Board of Regents

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

UW-Oshkosh

Held in Reeve Memorial Union, Room 227

Thursday, April 12, 2007

10:00 a.m.

- President Walsh presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Falbo, Loftus, McPike, Pruitt, Semenas, Shields, Smith, Spector, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Rosenzweig, and Salas

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UW-OSHKOSH PRESENTATION:  COLLABORATION IN ACTION – BUILDING A REGIONAL MODEL

Chancellor Wells’ Welcome and Overview

President Reilly introduced Chancellor Wells, noting that he has been chancellor of UW-Oshkosh since October 2000, having come to Wisconsin from Indiana State University where he was provost and vice president of academic affairs.  His academic expertise is in the field of sociology.

Chancellor Wells was recently appointed to the NCAA Division III Presidents’ Council and serves as chair of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities’ Task Force on Campus Engagement.  He was the founding chairperson of the Northeast Wisconsin Educational Resource Alliance (NEW ERA) and a founding member of the board of directors of New North. 

At the UW System level, President Reilly continued, Chancellor Wells has taken an important and courageous leadership role in the Inclusivity Initiative, which seeks to create a positive atmosphere for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning people on campus.  At UW-Oshkosh, the chancellor has engaged the campus community in developing a shared vision for the future, called “Governing Ideas”, which is used to develop campus priorities and which has led to remarkable accomplishments.

Welcoming the board and other visitors, Chancellor Wells remarked that the New North, with UW-Oshkosh at its heart, is the second largest economic powerhouse in the state.  Referring to a chart showing the campus’ substantial financial impact, he indicated that in both jobs created and total economic contribution, UW-Oshkosh’s impact has increased more than 15% over the last three years, while the state contribution has decreased.  The university’s total economic impact now exceeds $500 million per year.  During the same time, tuition revenue increased from almost $29 million to $46 million, and full-time-equivalent enrollment grew by almost 500 students.  There also has been a significant increase in federal grant and contract revenue.

Overall, he pointed out, the university generated state tax revenue of $37.5 million, almost equaling its state funding of $39 million in economic impact alone.

Turning to educational quality, Chancellor Wells noted the following accomplishments:

  • Letters and Science graduates are coveted by the best graduate programs in the nation.
  • There has been a 100% pass rate for graduate students on the Family Nurse Practitioner Exam for eight years in a row.
  • MBA and senior business majors taking the ETS business knowledge assessment test rank in the top five percent nationwide.
  • Students taking the CPA exam placed UW-Oshkosh in the top 10 schools nationally.
  • 35 alumni have received the Herb Kohl Teacher of the Year Award since 1990.
  • In 2005-06, the university graduated 2,035 students, the largest graduating class in the university’s 135-year history.
  • UW-Oshkosh has won seven highly coveted and competitive Regents’ Teaching Excellence Awards, four by individual faculty members, and three by departments: English, Biology/Microbiology, and Chemistry

With regard to UW-Oshkosh’s role in Wisconsin’s Growth Agenda, Chancellor Wells said that the plan is to increase enrollment by 1,400 students in high-demand areas, such as biology/microbiology, chemistry, medical technology, psychology, nursing, math/science teacher education, and business.  To do this would require funding in the next three biennia to hire 24 faculty, as well as capital funding for facility upgrades, such as the new $48 million academic building.  Another part of the Growth Agenda is to enhance collaborations to better serve needs of Wisconsin Technical College and UW College graduates. 

The chancellor then referred to a slide showing alignment of UW-Oshkosh’s Governing Ideas with resources and initiatives.  In addition, the university is held accountable through the current accreditation review, which has involved a very open strategic planning process. 

In moving forward, Chancellor Wells pointed out, it is necessary to recognize two facts:  1) There is not an appropriate mix of faculty and academic staff; and 2) The university is significantly behind its peers in terms of compensation.                 

The chancellor then referred to several university-wide areas of distinctiveness:  Engagement, partnership, environmental sustainability, and regionally and globally aligned curricula.  Noting that each would be a subject of presentation during these meetings, he introduced Amanda Cone and Brandon Strand, president and vice president of the Oshkosh Student Association, and Jeremiah Slinde, speaker and past president of the Oshkosh Student Association, to speak about UW-Oshkosh’s Model United Nations Program.

Mr. Slinde explained that Model United Nations (MUN) provides an opportunity for students to take on the role of diplomats and to apply those skills in a competitive atmosphere.  The team participates in two competitions a year – a regional competition  in St. Louis and a national competition in New York. UW-Oshkosh has won 41 awards at the regional competition since 1988 and 23 awards at the national competition since 1985.  No other university in the world, he said, has achieved such a record.

The program’s long-term success is based on mastering the skills of public speaking, effectively researching an issue, negotiation, writing, and leadership.  These skills are practiced throughout the year through weekly meetings and two mock General Assemblies.  Team members also volunteer up to seven hours a day during the January interim to research their topics and produce position papers.  Students negotiate common positions based on their country’s needs.  As in the real UN, the goal is to achieve consensus.

Noting that the program benefits both the campus and the community, he indicated that members of the MUN have served as president of the Oshkosh Student Association five times in the past 12 years and as vice president four times in the last 14 years.  Currently both the president and vice president, as well as four of the five members of the Executive Board are members of the MUN.  Six alumni of the team have received the Outstanding Young Alumni award in the past six years, and many alumni of the program remain in touch with the team and continue to promote student involvement in it.  Alumni often credit participation in the program with their success in the professional world.

Mr. Strand added that emphasis in the MUN program is on teamwork.  He credited Professor Kenneth Grieb, Coordinator of International Studies and long-time advisor to the MUN, for the program’s consistent success.  Professor Grieb received a Carnegie Foundation Professor of the Year Award in 2005 and also has received a Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award.

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Introduction of State Representative Gordon Hintz

Chancellor Wells introduced Representative Gordon Hintz, of Oshkosh, who had recently been elected to the State Assembly.

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NEW ERA Panel – “Model University Center?”

Panelists for the presentation were:  H. Jeffrey Rafn, Chair of NEW ERA and President of Northeast Wisconsin Technical College; Jim Perry, vice-chair of NEW ERA and dean of UW-Fox Valley; and Bruce Shepard, chancellor of UW-Green Bay.

In opening remarks, President Rafn noted that Chancellor Wells founded NEW ERA six years ago and that the organization is a consortium of 13 public colleges and universities in the New North.  The heads of these institutions meet regularly to discuss best ways to serve the 1.2 million people of Northeast Wisconsin.  The consortium, he pointed out, is a national leader in collaboration for quality seamless education.  NEW ERA was a precursor to and founding member of the New North organization, which has educational attainment as one of its primary objectives.

NEW ERA’s plans for future initiatives include:

  • Expansion of joint degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.  In that regard, Dr. Rafn noted that, although northeast Wisconsin has the second highest concentration of manufacturing in the state, there was no engineering program until UW-Fox Valley took the lead in bringing engineering education to the area.
  • Expansion of training and research centers, and creation of a compendium of research capabilities of all participating institutions.
  • Creation of a virtual entrepreneur assistance center, a one-stop assistance center for faculty and business technology transfer.

Dean Perry then outlined some of NEW ERA’s accomplishments. 

  • A 1+1 agreement between UW-Fox Valley and Fox Valley Technical College that now is being duplicated elsewhere in the state.
  • A 1+3 agreement among UW-Green Bay, UW-Oshkosh and a number of technical colleges.
  • Collaboration between Northeast Wisconsin Technical College and the College of the Menominee Nation. 
  • Collaboration among the UW Colleges and UW-Oshkosh to offer an alternative teacher licensure program for adults who hold baccalaureate degrees in math and science.
  • Development of an Applied Baccalaureate Degree between UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh and the technical colleges.
  • Continuing work on provision of credit for prior learning for adults wishing to complete bachelor’s degrees.
  • Meetings between the UW Colleges and Technical College faculty in an effort to enhance smooth student transfer.
  • Annual legislative breakfasts to inform lawmakers about collaborations.

The goal, Dean Perry said in conclusion, is to provide more opportunities for baccalaureate degrees in a cost-effective manner and to increase collaborative degrees, research, and adult student access.

Chancellor Shepard remarked that a university center model is an appropriate way to meet the educational needs of the area, and that NEW ERA is Wisconsin’s first university center.  In the Waukesha Study, he noted, university centers are defined as having the following characteristics, all of which are met by NEW ERA.

  • Collaboration among several institutions.  The chancellor noted that NEW ERA has a 13-institution collaboration, including technical colleges and the College of the Menominee Nation. 
  • Programs are located on all campuses
  • Flexible programming.  In that regard, he indicated that the Bachelor of Applied Science Degree, made possible by the NEW ERA model, is a revolutionary concept and also is cost effective, requiring no new money.  It is targeted toward expanding the number of baccalaureate degree holders by offering opportunity to the large number of associate degree holders.
  • CEO Driven.  Heads of NEW ERA institutions talk to each other at each meeting, with the understanding that service to the region is critical to the state’s future success.  By doing so, they were able to turn competition into a regional partnership, serving the agenda of the New North.
  • Span the region.  NEW ERA will span the region through a virtual university center and can act quickly and nimbly to deliver programs.

Turning to the matter of challenges facing NEW ERA, President Rafn indicated first that there is need for financial support for the programs that have been developed.  Noting that the consortium’s success has been the result of personal commitment by the current CEO’s of member colleges and universities, he indicated that there is a need to institutionalize that level of commitment going forward, possibly through a small financial investment to hire a staff person to continue advancing the NEW ERA agenda.

A second challenge will be ensuring that there is space at UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh for the increasing number of students who will be seeking enrollment through the 1+3 program and other efforts to enhance baccalaureate degree attainment.

As a third challenge, Dr. Rafn cited the freedom to innovate.  In that regard, he suggested using NEW ERA as a pilot program to find new ways to collaborate, with the goal of providing the best higher education to students in the area.

