Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

UW-Milwaukee
Held in the Union, Wisconsin Room
Thursday, June 7, 2007
9:30 a.m.

- President Walsh presiding -

PRESENT:  Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Davis, Falbo, Loftus, McPike, Pruitt, Rosenzweig, Salas, Shields, Smith, Spector, Thomas, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regent Cuene

 

Welcome to Regent Colleene Thomas

Regent President Walsh welcomed Regent Colleene Thomas, who had recently been appointed by Governor Doyle as a student regent, to succeed Regent Emeritus Christopher Semenas.

Regent Thomas, who majors in Political Science and Geography at UW-Madison, is a member of the Shared Governance Committee of the Associated Students of Madison and has served as a house fellow in an international learning community residence on campus.

Introduction of Special Guests

President Reilly introduced and welcomed several staff persons, representing members of Wisconsin’s congressional delegation:  Sara Spence, for Congresswoman Gwen Moore; Hilary DeBlois, for Senator Russ Feingold; and Danyell Tremmel, for Congressman Paul Ryan.

He also introduced and welcomed Steve Bablitch, former Secretary of the State Department of Administration.

 

UW-MILWAUKEE PRESENTATION:  REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN

In introductory remarks, Regent President Walsh recalled that Chancellor Santiago spoke to the Board of Regents last year about the need for investments in UW-Milwaukee’s research and access missions.  To address that need, the university’s budget initiative, Powering a Knowledge-Based Economy, was created as an important part of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  Governor Doyle supported these initiatives in his biennial budget, and they received a positive vote in the Joint Committee on Finance.

He then introduced UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos Santiago to provide a progress report on how the university was preparing itself to move forward in that regard.

The chancellor began his remarks by reporting that, of the $300 million plan for research growth, the university had raised nearly all of its $100 million commitment and would complete the fundraising campaign early.  A second $100 million would come from reinvesting the university’s existing dollars, and the third $100 million would be requested as state support over a 6-year period.

Referring to UW-Milwaukee’s 94-acre campus, Chancellor Santiago indicated that, when the university was built, it was envisioned that the campus would expand east or west, neither of which occurred.  The fact that there are 28,000 students on this size campus makes it the most compressed by far in the UW System.  Adding to the compression problem is the university’s movement from a commuter to a residential campus, greatly expanding the student presence and creating problems in adjacent neighborhoods.

The campus has only 2,700 residential beds, not even enough for the 4,300 freshmen who come to university each year.  While opening of the River View residence facility in January 2008 will add 500 beds and the Kenilworth Building will provide graduate student housing, the problem remains a large one.

River View, he pointed out, had been built by a private developer through the UW-Milwaukee Real Estate Foundation in only 20 months, compared to the eight years it took to remodel the Kenilworth facility and the 13 years it took to construct the Sandburg residence towers.  River View will be a living-learning community, including classrooms and transportation to campus.

While the university has continuing interest in the Columbia Hospital building, it would need to house 1,000 students to make it financially viable; and negotiations were proceeding slowly.

Another UW-Milwukee site is the Water Institute, located four miles from the main campus, which conducts important research on the Great Lakes.  The institute’s research vessel is 50 years old, and funds are being raised for a replacement.

At the Grand Avenue Mall, the School of Continuing Education serves 25,000 students on a fee basis.

Turning to possible new areas of expansion, Chancellor Santiago noted that availability of land would not drive decisions and that no funding is available for land or buildings at this time. Discussions are being held with potential donors and the budget request includes $3 million in planning monies.  He and his staff had met with 55 legislators and had obtained bi-partisan support. 

The university must move forward with such plans, he emphasized, because the future of the region is at stake and UW-Milwaukee must play a major role in realizing the region’s full potential.

In that regard, he explained that UW-Milwaukee’s Growth Agenda includes three areas:  1) Biomedical Engineering; 2) Advanced Automation; and 3) Health Care.

Noting that the Board of Regents had voted to support a school of public health in Milwaukee, he indicated that Aurora Sinai would be a potential partner and has land that could be used for an academic health center.  This would align the university with the largest indigent care hospital in Milwaukee and would provide access to patients for clinical programs. 

Another potential site for expansion, Chancellor Santiago continued, is the Milwaukee County grounds, on an 82-acre parcel adjacent to the Medical Campus in Wauwatosa.  Noting that UW-Milwaukee, the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University together generate less than $200 million annually in external support, he emphasized that this amount must be raised substantially in order to power expansion of research.   The plan would be to move the School of Engineering to this site, called Innovation Park, to enable expansion of biomedical sciences and advanced automation. 

Indicating that there is substantial private-sector support for the proposal, he reported that, in the coming week, the county board would take up a resolution to begin negotiations. 

In addition, UW-Milwaukee would continue to support its degree programming in Waukesha County. 

With regard to the means of accomplishing these ambitious goals, Chancellor Santiago said that the entrepreneurship of the UW-Milwaukee Foundation would be of great benefit in leveraging scarce dollars with private support. 

In conclusion, the Chancellor indicated that the Innovation Park would cost $149 million to build over a ten-year period; and the Central City Academic Health Center would cost $133 million. The result, he predicted, would an be economic transformation and a brighter future for the entire region.

 

PRESENTATION BY DENNIS JONES, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL CENTER FOR HIGHER EDUCATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

In introductory remarks, President Reilly, indicated that the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) is a nonprofit research and development center to improve strategic decision-making in higher education.  Noting that Mr. Jones is highly respected for his expertise, the President added that he recently has spoken in Wisconsin to the Higher Education Roundtable and at a UW System chancellors’ retreat

A recent NCHEMS study placed Wisconsin in the top five nationally in higher education productivity.

Mr. Jones began his remarks by indicating that strategic planning for the UW System as a whole is separate from planning for each of the campuses.  Investments need to be made in the future of the state and there needs to be accountability to show what Wisconsin will get in return for its investment.  In that regard, strategic planning must focus on a public agenda; that is, it must identify issues facing Wisconsin that the university can help to address.

One reason that education is important to the state, he said, is because there is a strong relationship between bachelor’s degrees and per capita income.  Wisconsin is below the national average on both measures; while those above are also in the top third of the New Economy Index in percentage of the population employed in high technology occupations, such as information and biomedical technologies.  Wisconsin is below the national average on this index as well.  There is a strong relationship, he said, between high-technology employment and educational attainment. 

In addition, he pointed out that there is a strong relationship between educational attainment and health; between educational attainment and lower rates of incarceration; and between educational attainment and engagement in the arts. 

Overall, he summarized, an educated population brings many benefits for the state’s economy and quality of life.

Turning to areas of strategic planning, he explained that decisions focus on who is served, how they are served, and what changes are to be made.

Wisconsin’s population of 5 ½ million is not expected to grow much and is concentrated in the southeastern part of the state.  In 20 years, the state will have fewer people of college age, meaning that the Growth Agenda could not be sustained on the basis of that age group alone.  Milwaukee is projected to grow less than the state as a whole, while Dane County and counties near Chicago and the Twin Cities will grow faster.  Most growth will be among people of color, and schools will educate a more diverse population of the kinds of students who have not been very well served to date. 

Turning to the economy and workforce, he noted that the state still relies heavily on manufacturing, with the percent of total gross state product from that industry at twice the national average. New economy industries are less well developed than in the nation as a whole; and employment in high technology occupations is relatively low.  High-need areas requiring postsecondary education include health care, teacher education, and information technology.

From 2000-2025, the working age population in Wisconsin is expected to increase only about seven percent, a statistic that highlights the importance of continuing education of adults to the future of the state.

At almost 72%, Wisconsin is among the highest states in terms of workforce participation. Unlike most other states, many jobs still are available for those who have not completed high school; and Wisconsin is one of the few states in which employability does not increase with level of education beyond high school.  The highest rates of workforce participation are in Dane and Brown counties.

With regard to rank among the states in educational attainment, Wisconsin ranks high in percentages of those with high school diplomas and associate degrees.  The state performs less well at the bachelor’s and graduate degree levels. 

While Wisconsin has made progress in the percentage of population with an associate degree or higher, the United States ranks 8th in the world in college degrees and will drop to 17th in the future.  Wisconsin now is at the national average for percent of the population aged 25-64 with an associate degree or higher, but falls below the national average at the level of bachelor’s degree or higher.  The population with at least a bachelor’s degree is most concentrated in the Madison, Green Bay, Twin Cities, and Milwaukee areas.

The country with the highest percentage of those with at least bachelor’s degrees is Norway.  In Wisconsin, white women and Asian Americans rank highest in educational attainment, while African Americans and Hispanics, whose numbers are growing fastest, rank lower. In attainment of associate degrees or higher, only Asian Americans rank at the highest level.

With regard to per capita income, Wisconsin has been near the national average for about 50 years and now is below the national average.  Relative to the nation as a whole, Wisconsin tends to overpay those with the least amount of education and underpay those with the most, partly as a result of the state’s manufacturing tradition, with jobs that paid well but required little education.  Wisconsin has a $7,000 difference in median earnings between a high school diploma and an associate degree, compared to $10,000 for the nation as a whole, and a $15,000 difference in median earnings between a high school diploma and a bachelor’s degree, compared to $20,000 for the nation as a whole. 

Turning to the education pipeline, Dr. Jones indicated that Wisconsin does better than the national average in terms of high school completion, percentage of students entering college directly from high school and percentage completing college within six years.  However, Wisconsin is below the national average in the percentage of bachelor’s degree holders.

The percentage of Wisconsin students leaving the state for postsecondary education is slightly higher than the national average, and most of those who leave go to Minnesota.  More students leave the state than come here to go to public research institutions, while the reverse is true for public comprehensive universities.  Wisconsin also loses more students than it gains in the public two-year and the private institutional sectors.    

White students are overrepresented at every level of attainment, while African American and Hispanic students are underrepresented.  While high school graduates are reasonably well-prepared for college on the basis of national assessments, there remains a gap in the proportion of eighth graders who take algebra, and there remains work to be done to align the pre-college curricula to college-level expectations.

While the number of high school graduates living in the southeastern part of the state will be about the same in ten years, there will be about 6,500 fewer white students and 5,000 more Hispanic students. 

The percentage of associate degrees awarded in Wisconsin is well below the national average, while the percentage of bachelor’s degrees is slightly below.  Graduation rates at both two-year and four-year institutions are above the national average.  In addition, science and engineering degrees as a share of higher education degrees conferred are above the national average. 

The problem, Dr. Jones explained, is that Wisconsin educates many students who go elsewhere to work.  While the state imports high school graduates, it exports those with bachelor’s degrees.  The question, therefore, is how to create jobs that will attract college graduates.  Among those leaving the state are computer specialists and engineers, who are being graduated in higher numbers than the economy can absorb. 

The percentage of resident associate-degree holders of working age, born in the state, is about 74%, while the percent with a bachelor’s degree born in the state is 58%, almost 20% higher than the national average.  Wisconsin imports few college graduates, reflecting the lack of jobs to attract them. 

As to innovation assets, Dr. Jones reported that Wisconsin gets low marks in employment growth. However, the state ranks fairly high in innovation assets like academic research and development and ranks 24th to 15th in every area of federal research and expenditures per capita.   While Wisconsin is the 20th most populated state, it is 15th to 18th in the dollar value of research.  Wisconsin has been more consistently high in this area than any other state in the Midwest. 

Wisconsin ranks low in the number of doctorates in science and engineering in the work force; high in license and patent income; and low in venture capital environment and in initial public offerings. 

Noting that the University of Wisconsin System has built a strong capacity, Dr. Jones indicated that a major issue is how to connect that capacity with the state in order to grow the economy.  Unless the economy changes, he pointed out, Wisconsin will not be in a position to gain wealth.

With regard to the fiscal environment, Dr. Jones noted that Wisconsin is above the national average in tax effort, but below the national average in tax capacity.  Every state, he pointed out, has a structural budget deficit, driven in large part by Medicaid costs. 

As key issues facing Wisconsin, he identified the following:

  • Expansion and diversification of the state’s economy;
  • Variations in regional access and in access and success of minorities, including how to use continuing education, the UW Colleges and other resources to take the university to adult students and students of color;
  • Revitalizing Milwaukee, using resources of the UW System as a whole.

Dr. Jones then listed several conditions for developing and pursuing a public agenda:

  • A process for creating and building consensus around a short list of state priorities that the state’s system of higher education should be addressing;
  • A mechanism for keeping the focus on this agenda over an extended period of time.  Newspaper editorial boards and the Board of Regents can function as builders and keepers of the agenda.
  • Accountability measures that allow monitoring progress toward achieving priority goals;
  • An approach to resource allocation that creates incentives and removes disincentives for pursuing priority goals;
  • A regulatory environment consistent with objectives, including exchange of more autonomy for accountability.

Over the next months, he suggested that the Board of Regents address:

  • Selection of three or four items as priorities that will encourage elected officials and business leaders to agree to the agenda. 
  • Agreement on how to measure progress, so that planning and accountability are on the table at the same time.
  • Resource allocation to align resources with goals, such as strategic investments in economic growth and creation of incentives to move students toward graduation.
  • Identification of barriers to progress in the regulatory environment at both the university and state levels.

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Smith asked what made recent efforts in North Dakota and Kentucky successful.

Dr. Jones replied that the key ingredient in both cases was leadership – from the governor in Kentucky and, in North Dakota, from a roundtable of legislative, executive branch, private sector, and education leaders.  In both cases, support from the business community was essential to success. 

In response to a question by Regent Crain, Dr. Jones explained that census data show out-migration of college graduates as net data, with the Wisconsin losing some graduates and not bringing in enough from other states to make up the difference.

Regent Connolly-Keesler noted that people in their twenties move to where they want to live and then find a job.  She asked what could be done to attract more educated people to Wisconsin.

Dr. Jones replied that research by itself encourages economic growth because of the high-salary employment opportunities that it creates.  Combined with a culture of entrepreneurship, it also promotes spin-off businesses. This is a culture, he said, that needs to be cultivated in states like Wisconsin that have relied on the auto industry and other large corporations for employment.  It is important, he indicated, to consider how the state can promote the success of businesses and how an environment, including arts and diversity, can be created to attract educated people.  In that regard, he noted that the University System of Georgia has a vice president with the authority to make deals with companies to provide training that they need to come to or remain in the state.

