, president, St. Croix Valley Community Foundation
  • Joe Hegge, vice president for education, West Central Wisconsin PK-16 Regional Consortium
  • Kim Heineman, president, Hudson chamber of Commerce and Tourism bureau
  • Dale Heinz, board of directors, Excel Genetics
  • Mike Hodges, customer and renewable programs coordinator, Wisconsin Public Power;
  • Bill Ihlenfeldt, president, Chippewa Valley Technical College,
  • Roger Leque, River Falls chief of police and co-chair, Governor Doyle’s Task Force on Campus Safety
  • Jeff McCardle, Westconsin Credit Union; member of UW-River Falls Foundation Board; recipient of Outstanding Service Award to UW-River Falls
  • Tom Paque, vice president for customer services and administration, Wisconsin Public Power
  • Don Richards, mayor of River Falls
  • Patti Robertson, vice president, St. Croix Economic Development Corporation Board of Directors;
  • Nancy Sarno, GE Medical Protective; UW-River Falls Foundation Board
  • Jill Shannon, director of community partnerships, St. Croix Valley Community Foundation
  • Steve Schroeder, Rotary Club of River Falls
  • Anastasia Shartin, Phipps Center for the Arts
  • Juliet Tomkins, UW-River Falls CAFES Advisory Board
  • Bill Warner, executive director, Pierce County Economic Development Corporation 

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

More Advocacy for a Strong UW System Budget

            Noting that regents continue to advocate for a strong budget, Regent President Bradley noted that:

  • Regent Colleene Thomas had a column published in the Dunn County News and the Superior Evening Telegram, urging legislators to preserve the high quality of a UW education.
  • Regent Jesus Salas wrote a column for the Capital Times in which he explained the need for many of the requested capital projects, including academic buildings and residence halls.
  • Regents Mike Falbo, Tom Loftus, and David Walsh advocated that veterans’ tuition remissions be fully funded by the state, just as the federal GI Bill is funded by the federal government.
  • Regent Peggy Rosenzweig is writing a column to be published in the coming weeks.

            In addition, many regents, chancellors, and President Reilly continued to meet with legislators to urge them to invest in the UW System.

            Regent President Bradley thanked all involved for their continued efforts.

-

Report on the September 11 and 12, 2007 Meetings of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

            A written report on those meetings was provided.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: A Collaborative Journey

            Chancellor Don Betz introduced Provost Connie Foster and Professor David Trechter, chair of the Department of Agricultural Economics.

            In opening remarks, Professor Trechter said that the speakers at this meeting represent just a few of the many partnerships in which the campus is engaged with the people of the region, state, and beyond.  The speakers were:

            Roy Thilly, president and chief executive officer of Wisconsin Public Power Inc, which he has led since 1992, and co-chair of Governor Doyle’s Task Force on Global Warming;

            Theresa Johnson, chair of the Town of St. Josephs, a member of the St. Croix River Crossing Stakeholder Committee, and president of the Western Wisconsin Intergovernmental Collaborative;

            Bill Rubin, executive director of the St. Croix County Economic Development Corporation since 1996;

            John Potter, CEO of the Phipps Center for the Arts in Hudson since 1985, former director of the River Valley Arts Council, former chairman and director of the Hudson Area Chamber of Commerce, and past president of the Hudson Rotary Club;

            Karwee Marshall, a senior at UW-River Falls, majoring in Speech and Theater Arts, who has worked with the Upward Bound and Falcon Tutors programs at UW-River Falls.

            Mr. Thilly began by noting that WPPI is owned by 41 Wisconsin communities.  Governor Doyle’s Off-The-Grid Initiative, he said, served as a catalyst for a major collaborative effort among UW-River Falls, the River Falls Municipal Utilities, and WPPI.  The initiative fit with WPPI’s commitment to substantially increasing energy conservation and developing renewable resources – priorities that are of critical importance in view of global warming concerns and rising electric rates.

            Stating that he has been impressed by Chancellor Betz’s enthusiasm and commitment to partnerships, he indicated that actions so far have included an energy kiosk, student purchase of renewable energy, a mapping study of energy consumption for the campus, and a wind power initiative. Negotiations also are under way to sell renewable energy.

            The collaboration involves the university assisting the community, while the city’s utility and WPPI help the university meet the Governor’s goal.   River Falls, he pointed out, already is one of the top cities in the country in the purchase of green power and in that regard could serve as a model for the state. 

            In conclusion, he expressed appreciation for the university’s help with the work of the Governor’s Task Force on Global Warming, adding that education and the engagement of young people are the best means of making a difference in climate change.

            Noting that the Western Wisconsin Intergovernmental Collaborative (WWIC) was born on the UW-River Falls campus, Theresa Johnson, president, explained that former Chancellor Lydecker held a series of listening sessions during the winter of 2004-05 in Polk, Pierce, and St. Croix counties to learn about pressing issues.  One theme that emerged was the need for a mechanism for local governments to address regional issues; and, in March 2005, UW-River Falls hosted a regional roundtable to present information about intergovernmental collaboratives.  The consensus opinion of the attendees was that such a collaborative was needed, and the university was charged with convening and facilitating a working group to develop the structure for what became the Western Wisconsin Intergovernmental Collaborative.

            The purpose of the organization is to enhance the quality of life in Pierce, Polk and St. Croix counties by providing a forum for villages, towns, cities, and counties to share information, experiences and best practices on key issues and problems; to engage in regional problem solving for such topics as waste water, storm water management, transportation, economic development, and creating sustainable communities; developing a more visible regional identity; and serving as a voice for the three-county region to influence public policy.

            Located in the fastest growing area in Wisconsin due to the growth of the Twin Cities metro area, the WWIC fills a need to allow exchange of information among 99 public entities in the three-county area and the ability to address together matters of mutual concern, such as traffic issues, wastewater treatment options and extraterritorial issues.  The partnership with UW-River Falls, Ms. Johnson said, has provided invaluable faculty and staff resources that otherwise would not have been available. 

            The WWIC and UW-River Falls have been recognized on a state and national level as important components in providing education to meet the needs of the public sector to manage changes that will occur with the new St. Croix River bridge.  Goals include promotion of natural, cultural and historic resources and protection of the St. Croix River watershed, thus helping to preserve water quality and scenic values. 

            William Rubin, executive director of the St. Croix Economic Development Corporation, reported that St. Croix County ranks as the 81st fastest growing county nationally by percentage increase of its population since 2000 and as the 42nd fastest growing by percentage increase in new housing units since 2000 – the only Wisconsin county to make these rankings. 

            UW-River Falls, he said, plays an important role throughout the region with respect to community and economic development.  The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) on campus provides outreach services to prospective entrepreneurs, connects clients with resources, and offers classroom-based entrepreneurial training programs.  The SBDC also functions as the registered agent for an angel network that serves the region, providing equity for growing companies in the St. Croix Valley. 

            Noting that technology companies pay higher wages than many others, which is good for the region and the state as a whole, he praised UW-River Falls for the important role it played in the successful application for the six-county region to achieve one of the eight Technology Zones designated in 2002.  In these zones, high-tech companies receive state tax credits that are tied to capital investment and job creation activities.  Examples of such companies include Sajan, Inc., based in River Falls, and Interfacial Solutions, the founder of which is a UW-River Falls alumnus. 

            Municipal officials and communities in the St. Croix Valley rely on collection of data through the university’s Survey Research Center, which provides economical statistically sound work, delivered on time.  Work products include surveys on labor, downtown parking, comprehensive land use plans, and the impact of tourism. 

            In addition, he continued, UW-River Falls operates a Center for Economic Research, with the mission of assisting and encouraging research that supports economic development in the region.

            With regard to building a regional coalition , he explained that the Governor’s Business Council provides a forum for multi-county regions, like the Milwaukee 7, the New North, and Centergy, to discuss best practices involving workforce development, education, and long-range planning.  While the St. Croix Valley region is not currently eligible for participation in the council, he said that work is under way to achieve membership, with leadership from the university, technical colleges, and economic development councils. 

            In closing, Mr. Rubin expressed appreciation for his partnership with UW-River Falls and for the resources that the university provides.

            John Potter, executive director of the Phipps Center for the Arts, indicated that the Phipps has had a close working relationship with more than a dozen UW-River Falls faculty and staff, half a dozen student interns, and ten formal institutional collaborations since its opening in 1983.  All, he said, have been “rewarding and fruitful beyond the projects themselves”.

            Six art professors have had exhibitions in the Phipps’ galleries and many have participated in planning and jurying shows.  Professor Emeritus Bill Ammerman was the center’s Visual Arts Council coordinator and served on the Board of Directors for six years.

            Theater Arts faculty have provided guidance, recommended and mentored student directors and designers, and staged and designed many productions for the Phipps; and the Journalism Department provided four marketing interns to work on the center’s publicity and promotion.

            Associate Professor of Music Kristin Tjornehoj served as a Phipps director at large for six years; and Gordon Hedahl, as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, served on the board for four years.

            With regard to institutional support, Mr. Potter related that, in 1994, the university, the Phipps, and area chambers of commerce helped to found the St. Croix Valley Regional Tourism Alliance, a bi-state tourism marketing group.  Mark Kinders, UW-River Falls director of public affairs, has been the driving force behind the organization from its inception.  Throughout the years, the university has offered in-kind services to the alliance, which received a best practice award at Synergy 2003, a nine-county economic development conference, along with numerous other recognitions.

            The Phipps and UW-River Falls brought hundreds of regional leaders together in a 2005 Synergy Conference to discuss challenges and opportunities of economic development.  The center also was the only off-site location for one of Chancellor Betz’s inaugural celebration events in 2006 – a free public lecture by Dr. T. H. Baughmanon on Sir Ernest Shackleton entitled “The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition.”

            The Phipps collaborated with UW-River Falls Art Professor Lynn Jermal in Crayola Dream-Makers exhibitions in 1994, 1996, and 1998.  In this national program to promote the importance of art education in the schools, the center displayed work by elementary-age students from an 11-state region. 

            Beginning in 2002, UW-River Falls, along with other partners, has sponsored a series of community forums -- events and exhibitions on the changing nature of the valley, through which art becomes a catalyst for community conversation.  Partners have included the St. Croix Valley Community Foundation; the St. Croix Scenic Coalition; the National Park Service St. Croix National Scenic Riverway; the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters; Artreach Alliance and Arcola Mills in Stillwater, Minnesota; the St. Croix ArtBarn in Osceola; Hammand Arts Alliance, Community Arts Base in River Falls; and the Phipps Center.

            One result of these forums is the bench project, a public art initiative, in which The Phipps, UW-River Falls faculty, students and community members collaborated to build art benches in Hudson, St. Croix Falls, and Bayport, Minnesota. 

            In 2007, Dean Terry Brown, of the College of Arts and Sciences, served on the steering committee for a study that measured the economic impact of 92 nonprofit arts, historical, and cultural organizations in five counties of the St. Croix Valley.  The university assisted in implementing the survey, which found that these organizations inject $16.5 million in to the region’s economy, support almost 400 full-time jobs, generate $1.58 million in annual revenues, and create event-related spending that benefits local businesses.

            In conclusion, Mr. Potter quoted Chancellor Betz, who said: “This study underscores that our valley and our avid support of the full spectrum of the arts produces economic, cultural, and civic dividends.  For a vibrant quality of life and a vital creative economy, the arts matter.”

            UW-River Falls student Karwee Marshall indicated that his remarks would focus on his work with Upward Bound, a federal program that serves low-income students, and Falcon Tutors, which helps students at low-income schools. 

            Noting that he has been involved in these programs for the past three years, Mr. Marshall said he also has served as a resident assistant for summer camps and that the he has helped to plan tours, mentor students, and has served as a big brother.  He also has assisted with school work, ACT preparation, and college applications.

            It helps these younger students, he remarked, to “show them that I came from the same place and let them know they can make it if I can.”

            Stating that Upward Bound and Falcon Tutors have been like both a family and fraternity to him, Mr. Marshall said the programs helped him to learn life skills, build relationships and open his mind to new opportunities.  The programs also have motivated him to work harder, knowing that younger students are watching him.  The programs help those students to grow and also serve as a means to recruit them to attend UW-River Falls.  Noting that they have done well on campus, he cited the example of a former Upward Bound student who recently won the Chancellor’s Award. The programs also benefit other River Falls students by helping them build relationships with students from backgrounds different from their own.

            In conclusion, he observed that the Upward Bound and Falcon Tutors programs show that UW-River Falls cares about the broader community.

            In discussion following the presentations, Regent Bartell inquired about requirements for membership in the Governor’s Business Council, and Mr. Rubin indicated that a five-county region is needed, with 50% of the membership and 65% of the funding from the private sector.  The St. Croix region currently has four counties, but hopes to expand to five and meet other criteria for eligibility by the end of the year.

            Noting that the La Crosse area is working toward the same goal, Regent Smith asked what impact population growth has on what is being done at UW-River Falls.

            Chancellor Betz replied that pressures are growing rapidly and that the university does not have the resources it needs to get the job done.  

            Thanking the speakers for their presentations, Chancellor Betz stated his pride in their partnerships and introduced another important partner, Carl Gaulke, head of the River Falls Municipal Utility

-

Resolution Commending Campuses and Students on Civic Engagement

            Expressing appreciation for the opportunity to hear from students engaged in international and cross-cultural learning, Regent Thomas remarked that those who participate in such activities receive as much as they give, taking the Wisconsin Idea past state borders and into the world.

            Regent Thomas then presented the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation:

Resolution of Appreciation UW System Civic Engagement

              Resolution 9394:               WHEREAS, the University of Wisconsin-River Falls has presented a number of wonderful examples of student civic engagement to members of the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents throughout their October meeting; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the student civic engagement work at UW-River Falls exemplifies the outstanding contributions made by students at all UW System institutions; and

                                                      WHEREAS, students at all UW institutions strengthen the fabric of Wisconsin communities through their service learning, community service and volunteer activities; and

                                                      WHEREAS, faculty and staff across the UW System serve as facilitators for much of the civic engagement work of UW System students, thus contributing in their own right; and

                                                      WHEREAS, building stronger communities is one of the cornerstones of President Reilly’s vision for the UW System; and

                                                      WHEREAS, civic engagement has been identified as an essential learning outcome in the Association of American Colleges & Universities’ Liberal Education and America’s Promise Campaign, in which the UW System is a proud pilot partner; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the Board of Regents and UW System institutions recognize both the educational and the societal benefits of student civic engagement in fulfillment of institutional missions and the Wisconsin Idea.

                                                      BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System extends its sincere gratitude, appreciation, and recognition to students, and the faculty and staff who support them, across the UW System for their civic engagement contributions to local, state and global communities.

-

Update on the Advantage Wisconsin Strategic Framework

            President Reilly recalled that, at the September meeting, he presented the basis for development of a system-level strategic framework to advantage the state’s future in a knowledge-based and increasingly global economy. This framework would:

  1. Strengthen the collective agenda for realizing the shared vision to Advantage Wisconsin;
  2. Create a framework to add value to the execution of individual campus strategic plans;
  3. Provide a context for future system-wide direction and development to advance the shared vision.

            President Reilly then called on Executive Senior Vice President Don Mash to report on progress in advancing a plan to enrich the seven core strategies of the strategic framework by February 2008.   

            Dr. Mash began his remarks by noting that each of the UW institutions has a dynamic strategic plan that is making a positive difference for Wisconsin.  At the system level, the effort is to create a strategic framework that will maximize the impact of those plans. 

            Seven core strategies, he indicated, have emerged as ways to Advantage Wisconsin (Attachment 1).  These strategies were discussed at the regents’ retreat in July in terms of the core values of quality, access, affordability, and a bright future for Wisconsin.

            He then showed a slide displaying a draft of the home page of the website, advantage.wisconsin.edu, which states that: “Advantage Wisconsin captures the response of UW System campuses across Wisconsin to the state’s urgent need to revitalize its economy, better educate its residents and strengthen its communities.  The UW System’s core strategies to Advantage Wisconsin will enhance the success of the state’s businesses, residents, and students in an increasingly global, multi-cultural and competitive world. 

            “Wisconsin’s transformation into a knowledge-based economy is proceeding too slowly, leading the state’s economy to lag behind Minnesota and other states’ economies.  Without change, we will have too few college educated workers and an increasingly older population.  State and community tax bases will be inadequate to care for seniors and others in need, invest in children and young adults, and maintain Wisconsin’s high quality of life.  Change is needed now!”

            In order to develop ideas on how best to enact each of the core strategies, seven think tanks were being created, each composed of members from a number of campuses, along with external members. While they deliberate on bringing forth the most compelling ideas for each strategy, campus constituencies, students, and others also will be asked to contribute their best thinking; and President Reilly and the chancellors will interact with rotaries, chambers of commerce, and other groups to involve them in the process.  The Advantage Wisconsin website will be interactive, providing more opportunities for input; and UW-Extension will host conversations in every county in the state.  

            In addition to the think tanks on the core strategies, separate working groups will bring forth ideas and options with regard to tuition and financial aid and concerning the role of the UW Colleges. 

            In December and January, President Reilly, the chancellors, and the president’s cabinet will meet to process all of the rich ideas that are brought forth, the best of which will be brought to the Board of Regents in February 2008. 

            Indicating that the teams will begin meeting in the next week or two, Dr. Mash said that each has a leader and two facilitators.  Meetings will be in Madison, and participation by telephone will be possible.

            In conclusion, he invited the regents to participate in any of the think tank meetings, a schedule of which would be distributed.  Progress reports will be made to the board at each meeting.

            In discussion following the presentation, Regent Salas suggested that the Working Group on Tuition and Financial Aid take into consideration other expenses, such as segregated fees and room and board costs.  He also suggested that capital projects be addressed as part of one of the core strategies, and Dr. Mash said that would be done.

            Noting that the strategy on collaborations involves a broad range of partners, Regent Rosenzweig asked if suggestions could still be made for additional members of the think tank teams; and Dr. Mash replied in the affirmative, adding that partners such as the PK-16 Council, the Wisconsin Technical Colleges, the Higher Education Business Roundtable, Competitive Wisconsin and others would be brought into the process.

            Stating her appreciation for the opportunity to participate in the think tank sessions, Regent Crain suggested that the description of the strategy on preparing students include language on preparing students to succeed and to contribute to society and that the description of the strategy on high paying jobs also include language on the importance of contributions to society.

            Regent Davis commended the sense of urgency with which the process was moving forward, adding that she was impressed with the membership of the think tank teams. The Education Committee, which she chaired, also would discuss a number of the think tank topics.

            Commending President Reilly and Dr. Mash for moving ahead with development of the strategic framework, Regent Walsh recalled that, in the Charting a New Course study, the effort had been made to include all players; but the end-product did not have the momentum needed to obtain the desired results. The challenge for the strategic framework will be to convince decision makers that the UW should not be viewed as an expenditure, but as a driver of revenue by preparing students and creating high-paying jobs and stronger communities.  They need to be convinced, he emphasized, that investing in the university is the right thing to do.

            Dr. Mash added that the Charting a New Course report would provide a basis for think tank deliberations, especially in the area of operational excellence.

            Regent Bartell noted that the core strategies are broad and that there could be overlap among them.  He urged coordination in order to keep them focused on separate issues.

            President Reilly said that involvement of the Governor and legislators will be sought in order to produce a shared understanding and commitment.

            Regent President Bradley noted that Chapter 36 of the statutes charges the Board of Regents with responsibility for planning for the needs of higher education in Wisconsin.  In addition to discharging that responsibility, he said, the Board must seek partners for a broader state discussion, as has been undertaken in other states and has been recommended by the National Governors’ Association and the National Conference of State Legislators. 

            Pointing out that there is no model for economic prosperity that does not include adequate funding for higher education, he said that, after action on the state budget is complete, support for such a broader discussion will be sought.

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Receipt of Large Grant by UW-Madison Institute for Clinical and Translational Research

            President Reilly reported that the UW-Madison Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR) recently received one of the largest grants in the history of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health -- $41 million from the National Institutes of Health to enhance the ability to translate medical research into practical, every-day uses by those who need them the most.  He congratulated Chancellor Wiley, ICTR Director Marc Drezner, and all of the faculty and staff who make the institute a world-class facility.

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Technology for Enhanced Security

            Over the past six months, President Reilly reported, the UW-Madison Police Department has partnered with the Division of Technology, University Communications, University Housing, and the Dean of Students Office to tighten the campus’ crisis response capabilities by transmitting information over as many lines of communication as possible.  For example, both broadcast text messaging and “reverse 911” technology are nearly ready for use, the latter allowing the police department to call many campus phone lines simultaneously.  He commended and thanked the police and other offices for being well prepared to keep the campus community safe.

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UW-Platteville Agreement with Confucius Institute  

            It was reported by President Reilly that UW Platteville recently signed an agreement with the Confucius Institute to establish a new branch on the campus, which will enhance the campus community’s intercultural understanding by providing enrichment courses in Chinese language and culture.  As part of the agreement, UW-Platteville will have the opportunity to work with a Chinese partner institution, the South-Central University for Nationalities in Wuhan, China.  He congratulated Chancellor David Markee and the entire university community for their work to increase international partnerships.

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Doubling of International Student Enrollment at UW-La Crosse

            President Reilly commended UW-La Crosse for almost doubling its international student enrollment over the last year, with 300 students from 46 countries currently enrolled – a reflection of its successful global recruitment and excellent academic rankings.  UW-La Crosse also will send an unprecedented number of students to study abroad this year.

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$10 Million Gift for UW-Milwaukee School of Public Health

            President Reilly expressed deep gratitude to Joseph J. Zilber for his $10 million gift toward establishing the proposed School of Public Health at UW-Milwaukee – a gift that equals the largest single contribution in campus history.

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New Engineering Center at UW-Rock County

            It was reported by President Reilly that the new Engineering Center opening at UW-Rock County will house an Electrical Engineering program offered through collaboration with UW-Platteville and will give students the opportunity to take courses toward a UW-Platteville bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering while staying close to home.  $700,000 in funding for the center was received from more than 50 area businesses, foundations and individuals, along with a grant from Alliant Energy. 

            He commended all involved for a job well done in helping to make education accessible throughout Wisconsin.

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REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE

            Regent Salas, chair, presented the committee’s report.

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UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: Building the Future

            In this presentation, campus participants spoke about the issues of technology enhancements, sustainability, and financial support for capital projects.

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UW Colleges: Annual Report of City and County Financial Support 

            UW Colleges Vice Chancellor Steve Wildeck reported to the committee that counties and local municipalities contribute about $13 million annually for financial support of the UW Colleges.

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UW-Platteville: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Glenview Commons Remodeling Project

            The committee passed a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Stevens Point: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Baldwin Residence Hall Renovation Project

            A resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority was adopted by the committee for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

            The committee approved, for inclusion in the consent agenda, a resolution granting the requested authority to construct maintenance and repair projects at UW-Milwaukee, UW-Madison, and UW-Eau Claire, including a roof replacement, remodeling of space, and a chiller and cooling tower replacement.

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Consent Agenda

            Regent Salas moved adoption of Resolutions 9395, 9396, and 9397 as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent Davis and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Platteville: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the Glenview Commons Remodeling Project

              Resolution 9395:               That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report of the Glenview Commons Remodeling Project be approved and authority be granted to: (a) increase the budget by $1,054,000 existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, and (b) construct the project for a total cost of $4,000,000 ($2,946,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, and $1,054,000 existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing).

UW-Stevens Point: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Construct the Baldwin Residence Hall Renovation Project

              Resolution 9396:               That, upon the recommendation of the of the UW-Stevens Point Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, contingent upon enumeration of this project in the 2007-09 Capital Budget, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct the Baldwin Residence Hall Renovation Project for a total cost of $4,986,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing.

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

              Resolution 9397:               That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $5,255,455 ($595,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $1,820,700 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; $188,755 Program Revenue-Cash; and $2,651,000 Gift and Grant Funds).

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Report of the Assistant Vice President

Building Commission Actions

            Assistant Vice President David Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $18 million for projects at its September meeting, including $2.6 million in general fund supported borrowing, $3 million in program revenue, and $12.5 million in gift and grant funds.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

            Regent Davis, chair, presented the committee’s report.

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UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: the Global Connection

            Regent Davis reported that the presentation informed the committee of the excellent infrastructure in place at UW-River Falls to enable students to participate in a variety of international learning experiences, from short courses led by faculty, to independent research projects, to service learning internships.

            Included was powerful testimony from three students on the life-altering experiences they had abroad.  These students, Nick Bisley, Rachel Mottet, and Katie Leisch, returned with informed global perspectives, not only on the new cultures in which they immersed themselves, but also on their own lives and places in the global society.  Ms. Leisch’s description of her experience working with children in Uganda was particularly moving.

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UW-Stout:  Summary of Academic Quality Improvement Program Accreditation Review by the North Central Association Higher Learning Commission

            Reporting on UW-Stout’s reaccreditation process, Provost Julie Furst-Bowe advised that Stout is the only UW institution to use the Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) – an alternative reaccreditation process focusing on continuous quality improvement.  One of the distinguishing features of AQIP is the requirement for annual reporting, in contrast to the more traditional accreditation process, which occurs every ten years. 

            UW-Stout was commended for its innovative use of technology for teaching and learning, its broad-based, participatory strategic planning, and for being a data-driven campus.

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Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Education Committee Priorities for 2007-08

            The committee clarified some of the topics identified at the September meeting and asked Senior Vice President Martin to bring to the November meeting a re-organized list that would include three categories:  

  1. Priority topics that will be covered by one or more of the think tanks charged with developing the Strategic Framework to Advantage Wisconsin.  Representatives of the think tanks will be asked to join the committee at future meetings to share their findings.
  2. Topics that will require the committee’s action.
  3. Topics that will be taken up for information purposes to deepen the committee members’ understanding of major policy areas.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

            Regent Smith, chair, presented the committee’s report.

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UW-River Falls Presentation – Living the Promise: Investing in our Future

            UW-River Falls Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Mary Halada spoke about the Living the Promise strategic plan process and goals; Budget Director Kristen Hendrickson presented an overview of the institution’s budget; and Foundation president Nancy Devine reported on the foundation’s endowment and planned fundraising campaign.

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Information Technology Update

            Regent Smith noted that this report was presented pursuant to a resolution adopted by the Board the preceding May.

Oversight and Reporting Structure

            Ed Meachen, associate vice president, Office of Learning and Information Technology, reported on the oversight and reporting structure.

Common Systems 2007-08 Expenditure Plan

            Vice President Debbie Durcan discussed the 2007-08 expenditure plan and status.

Information Technology Roadmap

            A roadmap on the future of technology in the UW System was discussed with the committee.

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Trust Fund Items

Investment Policy Statement

            The committee had a first reading of an investment policy statement, intended to better outline the roles and responsibilities of various parties and bring together key policies governing UW System Trust Funds.

2007 Proxy Season Voting Results

            The committee received a report that voting instructions were submitted by UW Trust Funds for 60 proxy proposals, including non-routine corporate governance proposals.  The primary submissions on social issues involved the environment and global climate change, sustainability, and animal welfare.

Follow Up on Changes to Strategic Asset Allocation Plan

            The committee received information on three questions raised at the previous month’s meeting regarding the shift of assets out of U.S. equities over the past five years, the lack of investment in Wisconsin companies, and greater use of alternative investments.

            It was noted that the asset allocation policy prescribes the percentage of trust funds to be dedicated to U.S. equities, the target for the long-term fund being 15%, with an allowable range of 10-20%, and that it is the board’s fiduciary responsibility to select the best investments regardless of state or country of origin.

            It was reported that a conservative approach is taken with respect to hedge funds and that including them in the portfolio is designed to lower the risk of the overall fund and improve the risk-return profile. 

            In discussion at the board meeting, Regent Salas, who had raised questions at the previous meeting, expressed appreciation for the response regarding investments, as well as for the information about proxy voting on social issues.  It was his hope that efforts would be made to consider how to invest in Wisconsin firms in a way that would balance the board’s fiduciary responsibility with the benefit of investments that could help to create jobs for the state.

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Report of the Vice President

Tuition and Financial Aid Advisory Group

            The committee was informed that, at its meeting in September, the group discussed using tuition for financial aid and the merits of the bridge program that was advanced by the board as a means to attach funding to the Wisconsin Covenant.

Segregated Fee Committee Update

            Vice President Durcan provided an update on the first meeting of the new Segregated Fee Committee.

Legislative Hearing

            The committee received information on the September 25th hearing of the Assembly Colleges and Universities Committee on the response of higher education institutions to ethical concerns about relationships with student loan lenders. 

            President Reilly provided testimony on the importance of financial aid, including grants and loans to help students finance their education.

Federal College Cost Reduction and Access Act

            The committee was informed that President Bush recently signed into law the Federal College Cost Reduction and Access Act, which contained many favorable provisions, including an increase in the maximum of Pell Grants and a reduction in interest rates for Stafford and other federally backed loans.  The act did not appear to have any impact on the board’s student lending policy.

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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MEETING EFFECTIVENESS

            Remarking that how and when the board meets should be the result of intentional decisions, not simply habit, Regent President Bradley noted that he had referred the matter to a committee composed of  Regent Connolly-Keesler, chair, Regent Thomas and Regent Pruitt.

            Regent Connolly-Keesler began her remarks by thanking the committee members, as well as Regent Bartell, Regent Spector, President Reilly, Assistant Vice President Miller, and Secretary Temby, all of whom contributed to the committee’s work.

            She then presented the following two options that the committee forwarded to the board for its consideration:

  • Eight two-day meetings per year, with one at UW-Milwaukee, at least two on other UW campuses, and five or fewer in Madison. 
  • Six two-day meetings per year and two one-day meetings, with one at UW-Milwaukee, at least two on other campuses and five or fewer in Madison.

            Pros and cons of each of these options were outlined.

            With regard to one-day meetings, Regent Connolly-Keesler pointed out that the centerpiece could be in-depth focus on one or more major policy issues from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., preceded by committee meetings, if needed, and followed by a Board of Regents meeting.

            She also presented an option for a 1 ½ days meeting on campus, which would begin on a Wednesday with campus presentations from 3:00-5:00 p.m., followed by a campus tour and a reception with campus and community constituents.  The following day, there could be a breakfast with students, followed by committee meetings in the morning and a board meeting in the afternoon.

            Suggested time-frames for two-day meetings could include presentation and discussion of policy issues from 9:00 a.m. to noon, followed by committee meetings in the afternoon, a reception after that, breakfast with students on Friday morning, and then a board meeting. 

            She also presented an agenda for a board meeting that could include time frames for each item, as an option that the board might wish to try.

            Regent Connolly-Keesler then presented alternative 2008 meeting calendars, based on the two options presented, noting that one-day meetings would be scheduled for March and November, if that option were chosen. 

            Concluding her remarks, she presented a draft list of policy issues that the board might wish to consider when choosing items on which to focus for future meetings.  Regents could choose priorities among the issues, and the list could be updated as needed.

            Thanking the committee for responding to concerns that had been raised, Regent Salas said that he was satisfied that the matter of acting on capital projects in a timely manner had been addressed by Mr. Miller’s participation in the deliberations.  He expressed a preference for Option #1 as providing more time to discuss these and other important matters.  He also commended the committee for developing a list of key issues and was pleased to see that the matter of segregated fees was included in that list.

            Commending the committee for setting forth clear alternatives, Regent Davis expressed a preference for trying Option #2 to see if it would work well for the board.  She thought that the list of priorities could be coordinated with the work of the think tanks in a flexible manner.

            Regent Crain agreed, noting that some issues are linked together and that work on some is under way.

            Regent Smith suggested that there be at least three meetings on campuses per year, in addition to one at UW-Milwaukee; and Regent Connolly-Keesler agreed with that suggestion.

            It was noted by Regent Smith that the 1 ½ day campus option would not include time set aside for focus on key policy issues.

            Chancellor Gow felt that a 1½ day option might be more efficient than 2 ½ days, if scheduled properly. 

            Regent Connolly-Keesler indicated that another option might involve seven two-day and one one-day meetings.

            Regent Bartell suggested that key policy issues should involve “deep dive” unstructured discussions and that presentations should have defined educational objectives for board members.  For meetings on campuses, he thought that the regents should have opportunities to meet with faculty and staff, as well as with students.  He also suggested that a means be developed for regents to be able to request that specific issues be considered by the full board, rather than by a committee.

            With regard to the latter suggestion, Regent Falbo noted that there could be a special committee meeting, scheduled at a time when other committees were not in session.  He expressed hesitation about reducing the number of meetings because of the great amount that regents need to do and learn.

            In reply to a question by Chancellor Keating, Regent Connolly-Keesler said that Wednesday and Thursday had been suggested for 1 ½ day campus meetings because some might prefer not to meet for a full day on Friday.

            Regent Smith moved adoption of the 2008 meeting schedule that reflected Option #2. The motion was seconded by Regent Thomas and carried on a voice vote.

            Regent Falbo suggested consideration of meeting content in terms of adequacy of reporting. 

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ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-River Falls

            Expressing appreciation to Chancellor Betz and the UW-River Falls community, Regent Pruitt noted that the welcome extended by students and staff had been remarkable and that UW-River Falls is well-equipped to exercise leadership going forward.

            Citing the selection of chancellors as one of the Board of Regents’ most important duties, Regent Pruitt said that he was honored to have chaired the committee that chose Chancellor Betz.  He commended the committee members, Regents Davis, Smith, and Salas, for choosing an outstanding leader and the UW-River Falls Search and Screen Committee, chaired by Terry Brown, for its excellent work.

            Noting that Chancellor Betz has described Living the Promise as a conscious effort to develop leaders and talent to address the challenges of the future, Regent Pruitt said that, with the Chancellor’s leadership, UW-River Falls students, faculty and staff are making a difference in helping to change the world.

            He then presented the following resolution, which was adopted by acclamation with a standing ovation.

              Resolution 9398:               WHEREAS, the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System are pleased to see UW-River Falls’ commitment to the principles of sustainability, globalization, inclusiveness, and leadership development as displayed during the campus’ presentations this month; and

                                                      WHEREAS, UW-River Falls, by increasing collaboration with community leaders, businesses, and local government, is dedicated to achieving energy efficiency and promoting economic growth in the St. Croix Valley; and

                                                      WHEREAS, the number of students, faculty, and staff participating in international programs has increased significantly, demonstrating the campus-wide desire to promote global awareness and participation in the international community; and

                                                      WHEREAS, UW-River Falls has incorporated community service with the undergraduate education experience through Service Learning and Civic Engagement programs in the interest of developing high-quality leaders and model citizens; and 

                                                      WHEREAS, Regents appreciate both the UW-River Falls Dance Theatre’s outstanding performance and the creative displays in the international student fair for their celebration of the diversity of campus life; and

                                                      WHEREAS, faculty members and students are involved in substantive research projects that will positively impact the local community and elevate the quality of life for people around the globe; and 

                                                      WHEREAS, UW-River Falls is a laudable example for Wisconsin in its willingness to implement comprehensive renewable energy and conservation initiatives to achieve energy independence by the year 2012;

                                                      BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks Chancellor Don Betz and the entire UW-River Falls community for generously hosting the Board’s October 2007 meeting, and praises the faculty, students, and staff for providing an enlightening and productive experience that points toward the exciting future of the UW System. 

            The meeting was recessed at 11:50 a.m. and reconvened at 12:00 p.m.

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Closed Session

            The following resolution, moved by Regent Pruitt and seconded by Regent Shields, was adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Thomas, Smith, Shields, Salas, Pruitt, Falbo, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Bradley, and Bartell voting in the affirmative. There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

              Resolution 9399: That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider UW-Madison honorary degree nominations and naming a facility at UW-Stout after a person, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider a UW-Madison request for consideration of employment terms for a specific candidate, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

            During closed session, the following resolution was adopted:

UW-Stout: Authority to Name the Library Learning Center the “Robert S. Swanson Learning Center”

              Resolution 9400: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Stout Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the Library Learning Center the "Robert S. Swanson Learning Center."

            The meeting was adjourned at 1:10 p.m.

Submitted by:

Judith A. Temby, Secretary