Regent Smith inquired about financial assistance from the private sector. Replying that NEW ERA has support from the business community, President Rafn indicated that, while the New North also is supportive, that organization is not yet mature enough to provide financial assistance.

Regent Bradley asked if President Rafn meant educational capacity, rather than physical space, when he spoke about educating more students; and President Rafn replied in the affirmative.

Noting that there have been enhanced collaborations between the UW System and the Wisconsin Technical College System, Regent Smith asked about President Rafn’s concerns in that regard.

In response, President Rafn commented that focus on adhering to missions seems at times to inhibit innovation.  Indicating that the goal of NEW ERA is to strengthen all institutions to serve people better, he said that mechanisms like faculty dialog groups and enrollment management discussions have been instituted to serve that purpose.  He added that there have been difficulties in efforts to obtain an engineering degree from UW-Stout due to lack of funding.

Regent Crain expressed appreciation for the clarity and candor of the presentation.

Regent Cuene thanked NEW ERA for its investment of time and effort to collaborate without any new resources.  She commented that it is a perfect example of the benefits of sharing to serve everyone better.

Chancellor Wells introduced Dan Blankenship, dean of UW-Fond du Lac.

The discussion concluded and the meeting was adjourned at 11:10 a.m.

                                                                                    Submitted by:

                                                                                    Judith A. Temby, Secretary


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

UW-Oshkosh

Held in Reeve Memorial Union, Room 227

Friday, April 13, 2007

9:00 a.m.

- President Walsh presiding -

Approval of the Minutes of the March 8 and 9, 2007 Meetings. 4

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD.. 4

Legislative Meetings. 4

Report on the March 27 and 28, 2007 Meetings of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board   5

Report on the April 11, 2007 Meeting of the Hospital Authority Board.. 5

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM... 5

UW-Oshkosh Presentation: The New North – North of What You’d Expect.. 5

Achieving Excellence: UW System 2006-07 Accountability Report.. 9

Meetings with Legislators. 14

UW System Alliance. 14

More Support for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin.. 15

UW-Eau Claire University Senate. 15

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 15

Superior Daily Telegram.. 15

St. Croix Institute for Sustainable Community Development.. 15

Award to Synergy Initiative for West Central Wisconsin.. 16

In Memory of Maurice Graff. 16

Student Loan Industry Issue. 16

Posters in the Rotunda and Spirit Day.. 17

Chancellor Saunders to become President of the University of Southern Mississippi 17

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE. 17

Program Authorizations. 18

B.S. in Biochemistry, UW-Stevens Point 18

B.A. in First Nation Studies, UW-Green Bay. 18

Bachelor of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies, UW-Oshkosh. 18

Presentation on UW-Oshkosh’s Role in Northeast Wisconsin’s Growth Agenda: Aligning Academic Program Menu and Current and Future Regional Needs. 19

Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate. 19

Minority and Disadvantaged Student Annual Report.. 20

Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. 20

Update on Inclusion of Socio-Economic Factors in Admissions Process. 20

Report on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment 20

Progress on Education Committee Goals. 21

Retention of Veterans. 21

Consent Agenda.. 21

UW-Stevens Point: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Biochemistry. 21

UW-Green Bay: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A. in First Nations Studies. 21

UW-Oshkosh: Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies  22

Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate. 22

Minority and Disadvantaged Student Annual Report 22

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE. 22

UW-Oshkosh Presentation: Enhancing Existing and Building New Facilities. 23

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct Two Utility Structures for the East Campus Utility Project   23

UW-Milwaukee: Authority to: (a) Sell a Parcel of Land to the Milwaukee Jewish Federation; (b) Petition the City of Milwaukee to Vacate a Public Alley; (c) Enter into a Land Use Agreement to Allow Construction of a Parking Area and Accept It as a Gift-In-Kind; (d) File a Certified Survey Map; and (e) Convey a Right-of-Way to the City of Milwaukee. 23

UW-Platteville: Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land for Parking Purposes. 23

UW-River Falls: Authority to Accept a Gift-in-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Mann Valley Farm    24

UW System: Authority to Construct All-Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects. 24

Consent Agenda.. 24

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct Two Utility Structures for the East Campus Utility project 24

UW-Milwaukee: Authority to: (a) Sell a Parcel of Land to the Milwaukee Jewish Federation; (b) Petition the City of Milwaukee to Vacate a Public Alley; (c) Enter Into a Land Use Agreement to Allow Construction of a Parking Area and Accept It as a Gift-In-Kind; (d) File a Certified Survey Map; and (e) Convey a Right-Of-Way to the City of Milwaukee. 24

UW-Platteville: Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land for Parking Purposes. 25

UW-River Falls: Authority to Accept a Gift-In-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Mann Valley Farm.. 25

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects. 25

UW-Madison: Authority to Accept a Gift-in-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Kegonsa Research Campus  26

UW-Madison: Authority to Accept a Gift-In-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Kegonsa Research Campus. 26

Report of the Assistant Vice President.. 26

Building Commission Actions. 26

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE. 27

UW-Oshkosh Presentation: UW-Oshkosh’s Role in Northeast Wisconsin’s Growth Agenda: Diversifying Our Revenue Sources. 27

Evaluation of Targeted Tuiton Programs and Extension of Return to Wisconsin Program    27

Review and Approval of Selected Differential Tuition Programs. 27

UW-Oshkosh: Reaffirmation and Extension of Campus-Wide Differential Tuition. 28

UW-River Falls: Campus-Wide Differential Tuition Proposal 28

UW-Madison: School of Business Differential Tuition. 28

Consideration of Salary Adjustments for Senior Academic Leaders to Address Recruitment and Retention Challenges for Chancellors at UW-Eau Claire and UW-Colleges/UW-Extension and a Provost at UW-Whitewater.. 29

Trust Funds. 29

Annual Endowment Peer Benchmarking Report 29

Voting of 2007 Non-Routing Proxy Proposals. 29

Acceptance of Bequests over $50,000. 30

Committee Business. 30

UW-Madison Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Contract with Learfield Communications. 30

University of Wisconsin System Public Records Management Policy. 30

New Format for Regent Policy Documents. 31

Report of the Vice President.. 31

Legislative Audit Bureau Update. 31

Utility Projections. 31

Consent Agenda.. 31

Extension of the Return to Wisconsin Tuition Program.. 32

Consideration of Salary Adjustments for Senior Academic Leaders to Address Recruitment and Retention Challenges for Chancellors at UW-Eau Claire and UW Colleges/UW-Extension and the Provost at UW-Whitewater 32

Voting of 2007 Non-Routine Proxy Proposals. 33

UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of Bequests. 34

UW-Madison Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Contract with Learfield Communications. 34

University of Wisconsin System Public Records Management Policy. 34

University of Wisconsin System New Format for the Regent Policy Documents. 35

UW-Oshkosh: Reaffirmation and Extension of Campus-wide Differential Tuition. 38

UW-River Falls: Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 39

UW-Madison: School of Business Undergraduate Differential Tuition. 39

ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS.. 39

UW-Oshkosh: Resolution of Appreciation. 39

Closed Session.. 41

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Baraboo/Sauk County, University of Wisconsin Colleges. 41

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Sheboygan, University of Wisconsin Colleges. 41

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Marathon County, University of Wisconsin Colleges. 42

UW-Madison: Amendments to Coach’s employment agreement 42

UW-Whitewater: Authorization to Appoint Interim Chancellor 42


MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

UW-Oshkosh

Held in Reeve Memorial Union, Room 227

April 13, 2007

9:00 a.m.

- President Walsh presiding -

PRESENT: Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Falbo, McPike, Pruitt, Rosenzweig, Semenas, Shields, Smith, Spector, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents Connolly-Keesler, Loftus, and Salas

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Approval of the Minutes of the March 8 and 9, 2007 Meetings

Upon motion by Regent Bartell, seconded by Regent Cuene, the minutes of the March 8 and 9, 2007 minutes were approved as distributed.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Legislative Meetings

Regent President Walsh reported that a number of regents and system officers recently visited with legislative leaders.  He and President Reilly had a constructive meeting with Representative Scott Suder who has been an outspoken critic of the university. Representative Suder noted that only ten percent of the people in his district are college educated and expressed the view that the state does not have enough money available to spend more on higher education.

Presidents Walsh and Reilly also met with Senator Jim Sullivan, who is a supporter of the university.  He asked for information, which is being provided to him.

There also had been a meeting with the Joint Committee on Finance regarding the UW’s budget.  Regent President Walsh commented that this was the best meeting of the committee that he has attended and that the constructive discussion was very much appreciated. 

In conclusion, he remarked that the UW is on its way to a better budget because of these and other productive conversations.

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Report on the March 27 and 28, 2007 Meetings of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

A written report on these meetings was provided. 

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Report on the April 11, 2007 Meeting of the Hospital Authority Board

A written report on this meeting was provided.

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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

UW-Oshkosh Presentation: The New North – North of What You’d Expect

Noting that collaboration and action to build a regional model is the theme for this meeting, Chancellor Wells introduced panelists for a presentation on the New North:  Jerry Murphy, executive director, New North; Kathi Seifert, chair, Pinnacle Perspectives; Bob DeKoch, president and COO, Boldt Company; and Larry Weyers, chairman and CEO, WPS Resources Corporation.

Referring to a chart showing the organization of the New North, Mr. Murphy said that the mission is to “harness and promote the region’s resources, talents and creativity for the purpose of sustaining and growing our regional economy.  This will be accomplished with broad-based collaboration, effective regional and external marketing and a focus on new capital investment and quality jobs.” 

The New North is composed of 18 counties, stretching from Fond du Lac and Sheboygan on the south to Marinette on the north.  Partners in the New North include NEW ERA, the Northeast Wisconsin Regional Economic Partnership, workforce development organizations, chambers of commerce, investors, area CESAs, tribal governments, local governments, state government, and the Bay Lake and East Central planning commissions. NEW ERA, he said, is a critical component in creating economic development.  Investors in the New North include the most prominent Northeast Wisconsin businesses.

As to UW contributions, Mr. Murphy indicated that the UW-Oshkosh Geography Department is important in providing information on developing the resources of Northeast Wisconsin and that the MBA program is helping to look at markets. 

The New North began as an organization in 2004 as a collaboration to pull together all the pieces needed to advance economic growth.  A Northeast Wisconsin opportunity study was done to provide baseline data on opportunities and challenges, and a branding effort was undertaken to invent the New North. 

The opportunity study generated 98 action items, which were folded into six initiatives. Task forces, organized around these initiatives, are moving forward on work programs in a fast-paced manner.  The six initiatives are composed of 50% talent, 30% business development, and 20% marketing. 

Strategies with respect to talent include attracting, retaining, and developing talent; diversity; and educational advancement, from the K-12 curriculum on up.  Included in the educational advancement strategy is the N.E.W. Manufacturing Alliance, composed of companies working to position manufacturing as an attractive career for students.  Educational advancement accomplishments include one plus three and one plus one transfer agreements among area institutions, a Business Management Associate and Baccalaureate Degree between technical colleges and Lakeland College, the UW-Oshkosh and Fox Valley Technical College Baccalaureate Degree in Fire and Emergency Response Management, the Alternative Teacher Licensure Program, a common library card, and the Global MBA.

Educational advancement initiatives for 2007 include eliminating the achievement gap at the PK-grade 3 level; financial post-secondary access available to all; and rural and urban access to high quality education.  More specific objectives include the Applied Baccalaureate Degree for technical college Applied Associate of Science Degree holders at UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh; a Manufacturing Engineering Degree offered at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College by UW-Stout in partnership with UW-Green Bay; offering customized courses and engineering internships through UW-Oshkosh; and exploring the potential of a collaborative relationship with the UW-Madison College of Engineering.

Two strategies for business development involve wind energy and include attracting and retaining cluster development and supporting small business and entrepreneurship through underwriting, technical and innovation support. 

The branding strategy involves identifying the New North as a brand within and outside of the region.  The 18 counties are all part of a region because of six “C’s”: Commerce; commuting; consumption of retail, entertainment, education, etc; common culture/history; common address; and collaborations.

Pointing out that the New North has a workforce of 675,000 people, Mr. Murphy noted that this number is more attractive as a recruitment tool for potential employers than the workforce of any one county. 

In conclusion, Mr. Murphy showed a series of maps illustrating the purpose of the New North to connect the dots – to amplify existing networks and create new ones for the umbrella purpose of economic development, with a disciplined focus around six initiatives.

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Spector asked if the New North has had any contact with the Milwaukee 7 group, which might benefit from the New North’s experiences. 

Replying in the affirmative, Mr. DeKoch said that there has been communication with the Milwaukee area group as well as with one in Southwest Wisconsin.  Referring to the Governor’s interest in regionalization, he noted that the asset base is larger when combined into a region.  The model would be four or five regions collaborating to bring business into the state and to determine where businesses might best be located.  This, he remarked, is the way for the state to become competitive in attracting companies.

Regent Burmaster commended the panelists for the organization’s outstanding work on regional economic development and for recognizing that needs begin in early childhood.  From the PK-16 perspective, she was impressed by the focus on 21st century workforce needs and on a global perspective.

Ms. Seifert said that the New North is learning from other organizations around the country and is engaged in benchmarking. 

Regent Pruitt asked how the Growth Agenda initiatives of UW-Oshkosh and UW-Green Bay fit with the New North’s mission. 

In reply, Mr. Murphy said that the Growth Agenda is a perfect match for the New North’s focus on development potential and that investment in these initiatives is essential.

Mr. Weyers pointed out that a workforce shortage can be foreseen as early as 2010 as baby boomers retire.  It is important to have enough Technical College and UW graduates to make the area an attractive place for businesses to locate. 

Mr. DeKoch added that initiatives of NEW ERA and the New North are aligned and link the needs of business and education. 

Regent Davis inquired about challenges the group had faced and how they overcame them. 

Mr. DeKoch recalled that, in the beginning, the economic opportunity study showed much about what needed to be done; but, at the time, a mechanism was lacking for knitting together the pieces that were needed to move forward.  At a breakfast meeting four years ago, the need was recognized; and he and Ms. Seifert agreed to lead the effort.

Ms. Seifert added that another challenge was to get 18 counties and competing businesses to work together and play team ball.  The movement now has momentum, and people want to be involved.  Noting the importance of having business leaders at the table who are able to provide funding, she credited both Bolt and WPS as being generous in providing needed resources.

Commending the New North for its exciting energy, Regent Crain asked the panelists to address the matter of increasing diversity.

Indicating that the New North has a diversity committee, Ms. Seifert said that the vision is for Northeast Wisconsin to be welcoming and helpful to all in achieving success.  New North representatives speak with organizations about embracing diversity and a diversity award is being created.  The New North also acts as an advocate for minority-owned businesses in order to foster success for growing diversity in the region.

In response to a question by Regent Bradley about promoting college attendance among area students, Mr. Murphy said that post-secondary degree attainment in the region is 18%, a rate that must be increased in order to provide a technology knowledgeable workforce.  While postsecondary education was not needed in the manufacturing marketplace of past years, this has changed; and education now is a critical component of future economic success.

Mr. Weyers added that, in order to attract companies to the region, they need to know that the workforce they require is in place.  Mr. DeKoch indicated that it also is necessary to create an environment that caters to highly educated professionals in order to attract and retain them in the region.

President Reilly remarked that the New North could be a powerful force in convincing people of the importance of postsecondary education.

Mr. Murphy agreed, noting that companies may not have communicated their workforce needs effectively.  The New North can attach the educational path to the marketplace, beginning early in students’ lives.  This, he pointed out, is something that has not been done in the past. 

Ms. Seifert added that businesses have told them that eighth grade is a good time to start talking about careers.  Noting that the New North has a good relationship with area media, she said that media attention is needed in order to bring this story to public attention.

Regent Semenas inquired about reaching out to small businesses and re-educating the workforce.

In response, Mr. DeKoch noted that entrepreneurs have long been the engine of growth in the region. Many large companies in the area grew from small family enterprises and investment of family money.  Small business development, he said, is one of the objectives of the New North, which is working with an alliance of 50 small manufacturing companies.

Ms. Seifert added that, in order to find jobs in these kinds of companies, people need university and technical college education.  Workforce development organizations have resources for re-educating people for today’s employment and have a job-fit process. 

Mr. Weyers agreed that entrepreneurship is important to the New North.  He pointed out that UW-Oshkosh has a Council for Innovation and that there is a business incubator in Green Bay, as well as a venture capital group to provide funding.

Remarking that the New North is an inspiring story, Regent Rosenzweig observed that the connection of the Growth Agenda to the needs of the region will be determined by the Legislature and the public.  She asked if there is a public relations effort underway to make them aware of the importance of this effort.

Mr. Murphy indicated that the message connecting the Growth Agenda to economic development is something that people will understand and support.  “We have to connect the dots and keep it simple.”

Mr. DeKoch observed that it is important to be able to articulate what one can offer to please a customer, so that when a company decides to expand, this area has more to offer than another.  He gave as an example a company in Neenah that was being courted by Michigan.  The New North was able to help the CEO get what he needed to keep the company here, saving 400-600 jobs.  Also, Proctor and Gamble is expanding in Green Bay because of collaboration among the state, local government, and the New North.

Thanking the panel for its solution-oriented presentation, Regent President Walsh said that he took the message the regents heard in Green Bay to the Legislature and Governor, and it made a positive difference.  The New North, he said, is another inspiring story of great companies linking together with higher education.

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Achieving Excellence: UW System 2006-07 Accountability Report

Noting that this is the 13th annual accountability report, President Reilly recalled that the report was initiated in 1995, at which time the UW System was the first in the nation to adopt a system-wide accountability report.  Today, the report still serves as a national model and as an effective means of reporting back to the many people who have a stake in the university.  Institutional accountability reports provide a sense of the different missions and goals of UW institutions.  Measures include service to nontraditional and transfer students, preparation of students for professional careers, outreach to Wisconsin citizens, and opportunities for undergraduate research, service learning, and study across disciplines.

As next steps, President Reilly said, the report would be shared with provosts, admissions officers, public information officers, institutional researchers and others so that all can reach an understanding of the progress that has been made.  He also would continue to use the institutional reports in performance evaluations of chancellors. 

Externally, the report will be shared with colleagues in the K-12 and Wisconsin Technical College systems, with every state senator and representative, with the Governor, with federal representatives in Washington, and will be made available to the public at wisconsin.edu.

To present this year’s findings, he called on Sharon Wilhelm, interim associate vice president of policy analysis and research. 

In opening remarks, Ms. Wilhelm noted that the report is designed to provide a broad array of information on progress towards achieving excellence, but is not intended to include every area of activity. 

Progress toward six goals is measured: 

  • Ensure widespread access to the UW,
  • Increase student persistence and degree completion,
  • Improve learning competencies,
  • Prepare students for a dynamic world community,
  • Provide opportunities and student services that enhance the learning environment, and
  • Exercise efficient and effective stewardship of resources.

Where possible, UW performance is compared to national benchmarks.  In other cases it is compared to targets that have been developed.

The six accountability goals have 20 associated indicators.  The report shows that the UW System met or exceeded 11 of the 20 measures.  There was mixed success on six other measures, and three targets have yet to be achieved.

Changes from past reports include addition of access for students from lower-income families, in response to regent discussion of last year’s report; addition of access, retention and graduation rates for men and women, in response to the May 2006 report of the Status of Women Working Group; and modification of the goal for study abroad to emphasize continual increases, rather than a specific numerical target of 25%.

Ms. Wilhelm then listed the following challenges identified in the report:

  • Diversity-related goals have not yet been achieved.  A gap persists between the rate at which high school graduates of color enroll in the UW System, compared to white students; a gap persists between retention and graduation rates of students of color and white students; and enrollments in pre-college programs declined slightly from last year.
  • The numbers of students studying abroad continued to increase, but UW seniors reported fewer experiences of other kinds, such as interactions with students from different religious, political, or racial and ethnic backgrounds, that would prepare them for a diverse world, compared with seniors nationally.
  • Seniors continued to rank the UW lower than seniors nationally on the quality of academic advising.