Regent Rosenzweig inquired about the role of the Technical Colleges in the matter of providing regional access. 

In response, Dr. Jones observed that Wisconsin needs to determine how best to use the Technical Colleges and the UW Colleges to serve students by providing them with a strong community college experience, including adult literacy training, transferability of credits and education for technical jobs, and how best to meet the workforce needs of employers.  In that regard, he suggested avoiding reorganization, except as a last resort, and focusing instead on creating financial mechanisms that provide incentives for those institutions to collaborate rather than compete.

Regent Spector reported that he attended a meeting of the National Governors’ Association at which remarks on the topic of state economic growth were made by the Governors of Kansas and Missouri, as well as representatives of North Dakota and Kentucky.  Presentations on technology transfer were made by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation and WiSys.  It was felt that involvement by governors and legislators has been crucial to the success of such efforts.

Regent Davis asked if other states had been successful in improving educational attainment of students of color and older students   

While no state has all the answers, Dr. Jones cited the Indiana program which, like the Wisconsin Covenant, reaches out to young people, starting in the seventh grade, with eligibility based on income.  High schools provide a college-preparatory curriculum that students are expected to take unless parents specifically sign a document to deviate from it.  If students are successful in that curriculum and stay out of trouble, they will receive the money they need to go to college.

For adults, he continued, it would involve making courses available at places and times that reflect their work realities, including nights and weekends, and making the courses affordable.  It also might involve working with employers to provide specific training for their employees.

In reply to a question by Regent Bartell about regulatory obstacles, Dr. Jones indicated that some barriers impact how the university conducts its operations and others impact creation of businesses in the private sector.  It is important, he added, to conduct a policy audit that includes review of statistics, discussion with campuses about what obstacles are in their way, and creation of a database.  In addition, he emphasized the necessity of considering these matters in the context of the agreed-upon agenda of priority issues, so that discussion of regulatory barriers is not perceived simply as complaining.

Regent Loftus recalled that he had been living in Norway when the educational system was reformed to make the transition from high school to college more seamless.  Students then move to specialized campuses for engineering, business, and other professional education.  He also recalled that, in the late 1980’s, the Wisconsin Legislature had a Committee on the Future of the University which resulted in enrollment caps that universities were penalized for exceeding.  Academic standards were used in limiting enrollments, thus increasing graduation rates.  He asked if there were examples in other states of funding based on success in terms of graduation rates. 

Dr. Jones replied that Oklahoma has used a brain-gain funding mechanism that pays for increasing the number of graduates, with developmental students weighted more heavily.  No state has been willing to pay for numbers of graduates alone; but some pay for courses completed, which provides an incentive to avoid dropping of courses.  In addition, Missouri has paid capitation grants for graduates in certain fields.  In Oklahoma, there is a set-aside pool of funds to be used; and Tennessee has a performance funding mechanism that returns any unused funds to the state.

Noting that people recognize the correlation between educational attainment and higher incomes, Regent President Walsh asked Dr. Jones about buy-in around the country, noting that financial issues and split leadership at the state level can cause problems.

Dr. Jones replied that the states that have bought into the need for change tend to be at the far ends of a spectrum.  At one end, states like Arizona, Washington, and Colorado have been realizing that they cannot continue to accommodate current rates of growth.  At the other end, states like North Dakota have needed to take bold action to reverse a declining situation.  For states like Wisconsin, in the middle of the spectrum, there is no crisis to spur change; and one of the challenges is how to create energy behind the need to promote the changes that will move the state forward.

Regent Bradley asked where Wisconsin would be in 10-20 years if changes were not made and whether the state would then slip below the middle.

Replying in the affirmative, Dr. Jones said that to stand still is to fall behind because others are taking action to move ahead.  In that regard, he indicated that the focus on education in Minnesota and Texas has been spurred by business concerns about being able to compete on an international basis. Similarly, Texas recognized that it needs to serve Hispanic students better in order to be competitive in the future.

President Reilly emphasized the need to work with others in order for strategic planning to be successful.

Regent Burmaster suggested the Statewide PK 16 Council as a group with which the Board of Regents might consult in that regard.

The discussion concluded, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m.         

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

UW-Milwaukee
Held in the Union, Wisconsin Room
Friday, June 8, 2007
9:00 a.m.

- President Walsh presiding -

 

Approval of the Minutes of the May 10 and 11, 2007 Meetings. 4

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 4

UW Budget Update. 4

Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Christopher Semenas. 5

Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Christopher M. Semenas. 6

Report on the May 15, 2007 Meeting of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board   7

Report on the June 6, 2007 Meeting of the Hospital Authority Board.. 7

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 7

Remarks by Chancellor Santiago and Special Guests. 7

Biennial Budget Update and Support for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.. 8

Meetings with Wisconsin Congressional Delegation.. 9

UW-Madison/UW-La Crosse Library Collaboration.. 9

Introduction of Eloisa Gomez, Director of Milwaukee County Cooperative Extension Office  10

Medieval Device Designed and Built by UW-Manitowoc Students and Staff. 10

In Memory of UW-Green Bay’s Founding Chancellor Edward Weidner.. 10

Appreciation to Regent President David Walsh.. 10

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE. 11

Student Financial Aid: 2005-06 Update. 11

Adoption of Regent Policy Document: UW System Policy on Student Lending/Code of Conduct   12

Amendments to UW Medical Foundation Bylaws. 12

2007-09 Biennial Operating Budget Update. 13

Report of the Vice President.. 13

Minnesota Reciprocity. 13

Tuition and Financial Aid Advisory Group Meeting. 13

Assembly Speaker’s Task Force on IT Failures. 14

Consent Agenda.. 14

University of Wisconsin System Policy on Institutional and Employee Relationships with Educational Loan Lenders  14

Amendments to Bylaws of the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation. 14

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE. 15

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct 21st Century Telecommunications Project.. 15

UW-Madison: Approval of Design Report, Authority to Construct East Campus Utility Improvements Project, and Authority to Transfer Funds to University Square Redevelopment Project   15

UW-Madison: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Arts Relocation Project and Adjust the Project Budget.. 15

UW-Superior: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Rothwell Student Center Project, Adjust the Project Scope and Budget, and Seek a Waiver of s.16.855 to Allow for Single Prime Bidding.. 15

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects. 16

Consent Agenda.. 16

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct the 21st Century Telecommunications Phase III project 16

UW-Madison: Approval of the Design Report, Authority to Construct the East Campus Utility Improvements Project, and Authority to Transfer Funds to the University Square Redevelopment Project 16

UW-Madison: Approval of the Design Report, Authority to Construct the Arts Relocation Project, and Adjust the Project Budget 17

UW-Superior: Approval of the Design Report, Authority to Construct the Rothwell Student Center Project, Adjust the Project Scope and Budget, and Seek a Waiver of s.16.855 to Allow the Single Prime Bidding. 17

UW System: Authority to Construct Various Maintenance and Repair Projects. 17

UW-Milwaukee Presentation: The Role of a Master Plan in Campus Development.. 18

Report of the Assistant Vice President.. 18

2007-09 Capital Budget Update. 18

Building Commission Actions. 18

Minority Business Enterprise Participation. 18

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 19

Program Authorizations. 19

UW-Parkside: B.S. in Applied Health Sciences. 19

UW-Milwaukee: B.S. in Computer Engineering. 19

UW-Milwaukee: Ph.D in Information Studies. 20

Presentation on UW-Milwaukee’s Dual Mission of Research and Access. 20

Committee Business. 21

UW-Green Bay Mission Revision (First Reading). 21

UW System Appointments to the Natural Areas Preservation Council 21

Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Related Academic Approval Items. 21

Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. 22

Charter School Presentation. 22

UW System Climate Study. 22

Consent Agenda.. 22

UW-Parkside: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Applied Health Sciences. 22

UW-Milwaukee: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Computer Engineering. 23

UW-Milwaukee: Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Information Studies. 23

Approval of Appointments to Natural Areas Preservation Council 23

2007-08 Report on Faculty Promotions Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status. 23

ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS.. 24

President of the Board.. 24

Vice President of the Board.. 24

Secretary, Assistant Secretary, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers. 25

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS.. 25

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee. 25

Closed Session.. 26


PRESENT: Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Davis, Falbo, McPike, Pruitt, Rosenzweig, Salas, Shields, Smith, Spector, Thomas, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regent Cuene and Loftus.  Regent Loftus joined the meeting by telephone conference for election of officers of the Board.

 

Approval of the Minutes of the May 10 and 11, 2007 Meetings

There being no additions or corrections, the minutes of the May 10 and 11, 2007 meetings of the Board of Regents stood approved as distributed.

 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

UW Budget Update

Regent President Walsh reported that he and others had been communicating with the Executive and Legislative branches regarding the budget, which currently was before the Joint Committee on Finance.  While those deliberations had been going well, he cautioned that it is only the first step in a long process. 

At a news conference on the UW-Madison campus to honor prize winning engineering students, Governor Doyle made a strong statement on the importance of the UW System to the future of the state.

Referring to a series of charts on university funding, Regent President Walsh noted that GPR tax dollars are a small part of the overall budget and that the UW System receives less GPR currently than seven years ago, as a result of the state’s need to fund other constituencies, such as Medicaid, corrections, and the K-12 system. 

Stating that the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin is the best vision that the university has had in many years, he commended President Reilly for his excellent work in communicating the importance of this vision to Wisconsin’s future.

At UW-Madison, he pointed out, the percentage of GPR support is even smaller because of the large amount of research funding, showing the university’s ability to succeed through public/private partnerships.  Over the years, the percentage of GPR support in the university’s budget has become increasingly smaller; and flexible GPR has increased much less than the rate of inflation, amounting to $50 million less than ten years ago. 

Finally, he referred to a chart that showed UW-Madison’s tuition as a lower percent of disposable per capita income than all but one other Big Ten institution. 

Noting that Wisconsin remains a low tuition/low financial aid state, he remarked that, although the Board of Regents asked the state to fully fund faculty/staff compensation increases, that probably would not happen. The result would be a difficult decision for the Board regarding tuition, although the significant increase in financial aid included in the Governor’s budget would help in that regard. 

Regent Falbo suggested that a breakdown by use, as well as source, of funding would be helpful.

Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Christopher Semenas

Before presenting the resolution, Regent Burmaster spoke of Regent Semenas’ many contributions to the Board, remarking that he carefully weighed issues and spoke eloquently on such matters as domestic partnerships, diversity, and equal opportunities for all students.  A history major, Regent Semenas also served as president of the UW-Parkside Student Government.  Commending him for his passion, intelligence, stamina,  and compassion, Regent Burmaster concluded her remarks by extending best wishes to Regent Semenas for success in his first job in Washington, D.C.

The following resolution was read by Regent Burmaster and adopted by acclamation, with a standing ovation in honor of Regent Semenas, who was presented with a plaque containing the resolution and with an UW System medallion.

Resolution of Appreciation: Regent Christopher M. Semenas

Resolution 9359:   WHEREAS, Christopher Semenas has served for two years as an insightful and dedicated student representative on the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents; and

WHEREAS, as a member of the Education Committee, Regent Semenas displayed his strong commitment to the continuous improvement of UW education and expanding equitable opportunities for students from all backgrounds; and

WHEREAS, through his participation on the selection committee for the Regents Teaching Excellence Awards, Regent Semenas extolled the virtues of recruiting and rewarding those educators who go the extra mile to ensure student success; and

WHEREAS, Regent Semenas offered a valuable student perspective as a member of the Committee on Student Discipline and Other Student Appeals; and

WHEREAS, Chris was responsive to the UW System student body through his strong and consistent advocacy for affordable tuition, increased financial aid, respect for the student role in shared governance, and academic quality;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System wholeheartedly thanks Regent Emeritus Christopher Semenas for his remarkable contributions and service to the students, faculty, and staff of the UW System and to the citizens of Wisconsin, and wishes him every success as he embarks on a future that already is bright with promise.   

Regent Semenas expressed appreciation to the Board for the resolution and thanked Regent Burmaster in particular for her excellent work as State Superintendent of Public Instruction.  He also thanked his family for their unwavering support and expressed gratitude to Governor Doyle for providing strong leadership to move Wisconsin forward. 

Noting that the university was facing some difficult issues at the time of his appointment, he commended Regent President Walsh, Regent Vice President Bradley, and President Reilly for leading the university forward.  During his time of service, he recalled, the Board stood up for a fair undergraduate admissions policy, against a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage, for the Wisconsin Covenant, for ensuring that the campus is a safe place for employees and students, and for building a stronger Wisconsin.  He stated his pride in being part of those accomplishments. 

Regent Semenas also expressed gratitude to Chancellor Keating who had been a friend, leader and inspiration to him; to Regent President Walsh for his strength and vigilance in support of the UW System, and all of his fellow Regents who offered their friendship and taught him the importance of public service.

Report on the May 15, 2007 Meeting of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

A written report on that meeting was provided.

Report on the June 6, 2007 Meeting of the Hospital Authority Board

A written report on that meeting was provided.

 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Remarks by Chancellor Santiago and Special Guests

Chancellor Santiago began is remarks by thanking all UW-Milwaukee colleagues who helped with arrangements for these meetings.

Stating that UW-Milwaukee needs to be the catalyst for building strength in the demographic center of the state, he invited the following guest speakers to give their perspectives in that regard:  Bruce Block, President of the UW-Milwaukee Foundation Board, an attorney specializing in real estate who was instrumental in building the River View student residence hall; Milwaukee County Supervisor Michael Mayo, chair of the Committee on Economic and Community Development, which would review the university’s acquisition of land in Wauwatosa; Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker who has demonstrated his understanding of the importance of economic development and commercialization of research; Lee Holloway, Chair of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors and an important supporter of the River View development; and Michael Cudahy, a Milwaukee entrepreneur and philanthropist who understands the value of public/private partnerships.

Mr. Holloway began by commending Chancellor Santiago for his enthusiastic leadership in expanding the university and housing for students.  Stating his own enthusiasm for UW-Milwaukee, Mr. Holloway said that, while there still are shortfalls in such areas as graduation rates for African-American students, he was pleased that progressive action was being taken to address those concerns. While the university always has been a pillar of Milwaukee, he noted that it has not been in the forefront but predicted that the Innovation Park would change that perception by spurring economic growth and bringing opportunities for high-paying jobs.  While nothing had yet been decided, he said that the proposal would move progressively through the County Board’s process and that he planned to help it become a reality.

Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker remarked that UW-Milwaukee always has been a great institution, but Chancellor Santiago’s vision of being one of the best in the country will do much to move the region and state forward.  Stating that he is 100% behind the plan, he thought that the county grounds would be the perfect place for the Innovation Park in terms of synergy with other entities. To put the Engineering School in that location, he predicted, would be like “pouring jet fuel” on the economic engine that is already there and ensuring a strong takeoff into the future.  He noted that the Mayor of Wauwatosa and other officials also support the plan.

Michael Cudahy recalled that innovation was the key to continuing growth of Marquette Electronics, the company he founded, which was sold to General Electric in 1998.  Referring to the explosive research growth that had taken place in Silicon Valley, he said that the key to success was having a critical mass of research and development entities in one place.  Noting that the Medical College of Wisconsin, General Electric and others already are located in the proposed Innovation Park area, he expressed his interest and enthusiasm for locating the Engineering College there.  If critical mass is reached, he concluded, it could result in the “biggest economic explosion the state has seen in a long time.”

Noting that it is the mission of the UW-Milwaukee Foundation to bring private dollars to the university, Bruce Block indicated that one way to do that is through the Real Estate Foundation, which created River View.  He stated that the foundation is behind the chancellor’s vision and that he believed that the private sector will support it as well.

Supervisor Michael Mayo stated his excitement about UW-Milwaukee coming to the research park and urged the Board of Regents to support the initiative.

Regent Falbo noted that in1957 a committee formed by the mayor recommended the county grounds a location for UW-Milwaukee.    

President Reilly thanked Chancellor Santiago and the speakers for their remarks and support.

Biennial Budget Update and Support for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

President Reilly reported that last week he attended a news conference with Governor Doyle at which they made a strong push for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.  They were joined by Regent President Walsh, UW-Madison Provost Patrick Farrell, Engineering Dean Paul Peercy, and a group of gifted engineering students.  Six legislators who represent UW campuses also appeared to support the Growth Agenda: Senator Fred Risser and Representatives Kim Hixson, Gordon Hintz, Jennifer Shilling, Jeff Smith, and James Soletski.

The Governor emphasized the importance of keeping the university strong so that it can produce college-educated graduates for Wisconsin’s future; and he outlined how reinvesting in the UW System would help fill critical job gaps, including more slots for students in engineering, nursing, and teacher education.  He also described how his budget would provide financial aid to keep the UW affordable for students and endorsed the request for $10 million for a fund to retain talented faculty.

President Reilly expressed gratitude to the Governor for his support and to all the legislators on both sides of the aisle who have been supporting the budget request.  Noting that the process has passed a critical point, he indicated that the Joint Committee on Finance has considered the capital budget and the Growth Agenda initiatives and that the budget bill will next be considered by the Senate.  He thanked regents, chancellors, other UW colleagues, and third-party advocates for their hard work in promoting legislative support. 

Meetings with Wisconsin Congressional Delegation

President Reilly reported that he, Regent Bradley and Assistant Vice President Kris Andrews visited all members of the Wisconsin congressional delegation and their staffs on a recent trip to Washington, D.C.  Chancellor Keating joined them for a number of the visits. 

A wide range of issues were discussed, including campus safety, access, affordability, recruitment and retention.  The House Education Appropriations Bill would raise the Pell Grant maximum to $4,700, restore SEOG, Perkins and LEAP funding, and increase TRIO funding.  The budget for the National Institutes of Health also would be increased, and it was hoped that more funding for biomedical research would be included. 

The group shared concerns with congressional members and staff about the U.S. Department of Education’s aggressive push to change federal rules governing accreditation.  Representative Obey introduced an amendment to block implementation of the accreditation regulations; and Senator Alexander indicated that he would introduce similar legislation in the Senate.  

UW-Madison/UW-La Crosse Library Collaboration

President Reilly reported that UW-Madison and UW-La Crosse were working to digitize a large collection of steamboat photographs that document the Mississippi River’s role in economic growth of the upper Midwest.  UW-La Crosse’s Murphy Library houses one of the world’s premier collections of these images – 50,000 images dating back to the 1850s – and UW-Madison’s Digital Collections Center will use its capability to make them available online.

Introduction of Eloisa Gomez, Director of Milwaukee County Cooperative Extension Office

Introducing Ms. Gomez, President Reilly said that the Milwaukee County Cooperative Extension Office provides education programs that address the needs of county residents, families and communities.  A Milwaukee native, Ms. Gomez has broad experience in working with private foundations, community organizations, and local government.  She began her graduate studies at UW-Madison, completing them at UW-Milwaukee, and brings to her position more than 25 years of valuable experience in administrative leadership and project management in Milwaukee.  She recently organized travel for 40 friends and volunteers of Cooperative Extension to the State Capitol to meet with their legislators.  President Reilly thanked Ms. Gomez for her dedication and commitment.

Medieval Device Designed and Built by UW-Manitowoc Students and Staff

President Reilly reported that, as part of a three-day celebration of the genius of Leonardo da Vinci, UW-Manitowoc held a demonstration of a da Vinci-inspired trebuchet, which is a catapult that hurls projectiles.  Designed and built by students and staff, with help from community members, the trebuchet was used to hurl ice balls into Lake Michigan.  President Reilly commended Dean Daniel Campagna, who had the idea, and all others who participated in the event.

In Memory of UW-Green Bay’s Founding Chancellor Edward Weidner

President Reilly noted the passing at age 85 of Edward Weidner, UW-Green Bay’s founding chancellor, who was instrumental in turning what he said was “a farm field with corn” into a world-class university. 

Current Chancellor Bruce Shepard said that the campus is in many ways Chancellor Weidner’s university, as “the direct expression of his revolutionary vision for higher education, as the product of his tireless hard work, and, even after his retirement, as the focus of his caring, concern, and commitment.”

Extending the sympathy of the UW System community to Chancellor Weidner’s wife, Marge, and family, President Reilly said that, while all are saddened by his loss, his enormous contributions to higher education in Wisconsin will always be remembered.

Appreciation to Regent President David Walsh

President Reilly commended and thanked Regent President Walsh on conclusion of his term as president of the board, remarking that he has been “a truly tireless advocate for the UW and has been purposefully tenacious in fighting for support for this university.”  In that regard, President Reilly noted that Regent President Walsh had visited communities throughout the state to talk to audiences about the importance of the university and to ask for their support. 

He also listened when legislators and others expressed concern about university practices and saw to it that unprecedented reforms in personnel policy and practices were implemented.  In doing so, he earned the respect of faculty, staff and students across the university system. 

Stating that there are “few, if any, UW alumni who care as strongly and passionately about the University of Wisconsin as David,” President Reilly gave two examples of his lengthy record of support.  The research of Dr. David Gamm, assistant professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at UW-Madison, on growing retinal progenitor cells is supported in part with funding provided by Regent Walsh.  He also has established a scholarship in the name of his father, the legendary UW boxing coach John Walsh, at the UW-Madison Law School to support education of student athletes who are pursuing a career in law. 

Remarking that Regent President Walsh’s leadership and tenacity will be greatly missed, President Reilly added that Regent Walsh will remain a member of the board and that he will always be there for the university and its students.  In that regard, President Reilly said that he could not recall a time when Regent Walsh said “no” when asked for help and that he did it all in the best interests of students, faculty and staff.

 

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

Regent Pruitt, chair, presented the committee’s report.

Student Financial Aid: 2005-06 Update

Sharon Wilhelm, interim associate vice president, Office of Policy Analysis and Research, reported that total financial aid awarded in fiscal year 2005-06 was $829 million, an increase of eight percent over 2004-05.  Sixty-five percent, or a total of 105,000 UW students received some form of financial aid, of which $222 million came in the form of grants and $593 million in the form of loans. While federal sources accounted for 77% of aid received by UW students, alternative loans have grown dramatically over the past several years, totaling about $58 million – almost 10% of total loan volume. 

Regent Pruitt stated the need for continuing attention to the growth of loans over grants and the accompanying increase in student debt load, resulting from federal government withdrawal of support from Pell Grants and federally subsidized loans.

Adoption of Regent Policy Document: UW System Policy on Student Lending/Code of Conduct

The proposed policy was presented by Julie Gordon, Director of the Office of Operations Review and Audit, pursuant to committee discussion and action at the May meeting when the committee required development of a policy on the relationship with educational loan lenders. It was noted that the investigation by the New York attorney general and congressional actions underscore the seriousness of this situation. 

Key among the statements in the proposed policy is that UW institutions may not solicit, accept, or enter into any agreement in which a lender of education loans provides fees, revenue sharing or material benefits to the institution or employee.

The policy is largely consistent with the proposed student loan Sunshine Act, rules proposed by the U.S. Department of Education, the code of conduct released by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, and the code of conduct released by the New York attorney general. 

In several cases the UW code is more restrictive than others; and the policy would be the most open, transparent and far-reaching of any code in the country. 

It was noted that the vast majority of financial aid staff are doing extraordinary work at the highest level of conduct in the best interest of students.

The committee approved the policy for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Amendments to UW Medical Foundation Bylaws

Claudia Sanders, vice president for legal services of the UW Medical Foundation, and Peter Christman, executive vice president and chief operating officer, led a discussion on requested changes to the foundation’s bylaws.  These changes were being sought in response to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and congressional interest in the operations of not-for-profit health care providers.  They had been reviewed and approved by appropriate governance groups, the UW Medical Foundation Board and the UW-Madison chancellor. 

The key changes include addition of two more public members to the UW Medical Foundation Board, designation of the dean of the Medical School as chair of the UW Medical Foundation Board, and a requirement that the Audit Committee report to the UW Medical Foundation Board.

The committee approved a resolution adopting the requested amendments for inclusion in the consent agenda.

2007-09 Biennial Operating Budget Update

Freda Harris, associate vice president, Office of Budget and Planning, presented an update on actions earlier in the week by the Joint Committee on Finance, a written summary of which had been provided, and a summary of capital budget actions taken earlier in May.

Report of the Vice President

Minnesota Reciprocity

Vice President Durcan reported that this month’s agenda of the University of Minnesota Board of Regents meeting includes a plan to withdraw from the reciprocity agreement with Wisconsin and to establish tuition at the same rate as Minnesota residents in the second year of the biennium (2008-09).

The meeting materials indicate that they are willing to consider participation in reciprocity agreements that they consider fair and equitable for both students and higher education institutions.  Negotiations were continuing and the UW System was hopeful that an agreement could be reached before the June 27th meeting of the University of Minnesota board.

Tuition and Financial Aid Advisory Group Meeting

Vice President Durcan reported that the Advisory Group on Tuition and Financial Aid held its first meeting the preceding week.  Among its members are Regent Crain and Regent Falbo.

The group agreed that the following draft principles would guide their work.  Tuition and financial aid policy should:

  • Be considered within the context of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin with a goal of increasing the number of baccalaureate degree holders;
  • Strike a balance between providing affordable access and generating sufficient revenues to improve student success;
  • Be understandable and as easy as possible to implement and manage;
  • Recognize political realities; and
  • Respect the diverse needs and missions of UW System institutions.

The group suggested that, in addition to President Reilly’s stated major focus areas, a possible additional focus area might be funding the lowest two income quintiles.

The group agreed that the current practice of setting the UW Colleges tuition $300 below the base rate of the comprehensive institutions should be discontinued, as this practice requires a higher percentage increase for UW College students than other UW students.  However, the group was not ready to recommend a preferred tuition level for the UW Colleges at this time.

Assembly Speaker’s Task Force on IT Failures

Vice President Durcan reported that Assembly Speaker Huebsch established a task force of eight legislators and eight private sector members to explore a number of failed information technology projects undertaken by the state and to look at successes in the public and private sectors in order to find workable solutions. 

Ed Meachen, associate vice president of the Office of Learning and Information Technology, would be providing testimony on behalf of the UW System, outlining the recently completed UW audit and the changes made by the university in order to mitigate risk.

Consent Agenda

Regent Pruitt moved adoption by the Board of Regents of the following resolutions as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent Smith and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

University of Wisconsin System Policy on Institutional and Employee Relationships with Educational Loan Lenders

  Resolution 9360:   Whereas the University of Wisconsin System (UWS) and its employees adhere to the highest standards of ethical conduct and rigorous professional standards; and

Whereas the Board of Regents believes that the best interests of students and their families should be the primary concern of UW institutions and employees;

Therefore, be it resolved that, upon the recommendation of the President of the UWS, the Board of Regents adopts the attached Policy on Institutional and Employee Relationships with Educational Loan Lenders.

Amendments to Bylaws of the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation

  Resolution 9361:   That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Board of the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation, the Board of Regents approves the amended bylaws of the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation as presented in Exhibit C of these materials.

 

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE

Regent Salas, chair, presented the committee’s report.

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct 21st Century Telecommunications Project

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority to construct the 21st century in-building wiring project for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Madison: Approval of Design Report, Authority to Construct East Campus Utility Improvements Project, and Authority to Transfer Funds to University Square Redevelopment Project

The committee approved a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Madison: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Arts Relocation Project and Adjust the Project Budget

The committee approved a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Superior: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Construct the Rothwell Student Center Project, Adjust the Project Scope and Budget, and Seek a Waiver of s.16.855 to Allow for Single Prime Bidding

The committee approved a resolution approving the design report and granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Consent Agenda

Regent Salas moved adoption of the following resolutions as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent McPike and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct the 21st Century Telecommunications Phase III project

  Resolution 9362:   That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct the 21st Century Telecommunications project at a total project cost of $1,310,000 ($1,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – 2005‑07 UW System Classroom/Instructional Technology and $310,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing - 2003-05 UW System Classroom/Instructional Technology).

UW-Madison: Approval of the Design Report, Authority to Construct the East Campus Utility Improvements Project, and Authority to Transfer Funds to the University Square Redevelopment Project

  Resolution 9363:   That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, contingent upon enumeration of this project in the 2007-09 Capital Budget, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to:  (a) construct the East Campus Utility Improvements project at an estimated total project cost of $19,984,000 ($16,010,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, and $3,974,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing), and (b) transfer $2,800,000 ($2,242,800 GFSB, and $557,200 PRSB) to the University Square Redevelopment Project for construction of the utility improvements adjacent to that project.

UW-Madison: Approval of the Design Report, Authority to Construct the Arts Relocation Project, and Adjust the Project Budget

  Resolution 9364:   That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to: (a) increase the project budget by $430,000 ($245,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing-All Agency-Health and Safety and $185,000 Institutional Funds non-GPR); and (b) construct the Arts Relocation project at an estimated cost of $9,245,000 ($2,250,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing-BioStar-Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, $245,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing-All Agency-Health and Safety, and $6,750,000 Gift and Grant Funds).

UW-Superior: Approval of the Design Report, Authority to Construct the Rothwell Student Center Project, Adjust the Project Scope and Budget, and Seek a Waiver of s.16.855 to Allow the Single Prime Bidding

  Resolution 9365:   That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Superior Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to: (a) construct the Rothwell Student Center project, (b) increase the project scope and budget by $1,177,000 ($208,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing - Jim Dan Hill Library and $969,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing - New Academic Building), and (c) seek a waiver of s.16.855 under the provisions of s.13.48 (19) to allow for single prime bidding, for an estimated total project cost of $22,062,000 ($208,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – Jim Dan Hill Library, $969,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing – New Academic Building, $16,885,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing and $4,000,000 Gift and Grant Funds).

UW System: Authority to Construct Various Maintenance and Repair Projects

  Resolution 9366:   That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $6,780,100 ($1,020,700 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $2,901,200 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $2,858,200 Program Revenue-Cash).

UW-Milwaukee Presentation: The Role of a Master Plan in Campus Development

Sherwood Wilson, UW-Milwaukee vice chancellor for administration, presented information about the role of a master plan in campus development. He began by outlining the history of the location and development of the current campus and then discussed the goals and timeline of the comprehensive master plan that would be presented to the board for authorization at the July meeting.

Report of the Assistant Vice President

2007-09 Capital Budget Update

Assistant Vice President David Miller reported that all general fund supported projects, gift-funded projects, and smaller program revenue projects were unanimously approved by the Joint Committee on Finance in May.  Two student union projects – at UW-Eau Claire and UW-Madison – along with six new residence halls at UW-Madison, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Whitewater failed on a tie vote to be included in the capital budget. 

Regent Salas expressed confidence that, once there is understanding that students support these projects and that there are no taxpayer dollars involved, legislators will be persuaded to restore them to the budget.  Mr. Miller assured the committee that discussions with legislators about returning the projects to the budget have already begun.

Building Commission Actions

It was reported by Mr. Miller that the Building Commission approved the $2.6 million gift-funded Washburn Observatory project for UW-Madison at its May meeting.

Minority Business Enterprise Participation

Mr. Miller reported to the committee about participation in the Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) program, which is managed by the Department of Administration, with the data reported being for all state design and construction contracts.

For the first three quarters of this fiscal year, MBE companies received 5.4% of the value of architecture and engineering contracts and 8.3% of the construction contracts.  However, only 14 MBE firms bid on 758 construction contracts. 

Regent Salas assured the board that the committee will continue to monitor and report on this matter.

 

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Regent Davis, chair, presented the committee’s report.

Program Authorizations

UW-Parkside: B.S. in Applied Health Sciences

Interim Provost Jerry Greenfield introduced Dr. Bryan Lewis, Department of Biological Sciences and assistant to the dean for Health Related Professions, and Dr. Penny Lyter, chair of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Athletics.  Also present were Dr. Carmel Ruffalo, Department of Biological Sciences, and Professor Doug De Viny, interim associate provost.

Drs. Lyter and Lewis explained that the program draws on UW-Parkside’s strengths in the areas of health and science.  It is the result of collaboration between biological science and health and physical education at the university.

The program would prepare students for degree programs in the allied health professions, such as physical therapy, athletic training and physician’s assistant, as well as for entry level positions.  It would include a clinical foundation and internship and would respond to the state and national need for health care professionals.  It would serve existing UW-Parkside students, as well as provide degree completion options for the many students in health related programs at Gateway Technical College.  The program also would build on the strong diversity at UW-Parkside and expects to attract a diverse body of students. 

The committee approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Milwaukee: B.S. in Computer Engineering

Provost Rita Cheng introduced Professor Hossein Hosseni, chair, and Professor K. Vairavan, of the Computer Science Department. 

Professor Hosseni described the program as responsive to local and national demand, advice from the Industry Advisory Committee, and the needs of UW-Milwaukee students who currently major in electrical engineering and minor in computer science.  Supportive of the university’s mission, it would consist of 126 credits and conform to professional and accreditation standards.

Questions were raised about the new engineering campus envisioned by Chancellor Santiago and the challenges of attracting women into the program.  Acknowledging the challenge of attracting students of color, as well as women, to such programs, Professor Hosseni indicated that the program would benefit from a number of national and campus initiatives to attract and retain women and minorities. 

The committee approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Milwaukee: Ph.D in Information Studies

Provost Rita Cheng introduced Dean Johannes Britz and Professors Hope A. Olson and Dietmar Wolfram, of the School of Information Studies. 

The proposed program would build on faculty strength in the areas of information organization, policy and retrieval.  Its strengths include its interdisciplinary nature, flexibility and quality.  The faculty is internationally recognized, and the program would support UW-Milwaukee’s mission of offering a balance of basic and professional Ph.D programs.  It also would be in accordance with recommendations made by a university task force on UW-Milwaukee’s doctoral programs.

Assessment would occur on the individual student level and through exit and longitudinal surveys, which would provide information for regular reviews by a faculty council and five-year campus reviews.  Student diversity would be addressed in part by a federally funded grant for underrepresented students in UW-Milwaukee’s related master’s programs. 

The committee approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Presentation on UW-Milwaukee’s Dual Mission of Research and Access

Updating the committee on UW-Milwaukee’s dual missions of research and access, Provost Rita Cheng noted that since the university’s first commencement 50 years ago, it has grown to grant 4,000 degrees annually and has more than 150,000 alumni.

The university’s research is critical to economic growth in the region, helping provide both an educated work force and technological assistance to the local economic community; and UW-Milwaukee’s Research Grant Initiative is providing seed money to help university researchers initiate or continue work in their fields.

At the same time, the Access to Success program is helping more students attend and succeed in college, fulfilling the second part of the university’s mission.  The program is showing promising results, with admissions of minority students up significantly from fall 2006 to fall 2007 – 13% for Southeast Asian students; 31% for American Indian students; 42% for Latino students, and 46% for African American students. 

As examples of the varying ways in which students can be helped to succeed, Provost Cheng cited the case of a student with a low ACT score who attained a 3.0 plus grade point average by her sophomore year; the McNair Summer Scholars program, which encourages promising minority students to begin graduate level work; and the Sloan Foundation Grant, which will use hybrid courses to give better access to working adults. 

After the presentation, the committee discussed the growing excitement about UW-Milwaukee’s research mission and the importance of the liberal arts.

Next steps include linking academic planning and master planning.  The committee asked Provost Cheng to report back on that work. 

Committee Business

UW-Green Bay Mission Revision (First Reading)

Provost Sue Hammersmith explained that UW-Green Bay has been reviewing its mission as part of a process that began with preparation its Higher Learning Commission accreditation review.  The goal was to redraft the mission as a concise statement of the university’s approach to addressing the mission of the comprehensive universities.  The proposed statement has gone through development and revision by campus governance groups, with community input.

In response to a question about whether the revised statement would incorporate life-long learning and liberal education, Chancellor Shepard and Provost Hammersmith indicated that, while these specific terms are not part of the statement, it does indicate how the university offers an education steeped in the liberal arts tradition through its interdisciplinary approach to programs. 

UW-Green Bay will hold an open meeting for public comment that includes participation by at least one member of the Board of Regents.  The revised statement will come before the board again for approval sometime thereafter.

UW System Appointments to the Natural Areas Preservation Council

The Natural Areas Preservation Council is a legislatively mandated body that works with the Department of Natural Resources’ State Natural Areas Program.  The Board of Regents has statutory authority to appoint four UW System representatives.

The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda a resolution reappointing Dr. Timothy Ehlinger for a term ending in 2009.

Report on Promotions, Tenure Designations, and Related Academic Approval Items

In reviewing this annual report, the committee was informed that chancellors and provosts provide assurance that they have personally reviewed the dossiers of each of the faculty on the list and can vouch for the appropriateness of the tenure designations and promotions.  Although the decisions are made at the institutional level, the Board of Regents is required to approve them as a final step in the process.

It was noted by Senior Vice President Martin that 95% of the individuals considered for tenure received the designation.  Of those, 14% were minority males and 8% were minority females. 

The committee passed a resolution approving the report for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Charter School Presentation

Senior Vice President Martin noted that the presentation will be made in September when more comprehensive performance data is available.

UW System Climate Study

Providing an update on the UW System Climate Study, Senior Vice President Martin recalled that, two years ago, the Board asked System Administration to explore the feasibility of conducting such a survey as an integral component of diversity work. 

Led by UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells, the UW System’s Inclusivity Initiative considered how best to accomplish the goal of a broad-based assessment of climate that considers the multiple identities of faculty, staff and students.  That research concluded that Dr. Susan Rankin, a faculty member at Penn State University, had the best experience with broad-based climate surveys at higher education institutions.

Four UW institutions expressed interest in participating in the pilot: UW Colleges, UW-La Crosse, UW-Milwaukee, and UW-Oshkosh.  These four institutions also are participating in the Equity Scorecard project, and the climate survey seemed an appropriate adjunct to the goals of that initiative. 

The survey is to be administered in spring 2008.

Consent Agenda

Adoption of the following resolutions as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Crain, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Parkside: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Applied Health Sciences

  Resolution 9367:   That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Applied Health Sciences.

UW-Milwaukee: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Computer Engineering

  Resolution 9368:   That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Computer Engineering.

UW-Milwaukee: Program Authorization (Implementation) Ph.D. in Information Studies

  Resolution 9369:   That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Ph.D. in Information Studies.

Approval of Appointments to Natural Areas Preservation Council

  Resolution 9370:   That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the reappointment of Dr. Timothy Ehlinger, for a term beginning January 1, 2007, and ending June 30, 2009, as a University of Wisconsin System representative to the Natural Areas Preservation Council.

2007-08 Report on Faculty Promotions Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status

  Resolution 9371:   That, upon recommendation of the respective Chancellors and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the 2007-08 Report on Faculty Promotions, Tenure Designations and Other Changes of Status be approved.

 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS

President of the Board

Nominating Regent Mark Bradley for President of the Board, Regent Davis remarked that his deep understanding of important issues is one of his greatest strengths.  She characterized him as an inclusive leader, a strong listener, and a sage advisor who stands for excellence.  She felt that his legacy will be his stewardship and that knowing what to do and doing it well will make him a very successful president.

The nomination was seconded by Regent Crain.

There being no further nominations, it was moved by Regent Connolly-Keesler and seconded by Regent Falbo that nominations be closed.  The motion passed on a unanimous voice vote. 

Regent Bradley then was elected President of the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

Thanking his colleagues, Regent Bradley pledged his best efforts on behalf of the board, the UW System and students.  Noting that service as vice president with Regent President Walsh was very helpful in preparing him for his new role, he expressed appreciation to Regent President Walsh for his inclusive style and outstanding leadership. 

Vice President of the Board

Nominating Regent Charles Pruitt for Vice President of the Board, Regent Salas remarked on his dedication, ability to work effectively with people, including state and city officials and neighborhood groups, and outstanding service as chair of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.

The nomination was seconded by Regent Spector.

There being no further nominations, it was moved by Regent Crain and seconded by Regent Shields that nominations be closed.  The motion was approved on a unanimous voice vote.

Regent Pruitt then was elected Vice President of the Board on a unanimous voice vote.

Thanking the board, Regent Pruitt stated that he is honored to serve as Vice President and noted that he learned much from Regent Bradley while serving with him on the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee.  He also expressed appreciation to Regent President Walsh for his outstanding service as President of the Board and the great commitment of time and energy he had devoted to advancing the university over the past two years and improving its prospects for the future.

Secretary, Assistant Secretary, Trust Officer, and Assistant Trust Officers

Regent Spector nominated the following officers for re-election, and the nominations were seconded by Regent Pruitt:

Judith Temby, secretary

Cheryle Goplin, assistant secretary

Deborah Durcan, trust officer

Patricia Brady, assistant trust officer

Doug Hoerr, assistant trust officer

There were no further nominations, and nominations were closed on a unanimous voice vote.

The nominated officers then were re-elected on a unanimous voice vote.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Resolution of Appreciation to UW-Milwaukee

Regent Salas offered the following resolution of appreciation to UW-Milwaukee:

Resolution 9372:   “I want the UW-M chancellor, faculty and staff to know that we appreciate UW-M’s continuing effort to strengthen the economy and how they have energized academic and research programs in biomedical sciences, as well as in advanced manufacturing, and presented development of a design for a master plan that the Board will review at the next meeting. 

“We most appreciate the creative approach to meeting student housing needs in the River View residence hall, as well as the Kenilworth project, where the Peck School of the Arts is located and where they held the reception for us last night.

“We were thrilled with the delicious benefits of the fresh water perch and with having so deserving a setting for the Physical Planning and Funding Committee’s meeting.

“So be it resolved that we all say muchas gracias to Chancellor Santiago, Provost Cheng and to all UW-Milwaukee colleagues.”

The resolution was adopted by acclamation with a standing ovation of appreciation to UW-Milwaukee.

Closed Session

At 11:15 a.m., the following resolution, moved by Regent Bradley and seconded by Regent Spector, was adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Walsh, Thomas, Spector, Smith, Salas, Rosenzweig, Pruitt, McPike, Falbo, Davis, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Burmaster, Bradley and Bartell (15) voting in the affirmative.  There were no negative votes and no abstentions.

 Resolution 9373:   That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider annual personnel evaluations, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

The closed session concluded at 2:00 p.m., at which time the meeting was adjourned.  There were no actions to report.

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary