Board of Regents

Regular Meeting Minutes -November 2006

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Madison, Wisconsin

 

UW-Madison
Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall
Thursday, November 9, 2006
10:00 a.m.

 

- President Walsh presiding -

 

PRESENT: Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Cuene, Davis, McPike, Pruitt, Rosenzweig, Salas, Semenas, Smith, Spector, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents Loftus and Randall

 

- - -

REPORT BY THE UW SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH ON ITS ACTIVITIES IN MILWAUKEE

Regent Vice President Bradley presiding

In introductory remarks, Regent Vice President Bradley reviewed the status of three issues that formed the background for the report.

First, when the Board of Regents approved the renaming of the UW Medical School to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health in November 2005, the school was asked to engage in good faith dialogues with UW-Milwaukee and the City of Milwaukee on strategies to address the significant public health challenges of the city.  The school was further directed to provide the board with an annual report on its collaboration with UW-Milwaukee and the City of Milwaukee and its activities addressing the public health issues facing Milwaukee. This report is being presented at this meeting.

Second, the Board of Regents asked the School of Medicine and Public Health to report on the medical education provided to students at the Milwaukee Clinical Campus through its affiliation agreement with Aurora Health Care.  Specifically, the board asked that, upon assuming the position of dean of the school, Dr. Robert Golden give prompt and careful attention to how best to address the need for physician and medical school involvement with the diverse populations found in Milwaukee’s central city as part of its affiliation agreement with Aurora.  Dean Golden’s report is to be presented at this meeting.

Third, at the December 2006 meeting, the board is to receive a report on the planning process to assess health-related initiatives at UW-Milwaukee and options by which the university might better address the health needs in the region.

Introducing Dean Golden, Regent Bradley indicated that he assumed the deanship in July 2006, coming to the UW from his previous position as vice dean of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and former chair of the UNC Department of Psychiatry.  In more than 20 years at UNC, Dr. Golden held the Stuart Bondurant Distinguished professorship and proved himself a highly effective leader in academic medicine, launching a number of creative new programs. 

In opening remarks, Dean Golden noted that he went to medical school in Boston, where students were involved with two hospitals – one that cared for the under-served and a university hospital that served a very different patient base.  While both provided high quality care, there were differences in a number of areas, including access to care and attitudes toward patients.  His professional work has always been in public institutions, with a key focus on breaking down those kinds of differences.

The first portion of his presentation concerned a report on collaborations in Milwaukee.  These collaborations, he explained, are supported by the Wisconsin Partnership Program and by the UW School of Medicine and Public Health. 

The Wisconsin Partnership Program collaborations involve a growing number of organizations, including the City of Milwaukee Health Department, Milwaukee research sites, UW-Milwaukee, the Center for Urban Population Health, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and organizations associated with the Community-Academic Partnership Fund.

The Community-Academic Partnership Fund, totaling $1.4 million, includes seven grants to community health organizations, amounting to $25,000 - $450,000 per grant.  The purpose of these grants is to address public health needs and eliminate health disparities.  Representative projects include: 

  • Improving birth outcomes in minority populations
  • Providing social support and case management for women at risk for partner violence
  • Promoting healthy and safe neighborhoods.

The next cycle of grants, for which 20 Milwaukee organizations have applied, are to be awarded in December 2006.

The City of Milwaukee Health Department was granted $1.069 million to promote the department as a flagship education and training site, with the expectation that many of the professionals trained there would stay in Milwaukee and serve the local populations.  The grant also is intended to address critical public health issues, such as serving African Americans with cancer and a city-wide effort to create a HIV/AIDS service plan. 

The Wisconsin Partnership Program granted $450,000 to Milwaukee research sites for the following efforts:

  • Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), long-range study of the health status of Wisconsin residents
  • Wisconsin Health Research Network (WiNHR) of state-wide health care organizations
  • Focus on health disparities, health status, access to care, and health promotion in under-served populations.

A grant of $1.3 million for UW-Milwaukee includes salary support for faculty and staff affiliated with the Center for Urban Population Health and funds to establish the regional partnership network with UW-Milwaukee and CUPH to reduce disparities in cancer care.

Funding of $299,839 was provided to the Center for Urban Population Health for a special initiative to address the health of Milwaukee public school children and to remove health-related barriers to learning -- a collaborative effort with UW-Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Public Schools.

Funding of $30,000 was provided to the Medical College of Wisconsin for the Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute, a statewide public health leadership training program, jointly supported by MCOW and the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, that created five community teams, one in Milwaukee, to reduce risky sexual behavior among adolescents.

In addition to the Wisconsin Partnership Program, the School of Medicine and Public Health is involved in other collaborations with United Community Center, UW-Milwaukee, the Milwaukee Clinical Campus, the Center for Urban Population Health, the UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, and the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

United Community Center, a comprehensive human service organization serving Hispanics in Milwaukee, received $124,000 from the school to support development of clinical and research programs for Hispanics with Alzheimer’s Disease and to educate physicians on treatment and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease in this population.

UW-Milwaukee received $50,000 to explore creation of a school of public health on that campus.

The Milwaukee Clinical Campus, which receives $500,000 annually, is considered an essential element of the school’s commitment to clinical learning experiences with urban under-served patients. 

The Center for Urban Population Health, a partnership with Aurora Health Care, UW-Milwaukee, and the School of Medicine and Public Health, receives $380,000 annually for its work in improving the health of urban communities through health services research, education and training, and health promotion.

The UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention receives $2 million annually.  The center has established an active outreach and research presence at Aurora Sinai for under-served populations; has expanded smoking cessation services to other Milwaukee clinics serving minority communities; and has collaborated with a network of minority populations on tobacco control programs.

The Institute for Clinical and Translational Research receives $200,000 annually to support the clinical and population health research infrastructure at Aurora Sinai.  The school has applied for substantial support from the National Institutes of Health for this effort.

In total, the Wisconsin Partnership program has provided $4.6 million for Milwaukee collaborations, and the School of Medicine and Public Health has provided $3.25 million in support of Milwaukee programs, for a grant total of $7.86 million. 

Dean Golden then made a statement to the board regarding the Milwaukee Clinical Campus. 

Since his graduation from medical school, the dean indicated that he had chosen to work only at public institutions and was attracted to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health because of its well-developed statewide campus, which helps to advance the Wisconsin Idea.  He stated his firm belief that the education of health sciences students should span society’s economic, geographic, ethnic, and cultural spectra.

To learn about Milwaukee’s complex healthcare and training issues, he had taken a number of steps:

  • He made six visits to the city and toured community-based clinics, hospital units, and training sites.
  • He visited United Community Center and discussed its health care programs with Director Ricardo Diaz.
  • He toured Aurora Health Care’s under-served clinic network, including the Walker’s Point free clinic and clinical programs at Aurora Sinai Medical Center.
  • He met with community health leaders, including the City of Milwaukee Commissioner of Health, directors of federally designated community health centers and other public and community health organizations.
  • He met with Milwaukee faculty and medical students at Milwaukee training sites.
  • He met with Dean Michael Dunn of the Medical College of Wisconsin and with leadership of Aurora Health Care, including the new CEO, Dr. Nick Turkal, a former member of the UW’s Milwaukee faculty.
  • He scheduled meetings with Mayor Tom Barrett and with Chancellor Carlos Santiago.

He learned that, while many resources are in place to provide effective clinical training, there are areas of concern that must be addressed and monitored.

First, the majority of medical students have requested clinical rotations in Milwaukee because of their wish to work with patients from under-served populations.  The transition of Milwaukee faculty into the Aurora medical practice group resulted in turnover in a few key positions in Aurora Sinai that are now filled by new faculty leaders.  Students based in Milwaukee were exposed to vocal unrest among a few departing faculty and there was, in some instances, inadequate attention to student training needs.  While the majority of students’ clinical experiences in Milwaukee are with under-served populations, not all have received the opportunity to work with this patient group. 

Second, in discussions with Milwaukee community leaders, Dean Golden heard their deep concern about the health of Milwaukee residents and their request that UW-Madison play a more significant role in solving the problems of inadequate access to health care, along with related social and economic issues.

In the area of medical student education, he reported that a task force recently completed cataloguing a wide array of learning opportunities with under-served populations and recommended ways to enrich that portion of the curriculum and increase such opportunities.  Implementation of those recommendations is proceeding rapidly.  In addition, the dean directed that student learning experiences at the Milwaukee Clinical Campus be closely monitored to insure that they receive high quality education about health care needs of the under-served.

Based on what he had learned to date, Dean Golden reported that he had formed the following conclusions:

  • The new seven-year affiliation agreement with Aurora provides a solid foundation for the school’s continuing relationship with the underserved populations in Milwaukee.  In that regard, he noted that Aurora is the primary provider for Milwaukee’s at-risk populations and the only one that has a hospital in the most disadvantaged area of the city.  Aurora has made a public commitment to maintain Aurora Sinai Medical Center and has invested substantial resources in the facility.
  • Problems of poor health and inadequate access to health care in Milwaukee are longstanding; and the “safety net” has gaping holes, especially as hospitals close, leaving Aurora Sinai as the primary inpatient resource for central Milwaukee.
  • Aurora’s decision to reduce the number of its clinics in central Milwaukee and the transition to an Aurora employment model for teaching physicians has created the potential to reduce the number of student learning opportunities with under-served people.  Stating that students must have access to such opportunities, he said that steps have been taken to insure that this occurs and that new training opportunities are being negotiated with community-based health centers outside of the Aurora system.
  • The new medical group established by the School of Medicine and Public Health and Aurora Health Care is now fully staffed and has a governance process that includes strong university input.
  • The school will continue to place as many students as possible in Milwaukee, with about 150 students there this year.  Nearly two-thirds will learn some aspect of clinical medicine in Milwaukee during their time in medical school.
  • The education of medical students is not complete unless they learn, from physician role models who practice in these environments, of the unique health risks experienced by urban, disadvantaged populations. One of the school’s most important contributions to improving health care in Milwaukee may be the continuous production of physicians who choose to practice in under-served areas.  Studies have shown that students who train in these settings often select them as sites for their practices.
  • The School of Medicine and Public Health supports the Milwaukee Health Care Partnership, Inc., recently formed by the city’s five health-care systems to bring more physicians to the central city.
  • Enhancing the school’s relationship with Milwaukee is one of the top priorities of his deanship, Dean Golden said, adding that he has initiated a planning process for several new collaborations in Milwaukee, all designed to address unacceptable problems of health-care access.  For example, the school’s initiative to increase the numbers of physicians in rural Wisconsin can serve as an excellent model for development of a parallel initiative for the central city.

Stating that the School of Medicine and Public Health will continue to work towards creation of the most effective possible collaborations, Dean Golden concluded his remarks by cautioning that the school cannot solve all the problems of the central city.  However, he was convinced that the school, working with partners, can have a transforming effect on improving the situation over time.

In discussion following the presentation, Regent Salas remarked that, while student interest in training in Milwaukee is encouraging, Aurora has continued to trim its clinical presence in the city.  He asked what could be done to expand services and provide more sites for student learning.  With regard to faculty unrest over the new Aurora contract, he asked how many left and how many decided to stay. 

In reply to the latter question, Senior Associate Dean Gordon Ridley indicated that ten physicians left, 30 remained, and seven appeals were pending.

Dean Golden added that, while the school could not control Aurora’s actions, Aurora would be encouraged to do as much as possible to provide services in the central city.  In his view, Aurora was stepping up to meet the challenge.  Noting that the school could not set up clinics, he said that the need to find adequate training opportunities led him to discussions with other providers.  While the school could not fill the gaps in health care, it could partner with others to make a positive difference, he added.

Commending Dean Golden for his commitment to increasing opportunities for student learning experiences in the central city, Regent Davis asked how the Board of Regents could help in that regard. 

In response, Dean Golden asked that the board continue to be an effective advocate for the UW System and, hence, for the School of Medicine and Public Health, so that the school would have the resources needed to advance its objectives.

Second, he asked that regents, especially those who are familiar with Milwaukee, be a continuing source of advice and counsel in order to provide him with valuable perspective going forward.

Regent Burmaster commended initiatives with Milwaukee Public Schools on health issues.  Noting a shortage of school nurses, she asked what could be done to alleviate that problem.

Dean Golden replied that he would share the concern with the dean of the School of Nursing, with whom he collaborates on a regular basis. 

Regent Bartell asked if medical students are required to spend some time training in Milwaukee. 

Replying in the negative, Senior Associate Dean Susan Skochelak explained that students spend 16 months in different rotations around the state, so that they train in different environments.  Locations include Milwaukee, Marshfield and La Crosse.  Students choose the rotations they want; and, while they are not required to go to Milwaukee, they are encouraged to do so.  Currently, 88% train in under-served locations – a percentage that Dean Golden wants to raise.

In response to a question by Regent President Walsh, Dean Golden said that, while he did not know what could be done to encourage re-establishment of medical facilities in Milwaukee to replace those that closed, the School of Medicine and Public Health will partner with others in doing as much as possible to improve health care in the city.

Regent Vice President Bradley referred to a petition submitted on behalf of the SMPH classes of 2009 and 2010 and signed by more than 80 students, expressing concern about lack of adequate health care and training opportunities in central Milwaukee.  Thanking the students for their comments, he noted that the issues they raised had been addressed in Dean Golden’s presentation and that they would receive further attention going forward.

Thanking Dean Golden for his presentation, Regent Vice President Bradley asked the dean to combine this report in future years with the annual report on the Wisconsin Partnership Program, presented to the board in May.  

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 a.m.

Submitted by:
Judith A. Temby, Secretary

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Madison, Wisconsin

 

UW-Madison
Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall
Friday, November 10, 2006
9:00 a.m.

 

- President Walsh presiding -

 

Approval of the Minutes of the October 5 and 6, 2006 Board Meetings

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Report on the October 20, 2006 Meeting of the Educational Communications Board
Report on the August 29 and October 13, 2006, Meetings of the Higher Educational Aids Board
Report on the November 8, 2006, Meeting of the Hospital Authority Board
Report on the October 24, 2006, Special Meeting of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board
International Education Week Proclamation
A PROCLAMATION
Confirmation of Regent Nominations
Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Remarks by John Scocos, Secretary, Department of Veterans Affairs
The Growth Agenda for Wisconsin
Grant for Online Learning
In Memory of Robert Sedlak
In Memory of Doris Hanson
Large Voter Turnout
Committee Regarding Faculty/Academic Staff Disciplinary Process
Recognition of Senior Vice President Marrett

PRESENTATION OF 2006 REGENTS TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

John Koker, Professor of Mathematics, UW-Oshkosh
Kathryn Olson, Professor of Communication, UW-Milwaukee
UW-Eau Claire Department of History

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Presentation in Recognition of 2006 as Year of Study Abroad
Presentation on Distance Learning: UW-Platteville’s Niche
Revised Faculty Personnel Rules, UW-Green Bay..
Appointments to the Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future
Authorization to Recruit: Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
Summary of Accreditation Review by the North Central Association Higher Learning Commission and Institutional Report on General Education, UW-Whitewater
Report of the Senior Vice President
Guidelines and Criteria for the Proposed Expansion of Wisconsin Technical College System Liberal Arts and Pre-Professional Offerings
Consent Agenda
UW-Green Bay:  Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules
The Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future (Blue Cross & Blue Shield Program) UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Reappointments and Appointments
Authorization to Recruit: Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs University of Wisconsin System

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

Faculty, Academic Staff, and Senior Academic Leaders Recruitment and Retention Challenges.
Consideration of Salary Adjustments for Chancellors at UW-Platteville, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior and for a Provost at UW-Platteville
Audit Update
Legislative Audit Bureau Audit of Personnel Policies and Practices
Academic Performance Standards in UW System Athletic Directors’ and Coaches’ Job Performance Evaluations
Discussion Regarding Scope of Potential Analysis of Policy Options for Board of Regents Oversight of Information Technology Projects
Committee Business
Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts Report
Report of the Vice President
Board Meeting Efficiency and Effectiveness
Departure of Audit Director Ron Yates
Annual Trust Funds Public Forum
Consent Agenda
Consideration of Salary Adjustments For Chancellors at UW-Platteville, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior, and for a Provost at UW-Platteville

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE

Discussion of Renewable Energy Alternatives for UW Institutions
UW-Eau Claire: Authority to Sell a Parcel of Land to the Department of Transportation
UW-Platteville:  Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the New Engineering Building Project
UW-River Falls: Authority to Exchange a Parcel of Land for Agricultural Purposes
UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects
Consent Agenda
UW-Eau Claire:  Authority to Sell a Parcel of Land to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation
UW-Platteville:  Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Increase the Project Budget and Construct the New Engineering Building Project
UW-River Falls:  Authority to Exchange a Parcel of Land for Agricultural Purposes
UW System:  Authority to Construct Various Maintenance and Repair Projects
Report of the Assistant Vice President
Building Commission Actions

UNFINISHED OR ADDITIONAL BUSINESS

International Students
Director of Communications, UW-Stout

CLOSED SESSION

UW-La Crosse:  Appointment of Chancellor

 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

of the

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

 

Madison, Wisconsin

 

UW-Madison
Held in 1820 Van Hise Hall
November 10, 2006
9:00 a.m.

 

 

PRESENT: Regents Bartell, Bradley, Burmaster, Connolly-Keesler, Crain, Cuene, Davis, Loftus, McPike, Pruitt, Salas, Semenas, Smith, Spector, and Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents Randall and Rosenzweig

 

- President Walsh presiding -

Approval of the Minutes of the October 5 and 6, 2006 Board Meetings

Upon motion  by Regent Smith and seconded, the minutes of the October 5 and 6, 2006 meetings were approved on a unanimous voice vote.

- - -

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

Report on the October 20, 2006 Meeting of the Educational Communications Board

A written report on that meeting was provided.

Report on the August 29 and October 13, 2006, Meetings of the Higher Educational Aids Board

Written reports on those meetings were provided.

Report on the November 8, 2006, Meeting of the Hospital Authority Board

A written report on that meeting was provided.

Report on the October 24, 2006, Special Meeting of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

A written report on that meeting was provided.

International Education Week Proclamation

Regent President Walsh reported that Governor Doyle had signed a proclamation designating November 13-17, 2006, as International Education Week, to coordinate with a joint designation made by the U.S. Department of Education and the State Department.  The proclamation read as follows:

A PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, our nation’s population is among the world’s most diverse, with citizens and immigrants from nearly every nation, culture and background, including many people from all corners of the globe who live, work and study in Wisconsin; and
WHEREAS, technological advances affecting international trade, communications and travel continue to make our world “smaller” and increase opportunities for interaction among people from different societies, cultures and nations; and
WHEREAS, international security, respect for democracy and appreciation of others begin with education and the exchange of knowledge between students, scholars and members of the public; and
WHEREAS, international education promotes the sharing of ideas and experiences; encourages students and citizens to participate in study abroad opportunities, citizen and scholarly exchanges, and area and foreign language studies; fosters friendships and understanding between U.S. citizens and citizens from around the world; and prepares U.S. citizens to live, work and compete in the global economy; and
WHEREAS, about 5,500 international students study at UW System institutions, Wisconsin private colleges, and Wisconsin technical colleges each year; over 5,900  students from Wisconsin postsecondary institutions participate in study abroad programs; and international students and scholars come to Wisconsin from over 100 countries; and
WHEREAS, the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education began this joint initiative in 2000 as part of an effort to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences in the United States;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Jim Doyle, Governor of the State of Wisconsin, do hereby proclaim November 13-17, 2006 as

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION WEEK

in Wisconsin and urge our citizens to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of Wisconsin to be affixed. Done at the Capitol in the City of Madison this thirty-first day of October in the year two thousand six.

-

Confirmation of Regent Nominations

Regent President Walsh reported that he had spoken to Senator Robson, the new majority leader, who told him that the Senate will address confirmation of nominations to the Board of Regents in January.

-

Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

Noting that the recent elections showed that the public places a high priority on education, Regent President Walsh remarked that it will continue to be necessary to contact and persuade decision makers about the importance of the Growth Agenda for Wisconsin to compete in the knowledge economy.  He expressed appreciation to chancellors and regents for their successful work generating support for the Growth Agenda and asked that their efforts be continued going forward.

 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

Remarks by John Scocos, Secretary, Department of Veterans Affairs

Noting that November 11th is Veterans Day, President Reilly referred to the large number of veterans that the GI Bill helped to attend college since 1944. Wisconsin, he observed, remains a leader in assisting and honoring veterans through the new GI Bill that grants tuition remissions to provide access to higher education.

He then introduced Secretary Scocos, a veteran with more than 26 years of service with the U.S. Army, and expressed appreciation to him for his partnership in requesting funding for and implementing the new GI Bill.

Secretary Scocos began by thanking President Reilly for his exceptional efforts in working together with the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs on issues of importance to the education of veterans.  He also thanked Director of Communications Doug Bradley, Assistant Vice President Kris Andrews, and others for their assistance.

He remarked that the GI Bill, enacted more than 60 years ago, helped change the face of America.  However, inflation, time and priorities have allowed the benefit to deteriorate over time, so that it often is not enough to pay for a full education, let alone room and board costs.  A full-time course load, he pointed out, can result in 60 plus hours of academic work for students, making full-time employment impossible and even part-time employment difficult without sacrificing educational achievement.

In addition, Secretary Scocos pointed out that the federal G.I. Bill has limitations: Its use is limited to the first 10 years after discharge from active duty; veterans with less than three years of active duty receive a lesser benefit; and the reserve and national guard veterans called to tours of active duty in Iraq, Afghanistan and other places receive minimal assistance. 

The Wisconsin G.I. Bill, he continued, will help to reinvigorate the state’s economy by stemming brain drain and encouraging veterans to pursue a degree.  The benefits will help to encourage Wisconsin veterans to return home after military service, and the lifetime nature of the benefit may encourage veterans to remain in the state and possibly use it again later in their careers.

Under the new G.I. Bill, Wisconsin veterans of any era currently may attend a UW or WTCS institution with a 50% tuition waiver.  The waiver will be increased to 100% effective in fall 2007.  Working together, the UW System, WTC System and Department of Veterans Affairs convinced the bill’s author to allow a one-year time delay before implementation in order for the systems to better understand demand, to seek additional funding, and to budget for the expected costs of the increased benefit. 

Stating his wish to continue expanding the positive relationship with the UW System, Secretary Scocos indicated that the department would share information about available research funding from the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affiars so that some of these federal dollars could be captured for Wisconsin.  In addition the department would work with the UW and WTCS to provide information to veterans about the benefits to which they are entitled.

President Reilly then introduced Liz O’Herrin, a sergeant in the Wisconsin Air National Guard and a junior at UW-Madison. 

Ms. O’Herrin indicated that she enlisted in 2001 and was called up in 2004, after which she was deployed twice to the Middle East.  The university, she observed, had treated her with fairness and flexibility when she left campus and returned to resume her studies.  She felt that the tuition waiver is an excellent way to thank veterans for their service and that it will give them reasons to come back to Wisconsin and enrich communities across the state.

Noting that Wisconsin Public Television was to air Wisconsin veterans’ Korean War stories, President Reilly added that he would be hosting a reception for those veterans at Brittingham House.

The Growth Agenda for Wisconsin

Reporting that he had traveled to River Falls in October to promote the Growth Agenda, President Reilly said that he joined Chancellor Betz on visits with many organizations around the area and also spoke with the editorial page editor of the St. Paul Pioneer Press. 

The UW-River Falls Faculty Senate endorsed the Growth Agenda, and the faculty, staff and students at UW-Stevens Point sent a letter to the Governor also endorsing the Growth Agenda

President Reilly met with Alumni Councils around the UW System, asking them to advocate for the university and the Growth Agenda.  Plans in the near future included a trip to UW-Parkside to join Regent Emeritus Al DeSimone and Regent Chris Semenas in speaking to a seniors group in that area about the Growth Agenda.

Grant for Online Learning

President Reilly commended UW-River Falls and the Chippewa Valley Technical College on being awarded a $5.2 million grant to improve online learning – the third grant of its kind that the institutions had received.

In Memory of Robert Sedlak

President Reilly spoke of the passing of UW-Stout Provost Bob Sedlak, noting that he had served the campus with dedication and leadership for 23 years.  During that time, he was instrumental in establishing the School of Education and did much to enhance the university’s excellence.

In Memory of Doris Hanson

President Reilly spoke of the passing of Doris Hanson, the first woman to serve as secretary of the State Department of Administration.  She also served in the State Assembly and as executive director of the TEACH organization, which was instrumental in getting schools wired for new educational technology.

Large Voter Turnout

Referring to the large voter turnout in the recent elections, President Reilly said that he was especially impressed by the turnout of young people at the polls.  The number of young voters increased by two million nationally; and Wisconsin led the way with a 66% increase in student wards at UW-Madison and large increases on other campuses as well.  Six districts in campus areas changed their legislators; and six university instructors were among those elected. 

President Reilly expressed his pride in students for exercising their rights as citizens in a democracy.

Committee Regarding Faculty/Academic Staff Disciplinary Process

Regent President Walsh reported that the committee planned to bring proposed rules to the board for action in December.  When the process for adoption and implementation is completed, he expected the new rules to work well and the disciplinary process to proceed in a fair and timely manner.

He thanked the members of the committee:  Regent Spector, Chair, Regent Rosenzweig, Regent Smith, Professor Dickey, General Counsel Brady, and Chancellor Markee for their work and also thanked General Counsel Brady and her staff for the excellent support provided to the committee.

Recognition of Senior Vice President Marrett

Referring to Senior Vice President Marrett’s upcoming departure to take a post at the National Science Foundation, Regent Salas noted that it is appropriate to recognize her for her many contributions to the UW System.

President Reilly indicated that consultation has begun on filling this position and that views of regents, chancellors, provosts, faculty, academic staff and students will be sought on what the Office of Academic and Student Services needs to do in order to best serve campus and system needs going forward.  He advised that a draft position description will be circulated as well.

 

PRESENTATION OF 2006 REGENTS TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

In introductory remarks, Regent President Walsh noted that this year marks the 14th annual presentation of the Regents Teaching Excellence Awards, which were instituted in 1992 as a way of recognizing and rewarding the finest individual teachers and academic departments in the UW System for their exceptional contributions to quality education for students.

Two awards recognize outstanding career achievement by individual teachers, and a department award honors collaborative teaching achievement.  The program is administered by the UW System Office of Professional and Instructional Development.

Regent President Walsh thanked the members of the committee that selected the award winners: Regent Davis, chair, Regent Pruitt, Regent Salas, and Regent Semenas.

Welcoming this year’s award recipients, along with their families, friends, and supporters, Regent Davis remarked on what a valuable resource the university has in its faculty and academic staff who “enthusiastically teach day in and day out with dedication, creativity and passion; and to whom we entrust the education and enlightenment of the citizens of the future.”  It therefore is important, she indicated, to take every opportunity to publicly honor and make understood the labor and dedication that go into teaching and learning.  These awards are a small but significant step in that direction.

She thanked her fellow committee members, the staff of the Office of Professional and Instructional Development, and especially Rebecca Karoff, for their work in making these awards possible. 

Noting that the pool of nominees was exceptional, Regent Davis stated that those honored at this meeting are “shining examples of the ability that excellent teachers have to change students’ lives.”  While they go about their teaching in unique ways, they share several characteristics:  A distinct philosophy of teaching and learning; a willingness to adapt and innovate in order to meet student needs; a passion for their discipline; and a commitment to constant self-examination and improvement.  All are highly respected by their colleagues.

John Koker, Professor of Mathematics, UW-Oshkosh

Presenting the first individual teaching excellence award, Regent Salas noted that Professor Koker has already received two of the highest awards that UW-Oshkosh can bestow on faculty: The John McNaughton Rosebush Professorship for Excellence in Teaching, Research and Service, and the Distinguished Teaching Award. 

Professor Koker is renowned for his focus in the classroom on problem-solving processes, rather than on skills or answers. One of his students wrote, “I always looked forward to each of John’s classes because I never knew how I would be challenged, but I knew that the students would play a significant role in the course.”

His achievements also extend far beyond the classroom.  He has authored and received more than $350,000 in grants to offer high quality mathematical instruction to middle and high school teachers, a significant part of which was used to reach out to the Menominee Indian School District and the Menominee Tribal School, where he helped to create an atmosphere of mathematical reasoning and problem solving in the classroom.

Professor Koker, Regent Salas said, “embodies the Wisconsin Idea, regularly and successfully engaging citizens, both in and out of the classroom, teaching not only mathematics, but the ability to think deeply and focus on problem solving.” 

Expressing appreciation to the board for the award, Professor Koker said that he was fortunate and grateful to have excellent colleagues who merit awards as well.

What he wants for his students is not only to learn mathematics, but to learn how to learn.  Students, he explained, need the opportunity to be “stuck” and to understand that being “stuck” is “a natural and honorable place to spend time.” Their growth as thinkers and improvement in their problem solving ability is provoked by teaching that includes elements of tension and surprise that require them to learn how to find their way to a solution. 

Indicating that he views the profession of teaching as an ongoing “problem”  to be solved, he concluded by remarking that excellent teaching involves continually working to solve the problem by finding ways to improve.   

Kathryn Olson, Professor of Communication, UW-Milwaukee

Introducing the award presentation to Professor Kathryn Olson, Regent Pruitt remarked that serving on the committee has given him great appreciation for what it means to be a teacher who has a profound impact on students’ lives.

Professor Olson, he noted, has received many previous teaching honors, including being named a Wisconsin Teaching Scholar, a CIPD scholar, and a Wisconsin Teaching Fellow.  She won the Andre T. Weaver Award for Wisconsin’s outstanding College Educator and the Outstanding New Teacher Award from the Central States Communication Association. 

Professor Olson has been characterized by her colleagues as “the consummate teacher – dedicated, conscientious, and passionately interested in helping students learn.” In a letter supporting her nomination, one of her students described her Great American Speakers course as “the most intellectually stimulating and invigorating class imaginable.”

Envisioning her teaching as a work in progress, Professor Olson constantly hones her instructional methods, developing innovative approaches and researching their effects.  To empower her students, she strives to make material accessible to learners with different learning styles and to better connect the material to their own experiences and abilities. She has written more than thirty articles on teaching and rhetoric in addition to giving and attending numerous teaching workshops.

Professor Olson also led efforts to develop the Rhetorical Leadership Program, which focuses on argumentation, critical thinking, and ethical considerations in training leaders and future leaders for government, business, and non-profit organizations.  No other program like it exists in the country.  A student who completed the program described it as “powerful” and one that enables those who take it to “gain the skills that can change events.” 

In the area of educational outreach to the community, Professor Olson has made numerous appearances on WUWM radio and has worked with the Racine Group to improve understanding of presidential and other political debates. 

In conclusion, Regent Pruitt remarked that “there can be no doubt in anyone’s mind that, from classroom to community,  Professor Olson’s work is truly exceptional and that she is a role model for what it means to be an excellent teacher.”

Expressing appreciation for the award, Professor Olson noted that she never set out to be a teacher.  She simply loved to learn, and the surest way to be able to continue learning was to work toward a Ph.D.  The way teaching was done at that time, she said, met her preferred learning style of attending lectures and reading and writing on her own.

When she began teaching, she was amazed to find that this learning style did not work for all students.  Instead, she found that there are other ways of learning; and she felt fortunate to be part of UW-Milwaukee and UW System groups that work to enhance teaching and learning. 

Noting that many are involved, she cited the UW-Milwaukee Center for Instructional Development, the UW System Instructional and Professional Development Fellowships, the UW System Faculty College, the UW System Office of Professional and Instructional Development, and the Teaching Fellows and Scholars program as wonderful resources for fostering better learning for students. 

The Rhetorical Leadership Program, she said, is intended to help people solve problems in an information-rich society.  She expressed gratitude to UW-Milwaukee leaders for their support of this program which has come to serve others in the community as well as traditional students.

UW-Eau Claire Department of History

Introducing presentation of this award, Regent Semenas recalled that, as a student on September 11, 2001, he decided to major in history as a way of searching for answers by looking to the past. It is departments like the UW-Eau Claire Department of History, he remarked, that create understanding through correlation of the past, present, and future.

The department currently serves 117 history majors in the College of Arts and Sciences, 97 majors in the College of Education and Human Sciences, 65 history minors, and provides 400 student credit hours each semester through general education courses.  The maximum of 28 students are currently enrolled in the master’s program.

Even with the large number of students served, the deep dedication of the faculty has enabled the department to tailor curricula and projects to the needs of individual students.  In letters supporting the department’s award nomination, students praised departmental faculty as advisors and mentors who guide and support them through individualized research projects and career opportunities.

Building a diverse faculty has been a priority for the department, which has 14 tenured and tenure-track faculty, including six women, one African American, one Latino, one Native American and one Asian.  The curricula represent diversity by covering many regions of the world and various aspects of the human experience.  Faculty members have published important works on Native American peoples, immigration, public history, rural history and women’s history.

The department has an outstanding record of obtaining external grant funding to launch innovative programs to improve history education at the elementary and secondary levels.  During the last five years, the department secured four million dollars in grants from the U.S. Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Wisconsin Humanities Council, and the American Council of Learned Societies.  The grants have funded two graduate programs for teachers of American History and have served more than 296 teachers, in collaboration with local museums and Cooperative Educational Service Agencies throughout the state.  The programs emphasize the connections between local and national history.

With grant funding, the department also hired a public historian who spearheaded creation of a curriculum in public history that has attracted a growing number of students who work on public history projects that benefit the community and region.  Students have partnered with the Chippewa Valley Museum, Minnesota Historical Society, Wisconsin State Historical Society and the State Office of Historic Preservation on a large number of projects and exhibits. 

Students praise the dedication, collaboration, teaching excellence and personal mentoring of the faculty. In the words of one student, “The entire department becomes mobilized to collectively support the educational dreams of each student.”  As a result, the department creates historians who are passionate about their discipline and who engage in research projects that benefit the region and build on understanding of communities and surroundings. 

In conclusion, Regent Semenas said that, whether investigating historical aspects of the ban on use of the death penalty in Wisconsin and presenting their findings to the state Supreme Court or whether creating historical exhibits for the Chippewa Falls Museum of Industry and Technology, UW-Eau history students are meeting the challenges of the 21st century and will be leaders in helping to solve tomorrow’s problems.       

Accepting the award, Professor Katherine Lang, chair of the department, thanked the board for the public recognition of the department’s work.  It is a privilege, she said, to chair a department of “immensely talented, creative, and hard-working people who are committed to student learning and always focused on how we can be even better at what we do.”         

 She then introduced other members of the department who had accompanied her to Madison for the award ceremony: Bob Gough, Oscar Chamberlain, John Mann, Patricia Turner, and Chancellor Brian Levin-Stankevich.

The department, she said, is most proud of the following accomplishments:

  • Curricula dedicated to the history of the global, multicultural society and the diverse American nation.
  • Student-Faculty collaborative research – one of the marks of distinction of UW-Eau Claire.  Mentored by faculty, students complete a senior thesis based on original historical research.
  • Work with K-12 teachers, much of which is grant-funded, most notably through three Teaching American History grants.
  • The Public History Program, which engages undergraduate and graduate students in presenting their research to the community.

In closing, Professor Lang expressed appreciation to a number of partners without whom the department could not have achieved all that it has:

  • The Wisconsin Historical Society, which has a field services representative in the department who places public history students in internships.
  • The Chippewa Valley Museum.
  • The UW-Eau Claire McIntyre Library and its professional archivist.

Finally, she thanked the “wonderfully supportive community that is always interested in what we do.”

 

REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee’s report was presented by Regent Davis, chair.

Presentation in Recognition of 2006 as Year of Study Abroad

The committee heard from UW-River Falls Chancellor Don Betz, Brent Greene, Director of International Education Programs at UW-River Falls, and Terence Miller, Director of International Education Programs at UW-Milwaukee, about two UW exchange programs – the Hessen Exchange Program that facilitates exchange of faculty and students between UW campuses and campuses in the German State of Hessen, and the Consortium of North American Higher Education Collaboration (CONAHEC) that fosters cooperation and student exchange among higher education institutions in Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Two students also spoke to the committee:  Nicole Lyon, of UW-Oshkosh, who participated in an internship program through the Hessen exchange; and Ivan Luna, a student from Mexico who is studying at UW-River Falls through the CONAHEC program.

Study abroad participation rates for UW undergraduates have doubled over the last few years; and UW-Milwaukee reported that the participation rate for its students has increased 127% in five years, with students of color representing 10.4% of study abroad students.

UW-River Falls also reported on a recent trip to India which has led to establishment of relationships with a number of universities in that country and opportunities for faculty and student exchanges, as well as collaborative research opportunities.

Presentation on Distance Learning: UW-Platteville’s Niche

The presentation was made by Provost Carol Sue Butts, Dawn Drake, executive director of alternative delivery systems, Michael Anderson, director of the School of Education, and Richard Shultz, dean of Engineering, Mathematics, and Science.  They explained that the main focus of the university’s distance learning programs is offering complete degree programs in business, criminal justice, engineering and project management to non-traditional students.

UW-Platteville’s distance learning programs have partnered with UW Colleges, the Technical College System, and others to reach place-bound students and to serve employees of more than 500 companies around the state.

The Master of Science in Adult Education reaches out to Racine, Milwaukee, and other areas through its flexible format.  Two-thirds of the students in the Racine/Milwaukee cohort are students of color.

The Collaborative Engineering Programs partner with UW-Fox Valley and UW-Rock County to meet business and student needs through degree programs in electrical and mechanical engineering.  These programs have been financially supported by companies and provide employers with graduates who are committed to staying in the area.

Revised Faculty Personnel Rules, UW-Green Bay

The proposed revisions clarify rules for non-renewals of probationary faculty.

At the August 2006 meeting, the committee asked that a brief statement from the Office of General Counsel accompany each set of rule revisions. The committee was satisfied with the prototype that was provided, and this type of document will be prepared for future rule revisions.

The committee approved the proposed revisions for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Appointments to the Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future

The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda two reappointments and two new appointments to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health’s Oversight and Advisory Committee of the Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future.

In reviewing the proposed appointments, the committee was pleased to welcome Regent Emeritus Patrick Boyle, who has served as the board’s liaison to the Oversight and Advisory Committee. The committee is responsible for planning for and overseeing the use of funds allocated for public health through the Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future. 

Authorization to Recruit: Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

The committee approved for inclusion in the consent agenda authorization to recruit a senior vice president to replace Cora Marrett.

Recognizing the significant role this position plays in the UW System, the committee discussed the importance of reaching a common understanding of the responsibilities involved and appreciated the comments of Senior Executive Vice President Don Mash on the consultation under way with faculty, academic staff, chancellors, and provosts.

Summary of Accreditation Review by the North Central Association Higher Learning Commission and Institutional Report on General Education, UW-Whitewater

The committee heard an institutional report on general education at UW-Whitewater, accompanied by a summary of the university’s North Central Association Higher Learning Commission (HLC) accreditation.

UW-Whitewater was visited by the commission in 2006 and subsequently received an unconditional ten-year re-accreditation.  The committee commended the university for this achievement. 

Provost Dick Telfer described a number of the positive comments from the HLC, including:

  • The high quality of instruction in spite of increased workloads,
  • Strong relations with community partners, and
  • Excellent strategic planning to help address budget cuts.

The committee also was very impressed with UW-Whitewater’s general education program, which includes excellent and innovative course offerings and a good assessment program to evaluate student learning.

Report of the Senior Vice President

Guidelines and Criteria for the Proposed Expansion of Wisconsin Technical College System Liberal Arts and Pre-Professional Offerings

Senior Vice President Cora Marrett spoke of the board’s stewardship role in meeting the statutory requirement that any broadening of the Wisconsin Technical College System collegiate transfer programs must be approved by both the WTCS and UW boards.

Larry Rubin, assistant vice president for academic and student services and the UW’s primary transfer coordinator, reviewed background information and provided an overview of transfer both within and into the UW System.  He highlighted the positive nature of growth in the number of WTCS transfer students in the last ten years due to changes in transfer policies and remarked that there are far fewer letters from students, parents, and state leaders on transfer problems because of increased coordination and the articulation agreements that are in place.

Kathy Cullen, vice president for teaching and learning at WTCS, provided an overview of the different types of degrees offered by WTCS institutions and the process used by WTCS to develop and approve collegiate transfer programs.

Ron Singer, UW associate vice president for academic and student services, concluded the presentation by discussing the role of the Board of Regents in the process and reviewed draft criteria for approval of WTCS collegiate transfer programs.

The committee applauded the collaboration between the WTC and UW systems on transfer issues.

Members of the committee raised questions about language on efficiency and effectiveness in the draft criteria and requested further explanation of pre-professional programs and more information on how UW Colleges view these guidelines. The committee considered it important to understand the full impact of the criteria before proceeding further and agreed to table action on the criteria until the December meeting.

In discussion at the board meeting, Regent Bradley inquired about communication with the WTCS Board about the delay.

Regent Davis indicated that WTCS President Dan Clancy attended the committee meeting, and President Reilly added that President Clancy was comfortable with deferring action at this time, understanding that the UW is working hard on the criteria and continuing to move forward. 

Regent Cuene, President of the WTCS Board, noted that action is planned at the December meeting and that everyone is comfortable with taking a little additional time to have questions answered.

Consent Agenda

Regent Davis moved adoption of the following resolutions as consent agenda items.  The motion was seconded by Regent Crain and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Green Bay: Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules

Resolution 9253: That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the amendments to the UW-Green Bay Faculty Personnel Rules.

The Wisconsin Partnership Fund for a Healthy Future (Blue Cross & Blue Shield Program) UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee Reappointments and Appointments

Resolution 9254: That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents approves the reappointments of Dr. Susan Goelzer and Mr. Douglas Mormann to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee for four-year terms; 

AND

That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Board of Regents approves the appointments of Dr. Michael Fleming and Ms. Lorraine Lathen to the UW School of Medicine and Public Health Oversight and Advisory Committee for four-year terms. 

Authorization to Recruit: Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs University of Wisconsin System

Resolution 9255: That, the President of the University of Wisconsin System be authorized to recruit for a Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, at a salary within the Board of Regents salary range for university senior executive salary group five.

 

REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE

            Regent Pruitt, chair, presented the committee’s report.

Faculty, Academic Staff, and Senior Academic Leaders Recruitment and Retention Challenges. 

President Kevin Reilly advised the committee of his meeting with the Compensation Advisory Committee in April and again last month to engage members of faculty and academic staff in a review of compensation relative to peers and to learn of the recruitment and retention challenges that UW institutions face. 

He pointed out that, by the end of the current biennium, average UW faculty salaries will be 8.5% below the peer median, academic staff will be 12% below, and academic leaders will be more than 16% below their peer medians.

Al Crist, associate vice president for human resources, presented pay plan information for unclassified staff.  Data were provided about where UW institutions stand compared to their respective peer groups, and recent pay plans for UW employees were compared to those of other state employees.

A panel of campus representatives presented information on specific challenges they have encountered in recruitment and retention of faculty and academic staff.  The committee also heard from representatives of the Association of UW Professionals. 

Regent Pruitt remarked that it is very important to solve these problems in order for Wisconsin to remain competitive in the national market and that the quality of the university depends on it.  Noting that the UW has lost six chancellors and substantial numbers of faculty and staff to higher salaries elsewhere, he said that, while budget constraints may not permit closing the gap immediately, solving this serious problem must be a strong focus going forward.

Action on a recommended pay plan for the 2007-09 biennium will be requested at the December meeting.

Consideration of Salary Adjustments for Chancellors at UW-Platteville, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior and for a Provost at UW-Platteville

Regent Pruitt recalled that the preceding February the board had endorsed a new process for periodic review and assessment of individual chancellors’ and provosts’ salaries to determine whether there is need for adjustment to recognize competitive factors or to correct salary inequities.

In reviewing the proposed adjustments with the committee, President Reilly emphasized the importance of leadership. The committee discussed and approved for inclusion in the consent agenda salary adjustments for chancellors at UW-Platteville, Stout, and Superior and for a provost at UW-Platteville under this new process.  The matter was considered and acted upon in open session in the interest of transparency.

Audit Update

The audit update portion of the report was presented by Regent Connolly-Keesler, the committee’s audit liaison and vice-chair of the committee.

Legislative Audit Bureau Audit of Personnel Policies and Practices

Vice President Debbie Durcan reported that in October the Legislative Audit Bureau (LAB) released its Evaluation of Personnel Policies and Practices in the UW System.  The audit focused on six key areas: sick leave reporting, sick leave conversion upon retirement, vacation reporting, limited and concurrent appointments, use of the consultant title, and faculty sabbaticals.

The committee reviewed the audit recommendations and discussed next steps in the process, including the Legislative Audit Committee hearing on November 29, 2006 and the final report due on June 1, 2007.

Ms. Durcan noted that a special regent committee had been appointed to provide advice to Associate Vice President Crist regarding the planned UW System response to the audit recommendations.

Regent President Walsh challenged the LAB’s statement that there was no substantive difference between concurrent and back-up appointments.

Academic Performance Standards in UW System Athletic Directors’ and Coaches’ Job Performance Evaluations

Regent Connolly-Keesler discussed specific recommendations to strengthen the extent to which student athlete academic standards are included in athletic directors’ and coaches’ contracts and performance evaluations.  These include requiring athletic directors and head coaches at all UW institutions to promote the academic success of student-athletes and requiring UW institutions with Division I athletic programs to submit an annual report. 

Action on this item was tabled since Regent Randall, who requested the review, could not be present.

Discussion Regarding Scope of Potential Analysis of Policy Options for Board of Regents Oversight of Information Technology Projects

Regent Connolly-Keesler discussed the potential scope and goals of this review, including policy options for the board to consider in carrying out its oversight responsibilities for major IT projects.  It was decided not to look back but to look forward and consider how to set benchmarks.  This type of proactive review was endorsed by the committee.

Committee Business

Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts Report

Vice President Durcan reported that total awards were about $400 million for the quarter ending September 30, 2006.  This is a slight decrease from the prior year.

Report of the Vice President

Board Meeting Efficiency and Effectiveness

Vice President Durcan reported that, in order to make the board meetings more efficient, UW System staff, including legal counsel, have been reviewing the statutorily required reports that are brought before the committee.  In some cases it is more efficient to send those reports to committee members, rather than presenting them at a meeting.

Departure of Audit Director Ron Yates

It was reported that Audit Director Ron Yates is moving to Oregon with his family.  The committee recognized that this will be a great loss for the university and for the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee and wished Mr. Yates and his family well in their future endeavors.

Annual Trust Funds Public Forum

Committee members Regents Pruitt, Smith, and Connolly-Keesler were joined by Regents Crain, Semenas, and Regent Elect Shields for this annual forum.

The committee heard from seven speakers who were almost evenly split in favor of and against asking the board to divest from companies that do business in or with Israel.  One speaker urged the committee to encourage the State Investment Board to divest from companies doing business in Sudan.

Consent Agenda

Regent Pruitt moved adoption of the following resolution as a consent agenda item.  The motion was seconded by Regent McPike and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

Consideration of Salary Adjustments For Chancellors at UW-Platteville, UW-Stout, and UW-Superior, and for a Provost at UW-Platteville     

Resolution 9256: Whereas, pursuant to ss. 20.923(4g) and 36.09(1)(j), Wisconsin Statutes, the salaries of UW System academic leaders must be set within the salary ranges established by the Board of Regents, and based upon a formula derived from the salaries paid by peer institutions to their academic leaders, and

Whereas in addition, section 36.09(1)(j), Wisconsin Statutes, authorizes the Board of Regents to increase chancellors' and other university senior academic leaders’ salaries to address salary inequities or to recognize competitive factors in the periods between pay plan adjustments, and

Whereas at the February 2006 Board of Regents meeting the Business, Finance and Audit Committee endorsed the recommendation that the President of the UW System periodically perform a review and assessment of individual Chancellors’ salaries to determine whether there is a need for an adjustment to recognize competitive factors or correct salary inequities among senior academic leadership, as allowed by law, and

Whereas the Board of Regents affirms that leadership is critically important to the performance of our institutions and the students and citizens they serve and therefore places a high value on recruiting and retaining our outstanding senior academic leaders.

Now, therefore be it resolved;

That, upon recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the annual salary for Chancellor Markee, Chancellor Sorensen, Chancellor Erlenbach and Provost Butts be adjusted due to competitive market factors and equity reasons per the attached recommendations, effective November 10, 2006.

 

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE

            Regent Salas, chair, presented the committee’s report.

Discussion of Renewable Energy Alternatives for UW Institutions

The Physical Planning and Funding Committee met jointly with the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee to discuss renewable energy alternatives for UW institutions.  Assistant Vice President David Miller informed the committees that the Governor’s Executive Order 145: “Conserve Wisconsin” directed creation of high performance building standards and a state facility energy efficiency goal of a 10% usage reduction per gross square foot by fiscal year 2008, and a 20% usage reduction by fiscal year 2010. 

He also discussed the renewable electrical energy goals of the recent Wisconsin Act 141, which directs that at least 10% of annual electrical usage be from renewable resources by the end of 2007 and 20% by the end of 2011.

The Governor requested that three campuses be chosen to participate in a pilot program to go “off the grid” in five years -- that those campuses be capable of acquiring or producing renewable energy equivalent to their consumption.  Campuses were evaluated for their suitability to be included in this pilot program and the following four were selected: UW-Green Bay, UW-Oshkosh, UW-River Falls, and UW-Stevens Point.

UW-Eau Claire: Authority to Sell a Parcel of Land to the Department of Transportation

UW-Eau Claire requested authority to sell a parcel of land to the Department of Transportation for a multi-purpose trail project being constructed by the department.  The committee approved the request for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-Platteville: Approval of Design Report and Authority to Adjust the Project Budget and Construct the New Engineering Building Project

The purpose of the new building is to relieve overcrowding in the College of Engineering Math and Science and in technology-based programs, as well as to provide space for the enrollment growth of the Tri-State Initiative.

The committee approved the project for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW-River Falls: Authority to Exchange a Parcel of Land for Agricultural Purposes

The committee was informed that the exchange would result in additional farm land for use by the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences.  The request was approved for inclusion in the consent agenda.

UW System: Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

The committee was advised that these projects include roof replacements, space renovation, a utility replacement, and the re-keying of a campus access system.  The request was approved for inclusion in the consent agenda.

Consent Agenda

Adoption of the following resolutions as consent agenda items was moved by Regent Salas, seconded by Regent Semenas, and carried on a unanimous voice vote.

UW-Eau Claire: Authority to Sell a Parcel of Land to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Resolution 9257: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Eau Claire Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to sell 283 square feet (less than 0.0065 acre) of the 31.88-acre parcel on U.S. Highway 12/West Clairemont Avenue, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation.

UW-Platteville: Approval of the Design Report and Authority to Increase the Project Budget and Construct the New Engineering Building Project

Resolution 9258: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, the Design Report be approved and authority be granted to construct a New Engineering Building Project and increase the project budget by $350,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing for a total project cost of $27,865,000 ($350,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing-Parking, $10,000,000 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing, $10,000,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing, and $7,515,000 Gifts/Grant Funds).

UW-River Falls:  Authority to Exchange a Parcel of Land for Agricultural Purposes

Resolution 9259: That, upon the recommendation of the UW-River Falls Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to exchange a 98.9-acre parcel of university-owned land at the UW-River Falls Mann Valley Farm for a 187-acre parcel of land owned by K&S Developers, Inc.

UW System:  Authority to Construct Various Maintenance and Repair Projects

Resolution 9260: That, upon the recommendation of the President of the University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct various maintenance and repair projects at an estimated total cost of $11,511,500 ($2,586,270 General Fund Supported Borrowing; $61,100 Building Trust Funds; $4,203,930 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing; $280,000 Program Revenue Cash; and $4,441,300 Gifts and Grants Funding).

Report of the Assistant Vice President

Building Commission Actions

            Assistant Vice President Miller reported that the Building Commission approved about $10.6 million for projects at its October meeting, with funding of $6.4 million general fund supported borrowing, $2.8 million program revenue, and $1.4 million gift and grant funds.

 

UNFINISHED OR ADDITIONAL BUSINESS

International Students

Regent Loftus reported that he recently spoke at the Global Education 2006 Conference for faculty from UW and private universities, where concern was expressed about the decreasing number of international students on campus.  He asked that the board review the situation and consider a strategy to help campuses attract more such students.

Director of Communications, UW-Stout

Regent Loftus extended congratulations to Doug Mell, former editor of the Eau Claire Telegram, on his appointment as director of communications at UW-Stout.

 

CLOSED SESSION

The meeting was recessed at 11:15 a.m. and reconvened at 11:30 a.m., at which time adoption of the following resolution was moved by Regent Bradley, seconded and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Walsh, Spector, Smith, Semenas, Salas, Pruitt, McPike, Loftus, Davis, Cuene, Crain, Connolly-Keesler, Burmaster, Bradley, and Bartell (15) voting in the affirmative.  There were no negative votes and no abstentions.

Resolution 9261: Recess into closed session to consider appointment of a UW-La Crosse Chancellor, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.;

The following resolution was adopted in closed session:

UW-La Crosse: Appointment of Chancellor

Resolution 9262: That, upon recommendation of the Special Regent Committee and the President of the University of Wisconsin System, Joseph D. Gow be appointed Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, with a start date of February 1, 2007, at a an annual salary rate of $184,000 and with the other terms, conditions, and benefits as stated in the attached employment agreement.

The meeting was adjourned at  12:15 p.m.

Submitted by:

_________________________
Judith A. Temby, Secretary