Accomplishments identified in the report included the following:

  • The UW System continues to provide access for 33% of Wisconsin high school graduates.
  • The six-year graduation rate increased to 64.2%, exceeding the long-term goal of 64%.  While the system-wide target for retaining students to the second year was not reached, it remains above the national average.
  • The average number of credits attempted for a bachelor’s degree decreased to 134, down from 145 in 1993-94.
  • Seniors continue to give the UW System high marks of fostering critical thinking, planned learning experiences outside the classroom, faculty mentoring, and activities that promote good citizenship.

In conclusion, Ms. Wilhelm pointed out that budget and enrollment pressures have forced UW institutions to make some difficult compromises.  For instance, although the number of adult students being served increased slightly from the preceding year, it still was lower than the number served 10 years ago, while access has been preserved for students right out of high school.

President Reilly thanked Ms. Wilhelm and her colleagues for their thorough, professional work that makes this report a national model.

Noting that the goals not yet being achieved were primarily related to diverse experiences, he indicated that, while the report shows incremental progress, diversity, academic success, and inclusion for all students, faculty and staff has not yet been attained.

The knowledge gained from previous accountability report was used in deciding to launch the Equity Scorecard pilot projects as a means of finding out why the goals have not been reached and what specific steps can be taken to solve the problems that are found.  While six UW institutions are participating in the pilot project at this time, he noted that other campuses have conducted similar studies and taken action accordingly. 

He called on UW-Green Bay Provost Sue Hammersmith and UW-Madison Provost Patrick Farrell to discuss the work being done at those institutions.

UW-Green Bay Provost Sue Hammersmith reported that her university has been working on reducing gaps for students of color and was influenced by the Equity Scorecard. 

Knowing that there was not equal access for students of color, a decision was made to institutionalize the Phuture Phoenix program, which has involved 4,600 students to date, by integrating it into the teacher education program.  All students in that program serve as tutors and mentors to Phuture Phoenix participants.  These young students make a visit to campus in fifth grade and are followed after that.  Included are meetings with parents and school personnel in order to develop a pipeline.  The original group of Phuture Phoenix are now in 10th grade and have scholarships awaiting them.

It was found that many students of color were lost in the step of completing their application.  Therefore, the university hired students to make personal phone calls to follow up with those students.  As a result, the number of applications from students of color is up by 67%.

Another finding was that many students of color were not performing equitably in the 16 general education courses taken by almost all students.  The university used a grant program to redesign those courses to incorporate more active learning, which students of color perform more successfully.  This is expected to improve their retention and graduation rates. 

Finally, UW-Green Bay has enhanced faculty and staff diversity to the point that there is no gap between faculty/staff and student diversity.

UW-Madison Provost Patrick Farrell reported that his university has programs in place that parallel the Equity Scorecard.  Noting that these programs are improving graduation rates for students of color, he said that 10 years ago there was a 20% gap and that gap is expected to be cut in half for the 2000 and 2001 cohorts. 

Fourteen percent of last fall’s entering class were students of color, and the percentage is expected to be higher for fall 2007.  Noting that admission to UW-Madison is competitive, he said that students are not admitted if they could not be successful.  The university’s responsibility is to give them the tools they need to succeed, and many faculty and staff work very hard to make that happen. 

President Reilly indicated that, in the coming months, the board would hear an update on Plan 2008, a system-wide set of goals and initiatives to improve diversity across UW campuses.  This report will include specific steps that have been taken over the past several years, the outcomes of those steps, and some major advances that have been made.  It will provide regents with an opportunity to consider questions about diversity goals and to think about goals for the future. 

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Davis said that she appreciated the approach of acknowledging what is wrong in attainment of diversity and the work that is being done through the equity scorecard and other efforts.  Stating that it is necessary to make progress in closing gaps in achievement, she was optimistic about the ability of volunteers in the equity scorecard to make progress; and she commended them for their ongoing work.

In response to a question by Regent Davis, Ms. Wilhelm explained that, while the number of students of color on UW campuses is increasing, the number of high school graduates who are students of color is increasing more rapidly, resulting in a lower service rate. 

Commending the inclusion of gender information in the report, Regent Crain suggested that it would be helpful to see information on students of color by gender as well.  She also suggested that a key be included to show the meaning of different marks that indicate whether or not goals were achieved.

Regent Bartell remarked that he was very impressed with the Phuture Phoenix program at UW-Green Bay as a means of developing in those students mindsets that include going to college.  Noting that serving more students of color is a critical aspect of the Growth Agenda, he was disappointed in the decline in pre-college programs and asked what more could be done to reach children at the right time.

Provost Rita Cheng indicated that UW-Milwaukee has the largest pre-college program, with 11,000 students per year.  The decline resulted from eligibility changes in federal criteria.  The university was using its own resources instead.

Associate Vice President Vicki Washington added that, because of the change in criteria, campuses are strapped for resources and could not maintain their programs at higher levels.

Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich said that one of UW-Eau Claire’s premier programs, the Wisconsin National Youth Sports Program, had no more funding.  Instead, some institutional funds have been used.

UW-Oshkosh Chancellor Rick Wells suggested finding ways to replicate Phuture Phoenix and other successful programs.

Chancellor Shepard pointed out that an important strength of a university system is that institutions can learn from each other.  Instead of recruiting students who already plan to attend college, the Phoenix program reaches down into the 5th grade to help students see college in their future.

President Reilly added that the national Know How 2 Go campaign also is aimed at elementary school students.

Regent Bradley noted that, while goals for teaching have been reached, the UW falls short in the area of advising.  He asked if there was a correlation of that result with budget cuts.

Ms. Wilhelm indicated that an advising task force is looking into how improvements can be made.

Provost Cheng observed that the question in the survey does not identify the kind of advising experience involved.  UW-Milwaukee is doing a survey to obtain more specific information.  Noting that advisors were considered administrators for the purpose of budget cuts, she said that the university has not been able to keep the number of advisors at an optimal level.

Regent Bradley noted that the Law School Admission Test was not included among those measured for learning outcomes, and Ms. Wilhelm replied that it would be considered for addition to future reports.

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Meetings with Legislators

President Reilly reported that he has been meeting with key legislators, including legislative leadership, members of the Senate and Assembly higher education committees, and the Joint Committee on Finance.  Regent President Walsh and Vice President Bradley have been active in visiting with legislators as well, as have many chancellors.

In March, he and Regent President Walsh met with Representative Scott Suder and Senator Jim Sullivan; he met individually with Representatives Robin Vos, Steve Kestell, Joan Ballweg, Mark Pocan, and Dan Meyer, as well as Senators Dave Hansen and Lena Taylor; and Regent Bradley met with Senators Jeff Plale and Julie Lassa.

In the coming week, he and Regent Vice President Bradley planned to meet with Representative Kitty Rhoades, co-chair of the Joint Committee on Finance; Representative Jeff Stone and Senator Alberta Darling, members of the Joint Committee on Finance; and Senator Kathleen Vineout, chair of the Senate Agriculture and Higher Education Committee.

These visits, President Reilly, remarked, provide the opportunity to follow up on March 22nd testimony before the Joint Committee on Finance.  At that time, he discussed the importance of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin, while Regent President Walsh outlined the university’s actions to ensure accountability and efficiency.  Subsequently, additional information was provided pursuant to requests by several committee members.  For example, he and Regent President Walsh provided Representative Suder with examples of instances in which the UW has lost faculty to other institutions, largely because of inability to offer competitive compensation. By the end of April, meetings will have been scheduled with every member of the Joint Committee on Finance and all members of legislative leadership.

President Reilly reported that he would testify the next week before the Joint Audit Committee as a follow-up to the review of state economic development programs.  At that time, he would provide information about the UW’s role in helping to develop a “one-stop shopping” website for statewide economic development programs.

That same day, the UW System’s Posters in the Rotunda event would take place at the Capitol, and the Joint Committee on Finance would hold a public hearing on the 2007-09 capital budget. 

President Reilly also was scheduled to present information about the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin to the Senate Agriculture and Higher Education Committee.  He expressed gratitude to Senator Vineout, chair of the committee, for granting his request to appear and noted that other members include Senators Lassa, Plale, Kapanke, and Harsdorf, all of whom have endorsed the Growth Agenda.

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UW System Alliance

President Reilly reported that students are sharing information with legislators and others through a new organization, called the UW System Alliance.  The group was formed by student governments from six campuses – UW-Green Bay, Platteville, River Falls, Stout, Superior, and Whitewater – which are no longer members of the United Council of UW Students.

Meeting with elected heads of student governments from UW-Green Bay and UW-Platteville, representing the Alliance, he informed them that he and the regents are interested in hearing from students at every campus and would be pleased to work with both the Alliance and United Council.

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More Support for the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

UW-Eau Claire University Senate

President Reilly reported that he had received a letter from the UW-Eau Claire University Senate in support of the Growth Agenda.  The senate, which includes both faculty and academic staff, endorsed the full agenda and particularly noted plans to fund the NanoSTEM initiative of UW-Eau Claire and UW-Stout, working with Chippewa Valley Technical College, as well as programs to expand teacher and nursing education.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

President Reilly and Chancellor Santiago met with the editorial board of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and spoke about the Growth Agenda, particularly about UW-Milwaukee’s plans to expand its research enterprise.  The following week, the newspaper published an editorial praising those plans for their potential to grow the number of advanced degrees in Wisconsin and to spur regional economic development.  The editorial encouraged the Legislature to find ways to fund these important initiatives.

Superior Daily Telegram

President Reilly reported that he and Chancellor Erlenbach met with news media during a recent trip to Superior.   The visit resulted in news articles and a supportive editorial from the Superior Daily Telegram.  The editorial said that lawmakers should support UW initiatives that will “propel Wisconsin to be the best it can be.  Better educated residents will earn more money, attract more jobs to the state and create a business climate that more than offsets taxpayer costs.” 

The President thanked Chancellor Erlenbach for inviting him to Superior and arranging meetings with the colleagues and students on campus, with the Chamber of Commerce, and with the Sunrise Rotary Club.

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St. Croix Institute for Sustainable Community Development

President Reilly reported that UW-River Falls has launched the St. Croix Institute for Sustainable Development that will address a range of issues related to economic and social sustainability on both local and global scales.

The institute will be a central contact for local government and non-profit organizations in Pierce, Polk and St. Croix counties that are managing rapid growth from the Twin Cities.  It also will involve students and faculty in service-learning projects to help communities identify problems and implement solutions.  In addition, the institute will guide the university in its efforts to use alternative energy sources and become an energy-neutral campus.

Chancellor Betz says that the campus launched the institute to be a partner in finding sustainability solutions and to serve as a model for other regions in Wisconsin and nationally. 

President Reilly congratulated UW-River Falls for this forward-looking approach.

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Award to Synergy Initiative for West Central Wisconsin

President Reilly congratulated UW-Eau Claire, River Falls, Stout, and Barron County – partners in the Synergy Initiative for West Central Wisconsin, which won an award for Excellence in Community Service from the Learning Resources Network, an international association in lifelong learning.  The initiative brings together representatives of business, education and government for collaborations that promote sustainable economic growth.

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In Memory of Maurice Graff

President Reilly noted that Maurice Graff, a long-time faculty member and leader at UW-La Crosse passed away recently at the age of 99.  A professor of economics and political science, Dr. Graff joined the university in 1941 and retired in 1972.  During his long career, he served as student personnel director, admissions director, summer session director, dean, and academic affairs vice president.  He called UW-La Crosse a “very special campus”. 

For 30 years, the campus has honored Dr. Graff through the Maurice O. Graff Distinguished Alumni Award.  In addition, Graff Main Hall, the oldest building on campus, is named in his honor.

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Student Loan Industry Issue

President Reilly noted that the New York State Attorney General’s Office is conducting an investigation of potential conflicts of interest and conduct in the student loan industry.  The issue has been discussed in the national media and has brought to attention lack of consistent policy in this area.

At President Reilly’s direction, financial aid officers, auditors, and legal counsel are participating in an internal review and inventory of relationships with the student loan industry.  If a need is found for system-wide policy, one will be developed promptly; and, in that regard, the New York college loan code of conduct has been provided as a model.

Stating that the purpose is to serve the best interests of students, he said that students are challenged in finding ways to pay for college and the effort is to do everything possible to assist students in that regard in ways that are completely transparent and above-board.  He indicated that the matter will be returned to the board at the May meeting. 

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Posters in the Rotunda and Spirit Day

President Reilly reported that the UW System’s annual Posters in the Rotunda and Spirit Day events are to be held the following Wednesday. More than 100 students from almost every UW campus will showcase the value of undergraduate research with poster presentations in the State Capitol.  It also is an opportunity for legislators to meet students from their districts and to learn more about the importance of supporting undergraduate research and the university in general. 

Lieutenant Governor Barbara Lawton is scheduled to speak, along with Regent President Walsh and President Reilly.  Also speaking is Lori Scardino, a nontraditional student at UW-Eau Claire and an outstanding undergraduate researcher who earned a place on this year’s USA TODAY College Academic First Team.

Featured at an end-of-day reception is a jazz performance from UW-Eau Claire musicians.  UW-Madison Head Football Coach Bret Bielema is to be a special guest.

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Chancellor Saunders to become President of the University of Southern Mississippi

President Reilly offered an advance farewell to Chancellor Martha Saunders, who is to leave UW-Whitewater in May to become president of the University of Southern Mississippi, her alma mater.  This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Chancellor Saunders, he remarked, noting that Wisconsin’s loss definitely is Mississippi’s gain.

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REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Regent Davis, chair, presented the committee’s report.

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Program Authorizations

B.S. in Biochemistry, UW-Stevens Point

Provost Virginia Helm introduced a team from UW-Stevens Point who described the program for the committee.  It was noted that Wisconsin is among the nation’s top five regions for biotechnology growth and that research hospitals as well as biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies are in need of trained biochemists.  It is anticipated that the program will attract 90-100 biochemistry majors.  No new faculty or facilities will be required since the program will be jointly administered by the existing departments of Biology and Chemistry.

The committee was persuaded that this degree will help to meet a significant need and approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

B.A. in First Nation Studies, UW-Green Bay

Provost Sue Hammersmith introduced Lisa Poupart, the chairperson of First Nation Studies at UW-Green Bay, who advised the committee that the program will assist the state in meeting Act 31 requirements, which provide that K-12 education shall include study of Wisconsin’s first inhabitants. 

The curriculum includes a 12-credit concentration in elder knowledge epistemology or the Oneida language.  The program will be delivered in collaboration with UW-Fond du Lac and the College of the Menominee Nation.  Discussion followed regarding potential of the major to attract more American Indian students to the university and the options available to graduates of the program.

The committee approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Bachelor of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies, UW-Oshkosh

Associate Vice President Ron Singer provided background on the kind of program represented by this request, pointing out that the Growth Agenda is designed to increase the number of baccalaureate degree holders in Wisconsin.  To address this need, the Committee on Baccalaureate Expansion’s (COBE) report called for development of degree completion programs targeted to working adult students who hold an associate degree.  COBE funds, provided in the 2005-07 budget, funded development of Bachelor of Applied Studies degree programs proposed collaboratively by UW-Oshkosh and UW-Green Bay.  The Green Bay proposal is expected in May.

Provost Lane Earns introduced Charles Hill, professor of English and chair of the Curriculum Planning Committee for the Leadership and Organizational Studies program.  Also present were Marsha Rossiter, assistant vice chancellor, Division of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement, and Lynn Brandt, coordinator of student services, Center for New Learning. 

Professor Hill explained that the purpose of the program is to equip graduates with the knowledge and skills needed for supervisory and leadership positions in public and private organizations and that it will provide seamless transition into baccalaureate-level education for technical college graduates.  The curriculum focuses on communication, organizational administration, leadership, appreciating diverse perspectives, understanding the research process, critical thinking, and self-directed lifelong learning.  The program involves collaboration with Fox Valley Technical College and UW-Fox Valley and joint recruitment and promotion with UW-Green Bay.

There was committee discussion about acceptance of credits from the technical colleges, availability of the program to students without associate degrees, and funding of the program.

The committee then approved a resolution authorizing implementation of the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Presentation on UW-Oshkosh’s Role in Northeast Wisconsin’s Growth Agenda: Aligning Academic Program Menu and Current and Future Regional Needs

Deans and students from the four UW-Oshkosh colleges discussed how a variety of collaborations have improved the education of students and provided needed expertise and resources to regional businesses and communities.

The  campus also has increased programs and services for working adults through collaborations with four UW colleges, four Technical Colleges, and employers like Mercury Marine and Miles Kimball.  

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Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

The committee was reminded that, each year, the UW benefits from the incredible generosity of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate.

Prior to the April meeting, the trustees of the estate formally request that the president of the UW System ask the chancellors of UW-Madison and UW-Milwaukee to determine the amounts they will request for funding.  At the April meeting, the board formally approves the request, which then is sent by President Reilly to the trustees, who determine the amount of income available for the various awards.  In May, the board acts to accept the proffer.

The Vilas Trust provides funding for undergraduate and graduate scholarships and fellowships, from which thousands of students at UW-Madison have benefited over the years.  It also funds named professorships and provides additional research funding for faculty and students.  Several requests from UW-Milwaukee are funded, including an annual music request and funding of a Vilas Research Professor in the Department of English.

Stating that the UW System is extremely grateful for this extraordinary support, Regent Davis reported that the committee approved the requests for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Minority and Disadvantaged Student Annual Report

This statutorily required report presents information on pre-college activities, expenditures for multicultural and economically disadvantaged student programs, and student financial assistance data.  The board’s acceptance of the report is required before it is submitted to the chief clerks of each house of the Legislature.

The committee was informed of the following highlights from the 2005-06 report:

  • A total of $45.8 million was expended from all funds.
  • UW institutions continue to contribute significantly through increases in external fund raising and reallocation of existing funds for minority and disadvantaged student programs.  $27.2 million were raised from extramural and non-government sources, up from $24.1 million the previous year – a $3 million increase and an almost 200% increase from 1998, the beginning of Plan 2008.
  • Out of state-created appropriation Fund 402, $7.9 million was expended in 2005-06.  62% of the funds were spent on retention, 17% on recruitment, and 21% on pre-college programs.

Associate Vice President Ron Singer advised the committee that larger issues concerning the nature of retention efforts and academic support services will be addressed in the coming months.

The committee approved a resolution accepting the report for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Update on Inclusion of Socio-Economic Factors in Admissions Process

Associate Vice President Ron Singer provided an update on the admissions process based on committee discussion at the February meeting.  At that time, regents had raised concerns that, while socio-economic factors were to be considered in the admissions process, information on socio-economic status was not explicitly included in the application process.  Various ways of including it in the future are being considered. 

Report on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment

Dr. Singer noted that the Annual Report on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment had been sent to the members of the board.  The report included institutional summaries of activities to disseminate information to students to prevent sexual assaults and harassment.  This report, which is required to be submitted to the Legislature, is financial in nature, rather than programmatic.

Progress on Education Committee Goals

The committee was informed that there has been excellent progress on matters related to working with the Wisconsin Technical Colleges, diversity, charter schools, and admissions policy.  Work still is being done on the climate study, inclusivity initiative, diversity award, rethinking accountability, and pre-college program assessment.

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Retention of Veterans

Regent Loftus noted the importance of gathering information on retention of veterans in view of their increased enrollment.  Associate Vice President Sharon Wilhelm responded that the Office of Policy Analysis and Research is looking into systematically tracking veterans through the central data request.

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Consent Agenda

Adoption of Resolutions 9316-9320 as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Davis, seconded by Regent Crain, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Stevens Point: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.S. in Biochemistry

Resolution 9316:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.S. in Biochemistry.

UW-Green Bay: Program Authorization (Implementation) B.A. in First Nations Studies

Resolution 9317: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the B.A. in First Nations Studies.


UW-Oshkosh: Program Authorization (Implementation) Bachelor of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies

Resolution 9318: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to implement the Bachelor of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies.

Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate

Resolution 9319:  That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the request to the Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate for $14,831,905 for fiscal year July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2008, subject to availability, as provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships, and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences and Music. 

Minority and Disadvantaged Student Annual Report

Resolution 9320: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents accepts the 2005-2006 Minority and Disadvantaged Student Annual Report for submission to the Governor and to the Chief Clerk of each house of the Legislature, pursuant to s.36.25 (14m) (c), Wis. Stats., for distribution to the appropriate standing committee under s.13.172 (3) Wis. Stats.

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REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE

Regent Bartell presented the committee’s report.

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UW-Oshkosh Presentation: Enhancing Existing and Building New Facilities

UW-Oshkosh provided a presentation offering a comprehensive view of the planning process the university has undertaken in its campus development.

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UW-Madison: Authority to Construct Two Utility Structures for the East Campus Utility Project

This request to construct two utility structures for the East Campus utility project would allow construction of the utility tunnel to occur without disruption of traffic on University Avenue and Johnson Street.  It would be funded through reallocation of $1.5 million of existing program revenue-supported borrowing.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Milwaukee: Authority to: (a) Sell a Parcel of Land to the Milwaukee Jewish Federation; (b) Petition the City of Milwaukee to Vacate a Public Alley; (c) Enter into a Land Use Agreement to Allow Construction of a Parking Area and Accept It as a Gift-In-Kind; (d) File a Certified Survey Map; and (e) Convey a Right-of-Way to the City of Milwaukee

The parcel of land involved in this request is 0.18 acres, which would be sold to the Milwaukee Jewish Federation for $219,000.  The federation plans to construct a new Hillel facility for UW-Milwaukee students and design and construct a reconfigured parking area and driveway as a gift-in-kind to the university.  The university would lose 18 parking spaces as a result of the project.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-Platteville: Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land for Parking Purposes

This request was to purchase a very small parcel of land at a cost of $157,000, of which $35,000 would be gift funding.  The parcel, along with three others already owned by the university, would be used for parking expansion.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW-River Falls: Authority to Accept a Gift-in-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Mann Valley Farm

This request asked for authority to accept a gift-in-kind of a .358-acre parcel of land for the Mann Valley Farm.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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UW System: Authority to Construct All-Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

This request asked for authority to construct three all-agency maintenance and repair projects, for a total of $4.9 million, at UW-Eau Claire, UW-Madison, and UW-Parkside.

The committee approved a resolution granting the requested authority for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Consent Agenda

Regent Bartell moved adoption by the board of Resolutions 9331-9335 as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent McPike and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Madison: Authority to Construct Two Utility Structures for the East Campus Utility project

Resolution 9331: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to reallocate $1,500,000 of existing Program Revenue Supported Borrowing to construct two underground bridge structures for the East Campus Utility Project.

UW-Milwaukee: Authority to: (a) Sell a Parcel of Land to the Milwaukee Jewish Federation; (b) Petition the City of Milwaukee to Vacate a Public Alley; (c) Enter Into a Land Use Agreement to Allow Construction of a Parking Area and Accept It as a Gift-In-Kind; (d) File a Certified Survey Map; and (e) Convey a Right-Of-Way to the City of Milwaukee

Resolution 9332: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted: (a) to sell approximately 0.18 acres of land facing North Stowell Avenue that is a portion of the 2419 East Kenwood Boulevard (Zelazo) Board of Regents-owned property in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to the Milwaukee Jewish Federation (MJF) for $219,500; (b) to petition the city of Milwaukee to vacate a public alley located southwest of the intersection of East Kenwood Boulevard and North Prospect Avenue; (c) to enter into a land use agreement with the MJF to allow them to construct a reconfigured parking area and a driveway, and to accept the completed facility as a gift-in-kind; (d) to file a certified survey map subdividing the property into three lots, an outlot, and a public alley; and (e) to convey to the city of Milwaukee a new public alley (dedicated right-of-way) connecting to an existing public alley, North Prospect Avenue, and North Stowell Avenue to allow public access to the reconfigured parking area.

UW-Platteville: Authority to Purchase a Parcel of Land for Parking Purposes

Resolution 9333: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, (a) authority be granted to purchase a 0.1187-acre parcel of land and property improvements within the approved campus boundary located at 55 South Hickory Street in the city of Platteville at a cost of $157,500 ($122,500 Program Revenue-Cash and $35,000 Gift Funds) and (b) an exemption be granted of Board of Regents Policy 94-3 which requires that the negotiated purchase price of the property be at or below the average of two recent appraisals.

UW-River Falls: Authority to Accept a Gift-In-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Mann Valley Farm

Resolution 9334: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-River Falls Chancellor and President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to accept a gift-in-kind of a 0.358-acre parcel of land located approximately 600 feet west of South Glover Road adjacent to county trunk highway (CTH) “MM” in Section 34 of the Town of Troy, St. Croix County, Wisconsin for the UW-River Falls Mann Valley Farm.

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

Resolution 9335: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $4,970,000 ($379,300 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $3,134,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; and $1,456,700 Program Revenue Cash).

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UW-Madison: Authority to Accept a Gift-in-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Kegonsa Research Campus

The gift would include a one-acre parcel and a structure currently operated as a lodging facility for researchers at the Synchrotron Radiation Center. 

Action on this request by the committee was deferred until questions about the environmental audit could be answered.  After the meeting, information was provided to committee members that the Phase I environmental audit indicated that a Phase II audit was not warranted.

Adoption by the board of the following resolution was moved by Regent Bartell, seconded by Regent Shields and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Madison: Authority to Accept a Gift-In-Kind of a Parcel of Land for the Kegonsa Research Campus

Resolution 9336:  That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to accept a gift-in-kind from the University of Wisconsin Foundation of land and a structure located in the Town of Dunn, Dane County, Wisconsin.  The value of this gift-in-kind is approximately $400,000.

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Report of the Assistant Vice President

Building Commission Actions

Assistant Vice President David Miller reported that last month the Building Commission recommended approximately $779 million to complete 36 major projects on UW campuses and approximately $180 million from all fund sources in the 2007-09 Capital Budget.

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REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

Regent Pruitt, chair, presented the committee’s report.

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UW-Oshkosh Presentation: UW-Oshkosh’s Role in Northeast Wisconsin’s Growth Agenda: Diversifying Our Revenue Sources

The committee heard a presentation by Tom Sonnleitner, vice chancellor for administrative services, and Art Rathjen, president of the UW-Oshkosh Foundation, who highlighted ways in which UW-Oshkosh is seeking out new revenue streams to support the Growth Agenda and current programs to meet the pressing needs of the region. 

The university has begun its first major capital campaign, with a goal to raise $24 million, of which $8 million will go towards a new academic building.

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Evaluation of Targeted Tuiton Programs and Extension of Return to Wisconsin Program

Lynn Paulson, assistant vice president for budget and planning, discussed with the committee the Return to Wisconsin Program, the Tri-State Initiative at UW-Platteville, and the Midwest Student Exchange Program (MSEP).  He noted that the board approved these programs in response to a significant drop in non-resident enrollments after UW non-resident tuitions outpaced that of peer institutions.

The committee was assured that no Wisconsin students are displaced by these programs and that substantial excess revenues over costs are used to support Wisconsin residents.

The committee approved a resolution to continue the Return to Wisconsin program for inclusion in the consent agenda.  No action was requested on the other programs at this time.

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Review and Approval of Selected Differential Tuition Programs

Regent Pruitt reported that committee review of these programs focused on three standards that must be met: 1) Demonstrated need for the differential tuition; 2) direct benefit of the differential to students; and 3) strong involvement by students in the decision-making process for approval and use of the differential tuition.

UW-Oshkosh: Reaffirmation and Extension of Campus-Wide Differential Tuition

Petra Roter, vice chancellor for student affairs at UW-Oshkosh, discussed the $55 per semester differential tuition for all undergraduate students and asked the committee to approve a resolution extending the program.

The resolution requires annual review of the fee by a committee made up of 10 students appointed by the Oshkosh Student Association and one advisor.  There is no expectation of increasing the differential for the foreseeable future.

The committee approved a resolution extending the program for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-River Falls: Campus-Wide Differential Tuition Proposal

Chancellor Don Betz and Joe Eggers, Student Senate president, discussed the proposal with the committee.  Along with UW-River Falls students Jim Vierling and Natalie Hagberg, they asked the committee to approve a new $36 per semester differential tuition for all undergraduate students at UW-River Falls. 

The student speakers focused on three areas of need for funding: expanded library hours, increased undergraduate research, and expanded testing centers.  The rate would be fixed for four years, after which it would be reviewed for reauthorization by a campus oversight committee consisting of an equal representation of students, faculty and staff.

The committee approved a resolution granting the proposed differential tuition for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Madison: School of Business Differential Tuition

Michael Knetter, dean of the School of Business at UW-Madison, and Eric Eickhoff, president of the Future Business Leaders of America and a sophomore pre-business student, discussed the proposal with the committee and asked for approval of  differential tuition of $500 per semester for undergraduates in the Bachelor of Business Administration major and $150 for those in the Certificate in Business program.  They urged approval of the differential in order to maintain the high quality of the program.

Also attending and asking for approval of the proposal were Kim Hughes, a senior Marketing major and president of the Student Marketing Association, and Jesse Siegelman, a junior Finance and Real Estate major and past president of the Undergraduate Business Leadership Council.

Dean Knetter pointed out that an important component of the differential is to provide an increase in financial aid. He also expects the Business School to be able to raise additional funds for scholarships.  He assured the committee that financial aid would be targeted to low and moderate income students to ensure that they are not discouraged from obtaining business degrees.

The committee approved granting of the differential tuition for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Regent Burmaster presented the next seven agenda items.

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Consideration of Salary Adjustments for Senior Academic Leaders to Address Recruitment and Retention Challenges for Chancellors at UW-Eau Claire and UW-Colleges/UW-Extension and a Provost at UW-Whitewater

President Reilly noted that the board had endorsed a new process for periodic review of individual academic leaders’ salaries to determine whether there is need for an adjustment to recognize competitive factors or to correct salary inequities. 

Under this process, the committee discussed and approved for inclusion in the consent agenda salary adjustments for chancellors at UW Colleges/UW-Extension and UW-Eau Claire and a provost at UW-Whitewater.

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Trust Funds

Annual Endowment Peer Benchmarking Report

Assistant Trust Officer Doug Hoerr reported that returns on UW Trust Funds exceed those of peers in the one, three, five and ten-year periods ending June 30, 2006.  Performance over recent years has improved due to increased exposure to equity and alternative assets.  It also was noted that the cost of managing UW investments is lower than peers. 

Mr. Hoerr indicated that, while the UW follows a typical methodology in establishing a spending rate, the 4% rate that has been used is somewhat more conservative than the peer average of 4.7%

Finally, it was noted that only 12-18% of peers have socially responsible investing practices.

Voting of 2007 Non-Routing Proxy Proposals

Tom Reinders, investment portfolio analyst, reported that the dominant social issues for 2007 were:  the environment and sustainability, corporate political contributions, equal employment opportunity, global labor practices, and animal welfare. 

Trust fund investment managers would be directed to vote in favor of most of the proxies related to those issues because they fall under the 20 social issues that the committee had already approved for active voting.  The one new issue was related to corporate reporting on political contributions.

The committee approved a resolution to vote these proxy proposals in the affirmative for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Acceptance of Bequests over $50,000

Mr. Hoerr noted that individual bequests of $50,000 or more are brought to the board to be formally accepted and recognized.  Bequests falling into that category for this period were:

  • Irene Marsh Trust – over $100,000
  • Dan P. Murphy Estate - $75,000
  • Bennett Tollefson Estate - $50,000
  • Frank Gabriel Estate - $1 million
  • Jan Horton Senescall Trust – nearly $600,000
  • Marion Peabody and Cary Peabody Family Trusts – about $150,000
  • Proceeds from sale of the Ann Carroll Hanson Forest - $2.2 million

Expressing gratitude to all these donors, the committee approved a resolution to accept these bequests for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Committee Business

UW-Madison Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Contract with Learfield Communications

Vince Sweeney, senior associate athletic director for external relations, requested the committee’s approval of changes in contract language and extension of the agreement with Learfield Communications.  UW-Madison officials believe that this would be one of the best contracts in the country.  It provides a minimum guarantee that is significantly higher than the current contract and also protects the university if gross revenues significantly decline over the life of the contract.

The committee passed a resolution approving the amended and restated agreement for inclusion in the consent agenda.

University of Wisconsin System Public Records Management Policy

General Counsel Pat Brady described proposed changes to the UW System records management policy.  The new policy is meant to enhance the organization, management, retention, and disposal of university public records through clearly stated retention guidelines and archival processes.

The committee approved the proposed policy for inclusion in the consent agenda.

New Format for Regent Policy Documents

Proposed changes to the numbering and organization of Regent Policy Documents were described by General Counsel Brady.  The proposed changes move away from a numbering system based on the year a policy was initially approved toward one based more on topical area.  It is believed that the new approach will provide a more coherent organization of Regent policies and facilitate easier access to related policies.

The committee approved the new format for inclusion in the consent agenda.

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Regent Pruitt presented the remainder of the committee’s report.

Report of the Vice President

Legislative Audit Bureau Update

Vice President Debbie Durcan updated the committee on the Legislative Audit Bureau’s (LAB) A-133 federally mandated audit of federal funds, noting that questioned costs were extremely low – only $12,802 out of $1.2 billion of federally funded expenditures, which is statistically insignificant at about .001%.

Vice President Durcan expected the state-wide information technology audit to be released about the middle of the month.  That audit, along with the UW’s audit on textbook costs, would be considered at the next meeting.

It was reported that the Special Regent Committee on Response to the LAB Audit on Personnel Policies and Practices met the preceding week.  Main issues were recommendations of the Fringe Benefits Advisory Committee and colleague coverage.  A report will be on the May agenda.

Utility Projections

Vice President Durcan reported that current projections through March showed a surplus.

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Consent Agenda

Adoption of Resolutions 9321-9330 as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Pruitt and seconded by Regent Smith.

At the request of Regent Davis, Resolution 9330 was removed from the consent agenda; and, at the request of Regent Bartell, Resolutions 9328 and 9329 were removed.

The question was put on the remaining consent agenda items as follow and they were adopted on a unanimous voice vote.


Extension of the Return to Wisconsin Tuition Program

Resolution 9321: Whereas, the Board of Regents approved the Return to Wisconsin tuition program in November 2003 as a pilot program to offer discounted tuition to children of alumni who reside out of state; and

Whereas, the Return to Wisconsin tuition program:

  • Provides a modest increase in funding per student for Wisconsin residents without additional GPR appropriations;
  • Attracts high quality undergraduate students without displacing Wisconsin resident students;
  • Addresses “brain gain” interests by increasing the number of high quality students coming to Wisconsin for their education and potentially staying for their careers;
  • Increases the geographic diversity of the student body to enrich the educational experience of all; and
  • ·Creates stronger ties with alumni, possibly resulting in greater future giving; and

Whereas, the Return to Wisconsin tuition program enrolled 36 nonresident children and/or grandchildren of alumni in 2005-06, and 49 in 2006-07;

Therefore, be it resolved that, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the extension of the Return to Wisconsin tuition program at UW-Eau Claire, UW-Green Bay, UW-La Crosse, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Parkside, UW-River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Whitewater for an additional three years.

Consideration of Salary Adjustments for Senior Academic Leaders to Address Recruitment and Retention Challenges for Chancellors at UW-Eau Claire and UW Colleges/UW-Extension and the Provost at UW-Whitewater

Resolution 9322: Whereas, pursuant to ss. 20.923(4g) and 36.09(1)(j), Wisconsin Statutes, the salaries of UW System senior academic leaders must be set within the salary ranges established by the Board of Regents, and based upon a formula derived from the salaries paid by peer institutions to their academic leaders, and

Whereas in addition, section 36.09(1)(j), Wisconsin Statutes, authorizes the Board of Regents to increase chancellors' and other university senior academic leaders’ salaries to address salary inequities or to recognize competitive factors in the periods between pay plan adjustments, and

Whereas at the February 2006 Board of Regents meeting the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee endorsed the recommendation that the President of the UW System periodically perform a review and assessment of individual chancellors’ salaries to determine whether there is a need for an adjustment to recognize competitive factors or correct salary inequities among senior academic leadership, as allowed by law, and

Whereas the Board of Regents affirms that leadership is critically important to the performance of our institutions and the students and citizens they serve and therefore places a high value on recruiting and retaining our outstanding senior academic leaders.

Now, therefore be it resolved;

That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the annual salary for Chancellor Levin-Stankevich, Chancellor Wilson, and Provost Telfer be adjusted due to competitive market factors and equity reasons per the attached recommendation, effective April 13, 2007.

Voting of 2007 Non-Routine Proxy Proposals

Resolution 9323: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the non-routine shareholder proxy proposals for UW System Trust Funds, as presented in the attachment, be voted in the affirmative.


UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of Bequests

Resolution 9324: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, the bequests detailed on the attached list be accepted for the purposes designated by the donors, or where unrestricted by the donors, by the benefiting institution, and that the Trust Officer or Assistant Trust Officers be authorized to sign receipts and do all things necessary to effect the transfers for the benefit of the University of Wisconsin.

Let it be herewith further resolved, that the President and Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, and the Deans and Chairs of the benefiting Colleges and Departments, express their sincere thanks and appreciation to the donors and their families for their generosity and their devotion to the values and ideals represented by the University of Wisconsin System.  These gifts will be used to sustain and further the quality and scholarship of the University and its students.

UW-Madison Division of Intercollegiate Athletics Contract with Learfield Communications

Resolution 9325:  That upon, recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents approves the amended and restated agreement with Learfield Communications, which will provide certain marketing and multi-media rights through June 30, 2019.

University of Wisconsin System Public Records Management Policy

Resolution 9326: Whereas, University of Wisconsin institutions create, receive, and manage public records when transacting public business on behalf of the University; and

Whereas, the University of Wisconsin System has a long-standing commitment to adopting business practices that ensure public records are properly managed in compliance with state and federal legal requirements; and

Whereas, increasingly complex state and federal legal requirements for public records management, rapid technological advances in the functions performed by the information technology and digitization systems utilized by UW System institutions, and best business practices within the field of records management, suggest the need for a comprehensive and coordinated approach to public records management within the UW System;

Therefore, be it resolved, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents adopts the Public Records Management Policy, as attached.

University of Wisconsin System New Format for the Regent Policy Documents

Resolution 9327: Whereas, the Regent Policy Documents of the University of Wisconsin System follow a chronological numbering system, under which each policy is assigned a number that combines the year in which the policy was approved with the sequential number of the policy within that year;

Whereas, this numbering system can make it difficult for members of the public and University employees to efficiently search the Regent Policy Documents, especially using web-based information technology tools;

Whereas, a new organizational structure and format categorizing the policies by topic and assigning each policy a number based upon its sequential position within each topical category will provide greater public transparency in the governance of the UW System because the Regent Policy Documents will be easier to research using web-based information technology systems; 

Therefore, be it resolved, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents adopts the organizational structure and format for the Regent Policy Documents of the University of Wisconsin System as set forth in the attached document.

Referring to the third standard for differential tuition, Regent Bartell inquired about the process of student involvement in the three proposals.

In response, Regent Pruitt affirmed that each proposal was approved by student governing bodies.

With regard to the UW-Oshkosh proposal, Petra Roter, vice chancellor for student affairs, noted that the request was to reauthorize differential tuition originally approved in 2002.  It was a student initiative and was approved by students as a means of enhancing their ability to succeed.  After a survey, assessment, and more student input in the past year, the Student Association voted unanimously in the Senate and Assembly to continue it.  Ten of the eleven members of the assessment team were students selected by the Student Association.  Going forward, students can vote to increase or decrease the amount of the differential tuition by a two-thirds vote of the Student Association.

Regent Smith affirmed that students had told him of extensive student involvement in the proposal.

UW-River Falls Provost Charles Hurt said that his university’s proposal also was predominantly student-driven and approved. 

Joe Eggers, UW-River Falls student government president, added that the student government played a large role in the proposal, which was passed by the Student Senate. Noting that there would be a committee to implement use of the differential tuition, he said that there is provision for a four-year sunset of the differential, after which it would have to be approved again by the Student Senate.  After that, there would be a review every three years.

Regent Bartell asked if the UW-Oshkosh differential tuition could be eliminated, and Ms. Roter replied that it could be eliminated by vote of the Student Association.

Associate Vice President Freda Harris explained that the process for approving differential tuition was developed in conjunction with United Council of UW Students and approved by the board.  Under that process, proposals are not brought to the board without student involvement and approval.

With regard to the UW-Madison School of Business proposal, she indicated that the Undergraduate Student Leadership Council, which represents 85% of business students voted strongly in favor of the differential tuition and would have further input in implementing it.  There also had been listening sessions for students, as well as support by a student newspaper.

Provost Patrick Farrell added that the dean of the School of Business talked about the proposal extensively with student organizations and in listening sessions.  Students recognized the need for quality faculty in approving the differential tuition.

In response to a question by Regent Rosenzweig, President Reilly said that a framework has been established for review of tuition and financial aid issues as part of a broader strategic planning effort and that regent involvement would be included.  Vice President Durcan added that initial thoughts could be presented at the June meeting.

Noting that the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee spent considerable time on this matter, Regent Burmaster said that students made presentations to the committee and that student involvement was very apparent. 

For her, the greatest issue with regard to the School of Business proposal was the matter of “sticker shock”.  It was noted by the dean that 25% of the differential tuition would be set aside for financial aid and that there also would be private fundraising for financial aid.  In the end, she was convinced to support the proposal.

President Reilly added that Vice Chancellor Bazzell said that the university would work with students so that they would be made aware of financial aid options and not deterred by “sticker shock”. 

In response to a question by Regent Davis, it was indicated that the School of Business tuition is the second lowest in the Big Ten.  Most others have differential tuition, and UW-Madison’s tuition would still be below the peer median with the addition of the proposed differential.

Regent Davis inquired about the length of time before the proposed 2011-12 review period.

In reply, Regent Pruitt explained that the practice is to allow about that much time in order to have a full view of the impact of the differential.  At this point, he added, loss of faculty has created a crisis situation.

In response to a question by Regent Davis about the review process, Regent Smith indicated that the same process of a vote by the Undergraduate Leadership Council would be employed.

Regent McPike said it was problematic that, although the board had not yet approved the proposed differential tuition, it was being reported in the media as if the tuition had already been increased by $1,000. 

President Reilly agreed, noting that student support is needed in order for such proposals to be brought to the board.  The student consultation process tends to attract media attention.

Regent Semenas pointed out that elected student representatives had voted to support the UW-River Falls and UW-Oshkosh proposals.  The Business School proposal, however, was supported by the Undergraduate Leadership Council, which is composed of representatives of other organizations, rather than being an elected body.  He was concerned about lack of involvement by the Associated Students of Madison in that proposal.

Ms. Harris explained that, for an institution-wide tuition differential, the process provided for a vote by the student government association or a vote by referendum.  For a program differential, it called for involvement by the student groups most affected by the proposal.

Regent Pruitt remarked that, like the concept of federalism, through which there are areas reserved for determination by the states, in this case the decision was made at the school level, rather than the university-wide level.

Regent Semenas felt that, in reviewing the process for approval of differential tuition, there should be provision for review by the student association as a whole.  He was concerned that, in this case, elected student leaders were not making the decision.  He thought that they should be accountable for program, as well as institutional, differential tuition.

Stating his support for Regent Semenas’ position, Regent Shields said that he would vote against the School of Business differential tuition.

Ms. Harris noted that the board-approved process had been followed in bringing forth the School of Business proposal.

Regent Shields inquired about the review process for the School of Business differential. 

In reply, Provost Farrell said that the same process would be employed as was used in bringing forth the proposal, including assessment of how the differential tuition was used. 

UW-Milwaukee Provost Rita Cheng added that her institution’s Business School has a $20 per credit differential tuition.  The school worked with students on implementing the differential, and they are pleased with the enhancements that have been made. 

Regent Davis stated that she would support all three proposals, but urged that the policy be reconsidered in terms of what level of student input is considered adequate.

Regent President Walsh asked for a vote on calling the question, which passed on a unanimous voice vote.

Resolution 9328 then was adopted on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Oshkosh: Reaffirmation and Extension of Campus-wide Differential Tuition

Resolution 9328: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the students and Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin‑Oshkosh, the Board of Regents approves the ongoing reauthorization of differential tuition for undergraduate students at UW‑Oshkosh.

Upon motion by Regent Smith, seconded by Regent Semenas, the following resolution was adopted on a unanimous voice vote:

UW-River Falls: Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9329: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the students and Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, the Board of Regents approves differential tuition for all UW-River Falls undergraduate students beginning in the fall Semester of 2007-08.   Tuition will increase $36 per semester ($72 per year).  The differential will be prorated for part-time students. 

Upon motion by Regent Pruitt, seconded by Regent Smith, Resolution 9330 was adopted on a voice vote, with Regent Semenas and Regent Shields voting in opposition.

UW-Madison: School of Business Undergraduate Differential Tuition

Resolution 9330: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the students and Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents approves differential tuition rates for all UW-Madison undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor’s of Business Administration (BBA) major and Certificate in Business (CIB) program.  For BBA majors, tuition will increase by $500 per semester ($1,000 per year).  CIB tuition will increase by $150 per semester ($300 per year). 

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ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS

Regent Davis presented the following resolution of appreciation to UW-Oshkosh, stating her pride in being an alum of this wonderful institution.  The resolution was adopted by acclamation, with a standing ovation in honor of UW-Oshkosh.

UW-Oshkosh: Resolution of Appreciation

Resolution 9337:  WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh is a demonstrated leader in providing opportunities for quality higher education and in making major contributions to economic development throughout Northeastern Wisconsin; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh is advancing a Growth Agenda that will meet the needs of the region by helping more working adult students earn a bachelor’s degree, and by adding 1,400 students in high-demand programs, such as biology/microbiology, medical technology, psychology, nursing, business, and teacher education; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh was a key partner in creating the Northeast Wisconsin Educational Resource Alliance (NEW ERA), which allows member institutions to share resources and collaborate to meet regional needs; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh frequently partners with New North Inc., an 18-county consortium of business, economic development, chambers of commerce, workforce development, civic, non-profit and education leaders committed to job growth, economic vitality and a high quality of life for the region; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh’s total economic contribution to the state increased 16 percent in three years, to $501 million in 2005-2006; and

WHEREAS, as the leading energy conservation and resource preservation campus in Wisconsin, UW-Oshkosh is one of only 25 institutions nationwide named a founding member of the Higher Education Steering Committee of the American Council on Renewable Energy; and

WHEREAS, UW-Oshkosh works in the spirit of the Wisconsin Idea to help hundreds of Fox Valley organizations grow and sustain their competitive advantage, and to advance the region’s economic, educational and cultural strengths;

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System thanks UW-Oshkosh for hosting the Board’s April 2007 meeting, and commends Chancellor Richard Wells and the campus’s faculty, staff and students for success in engaging people and ideas while building a regional model for collaboration in action.

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The meeting was recessed at 12:50 p.m. and reconvened in open session at 1:00 p.m., at which time the following resolution, moved by Regent Bradley and seconded by Regent Shields, was adopted on a unanimous roll-call vote, with Regents Walsh, Spector, Smith, Shields, Semenas, Rosenzweig, Pruitt, McPike, Falbo, Davis, Cuene, Crain, Bradley, and Bartell (14) voting in the affirmative.  There were no negative votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9338: Move into Closed Session to consider appointment of a dean, UW-Baraboo/Sauk County; appointment of a dean, UW-Sheboygan; and appointment of a dean, UW-Marathon County, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats., to consider an employment contract amendment for a UW-Madison coach, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats., to consider appointment of an interim chancellor for UW-Whitewater, as permitted by 19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats., and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.,

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Closed Session

The following resolutions were adopted in closed session:

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Baraboo/Sauk County, University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9339: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges/University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint Thomas C. Pleger as Dean at the University of Wisconsin-Baraboo/Sauk County, effective April 16, 2007 at an annual salary of $95,000.

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Sheboygan, University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9340: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges/University of Wisconsin-Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint Alan Hardersen as Dean at the University of Wisconsin-Sheboygan, effective April 16, 2007 at an annual salary of $95,000.

Authorization to Appoint: Dean, UW-Marathon County, University of Wisconsin Colleges

Resolution 9341: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges/University of Wisconsin Extension and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be authorized to appoint Sandra R. Smith as Dean of the UW-Marathon County, effective July 1, 2007, at an annual salary of $96,000.

UW-Madison: Amendments to Coach’s employment agreement

Resolution 9342: That, upon the recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the attached amendments to the employment agreement for Head Basketball Coach Bo Ryan be approved.  

UW-Whitewater: Authorization to Appoint Interim Chancellor

Resolution 9343: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Richard J. Telfer be appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, effective May 21, 2007 at a salary of $180,000.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:50 p.m.

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary